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  • 1. Edner, A
    et al.
    Ericson, Mats
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Milerad, J
    Katz-Salamon, M
    Abnormal heart rate response to hypercapnia in boys with an apparent life-threatening event.2002In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 91, no 12, 1318-23 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To determine instantaneous cardiac variability responses to increased carbon dioxide (CO2) during quiet sleep in infants who may be at risk for the Sudden Infant Death syndrome (SIDS).

    METHODS: The cardiac rate variability before, during and after a CO2 challenge was examined in 41 infants who had experienced an apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) and 41 gender- and age-matched control infants.

    RESULTS: The ALTE infants responded to CO2 breathing with a significant increase in R-R intervals, i.e. decreases in heart rate, compared to the controls (45.1% increase in R-R intervals vs. 41.4%; p = 0.005). The differences between ALTE infants and controls depended primarily on the boys' responses.

    CONCLUSION: ALTE infants, particularly ALTE boys, have an autonomic dysfunction-lower sympathetic stimulation and/or inhibited vagal withdrawal when stressed with CO2. The outcome might provide clues to the mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular processes contributing to the terminal event in SIDS.

  • 2. Forslund, L
    et al.
    Björkander, I
    Ericson, Mats
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Held, C
    Kahan, T
    Rehnqvist, N
    Hjemdahl, P
    Prognostic implications of autonomic function assessed by analyses of catecholamines and heart rate variability in stable angina pectoris.2002In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 87, no 5, 415-22 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prognostic impact of autonomic activity, as reflected by catecholamines and heart rate variability (HRV), in patients with stable angina pectoris.

    DESIGN: Double blind, randomised treatment with metoprolol or verapamil. 24 hour ambulatory ECG, used for frequency domain analyses of HRV, and symptom limited exercise tests at baseline and after one month of treatment. Catecholamine concentrations were measured in plasma (rest and exercise) and urine.

    SETTING: Single centre at a university hospital.

    PATIENTS: 641 patients (449 men) with stable angina pectoris.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cardiovascular (CV) death, non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI).

    RESULTS: During follow up (median 40 months) there were 27 CV deaths and 26 MIs. Patients who died of CV causes had lower total power and high (HF), low (LF), and very low (VLF) frequency components of HRV. HRV was not altered in patients who suffered non-fatal MI. Catecholamines did not differ between patients with and those without events. Metoprolol increased HRV. Verapamil decreased noradrenaline (norepinephrine) excretion. Multivariate Cox analyses showed that total power, HF, LF, and VLF independently predicted CV death (also non-sudden death) but not MI. LF:HF ratios and catecholamines were not related to prognosis. Treatment effects on HRV did not influence prognosis.

    CONCLUSIONS: Low HRV predicted CV death but not non-fatal MI. Neither the LF:HF ratio nor catecholamines carried any prognostic information. Metoprolol and verapamil influenced LF, HF, and catecholamines differently but treatment effects were not related to prognosis.

  • 3.
    Hamid Muhammed, Hamed
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Using Weighted Fixed Neural Networks for Unsupervised Fuzzy Clustering2002In: International Journal of Neural Systems (IJNS), ISSN 1793-6462, Vol. 12, no 6, 425-434 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel algorithm for unsupervised fuzzy clustering is introduced. The algorithm uses a so-called Weighted Fixed Neural Network (WFNN) to store important and useful information about the topological relations in a given data set. The algorithm produces a weighted connected net, of weighted nodes connected by weighted edges, which reflects and preserves the topology of the input data set. The weights of the nodes and the edges in the resulting net are proportional to the local densities of data samples in input space. The connectedness of the net can be changed, and the higher the connectedness of the net is chosen, the fuzzier the system becomes. The new algorithm is computationally efficient when compared to other existing methods for clustering multi-dimensional data, such as color images.

  • 4.
    Kleiven, Svein
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
    Influence of Direction and Duration of Impact to the Human Head2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Systematic Safety Management: the challenge of development2002In: The 68th International conference on the prevention of occupational accidents: Invited keynote lecture, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Field, Brian
    Victorian Workcover Authority, Melbourne, Australia.
    The distribution of occupational injury risks in the Victorian construction industry: Part 22002In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 40, no 5, 439-456 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a merger of workers' compensation data from the public fund Victorian Workcover Authority for the period 1996–1998 and denominator data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics 1996 Census, the relative distribution of occupational injury risk in the Victorian construction industry has been calculated. A four-part injury severity index, generated by the claims settling process, has been used to differentiate occupations, tasks and activities in terms of priorities for intervention and prevention. Falls from height represents the major severe injury problem in the Victorian construction industry. However, the fall risk problem is associated with different equipment and different tasks among the different occupational groups in the construction process and requires a variety of architectural, engineering and design solutions.

  • 7.
    Sundblad, Patrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Environmental Physiology (Closed 20130701).
    Wranne, B
    Influence of posture on left ventricular long- and short-axis shortening.2002In: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology, ISSN 0363-6135, E-ISSN 1522-1539, Vol. 283, no 4, H1302-1306 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    End-diastolic volume and left ventricular stroke volume are increased in the supine compared with upright position, but the contribution of long-axis (LAS) and short-axis shortening (SAS) to these changes with change in posture has not been established. We examined long- and short-axis motion and dimensions with echocardiography in 10 healthy subjects in the upright and supine position. Long-axis length at end diastole was almost identical, whereas the diastolic short-axis diameter was increased in the supine position. At end systole, there was a decreased long-axis length and increased short-axis length in the supine vs. upright position. Both LAS and SAS were enhanced in supine vs. upright positions [LAS: 9.3 +/- 2.2 vs. 15.1 +/- 3.1 mm (P < 0.001); SAS: 12.7 +/- 3.2 vs. 16.3 +/- 2.8 mm (P < 0.001)], presumably via Starling mechanisms. LAS increased more in the lateral part of the mitral annulus than in the septal part [7.7 +/- 2.6 vs. 4.0 +/- 2.8 mm (P < 0.006)], which implies that the more spherical form, in the supine position, induces more stretch at the lateral free wall than in the ventricular septum. These findings support the notion that Starling mechanisms affect systolic LAS.

  • 8.
    Söderqvist, Emil
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, KTH Syd.
    Lang, Helmuth
    Källner, Göran
    Hultman, Jan
    Lind, Britta
    KTH, Superseded Departments, KTH Syd. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    Left ventricular pressure indicies help to evaluate loading conditions and contractility2002In: IFMBE proc, ISSN 1680-0737, 1014-5 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Tanaka, Hidetaka
    et al.
    Borres, Magnus
    Thulesius, Olav
    Tamai, Hiroshi
    Ericson, Mats O
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Lindblad, Lars-Erik
    Evidence of decreased sympathetic function in children with psychosomatic symptoms.2002In: Clinical Autonomic Research, ISSN 0959-9851, E-ISSN 1619-1560, Vol. 12, no 6, 477-82 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated cardiovascular autonomic function using power spectral analysis of heart rate variation and beat-to-beat finger arterial pressure at rest and while standing and correlated these findings with self-reported psychosomatic and psychosocial symptoms in 122 schoolchildren. Children with three or more psychosomatic and psychosocial symptoms (somatizers) were found to have significantly lower blood pressure than children without symptoms. Somatizers had the more decreased spectral power of the low frequency (LF) band of arterial pressure and RR intervals in the supine position. The high frequency (HF) power did not differ between the two groups. Somatizers showed a more marked reduction in systolic arterial pressure at the onset of standing than did subjects without symptoms but somatizers showed an identical response in systolic arterial pressure when compared to subjects without symptoms during the later stage of standing. The increases in the LF band of arterial pressure and LF/HF of RR intervals during standing were higher in somatizers. These results suggest that somatizers have decreased sympathetic modulation. We conclude that psychosomatic and psychosocial symptoms in children might be associated with low blood pressure and decreased sympathetic modulation.

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