Change search
Refine search result
1 - 34 of 34
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Ankner, Tobias
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Cosner, Casey C.
    Helquist, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palladium- and Nickel-Catalyzed Alkenylation of Enolates2013In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 1858-1871Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transition-metal-catalyzed alkenylation of enolates provides a direct method to synthesize broadly useful ,-unsaturated carbonyl compounds from the corresponding carbonyl compound and alkenyl halides. Despite being reported in the early seventies, this reaction class saw little development for many years. In the past decade, however, efforts to develop this reaction further have increased considerably, and many research groups have reported efficient coupling protocols, including enantioselective versions. These reactions most commonly employ palladium catalysts, but there are also some important reports using nickel. There are many examples of this powerful transformation being used in the synthesis of complex natural products.

  • 2.
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ahlsten, Nanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martin-Matute, Belen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Enantioselective Synthesis of Alcohols and Amines by Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation, Transfer Hydrogenation, and Related Processes2013In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 19, no 23, p. 7274-7302Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preparation of chiral alcohols and amines by using iridium catalysis is reviewed. The methods presented include the reduction of ketones or imines by using hydrogen (hydrogenations), isopropanol, formic acid, or formate (transfer hydrogenations). Also dynamic and oxidative kinetic resolutions leading to chiral alcohols and amines are included. Selected literature reports from early contributions to December 2012 are discussed.

  • 3.
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Marcos, Rocio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sahoo, Suman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Inge, A. Ken
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    A Highly Active Bifunctional Iridium Complex with an Alcohol/Alkoxide-Tethered N-Heterocyclic Carbene for Alkylation of Amines with Alcohols2012In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 18, no 45, p. 14510-14519Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of new iridium(III) complexes containing bidentate N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHC) functionalized with an alcohol or ether group (NHC?OR, R=H, Me) were prepared. The complexes catalyzed the alkylation of anilines with alcohols as latent electrophiles. In particular, biscationic IrIII complexes of the type [Cp*(NHC-OH)Ir(MeCN)]2+2[BF4-] afforded higher-order amine products with very high efficiency; up to >99?% yield using a 1:1 ratio of reactants and 12.5 mol?% of Ir, in short reaction times (216 h) and under base-free conditions. Quantitative yields were also obtained at 50?degrees C, although longer reaction times (4860 h) were needed. A large variety of aromatic amines have been alkylated with primary and secondary alcohols. The reactivity of structurally related iridium(III) complexes was also compared to obtain insights into the mechanism and into the structure of possible catalytic intermediates. The IrIII complexes were stable towards oxygen and moisture, and were characterized by NMR, HRMS, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and elemental analyses.

  • 4.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Borowski, Tomasz
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Quantum Chemical Studies of Mechanisms for Metalloenzymes2014In: Chemical Reviews, ISSN 0009-2665, E-ISSN 1520-6890, Vol. 114, no 7, p. 3601-3658Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Carson, Fabian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Agrawal, Santosh
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Mikaela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Moraga, Francisca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ruthenium Complexation in an Aluminium Metal-Organic Framework and its Application in Alcohol Oxidation Catalysis2012In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 18, no 48, p. 15337-15344Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A ruthenium trichloride complex has been loaded into an aluminium metalorganic framework (MOF), MOF-253, by post-synthetic modification to give MOF-253-Ru. MOF-253 contains open bipyridine sites that are available to bind with the ruthenium complex. MOF-253-Ru was characterised by elemental analysis, N2 sorption and X-ray powder diffraction. This is the first time that a Ru complex has been coordinated to a MOF through post-synthetic modification and used as a heterogeneous catalyst. MOF-253-Ru catalysed the oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols, including allylic alcohols, with PhI(OAc)2 as the oxidant under very mild reaction conditions (ambient temperature to 40 degrees C). High conversions (up to >99%) were achieved in short reaction times (13 h) by using low catalyst loadings (0.5 mol% Ru). In addition, high selectivities (>90%) for aldehydes were obtained at room temperature. MOF-253-Ru can be recycled up to six times with only a moderate decrease in substrate conversion.

  • 6.
    Cumpstey, Ian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Intramolecular aglycon delivery2008In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 343, no 10-11, p. 1553-1573Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Cumpstey, Ian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of carbasugar-containing non-glycosidically linked pseudodisaccharides and higher pseudooligosaccharides2009In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 344, no 17, p. 2285-2310Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Deng, Youqian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Persson, Andreas K. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Carbocyclizations2012In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 18, no 37, p. 11498-11523Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Palladium-catalyzed oxidative carboncarbon bond-forming annulations, that is, carbocyclization reactions, have recently emerged as efficient and atom-economical routes to carbo- and heterocycles, whereby less functionalized substrates and fewer synthetic steps are needed to obtain a target molecule compared with traditional non-oxidative carboncarbon bond-forming reactions. In this review, the synthetic efforts in palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbocyclization reactions are summarized.

  • 9.
    Diner, Colin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Recent Advances in the Preparation and Application of Allylboron Species in Organic Synthesis2017In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 139, no 1, p. 2-14Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this Perspective we will highlight the most important recent breakthroughs in selective allylboron chemistry (both the synthesis and application of these species). In addition we will provide an outlook toward the future of this promising subfield of organic synthesis.

  • 10.
    Galkin, Maxim V.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Samec, Joseph S. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lignin Valorization through Catalytic Lignocellulose Fractionation: A Fundamental Platform for the Future Biorefinery2016In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564X, Vol. 9, no 13, p. 1544-1558Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current processes for the fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass focus on the production of high-quality cellulosic fibers for paper, board, and viscose production. The other fractions that constitute a major part of lignocellulose are treated as waste or used for energy production. The transformation of lignocellulose beyond paper pulp to a commodity (e.g., fine chemicals, polymer precursors, and fuels) is the only feasible alternative to current refining of fossil fuels as a carbon feedstock. Inspired by this challenge, scientists and engineers have developed a plethora of methods for the valorization of biomass. However, most studies have focused on using one single purified component from lignocellulose that is not currently generated by the existing biomass fractionation processes. A lot of effort has been made to develop efficient methods for lignin depolymerization. The step to take this fundamental research to industrial applications is still a major challenge. This review covers an alternative approach, in which the lignin valorization is performed in concert with the pulping process. This enables the fractionation of all components of the lignocellulosic biomass into valorizable streams. Lignocellulose fractions obtained this way (e.g., lignin oil and glucose) can be utilized in a number of existing procedures. The review covers historic, current, and future perspectives, with respect to catalytic lignocellulose fractionation processes.

  • 11.
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Recent Trends in Quantum Chemical Modeling of Enzymatic Reactions2017In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 139, no 20, p. 6780-6786Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The quantum chemical cluster approach is a powerful method for investigating enzymatic reactions. Over the past two decades, a large number of highly diverse systems have been studied and a great wealth of mechanistic insight has been developed using this technique. This Perspective reviews the current status of the methodology. The latest technical developments are highlighted, and challenges are discussed. Some recent applications are presented to illustrate the capabilities and progress of this approach, and likely future directions are outlined.

  • 12.
    Joosten, Antoine
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Persson, Andreas K. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Millet, Renaud
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johnson, Magnus T.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palladium(II)-Catalyzed Oxidative Cyclization of Allylic Tosylcarbamates: Scope, Derivatization, and Mechanistic Aspects2012In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 18, no 47, p. 15151-15157Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A highly selective oxidative palladium(II)-catalyzed (Wacker-type) cyclization of readily available allylic tosylcarbamates is reported. This operationally simple catalytic reaction furnishes tosyl-protected vinyl-oxazolidinones, common precursors to syn-1,2-amino alcohols, in high yield and excellent diasteroselectivity (>20:1). It is demonstrated that both stoichiometric amounts of benzoquinone (BQ) as well as aerobic reoxidation (molecular oxygen) is suitable for this transformation. The title reaction is shown to proceed through overall trans-amidopalladation of the olefin followed by beta-hydride elimination. This process is scalable and the products are suitable for a range of subsequent transformations such as: kinetic resolution (KR) and oxidative Heck-, Wacker-, and metathesis reactions.

  • 13.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Verho, Oscar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Artificial Photosynthesis: Photosynthesis: From Nanosecond Electron Transfer to Catalytic Water Oxidation2014In: Accounts of Chemical Research, ISSN 0001-4842, E-ISSN 1520-4898, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 100-111Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human society faces a fundamental challenge as energy consumption is projected to increase due to population and economic growth as fossil fuel resources decrease. Therefore the transition to alternative and sustainable energy sources is of the Utmost importance. The conversion of solar energy into chemical energy, by splitting H2O to generate molecular O-2 and H-2, could contribute to solving the global energy problem. Developing such a system will require the combination of several complicated processes, such as light-harvesting, charge separation, electron transfer, H2O oxidation, and reduction of the generated protons. The primary processes of charge separation and catalysis, which occur in the natural photosynthetic machinery, provide us with an excellent blueprint for the design of such systems. This Account describes our efforts to construct supramolecular assemblies capable of carrying out photoinduced electron transfer and to develop artificial water oxidation catalysts (WOCs). Early work in our group focused on linking a ruthenium chromophore to a manganese-based oxidation catalyst. When we incorporated a tyrosine unit into these supramolecular assemblies, we could observe fast intramolecular electron transfer from the manganese centers, via the tyrosine moiety, to the photooxidized ruthenium center, which clearly resembles the processes occurring in the natural system. Although we demonstrated multi-electron transfer in our artificial systems, the bottleneck proved to be the stability of the WOCs. Researchers have developed a number of WOCs, but the majority can only catalyze H2O oxidation in the presence of strong oxidants such as Ce-IV, which is difficult to generate photochemically. By contrast, illumination of ruthenium(II) photosensitizers in the presence of a sacrificial acceptor generates [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+)-type oxidants. Their oxidation potentials are significantly lower than that of Ce-IV, but our group recently showed that incorporating negatively charged groups into the ligand backbone could decrease the oxidation potential of the catalysts and, at the same time, decrease the potential for H2O oxidation. This permitted us to develop both ruthenium- and manganese-based WOCs that can operate under neutral conditions, driven by the mild oxidant [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+). Many hurdles to the development of viable systems for the production of solar fuels remain. However, the combination of important features from the natural photosynthetic machinery and novel artificial components adds insights into the complicated catalytic processes that are involved in splitting H2O.

  • 14.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Verho, Oscar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Artificial Photosynthesis: Molecular Systems for Catalytic Water Oxidation2014In: Chemical Reviews, ISSN 0009-2665, E-ISSN 1520-6890, Vol. 114, no 24, p. 11863-12001Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 15. Küpper, Frithjof C.
    et al.
    Feiters, Martin C.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kaiho, Tatsuo
    Yanagida, Shozo
    Zimmermann, Michael B.
    Carpenter, Lucy J.
    Luther, George W., III
    Lu, Zunli
    Jonsson, Mats
    Kloo, Lars
    Commemorating Two Centuries of Iodine Research: An Interdisciplinary Overview of Current Research2011In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 50, no 49, p. 11598-11620Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Iodine was discovered as a novel element in 1811 during the Napoleonic Wars. To celebrate the bicentennial anniversary of this event we reflect on the history and highlight the many facets of iodine research that have evolved since its discovery. Iodine has an impact on many aspects of life on Earth as well as on human civilization. It is accumulated in high concentrations by marine algae, which are the origin of strong iodine fluxes into the coastal atmosphere which influence climatic processes, and dissolved iodine is considered a biophilic element in marine sediments. Iodine is central to thyroid function in vertebrates, with paramount implications for human health. Iodine can exist in a wide range of oxidation states and it features a diverse supramolecular chemistry. Iodine is amenable to several analytical techniques, and iodine compounds have found widespread use in organic synthesis. Elemental iodine is produced on an industrial scale and has found a wide range of applications in innovative materials, including semiconductorsin particular, in solar cells.

  • 16. Liao, Rong-Zhen
    et al.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Quantum Chemical Modeling of Homogeneous Water Oxidation Catalysis2017In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564X, Vol. 10, no 22, p. 4236-4263Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of efficient and robust water oxidation catalysts has proven challenging in the development of artificial photosynthetic systems for solar energy harnessing and storage. Tremendous progress has been made in the development of homogeneous transition-metal complexes capable of mediating water oxidation. To improve the efficiency of the catalyst and to design new catalysts, a detailed mechanistic understanding is necessary. Quantum chemical modeling calculations have been successfully used to complement the experimental techniques to suggest a catalytic mechanism and identify all stationary points, including transition states for both O-O bond formation and O-2 release. In this review, recent progress in the applications of quantum chemical methods for the modeling of homogeneous water oxidation catalysis, covering various transition metals, including manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, ruthenium, and iridium, is discussed.

  • 17.
    Lundberg, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Catalytic α-Alkylation/Reduction of Ketones with Primary Alcohols To Furnish Secondary Alcohols2016In: Synthesis (Stuttgart), ISSN 0039-7881, E-ISSN 1437-210X, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 644-652Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of secondary alcohol products via a tandem -alkylation/transfer hydrogenation of ketones with primary alcohols is a little explored reaction with unrealized potential for green synthesis. This review covers the current literature in the field, including asymmetric versions of the reaction, and outlines future possibilities and challenges for the methodology. 1 Introduction 2 Formation of Racemic Alcohols 3 Formation of Enantiomerically Enriched Alcohols 4 Conclusions

  • 18.
    Lundberg, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tinnis, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Selander, Nicklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Catalytic amide formation from non-activated carboxylic acids and amines2014In: Chemical Society Reviews, ISSN 0306-0012, E-ISSN 1460-4744, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 2714-2742Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amide functionality is found in a wide variety of biological and synthetic structures such as proteins, polymers, pesticides and pharmaceuticals. Due to the fact that synthetic amides are still mainly produced by the aid of coupling reagents with poor atom-economy, the direct catalytic formation of amides from carboxylic acids and amines has become a field of emerging importance. A general, efficient and selective catalytic method for this transformation would meet well with the increasing demands for green chemistry procedures. This review covers catalytic and synthetically relevant methods for direct condensation of carboxylic acids and amines. A comprehensive overview of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic methods is presented, covering biocatalysts, Lewis acid catalysts based on boron and metals as well an assortment of other types of catalysts.

  • 19.
    Marcos, Rocio
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Combined Enzyme and Transition-Metal Catalysis for Dynamic Kinetic Resolutions2012In: Israel Journal of Chemistry, ISSN 0021-2148, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 639-652Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preparation of optically pure alcohols, axially chiral allenes, and amine derivatives by using enzymes and transition-metal catalysts through dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) is reviewed. After a general introduction into enzymatic kinetic resolutions and racemizations catalyzed by transition-metal complexes, selected examples of DKRs are presented, from early work to more recent outstanding contributions, and also applications of this approach.

  • 20.
    Merritt, Eleanor A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Diaryliodonium salts: A journey from obscurity to fame2009In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 48, no 48, p. 9052-9070Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent groundbreaking developments in the application of diaryliodonium salts in cross-coupling reactions has brought this class of previously underdeveloped reagents to the forefront of organic chemistry. With the advent of novel, facile, and efficient synthetic routes to these compounds, many more applications can be foreseen. Herein we provide an overview of the historical and recent advances in the synthesis and applications of diaryliodonium salts.

  • 21.
    Merritt, Eleanor A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Diaryliodoniumsalze - aus dem Nichts ins Rampenlicht2009In: Angewandte Chemie, ISSN 1521-3757, Vol. 121, no 48, p. 9214-9234Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Die jüngsten bahnbrechenden Entwicklungen bei der Anwendung von Diaryliodoniumsalzen in Kreuzkupplungsreaktionen haben diese ehemals unterentwickelte Klasse von Reagentien in die vorderste Reihe der organischen Chemie katapultiert. Mit dem Aufkommen neuartiger, einfacher, effizienter Methoden zur Synthese dieser Reagentien lassen sich noch sehr viel mehr Einsatzmöglichkeiten voraussehen. Wir bieten hier einen Überblick über die historischen und neuerlichen Fortschritte bei der Synthese und Anwendung von Diaryliodoniumsalzen.

  • 22.
    Otero-Fraga, Jorge
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Montesinos-Magraner, Marc
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mendoza, Abraham
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Perspectives on Intermolecular Azomethine Ylide [3+2] Cycloadditions with Non-Electrophilic Olefins2017In: Synthesis (Stuttgart), ISSN 0039-7881, E-ISSN 1437-210X, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 802-809Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our interest in the synthesis of compact nitrogen heterocycles from abundant sources has motivated a critical analysis of the status in azomethine ylide chemistry. Despite the outstanding developments in catalytic enantioselective [3+2] cycloadditions, these are still limited to electron-poor olefins. Only a few examples can be found in the literature that report on cycloadditions using non-electrophilic alkenes and those are compiled herein. With this account we aim to extract lessons and challenges that will inspire future breakthroughs in this area.

  • 23.
    Pace, Vittorio
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. University of Vienna, Austria.
    Holzer, Wolfgang
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Increasing the Reactivity of Amides towards Organometallic Reagents: An Overview2014In: Advanced Synthesis and Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, E-ISSN 1615-4169, Vol. 356, no 18, p. 3697-3736Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nucleophilic addition of carbon nucleophiles to amides has traditionally been a difficult task, both due to reactivity and selectivity problems. When successful, these processes would represent straightforward routes towards carbonyl-type or amine compounds, depending on the fate of the generated tetrahedral intermediate. The direct addition of nucleophiles to amides for the preparation of ketones has been studied and applied to the syntheses of several natural products. On the other hand, the addition of nucleophiles to amides to obtain substituted amines represented a major challenge, and only scattered applications on particular substrates have appeared. Initial improvements were based on the activation of amides by introduction of particular substituents, such as in N-methoxy amides (Weinreb amides) or electron-withdrawing groups able to increase the carbon nucleophilicity. Although these strategies facilitate the introduction of nucleophiles, chemoselectivity issues arise when additional electrophilic moieties (i.e., carbonyls) are present, thus decreasing the versatility of the methods. In recent years, important advancements towards fully chemoselective methods have been realized. The capture of tetrahedral intermediates with acids generates highly electrophilic iminium species able to undergo chemoselective additions of various nucleophiles, thus accessing substituted amines. Alternatively, the in situ generation of an iminium triflate ion allows highly chemoselective additions of nucleophiles, yielding amines, ketones or ketimines. Also thioamides can be used as precursors of ketones or alpha-substituted amines. The success of the above methodologies is further showcased by the application in various syntheses of natural products or biologically active molecules.

  • 24.
    Pu, Maoping
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Privalov, Timofei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Chemistry of Intermolecular Frustrated Lewis Pairs in Motion: Emerging Perspectives and Prospects2015In: Israel Journal of Chemistry, ISSN 0021-2148, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 179-195Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This feature article describes the chemistry in motion of frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs). With state-of-the-art ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations supplemented by minimum energy path (MEP) and potential energy surface (PES) calculations, we examine the binding of CO2 and the heterolytic cleavage of H-2 by a Lewis base (LB), tBu(3)P, and a Lewis acid (LA), B(C6F5)(3). We strive to uncover and understand mechanistic implications of the physical laws that govern the behavior of a LB and a LA when they react with a third species (e.g., CO2 or H-2) at finite temperature. The approximation that we necessarily must make at present is to forgo the quantization of the movement of atoms in favor of the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD), which unfold according to the classical (Newton's) laws of motion. However, strict quantum chemical theory is used to compute all of the forces that govern the dynamics of the macromolecular FLP system. Using physical reasoning and innovative computer simulations, we show that multi-scale motion is the predominant mechanistic aspect in reactions of the tBu(3)P/B(C6F5)(3) FLP, as well as, conceivably, those of other similar intermolecular FLPs. Insight achieved thus far leads to a novel activity model for intermolecular FLPs and specific predictions, which could be useful for future experimental and theoretical studies of FLP and other chemistries.

  • 25. Rios, Ramón
    et al.
    Córdova, Armando
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Examples of catalytic asymmetric amine synthesis using organic catalysts2009In: Current opinion in drug discovery & development, ISSN 1367-6733, E-ISSN 2040-3437, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 824-847Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 26. Santoro, Stefano
    et al.
    Kalek, Marcin
    Huang, Genping
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Elucidation of Mechanisms and Selectivities of Metal-Catalyzed Reactions using Quantum Chemical Methodology2016In: Accounts of Chemical Research, ISSN 0001-4842, E-ISSN 1520-4898, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 1006-1018Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantum chemical techniques today are indispensable for the detailed mechanistic understanding of catalytic reactions. The development of modem density functional theory approaches combined with the enormous growth in computer power have made it possible to treat quite large systems at a reasonable level of accuracy. Accordingly, quantum chemistry has been applied extensively to a wide variety of catalytic systems. A huge number of problems have been solved successfully, and vast amounts of chemical insights have been gained. In this Account, we summarize some of our recent work in this field. A number of examples concerned with transition metal-catalyzed reactions are selected, with emphasis on reactions with various kinds of selectivities. The discussed cases are (1) copper-catalyzed C-H bond amidation of indoles, (2) iridium-catalyzed C(sp(3))-H borylation of chlorosilanes, (3) vanadium-catalyzed Meyer-Schuster rearrangement and its combination with aldol- and Mannich-type additions, (4) palladium-catalyzed propargylic substitution with phosphorus nucleophiles, (5) rhodium-catalyzed 1:2 coupling of aldehydes and allenes, and finally (6) copper-catalyzed coupling of nitrones and alkynes to produce beta-lactams (Kinugasa reaction). First, the methodology adopted in these studies is presented briefly. The electronic structure method in the great majority of these kinds of mechanistic investigations has for the last two decades been based on density functional theory. In the cases discussed here, mainly the B3LYP functional has been employed in conjunction with Grimme's empirical dispersion correction, which has been shown to improve the calculated energies significantly. The effect of the surrounding solvent is described by implicit solvation techniques, and the thermochemical corrections are included using the rigid-rotor harmonic oscillator approximation. The reviewed examples are chosen to illustrate the usefulness and versatility of the adopted methodology in solving complex problems and proposing new detailed reaction mechanisms that rationalize the experimental findings. For each of the considered reactions, a consistent mechanism is presented, the experimentally observed selectivities are reproduced, and their sources are identified. Reproducing selectivities requires high accuracy in computing relative transition state energies. As demonstrated by the results summarized in this Account, this accuracy is possible with the use of the presented methodology, benefiting of course from a large extent of cancellation of systematic errors. It is argued that as the employed models become larger, the number of rotamers and isomers that have to be considered for every stationary point increases and a careful assessment of their energies is therefore necessary in order to ensure that the lowest energy conformation is located. This issue constitutes a bottleneck of the investigation in some cases and is particularly important when analyzing selectivities, since small energy differences need to be reproduced.

  • 27.
    Selander, Nicklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Catalysis by Palladium Pincer Complexes2011In: Chemical Reviews, ISSN 0009-2665, E-ISSN 1520-6890, Vol. 111, no 3, p. 2048-2076Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 28. Silva, Luiz F., Jr.
    et al.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Hypervalent iodine reagents in the total synthesis of natural products2011In: Natural product reports (Print), ISSN 0265-0568, E-ISSN 1460-4752, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 1722-1754Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes the recent applications of hypervalent iodine reagents in the total synthesis of natural products. The large diversity of high-yielding and chemoselective reactions that can be achieved, even for highly functionalized molecules, is summarized, demonstrating that hypervalent iodine reagents have become an essential tool in synthetic organic chemistry.

  • 29. Stamatov, Stephan D.
    et al.
    Stawinski, Jacek
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    O-Silylated C3-halohydrins as a novel class of protected building blocks for total, regio- and stereocontrolled synthesis of glycerolipid frameworks2010In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 463-477Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose O-silylated C3-halohydrins [1(3)-O-silyl-2-O-acyl-, 1,2(2,3)-O-bis(silyl)-, and 1(3)-O-acyl-2-O-silyl-3(1)-halo-sn-glycerides] as new chirons in the total synthesis of glycerolipid constructs. These are efficiently producible via opening of the oxirane ring of the corresponding glycidyl derivatives and permit (i) displacement of the iodine by a requisite carboxylate in the presence of O-triisopropylsilyl (O-TIPS), O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl (O-TBDMS), and O-acyl substituents; (ii) selective acylation across an appropriate silyloxy system [e. g., O-TBDMS or O-triethylsilyl (O-TES)] of monoesterified haloglycerides; (iii) direct exchange of an O-silyl protection (e. g., O-TBDMS or O-TIPS) for a trichloroacetyl group; (iv) conversion of a terminal TBDMS group into the corresponding trifluoroacetate without affecting O-TIPS-, O-acyl- and iodo functions. The above transformations secure flexible routes to a variety of otherwise difficult-to-access key-intermediates [e.g., 1,2(2,3)-O-bis(acyl)-3(1)-trichloroacetyl-, 1,3-O-bis(acyl)-2-trichloroacetyl-, 1,2(2,3)-O-bis(acyl)-3(1)-O-TBDMS/TIPS-, 1,3-O-bis(acyl)-2-O-TIPS/TBDMS-, 1(3)-O-acyl-2-O-TIPS-, 1,2(2,3)-O-bis(acyl)-3(1)-iodo-sn-glycerols, etc.] and lend themselves to a powerful methodology for the preparation of di- and triacylglycerols as well as glycerol-based cationic lipids. The reactions involved are entirely regio- and stereospecific, avoid acyl migration, and can provide target compounds with a chosen absolute configuration from a single synthetic precursor.

  • 30. Szijjarto, Csongor
    et al.
    Pershagen, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ilchenko, Nadia O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Borbas, K. Eszter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    A Versatile Long-Wavelength-Absorbing Scaffold for Eu-Based Responsive Probes2013In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 3099-3109Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coumarin-sensitized, long-wavelength-absorbing luminescent EuIII-complexes have been synthesized and characterized. The lanthanide binding site consists of a cyclen-based chelating framework that is attached through a short linker to a 7-hydroxycoumarin, a 7-B(OH)2-coumarin, a 7-O-(4-pinacolatoboronbenzyl)-coumarin or a 7-O-(4-methoxybenzyl)-coumarin. The syntheses are straightforward, use readily available building blocks, and proceed through a small number of high-yielding steps. The sensitivity of coumarin photophysics to the 7-substituent enables modulation of the antenna-absorption properties, and thus the lanthanide excitation spectrum. Reactions of the boronate-based functionalities (cages) with H2O2 yielded the corresponding 7-hydroxycoumarin species. The same species was produced with peroxynitrite in a x106107-fold faster reaction. Both reactions resulted in the emergence of a strong approximate to 407nm excitation band, with concomitant decrease of the 366nm band of the caged probe. In aqueous solution the methoxybenzyl caged Eu-complex was quenched by ONOO. We have shown that preliminary screening of simple coumarin-based antennae through UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy is possible as the changes in absorption profile translate with good fidelity to changes in EuIII-excitation profile in the fully elaborated complex. Taken together, our results show that the 7-hydroxycoumarin antenna is a viable scaffold for the construction of turn-on and ratiometric luminescent probes.

  • 31. Thorsheim, Karin
    et al.
    Siegbahn, Anna
    Johnsson, Richard E.
    Stalbrand, Henrik
    Manner, Sophie
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ellervik, Ulf
    Chemistry of xylopyranosides2015In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 418, p. 65-88Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Xylose is one of the few monosaccharidic building blocks that are used by mammalian cells. In comparison with other monosaccharides, xylose is rather unusual and, so far, only found in two different mammalian structures, i.e. in the Notch receptor and as the linker between protein and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains in proteoglycans. Interestingly, simple soluble xylopyranosides can not only initiate the biosynthesis of soluble GAG chains but also function as inhibitors of important enzymes in the biosynthesis of proteoglycans. Furthermore, xylose is a major constituent of hemicellulosic xylans and thus one of the most abundant carbohydrates on Earth. Altogether, this has spurred a strong interest in xylose chemistry. The scope of this review is to describe synthesis of xylopyranosyl donors, as well as protective group chemistry, modifications, and conformational analysis of xylose.

  • 32. Verendel, J. Johan
    et al.
    Pamies, Oscar
    Dieguez, Montserrat
    Andersson, Pher G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Univ KwaZulu Natal, Sch Chem, Durban, South Africa.
    Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Olefins Using Chiral Crabtree-type Catalysts: Scope and Limitations2014In: Chemical Reviews, ISSN 0009-2665, E-ISSN 1520-6890, Vol. 114, no 4, p. 2130-2169Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Volkov, Alexey
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tinnis, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stagbrand, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Trillo, Paz
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Chemoselective reduction of carboxamides2016In: Chemical Society Reviews, ISSN 0306-0012, E-ISSN 1460-4744, Vol. 45, no 24, p. 6685-6697Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reduction of amides gives access to a wide variety of important compounds such as amines, imines, enamines, nitrites, aldehydes and alcohols. The chemoselective transformation into these functional groups is challenging due to the intrinsic stability of the amide bond; nevertheless, the ability to reduce highly stable carboxamides selectively in the presence of sensitive functional groups is of high synthetic value for academic and industrial chemists. Hydride-based reagents such as LiAlH4 or diboranes are today the most commonly used compounds for amide reductions, and apart from the substantial amount of waste generated using these methods, they lack tolerance to most other functional groups. This tutorial review provides an overview of the recent progress made in the development of chemoselective protocols for amide reduction and gives an insight to their advantages and drawbacks.

  • 34.
    Warner, Madeleine C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mechanistic Aspects on Cyclopentadienylruthenium Complexes in Catalytic Racemization of Alcohols2013In: Accounts of Chemical Research, ISSN 0001-4842, E-ISSN 1520-4898, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 2545-2555Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclopentadienylruthenium complexes commonly serve as efficient transition metal catalysts in the racemization of alcohols. The combination of the racemization reaction with enzymatic resolution leads to dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR). In DKR, a theoretical yield of 100% is possible, making it a powerful tool for enantioselective synthesis. In this Account, we summarize the most important mechanistic aspects of racemization of alcohols reported over the past decade based on both experimental and computational results. Precatalyst activation is often necessary, either by heating the reaction or by adding an alkoxide-type base. The subsequent alcohol-alkoxide exchange is rapid and introduces the substrate into the catalytic cycle. This exchange requires a free coordination site, which may be created via several different mechanisms. Following alkoxide formation, racemization occurs via beta-hydride elimination and subsequent readdition. In cyclopentadienyldicarbonylruthenium alkoxide complexes, which are 18-electron complexes, researchers originally considered two mechanisms for the creation of the free coordination site required for beta-hydride elimination: a change in hapticity of the cyclopentadienyl ligand from eta 5 to eta 3 and dissociation of a CO ligand. Based on computational and experimental results, we have found strong support for the pathway involving CO dissociation. Researchers had also wondered if the substrate remains coordinated to the metal center (the inner-sphere mechanism) during the hydrogen transfer step(s). Using competition and crossover experiments, we found strong evidence for an inner-sphere mechanism. In summary, we have obtained a detailed picture of the racemization of alcohols by cyclopentadienylruthenium catalysts, leading to the development of more efficient catalytic systems for racemization.

1 - 34 of 34
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf