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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Transition metal-catalyzed epoxidation of alkenes2010In: Modern Oxidation Methods / [ed] Jan-Erling Bäckvall, Weinheim: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA , 2010, 2, p. 37-84Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Hanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Organic Chemistry.
    Carlsson, Anna-Carin C.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nekoueishahraki, Bijan
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brath, Ulrika
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Erdélyi, Máté
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Chapter Two - Solvent Effects on Nitrogen Chemical Shifts2015In: Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy, Academic Press , 2015, Vol. 86, p. 73-210Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to significant developments in cryogenic probe technology and the easy access to inverse detection pulse programmes (HSQC, HMBC), the sensitivity of nitrogen NMR has lately vastly improved. As a consequence, nitrogen NMR has turned into a useful and commonly available tool for solution studies of molecular structure and properties for small organic compounds likewise biopolymers. The high sensitivity of the nitrogen lone pair to changes in the molecular environment, alterations in intra- and intermolecular interactions, and in molecular conformation along with its wide, up to 1200ppm chemical shift dispersion make nitrogen NMR to an exceptionally sensitive reporter tool. The nitrogen chemical shift has been applied in various fields of chemistry, including for instance the studies of transition metal complexes, chemical reactions such as N-alkylation and N-oxidation, tautomerization, protonation–deprotonation equilibria, hydrogen and halogen bonding, and elucidation of molecular conformation and configuration. The 15N NMR data observed in the investigation of these molecular properties and processes is influenced by the medium it is acquired in. This influence may be due to direct coordination of solvent molecules to transition metal complexes, alteration of tautomerization equilibria, and solvent polarity induced electron density changes of conjugated systems, for example. Thus, the solvent may significantly alter the observed nitrogen NMR shifts. This review aims to provide an overview of solvent effects of practical importance, and discusses selected experimental reports from various subfields of chemistry.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Pher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry. Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry I.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Synthesis of Heterocyclic Natural Products via Regio- and Stereocontrolled Palladium-Catalyzed Reactions1996In: Advances in Heterocyclic Natural Product Synthesis, JAI Press Inc, Greenwich , 1996, p. 179-215Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry.
    Kihlberg, T.
    Långström, B.
    11C: Labelling chemistry and labelled compounds2003In: Handbook Chem03_0302, 2003, no 332, p. 119-165Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5. Arukuusk, Piret
    et al.
    Pärnaste, Ly
    Hällbrink, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Langel, Ülo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry. Tartu University, Estonia.
    PepFects and NickFects for the Intracellular Delivery of Nucleic Acids2015In: Cell-Penetrating Peptides: Methods and Protocols / [ed] Ülo Langel, New York: Springer, 2015, Vol. 1324, p. 303-315Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nucleic acids can be utilized in gene therapy to restore, alter, or silence gene functions. In order to reveal the biological activity nucleic acids have to reach their intracellular targets by passing through the plasma membrane, which is impermeable for these large and negatively charged molecules. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) condense nucleic acids into nanoparticles using non-covalent complexation strategy and mediate their delivery into the cell, whereas the physicochemical parameters of the nanoparticles determine the interactions with the membranes, uptake mechanism, and subsequent intracellular fate. The nanoparticles are mostly internalized by endocytosis that leads to the entrapment of them in endosomal vesicles. Therefore design of new CPPs that are applicable for non-covalent complex formation strategy and harness endosomolytic properties is highly vital. Here we demonstrate that PepFects and NickFects are efficient vectors for the intracellular delivery of various nucleic acids.This chapter describes how to form CPP/pDNA nanoparticles, evaluate stable nanoparticles formation, and assess gene delivery efficacy.

  • 6.
    Baltzer, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry II.
    Klinman, J.P.
    Hynes, J.T.
    Limbach, H-H.
    Acid base catalysis in designed polypeptides2006In: Handbook of Hydrogen Transfer, Wiley , 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bergqvist, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Zaliauskiene, Audrone
    Field study considerations in the use of passive sampling devices in water monitoring2007In: Passive Sampling Techniques in Environmental Monitoring / [ed] R. Greenwood, G. Mills and B. Vrana, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2007, p. 311-328Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are passive monitors that are being increasingly used by monitoring agencies and wastewater dischargers to measure the contents of lipophilic organic chemicals that may adversely affect water quality. This chapter addresses the most frequently asked questions regarding the use of SPMDs for water monitoring and other questions related to the field application of SPMDs. It provides a sound understanding of the applicability and limitations of SPMDs for obtaining reliable monitoring data. The chapter discusses under field study considerations: pre-exposure considerations; SPMD storage considerations; and precautions/procedures during deployment and retrieval of SPMDs. In environmental monitoring projects using SPMDs, quality control (QC) procedures for sampling and analysis are applied to ensure that the data are of high quality. Appropriate QC samples are prepared to quantify possible sampler contamination during transport, deployment, retrieval, storage, processing, enrichment, fractionation operations and analyte recovery. In general, two groups of quality assurance measures are implemented: replicate QC and sampling device control.

  • 8.
    Björklund Jansson, Marianne
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Nilvebrant, N. -O
    Wood Extractives2009In: Wood Chemistry and Wood Biotechnology, Walter de Gruyter, 2009, p. 147-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bouma, M. J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    7.07 α-Oxygenation of Carbonyl Compounds2014In: Comprehensive Organic Synthesis II (Second Edition) / [ed] Paul Knochel and Gary A. Molander, Amsterdam: Oxford: Elsevier , 2014, 2nd, p. 213-241Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The chapter describes synthetically useful strategies for α-oxygenation of carbonyl compounds, with special emphasis on recent methods for catalytic and asymmetric reactions. The oxidation of enolates, enols, enol ethers, and α,β-unsaturated compounds is discussed in detail. Classical oxidation reagents like metal oxides, molecular oxygen, peroxides, and peracids are covered, with asymmetric dihydroxylation of enol ethers giving the highest enantioselectivities together with organocatalytic methods using peroxides. Oxaziridines, nitrosoarenes, and hypervalent iodine compounds are more recently developed α-oxygenation alternatives that allow metal-free oxidations under mild conditions. The combination of nitrosoarenes with organocatalysis is currently the best method for enantioselective α-oxygenations. The area of asymmetric α-oxygenations with hypervalent iodine compounds is currently under development, and high enantioselectivities have only been achieved in intramolecular reactions and epoxidations.

  • 10. Bradley, Jean-Claude
    et al.
    Guha, Rajarshi
    Lang, Andrew
    Lindenbaum, Pierre
    Neylon, Cameron
    Williams, Antony
    Willighagen, Egon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Beautifying Data in the Real World2009In: Beautiful Data: The Stories Behind Elegant Data Solutions / [ed] Toby Segaran & Jeff Hammerbacher, Sebastol, USA: O'Reilly , 2009, 1, p. 259-278Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.