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  • 1. Bassan, Gioia
    et al.
    Larsson, David
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Nordenfur, Tim
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Acquisition of multiple mode shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic medium using dualprobe setup2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2. De Boever, P
    et al.
    Louwies, T
    Kounalakis, Stylianos
    Jaki Mekjavic, P
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Mekjavic, I.B.
    In vivo retinal images for a non-invasive analysis of the microcirculation during hypoxia and unloading/inactivity2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Eiken, Ola
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Kölegård, Roger
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Mekjavic, Igor, B
    Keramidas, Michail E
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    PlanHab: Normobaric hypoxia may exaggerate bedrest-induced reductions in peak oxygen uptake2015In: International Society for Gravitational Physiology, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Eiken, Ola
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Mekjavic, I.B.
    The hypoxic bedrest research programme2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Helix, LiU.
    Keynote: The hidden relationship between ergonomics and quality2017In: 48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SUMMATIVE STATEMENT 

    There is strong evidence that insufficient ergonomics cause quality deficiencies in production. Despite this, it has not yet been accepted that ergonomics is an important production factor. Reasons for this situation and possible actions are discussed.

     

    PROBLEM STATEMENT 

    The scientific literature reports many examples of relationships between ergonomics and quality. However, this knowledge has not been sufficiently systematized for ergonomics to become generally accepted as a production factor.

     

    RESEARCH OBJECTIVE

    The objective of this paper is to summarize different perspectives on the relationship between ergonomics and quality, and to discuss the formation of this knowledge on a generalized level.

     

    RESULTS

    There is a large number of studies and reviews that have identified strong relationships between the quality performance of individuals and different ergonomics aspects such as light, noise, vibration, ventilation, climate, cognition and physical ergonomics. Further, there are also a large number of studies that have identified a relationship between ergonomics and quality output for the organization in different production settings. There are also examples when causality has been shown. All together, this evidence point to that good ergonomics is a precondition for quality performance, in other words an important production factor.

     

    DISCUSSION

    The strong relationship between ergonomics and quality might be accepted within the ergonomics discipline, but not as a production factor and not in working life. TQM and Lean address quality and some aspects of work design as important production factors. There are many reasons why it is not generally recognized that ergonomics is an important production factor. Some of them might be that the research literature is not explicit on this point, the ergonomics knowledge is not spread to the production discipline, and that ergonomics is seen an additional luxury for the employees, provided when the economy of the organization is sufficiently strong. Still another reason might be that there are also examples of how ergonomics improvements can be shown to be unprofitable for the organization.

     

    CONCLUSIONS  

    A large number of research studies show strong evidence that insufficient ergonomics cause quality deficiencies in production, both on an individual and on an organizational level, confirming that ergonomics is a production factor. It is a problem that this knowledge is not formed, disseminated and accepted by production engineers and managers.

     

  • 6.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Helix, LiU.
    Lean in retail – implementation in stores2017In: / [ed] Anna-Lisa Osvalder, Mikael Blomé, Hajnalka Bodnar, Lund, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose

    Lean has been implemented to varying degrees in different organizations and in different branches. Mass-producing manufacturing industries were early in this respect, and later followed by e.g. healthcare, authorities and municipalities. Presently, some stores are implementing Lean-inspired working methods. The purpose of this paper is to identify different ways of working with and implementing Lean in stores.

     

    Methods

    The methods used were case studies in 9 stores. The stores were visited and data were collected through observation of working methods and artefacts in the stores, interviews were conducted with employees and managers, and a questionnaire was answered by a sample of those working in the stores. Finally, documents were collected and photographs were taken.

     

    Results

    A few stores worked according to some the principles of Lean, and other stores had implemented some of the Lean tools. Other stores had statements of the values for the organization on display. Continuous improvement and 5S were two commonly used tools. Visualisation by using whiteboards and KPIs were also applied in several stores, and daily meetings between the store manager and the employees were also taking place in a few stores. Waste reduction has been used for a long time in stores handling fresh food, as well as substantial work in order to improve the logistics. These are aspects that Lean include, but were present in the stores before Lean was introduced.

     

    Discussion with practical implications

    Few examples of a long-term Lean tradition exist. Disseminating good examples that are also good for the work environment of the employees could support a more holistic way of working with Lean and improve working conditions in the future.

     

    Conclusions

    The use of Lean in stores is under development, and several stores have started to introduce Lean-inspired working methods, such as Continuous improvement, 5S, customer orientation, visualization, daily whiteboard meetings and waste reduction.

     

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Orvik, Arne
    The management’s possibilities for facilitating sustainable workplaces: Workshop on  “How can health promotion facilitate sustainable workplaces?”2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Strömgren, Marcus
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Experiences of implementing OHS driven intervention methods for sustainable leadership in health care2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Forsman, Mikael
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SWEDEN.
    Yang, Liyun
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lind, Carl
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Practical objective measurements for sedentary time and body postures using Excel and iOS2016In: Preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders in a global economy: Book of Abstracts, 2016, p. 61-61Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Frånberg, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Gennser, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Dödsfall i samband med dykning med återandningsapparater: ett människa–maskin interaktionsproblem2013In: Hygiea, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Huvuddelen av de rapporterade och undersökta olyckorna med återandningsapparater utlöstes av felaktigt handhavande, eller bristande människa–maskininteraktion.

  • 11.
    Frånberg, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Loncar, Mario
    Larsson, Åke
    Gennser, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Örnhagen, Hans
    Metsim, ett hjälpmedel för att testa slutna andningsapparater på ett fysiologiskt sätt2013In: Hygiea, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Valet av propen som bränsle och de tekniska svårigheter som övervanns för att skapa en säker ämnesomsättningssimulator som kan användas vid tester i tryck motsvarande 100 m dykdjup.

  • 12.
    Gennser, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Submarine escape physiology2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Gennser, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Trimix tables for semi-closed mechanical rebreather: IS-Mix2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Gennser, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology.
    Blogg, SL
    Bubble scores after diving according to the new USNavy air decompression tables.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Gennser, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Douglas, J
    High resolution chest CT: Findings with possible bearing on risk for pulmonary barotrauma2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Gennser, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Frånberg, Oskar
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Blogg, S. L
    Dekompressionsbelastning vid trimixdykning: Jämförelse mellan dykning med konstant fraktion och konstant partialtryck oxygen2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Användning av trimixgas (O2, N2, och He) tillåter dykning till större djup än med luft eller nitrox. Trots att den här dyktekniken blir alltmer populär bland sk ”tekniska dykare” så visar de få vetenskapliga rapporter som publicerats att trimixdykning ger upphov till rikligt med bubblor i den venösa cirkulationen (Ljubkovic et al 2010). Den här studien genomfördes för att undersöka venös bubbelförekomst efter dykning med konstant oxygenpartialtryck (PO2). Jämförelse gjordes med tidigare mätningar med konstant oxygenfraktion.

    Metoder: Sex försvarsmaktsdykare och en instruktör deltog i dykningar med sluten återandningsapparat där PO2 kontrollerades elektroniskt (eCCR). Dykningarna genomfördes med trimixgas till djup mellan 20 – 100 m. I de flesta fall hölls PO2 konstant vid 1,3 atm. Dekompressionsprofilerna beräknades med VPM-B algoritm. Förekomst av venösa gasbubblor detekterades med hjälp av ultraljuds-Doppler. Mängden bubblor skattades med Kisman-Masurel skalan (KM). Resultaten jämfördes med trimixdykningar (33 – 60 m) som genomförts i våt tryckkammare, men en halvsluten dykapparat som gav dykarna en konstant oxygenfraktion (FO2 27%). Dekompressionerna i dessa dykningar beräknades med en DCAP-algoritm.

     Resultat: Bubbelförekomst hos de 7 dykarna som använde eCCR undersöktes efter totalt 133 dykningar. Ingen bubbelpoäng över KM 3 uppmättes vid något dyk. Sammanlagt 92 dykningar genomfördes med den halvslutna apparaten. Bubbelpoängen i dessa dykningar varierade mellan 0 – 4 (16% av dykningarna >KM III). Efter upprepade dykningar till 70 m med eCCR var median bubbelpoängen KM 2 (n = 11).

    Slutsats: Djupa trimixdykningar med konstant PO2 och dekompressioner beräknade med VPM-B gav upphov till lägre maximal bubbelförekomst än dykningar med konstant oxygenfraktion.

  • 17.
    Gennser, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Frånberg, Oskar
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Blogg, Samantha L.
    SLB Consulting, Cumbria, Storbritannien.
    Jämförelse mellan olika dekompressionstabeller med hjälp av ultraljudsdoppler2013In: Hygiea, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Två dekompressionstabeller, en med sk djupa stopp, jämfördes avseende förekomst av bubblor i den centralvenösa cirkulationen. Tabellen med ortodox algoritm orsakade betydligt färre bubblor.

  • 18.
    Gennser, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Grönkvist, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Norrbrand, Lena
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Sundblad, Patrik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Mekjavic, I.B.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Effekt av gasdensitet på ventilation och arteriell oxygenmättnad vid normobar och hypobar hypoxi2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Kothapalli, Veeravenkata S.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Gonon, Adrian
    Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    CLINTEC, Department of Medical Imaging and Technology, Karolinska Institute.
    Ultrasound contrast agent loaded with nitric oxide as a theranostic microdevise for myocardial ischemia2013In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging: Abstracts of EUROECHO 2013 The Seventeenth Annual Meeting of the European Association of Echocardiography, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounts for 1/3 of total global deaths worldwide. The most widespread CVD is ischemic heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in both genders, equally diagnosed in developed and developing countries with mortality exponentially increasing with age. Efforts of healthcare system should be primary focused on prevention, timely detection, efficient differentiation and instant treatment of the disease.

  • 20.
    Grönkvist, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Cihua, U
    Mekjavic, I.B.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Heat strain in a helicopter during a simulated desert mission2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Grönkvist, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Effects of loss of pressure in the anti-G system during a simulated target chase2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Grönkvist, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Keramidas, Michail E.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Intraokulärt tryck och oxygenering av hjärnans frontallob under långvarig, måttlig G-belastning i huvud-fot-riktning2013In: Hygiea, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Under G-belastning i huvud-fot-riktning (+Gz) faller pilotens artärtryck mellan hjärt- och huvudnivå. Trots att avståndet - och därmed artärtrycksfallet - är större mellan hjärta och hjärnbark än mellan hjärta och ögon, är näthinnan vanligen det organ som tidigast drabbas av kritiskt ischemi vid +Gz-belastning, vilket huvudsakligen anses bero på att artärtrycket måste övervinna ögonbulbens övertryck om ca 10-15 mmHg för att genomblödning av näthinnan skall kunna ske. I en tidigare undersökning fann vi att den symptomsekvens som normalt uppträder efter 3-10 sekunders latensperiod vid förhöjning av G-belastningen från låg till övertrösklig nivå (d.v.s. perifer synfältsinskränkning - central synfältsinskränkning - grumlat medvetande - medvetandeförlust) ofta uteblir om exponeringen för övertrösklig G-nivå föregås av långvarig exponering för måttligt, men tolererbart, förhöjd belastning. Således, då trycket i G-dräkten fjärmades efter 2 minuter vid +Gz-belastning om 5-6 G var risken att drabbas av medvetslöshet mångfalt högre än då G-belastningen höjdes till motsvarande nivå utan trycksättning av G-dräkt. Föreliggande experimentserier genomfördes för att undersöka om den ändrade symptomsekvensen beror på successivt minskande syrereserver i frontalcortex eller på ökande genomblödning av retina (d.v.s. på minskande intraokulärt tryck (IOP)). Metoder: Friska försökspersoner (fp) exponerades för +Gz-belastning om 2 respektive 3 G, under det att IOP mättes (n= 10), samt för 2, 3, 4 och 5 G, under det att förändringar av frontalcortex syreinnehåll (total oxygen index; TOI) mättes (n=13). Under alla betingelser registrerades mättnadsgraden för oxyhemoglobin i kapillärblodet (SpO2). Samtliga mätningar genomfördes då fp använde G-dräkt och de vid 2 och 3 G även utan att fp använde G-dräkt Resultat: IOP påverkades ej nämnvärt av +Gz-belastning. Såväl SpO2 som TOI sjönk successivt under G-exponeringarna, i synnerhet vid 4- och 5-G-nivåerna, då fp bar G-dräkt. Slutsatser: Den successiva minskningen av TOI vid given belastning antas bero på en pulmonell höger-till-vänster shuntning av blod. Resultaten talar för att den ökade incidens G-betingade medvetslöshet då tryck i G-dräkt fjärmas efter långvarig, måttlig belastning beror på successivt minskande cerebral syrereserv, ledande till att medvetslöshet kan uppträda utan att föregås av varningssymtom i form av synfältsbortfall.

  • 23.
    Grönkvist, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Keramidas, Michail E.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Sundgren, Carl Johan
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Interaction of anti-G suit and airway pressures on cerebral oxygenation during prolonged headward acceleration.2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Grönkvist, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Keramidas, Michail E.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Taylor, Nigel A.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Intraocular pressure and cerebral oxygenation during prolonged headward acceleration2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Hägg, Göran M
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Vogel, Kjerstin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Karltun, Johan
    McGorry, Raymond
    Knife force differences when cutting meat at different temperatures2012In: NES2012: Ergonomics for Sustainability and Growth / [ed] Ann-Beth Antonsson, Kjerstin Vogel, Göran M Hägg, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Meat cutters in abattoirs is a group with high risks for musculoskeletal disorders. A major reason for this is that they exert high hand forces over a great part of the day when cutting meat. Though meat is refrigerated due to hygienic demands, meat temperature can vary. Meat cutters have claimed that knife forces increase with lower temperatures. This study was performed to find out what effects the meat temperature has on cutting forces. In addition, the same issue was addressed for pure fat.

    Method

    To be able to do cuts in meat under controlled conditions while measuring cutting forces, a machine, Anago KST Sharpness Analyzer, was used. The machine normally runs a knife at constant speed through a standardized textile ribbon while the force exerted on the ribbon is recorded over time. For this investigation, the ribbon was replaced by a wooden fixture with a 10 mm wide slot where the knife could pass and where meat samples could be fixed.Meat obtained from hind loin and fat tissue of pork was cut into 5 cm long, 4 cm wide and 2 cm thick samples. The meat fibre orientation was aligned with the long axis of the sample. When fixated in the fixture and the machine was started, the knife made a 4 cm long cut through 2 cm thick meat or fat.One hundred and forty four samples of meat and as many of fat were collected and put overnight in one of three refrigerators with temperatures 2, 7 and 12 °C, 48 in each. Well sharpened standard knifes were used for the tests. The knife was changed after 24 cuts. During the procedure samples were taken directly from the refrigerator and put into the fixture and tested immediately. The sample order was generally 2, 7, 12 °C to avoid systematic effects of a gradually blunter knife.

    Results

    There were no significant differences in knife forces at the three meat temperatures. The forces for fat were in average about three times higher than the meat forces. There was no significant difference between forces in fat at 7 and 12 °C. However there was a strongly significant difference between these two groups and the 2 °C fat group. The force was about 30% higher compared to the forces at 7 and 12 °C in fat.

    Conclusion

    In the range 2-12 °C there are no differences in meat. For fat there are no differences in the range 7-12 °C while the force increases about 30% when going from 7 to 2 °C.

  • 26.
    Håkansson, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nyman, Teresia
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Sustained low physical exposure in a lean process plant2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Keramidas, Michail E.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Effects of acute and long-term hypoxia on local cold tolerance2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to high altitude is commonly considered a predisposing factor for local cold injury. A number of field studies have indeed confirmed that local cold tolerance is impaired in low-oxygen environments, presumably due to hypoxia-induced cutaneous vasoconstriction. However, during acute and long-term high-altitude exposure, the hypoxic stressor typically co-exists with other environmental and behavioral components, viz. hypothermia, malnutrition and physical fatigue, which independently or interactively may affect peripheral blood-flow responses. Laboratory-based, control studies have demonstrated that acute exposure to hypoxia, isolated from other confounding factors, does not potentiate vasoconstriction during local cold stress, but delays spontaneous rewarming following such cold stress. Conversely, it appears that long-term exposure to hypoxia elicits adaptive processes, in particular when the high-altitude acclimatization regimen is combined with physical exercise, that reverse the hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction after local limb cooling. Such adaptive responses do, however, not seem to be transferable to sea-level conditions, i.e. they do not reduce vasoconstriction during normoxic conditions, nor to be homogeneous across the limbs.

  • 28.
    Lind, Carl
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    An OHS practitioner tool for improving pushing and pulling operations2016In: Preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders in a global economy - Book of Abstracts, 2016, p. 138-138Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Lind, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Rose, Linda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Facilitating improvement measures in manual handling using the RAMP-tool2016In: Preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders in a global economy - Book of Abstracts, 2016, p. 137-137Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Lind, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701).
    Rose, Linda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701).
    Franzon, Helena
    Arla Foods.
    RAMP - Development of a risk assessment tool2012In: NES2012 Ergonomics for sustainability and growth / [ed] Antonsson A-B, Vogel K & Hägg GM, Stockholm, 2012, p. 14s-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Manual Materials Handling (MMH) and working in awkward postures are still important causes of MSDs. Proper ergonomic conditions can contribute to reduce absence from work, and are important prerequisites to ensure high quality and productivity. Risk assessment can be used to improve the working conditions by identifying important risk factors and support communication between key stakeholders in order to improve the working conditions.

    This paper presents an ongoing project called RAMP (Risk management Assessment tool for Manual handling Proactively), reported e.g. at NES 2011. The aim of the project is to develop a freely accessible load ergonomic risk assessment tool and to gain knowledge of contributing factors for implementation and usability of such a tool. The RAMP-tool is developed for assessing risk of MSDs, support communication of the main risk factors among stakeholders and support effective interventions. The project, mainly financed by AFA Insurance, is conducted in collaboration between KTH and companies in the manufacturing industry, mainly Arla Foods and Scania CV.

    Methods

    This far an overview of risk assessment tools which can be used to assess MMH activities and potentially be used by companies or OSH personnel has been performed including e.g. KIM, QEC, ART Tool, SES and Washington State Checklist. Interviews with companies in the manufacturing industry have been performed to gain insight of the companies’ use of risk assessment tools and their perception of their usability.

    Results

    The tool consists of two levels, RAMP I and RAMP II. The first level is intended for quick screening of work stations of occurrence (or not) of risk factors. If the screening indicates an occurrence of a risk factor, a more thorough analysis with the second level could be performed. RAMP II can be used for a more detailed analysis of the exposure to risk factors and point out the direction of possible improvements in order to reduce the exposure.

    A first prototype of the RAMP I has been evaluated by users, including managers, health and safety representatives, OSH personnel and workers.The tool will be further evaluated and refined after feedback from users. A preliminary version of the RAMP I will be presented at the conference and also preliminary results from the user tests.

  • 31. Mekjavic, I.B.
    et al.
    Kounalakis, S.N.
    Keramidas, Michail E.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology (Closed 20130701).
    Pisot, R.
    Di Prampero, P.E.
    Narici, M.
    Biolo, G.
    Eiken, Ola
    The exercise-induced sweating response after 35 days of horizontal bed-rest2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32. Mekjavic, I.B.
    et al.
    McDonnell, A.C.
    Keramidas, Michail E.
    Jozef Stefan Institute, SLOVENIA.
    Kölegard, Roger
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology (Closed 20130701).
    Lind, Britta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology (Closed 20130701).
    Hypoxic bedrest: Implications for planetary habitats2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Nord Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Vänje, Annika
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Kollegor eller konkurrenter? : Samverkan i nätverk mellan arbetsmiljöingenjörer, ergonomer samt forskare2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Nordenfur, Tim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Babic, Aleksandar
    GE Vingmed Ultrasound.
    Bulatovic, Ivana
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Giesecke, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ripsweden, Jonaz
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Samset, Eigil
    GE Vingmed Ultrasound.
    Winder, Reidar
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Cardiac Fusion Imaging of Computed Tomography Angiography and 3D-Echocardiography for Improved Risk Stratification of Coronary Artery Disease2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Nordenfur, Tim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Babic, Aleksandar
    GE Vingmed Ultrasound.
    Bulatovic, Ivana
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Giesecke, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ripsweden, Jonaz
    Department of Clinical Science, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Intervention and Technology at Karolinska Institutet.
    Samset, Eigil
    GE Vingmed Ultrasound.
    Winter, Reidar
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Verification of Fusion Algorithm for 3D-Echocardiographyand Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Nordenfur, Tim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Maksuti, Elira
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Widman, Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    A Comparison of Shear Wave Elastography Pushing Sequences2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Norrbrand, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Grönkvist, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Johannesson, Björn
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Rappe, Annika
    Sjölin, Johan
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Walking with night vision goggles increases metabolic demand2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Poehlman, Melanie
    et al.
    University Baureight.
    Kothapalli, Veera Venkata Satya Naray
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institutet (KI), CLINTEC – Division of Medical Imaging and Technology.
    Härmark, Johan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Hebert, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Philipp, A.
    Hoeller, Roland
    Seuss, M.
    Magerithelli, S.
    Paradossi, Gaio
    Diapartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata.
    Fery, Andreas
    Magnetic microbubbles for multimodality imaging: the importance of the shell structure for low and high frequency mechanics2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing interest in magnetic microbubbles (MBs) for simultaneous enhanced ultrasound (US) and enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to support well-established imaging procedures as well as new emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, the development of hybrid contrast agents is challenging, because their design needs to satisfy a variety of requirements such as a sufficient stability of the probe for the circulation within the cardiovascular system, the production of an adequate US echo signal and a reasonable reduced relaxation time of nearby located protons. The studied magnetic MBs consist of an air-filled core, which is encapsulated by a soft hydrogel-like shell composed of poly(vinyl alcohol) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs)[1]. Two strategies were used to combine magnetic nanoparticles with the polymeric shell: SPIONs were either covalently attached to the shell surface via a post-chemical treatment or embedded physically inside the shell during the MBs’ synthesis. In particular, we were interested on the impact of the used SPIONs integration strategy on low and high frequency mechanics of the magnetic MBs. Therefore, we used a straightforward characterization of the MBs on the single particle level to correlate the synthesis with the MBs’ morphological properties and low frequency mechanics that were studied in quasi-static force measurements with atomic force microscopy. High frequency mechanics were investigated by exposure of an ensemble of MBs to an acoustic field. By further correlation of low and high frequency mechanics, we were able to bridge the gap between synthesis and the MBs macroscopic properties relevant for their application. The shown approach offers the possibility to sustainable design and optimize complex probes based on an improved understanding of structure/property relations.

  • 39.
    Rose, Linda M.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Organizational and individual effects of poor working environments at companies: methods, examples, and why we should care2013In: Scandinavian  Journal of  Work, Environment & Health: conference abstracts, 2013, p. 77-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A poor working environment can result in negative consequences at the individual, organizational, as well as societal level, for instance as a negative financial consequence. The driving force for many who are working within the occupational safety and health (OSH) field is to achieve improvements in the working environment, but it can be challenging to motivate investments in this area.

     

    It is fairly easy to calculate the direct, visible costs of a poor working environment, but difficult to estimate the hidden costs and the benefits of improvements. This presentation will give examples of visible and hidden effects and types of costs due to a poor working environment and will provide a survey of methods available for estimating financial effects.

     

    The demographic changes societies face lead both to challenges and opportunities. One of the challenges is how to design jobs so that even an ageing population can remain healthy and productive at work. The presentation will also give some examples on the state of the art of what we know in the area of an ageing workforce and where some of the knowledge gaps are that require research and development to meet the two objectives of ergonomics: human well-being and overall system performance.

  • 40.
    Rose, Linda M
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Recovery need in manual work: Development and application of an assessment tool.2012In: Book ocf abstracts: NES2012 Ergonomics for Sustainability and Growth / [ed] Antonson, A-B, Hägg, GM, Vogel, K, Stockholm: KTH , 2012, p. 16-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Incomplete recovery is considered as one of the main causes for developing MSDs. This paper describes the further development and application of an assessment tool, Ergo-Index, which can be used to analyse different ways to perform a work task considering load ergonomics as well as time aspects. It can support decision making when choosing production methods and help reduce the physical load and the risk of MSDs in combination with good production economics.

     

    Objectives

    The objectives were to further develop the existing Ergo-Index by i) gaining data to understand how load level and loading time affect recovery need ii) modelling the recovery need, iii) refining the existing Ergo-Index model iv) testing and implementing the model and gathering examples in a database and v) disseminating the results.

     

    Methods

    An experimental study was carried out with 10 participants. over 16 sessions, each participant pushed a handle, in which static force and time were altered between the sessions. Subjectively rated Endurance time (ET) and Resumption time (Tres), defined as the time period needed after loading until the participant would resume the task if it was his job, was noted, as well as other parameters. Based on experimental data mathematical relationships were established, using regression analysis. A new version of the Ergo-Index was developed based on the results and results from literature. The new tool was coded as a simple Excel-program and applied to 10 typical work tasks in industry and evaluated using biomechanical and subjective methods.

    Results

    The main results were data for ET, Tres and Rating of perceived discomfort/fatigue and a new Ergo-Index model, which is described briefly in the conference paper. Some applied examples are illustrated in the presentation.

     

    Discussion

    Different types of fatigue and models are discussed, as well as issues when trying to model the complex phenomena of fatigue.

     

    Conclusions

    It is concluded that the recovery time can be modelled as a relationship between load level and loading time, and that the method has to be further used and validated.

  • 41.
    Rose, Linda M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    The RAMP Tool for Risk Management in Manual Handling: A Seven Year R&D Project2017In: NES2017 Conference Proceedings:: JOY AT WORK / [ed] Anna-Lisa Osvalder, Mikael Blomé, Hajnalka Bodnar, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose

    In 2010 a research and development (R&D) project started after an initiative from a large global company. They needed a free, systematic musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) risk assessment and management tool, focused on manual handling. The development of the RAMP tool (Risk Assessment and Management tool for Manual Handling – Proactively) was therefore initiated, and the progress has since then been presented at several NES-conferences. The objective of this paper is to present the result of this 7 year R&D project: the digitalized RAMP tool and  courses on the tool.

     

    Methodology

    A participative methodology in close co-operation between researchers and practitioners at companies has been used. The participating companies and the methodology, including the base for the development, ranging from scientific papers to user feedback, and evaluations will be described at NES 2017.

     

    Results

    The R&D project has resulted in the freely accessible RAMP tool consisting of four parts: RAMP I, RAMP II, the Action module and the Results module. A broad range of MSD risks are assessed, the results from assessments are visualized in a novel way and risk reducing actions for risk management are supported. The digitalised version has recently been released. Further, three massive open online courses (MOOCs) for professionals on the RAMP tool are under development, and will also be presented.

     

    Discussion

    The discussion focuses on the need of and dissemination of freely accessible methods such as RAMP, and how to enable users to acquire sufficient knowledge to use them. 

     

    Conclusions

    In conclusion: The project has resulted in a new tool for MSD risk management in manual handling jobs, the RAMP tool. Evaluations of the tool show that it is regarded as usable from different usability aspects. It is argued that the upcoming online MOCCs may contribute to provide adequate knowledge for proper use of the tool.

     

    Keywords. musculoskeletal disorders, risk assessment, risk reducing measures, risk communication, digital tool.

  • 42.
    Rose, Linda M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Jonsson, Christina
    On the IEA Strategy: Mapping HFE Performance Knowledge2014In: Proceedings 11th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organistional Design and management. 46th Annual Nordic Ergonomics Society Conference. Volume 1 / [ed] Broberg, O, Fallentin, N, Hasle, P, Jensen, P L, Kabel, A, Larsen, M E, Weller, T, 2014, p. 273-274Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to support the implementation of the IEA strategy of Human Factors/Ergonomics (HFE) the objective of this pilot-project is to map the current awareness, knowledge and strategies regarding how HFE can be used in optimizing system performance and how and to what extent such strategies are applied in organisations today. The methodology used is that each board member of the Nordic Ergonomics Society´s national boards has a talk with a key stakeholder, using a semi-structured question area guide during the spring 2014. The gist of the results from each talk regarding four core areas will be summarised and analysed and will be presented at the ODAM-NES 2014 conference.

  • 43.
    Rose, Linda M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Neumann, W. Patrick
    Ryerson University.
    Workshop: Human Factors And The Bottom Line – Quantifying The Benefits Of Healthy Workplaces2014In: 11th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organisational Design and Management (ODAM 2014)and 46th Annual Nordic Ergonomics Society, Technical University of Denmark / [ed] Broberg, O et al., 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the workshop

    The workshop gives opportunities to learn about how to banish the phantom of unexpected costs and poor operating performance that comes from ergonomics / Human Factors problems in the workplace. The objectives are to foster a broad discussion on the economics of ergonomics including aspects such as 1) How Human Factors can affect company’s bottom line , 2) Why companies underestimate Ergonomics/Human Factors costs and benefits, 3) What economic assessment tools and approaches can be used to help companies realise the financial benefits of good working environments.

     

    The format of the workshop

    Participants are invited to join this interactive workshop on quantifying the financial costs and benefits of workplace improvements. The workshop will take an interactive approach. First the hosts will share their experiences, and will be examining a range of economic assessment techniques and discuss case studies in from both Swedish and Canadian industry, of how attending the human factors and ergonomics can improve a company’s productivity and quality performance. Thereafter an open plenary discussion will follow.

    Work environment effects are often difficult to assess, especially since many of them are hidden. Moreover, the economic impact of these hidden effects is often many times larger than that from visible effects, such as costs from absenteeism. Hidden effects often play a larger role on business parameters than visible ones do. Without adequate measurement or assessment tools, hidden effects remain obscured. As a result, they may be overlooked, which can have significant business consequences, particularly when making investment decisions related to work environment issues. Ergonomics/Human Factors gains from quality and productivity are usually much greater than for reduced compensation costs. Companies that underestimate the financial impact of human aspects of their systems can find their anticipated profits vanish – so called ‘phantom profits’.

     

  • 44. Salvadego, D.
    et al.
    Keramidas, Michail E.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Domenis, R.
    Mavelli, I.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Mekjavic, I.B.
    Grassi, B.
    Site of impairment of oxidative function after 10- day normoxic or hypoxic bed rests2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45. Salvadego, D
    et al.
    Keramidas, Michail E.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Domenis, R
    Mavelli, I
    Mekjavic, I.B.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Grassi, B
    Skeletal muscle oxidative function after a 10-day exposure to hypoxia and microgravity2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skeletal muscle oxidative function was evaluated before (CTRL) and after 10 days of normobaric hypoxic (inspired PO2 12.5kPa) bed rest (H-BR) and normoxic bed rest (BR) in nine healthy young men (age: 24.1±1.7 years [mean±SD]). H-BR was taken as a simulation of lunar habitats. Pulmonary gas exchange and vastus lateralis muscle fractional O2-extraction (by near-infrared spectroscopy) were determined during an incremental cycle ergometer (CE) and one-leg knee extension (KE) exercise up to volitional exhaustion. Mitochondrial respiration was evaluated by high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized vastus lateralis fibers. During CE, peak pulmonary O2-uptake ( VO 2peak) significantly decreased by ~7 and 9 % after BR and

    H-BR, respectively. During KE, V O 2peak decreased significantly (by ~6%) after BR (0.83±0.07 vs. 0.89±0.08 [CTRL] L·min-1), but not after H-BR (0.86±0.07 vs. 0.90±0.07). Skeletal muscle peak fractional O2-extraction was significantly lower after BR (60±12 vs. 70±11% [CTRL]), but not after H-BR (65±12 vs. 71±10). No significant changes were observed in maximal ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration either after BR (48.9±11.5pmolO2·s-1·mg-1 wet weight) or H-BR (42.8±7.8) vs. CTRL (46.6±6.6). After relieving, by the KE exercise protocol, constraints related to cardiovascular O2-delivery, oxidative function in vivo was still impaired after BR, while a less pronounced impairment was evident after H-BR. Mitochondrial respiratory function ex-vivo was unchanged after both conditions. Peripheral O2-diffusion constraints and/or an impaired O2-delivery/O2-utilization coupling might be the main bottleneck to oxidative function in vivo after BR. Hypoxia may attenuate the impairment of muscle oxidative function observed after BR. 

  • 46. Salvadego, Desy
    et al.
    Keramidas, Michail E.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Domenis, Rossana
    Kölegård, Roger
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Mavelli, Irene
    Rittweger, Jorn
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Swedish Aerospace Physiology Centre, SAPC.
    Mekjavic, Igor B.
    Grassi, Bruno
    PlanHab: responses of skeletal muscle oxidative function to bed rest and hypoxia2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47. Stavrou, N.
    et al.
    McDonnell, A.C.
    Debevec, T.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Mekjavic, I.B.
    The effect of moderate exercise on emotional state during hypoxic confinement2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Normobaric hypoxic training is routinely used by athletes to improve their altitude and sea level performance. A multitude of schedules are being used, combining inactive and active exposure to hypoxic environments. The live high – train low regimen, in particular, requires athletes to spend a majority of time confined to a normobaric hypoxic environment. Despite the known positive effects of hypoxic training on physical performance, there is a lack of information regarding the influence of hypoxia and physical activity on emotional state. This was the principal aim of the current study. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that physical activity alleviates the hypoxia-induced increases in negative feelings. Fourteen male subjects were confined to 10-day continuous hypoxia (fraction of inspired O2=0.139±0.003; 4000m simulated altitude). Subjects were assigned to either the Hypoxic Confinement: Exercise group (HCE: N=8, two 1 hour training sessions/day at 50% hypoxic peak power output) or the Hypoxic Confinement: Sedentary group (HCS: N=6, no exercise). Subjects were administered the Profile of Mood States (POMS) and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) tests two days prior to hypoxic confinement (D-2), on days 3 (D3), 7 (D7) and 10 (D10) of hypoxic confinement and on the first day of recovery following the confinement period (R+1). The ANOVA repeated measure of the PANAS determined that positive affect differed significantly across the five time measures between HCS and HCE. Bonferroni post hoc analysis revealed that the HCS group elicited a reduction of positive emotion from D-2 to D7 and to D10 with a concomitant increase of negative emotion from D-2 to D10. In addition, an increase of tension from D-2 to D7 and to D10 was revealed in HCS, whereas an increase in tension on D10 was indicated in HCE. Based on the POMS, an increase of depression from D-2 to D7 was found in HCS, whereas no differences were revealed in HCE, among the five time measures. Finally, no significant differences revealed between D10 and R+1 in the PANAS or POMS in either HCS or HCE. The results indicate that in sedentary subjects hypoxic confinement increases tension and negative emotions, and decreases vigor and positive emotions. It is concluded that hypoxia negatively affects the emotional state, but that increasing the level of physical activity ameliorates such feelings.

  • 48.
    Stenberg, Una
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Ruland, Cornelia
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Olsson, Mariann
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    To Live Close To A Person With Cancer - Experiences Of Family Caregivers2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Strömbäck Alvarez, Victor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Halldin, Peter
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Influence of Neck Muscle Tone on Brain Tissue Strain during Pedestrian Impacts2014In: 11th World Congress on Computational Mechanics (WCCM XI), 5th European Conference on Computational Mechanics (ECCM V), July 20 - 25, 2014, Barcelona, Spain, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unprotected pedestrians are an exposed group in rural traffic were the most vulnerable humanbody region is the head and the source of many fatal injuries. Brain tissue strain has been shown to correlate well with brain injuries in a detailed FE model [1]. This study was performed to gain a better understanding of the influence that the neck muscle tone has on brain tissue strain during pedestrian head impacts. The study was carried out using a detailed whole body FE model with a detailed neck [2], [3] and brain model [4]. To determine the influence of the muscle tone, a series of simulations were performed where the vehicle speed,pedestrian posture and muscle tone were varied. A generalized hood was also used to get the same impact surface in the different simulations and isolate the influence on strain due changed head kinematics. The influence of increased muscle stiffness was also isolated by adding the increased stiffnes momentaraly before head impact. Hence, the head kinematics did not have time to change and a change in strain was asumed to only be due to the changed neck stiffness. It has previously been shown that the neck muscle tone has a relatively small influence on head kinematics compared to posture, and hence head impact orientation [5]. The influence on brain tissue strain levels was however highly sensitive to impact point on a detailed vehicle due to the complex impact surface. When impacting a generalized surface the diffrences in strain between all simulations were significantly reduced and the influence due to muscle tone was in the same level as due to posture. The isolated influence of increased neck stiffness due to muscle tone was lower than the influence due to slightly changed head impact orientation. The increased neck stiffnes was therefore considered relatively unsignificant when considering brain injuries due to first impact on a vehicle structure in pedestrain accidents.

  • 50.
    Strömgren, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Health promoting leadership – a structure to build capacity for health in a healthcare organization2014Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 66
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