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  • 1.
    Blasco, Pilar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Patel, Dhilon S.
    Engström, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Im, Wonpil
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Conformational Dynamics of the Lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli O91 Revealed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Molecular Simulations2017In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 56, no 29, p. 3826-3839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outer leaflet of the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria contains lipopolysaccharides (LPS) as a major component, and the outer membrane provides a physical barrier and protection against hostile environments. The enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli of serogroup O91 has an O-antigen polysaccharide (PS) with five sugar residues in the repeating unit (RU), and the herein studied O-antigen PS contains similar to 10 RUs. H-1-C-13 HSQC-NOESY experiments on a 1-C-13-labeled PS were employed to deduce H-1-H-1 cross-relaxation rates and transglycosidic (3)J(CH) related to the psi torsional angles were obtained by H-1-H-1 NOESY experiments. Dynamical parameters were calculated from the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the PS in solution and compared to those from C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation studies. Importantly, the MD simulations can reproduce the dynamical behavior of internal correlation times along the PS chain. Two-dimensional free energy surfaces of glycosidic torsion angles delineate the conformational space available to the O-antigen. Although similar with respect to populated states in solution, the O-antigen in LPS bilayers has more extended chains as a result of spatial limitations due to close packing. Calcium ions are highly abundant in the phosphate-containing core region mediating LPS LPS association that is crucial for maintaining bilayer integrity, and the negatively charged O-antigen promotes a high concentration of counterbalancing potassium ions. The ensemble of structures present for the PS in solution is captured by the NMR experiments, and the similarities between the O-antigen on its own and as a constituent of the full LPS in a bilayer environment make it possible to realistically describe the LPS conformation and dynamics from the MD simulations.

  • 2.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Can Reduction of NO to N2O in Cytochrome c Dependent Nitric Oxide Reductase Proceed through a Trans-Mechanism?2017In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 120-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of microbial denitrification, NO is reduced to N2O in the membrane bound enzyme nitric oxide reductase, NOR The N N coupling occurs in the diiron binuclear active site, BNC, and different mechanisms for this reaction step have been suggested. Computational studies have supported a so-called cis:b(3)-mechanism, in which the hyponitrite product of the reductive N N bond formation coordinates with one nitrogen to the heme iron and with both oxygens to the non-heme iron in the BNC. In contrast, experimental results have been interpreted to support a so-called trans-mechanism, in which the hyponitrite intermediate coordinates with one nitrogen atom to each of the two iron ions. Hybrid density functional theory is used here to perform an extensive search for possible intermediates of the NO reduction in the cNOR enzyme. It is found that hyponitrite structures coordinating with their negatively charged oxygens to the positively charged iron ions are the most stable ones. The hyponitrite intermediate involved in the suggested trans-mechanism, which only coordinates with the nitrogens to the iron ions, is found to be prohibitively high in energy, leading to a too slow reaction, which should rule out this mechanism. Furthermore, intermediates binding one NO molecule to each iron ion in the BNC, which have been suggested to initiate the trans-mechanism, are found to be too high in energy to be observable, indicating that the experimentally observed electron paramagnetic resonance signals, taken to support such an iron-nitrosyl dimer intermediate, should be reinterpreted.

  • 3.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Protonation of the binuclear active site in cytochrome c oxidase decreases the reduction potential of Cu-B2015In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1847, no 10, p. 1173-1180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the remaining mysteries regarding the respiratory enzyme cytochrome c oxidase is how proton pumping can occur in all reduction steps in spite of the low reduction potentials observed in equilibrium titration experiments for two of the active site cofactors, CUB(II) and Fe-a3(III). It has been speculated that, at least the copper cofactor can acquire two different states, one metastable activated state occurring during enzyme turnover, and one relaxed state with lower energy, reached only when the supply of electrons stops. The activated state should have a transiently increased Cu-B(II) reduction potential, allowing proton pumping. The relaxed state should have a lower reduction potential, as measured in the titration experiments. However, the structures of these two states are not known. Quantum mechanical calculations show that the proton coupled reduction potential for Cu-B is inherently high in the active site as it appears after reaction with oxygen, which explains the observed proton pumping. It is suggested here that, when the flow of electrons ceases, a relaxed resting state is formed by the uptake of one extra proton, on top of the charge compensating protons delivered in each reduction step. The extra proton in the active site decreases the proton coupled reduction potential for Cu-B by almost half a volt, leading to agreement with titration experiments. Furthermore, the structure for the resting state with an extra proton is found to have a hydroxo-bridge between Cu-B(II) and Fe-a3(III), yielding a magnetic coupling that can explain the experimentally observed EPR silence.

  • 4.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Why is the reduction of NO in cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR) not electrogenic?2013In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1827, no 7, p. 826-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The membrane-bound enzyme cNOR (cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase) catalyzes the reduction of NO in a non-electrogenic process. This is in contrast to the reduction of O-2 in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), the other member of the heme-copper oxidase family, which stores energy by the generation of a membrane gradient. This difference between the two enzymes has not been understood, but it has been speculated to be of kinetic origin, since per electron the NO reduction is more exergonic than the O-2 reduction, and the energy should thus be enough for an electrogenic process. However, it has not been clear how and why electrogenicity, which mainly affects the thermodynamics, would slow down the very exergonic NO reduction. Quantum chemical calculations are used to construct a free energy profile for the catalytic reduction of NO in the active site of cNOR. The energy profile shows that the reduction of the NO molecules by the enzyme and the formation of N2O are very exergonic steps, making the rereduction of the enzyme endergonic and rate-limiting for the entire catalytic cycle. Therefore the NO reduction cannot be electrogenic, i.e. cannot take electrons and protons from the opposite sides of the membrane, since it would increase the endergonicity of the rereduction when the gradient is present, thereby increasing the rate-limiting barrier, and the reaction would become too slow. It also means that proton pumping coupled to electron transfer is not possible in cNOR In CcO the corresponding rereduction of the enzyme is very exergonic.

  • 5.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ädelroth, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The mechanism for oxygen reduction in cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR) as obtained from a combination of theoretical and experimental results2017In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1858, no 11, p. 884-894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial NO-reductases (NOR) belong to the heme-copper oxidase (HCuO) superfamily, in which most members are O-2-reducing, proton-pumping enzymes. This study is one in a series aiming to elucidate the reaction mechanisms of the HCuOs, including the mechanisms for cellular energy conservation. One approach towards this goal is to compare the mechanisms for the different types of HCuOs, cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) and NOR, reducing the two substrates O-2 and NO. Specifically in this study, we describe the mechanism for oxygen reduction in cytochrome c dependent NOR (cNOR). Hybrid density functional calculations were performed on large cluster models of the cNOR binuclear active site. Our results are used, together with published experimental information, to construct a free energy profile for the entire catalytic cycle. Although the overall reaction is quite exergonic, we show that during the reduction of molecular oxygen in cNOR, two of the reduction steps are endergonic with high barriers for proton uptake, which is in contrast to oxygen reduction in CcO, where all reduction steps are exergonic. This difference between the two enzymes is suggested to be important for their differing capabilities for energy conservation. An additional result from this study is that at least three of the four reduction steps are initiated by proton transfer to the active site, which is in contrast to CcO, where electrons always arrive before the protons to the active site. The roles of the non-heme metal ion and the redox-active tyrosine in the active site are also discussed.

  • 6.
    Brea, Oriana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mó, Otilia
    Yáñez, Manuel
    Merced Montero-Campillo, M.
    Alkorta, Ibon
    Elguero, José
    Are beryllium-containing biphenyl derivatives efficient anion sponges?2018In: Journal of Molecular Modeling, ISSN 1610-2940, E-ISSN 0948-5023, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structures and stabilities of 2,2'-diBeX-1,1'-biphenyl (X = H, F, Cl, CN) derivatives and their affinities for F-, Cl-, and CN- were theoretically investigated using a B3LYP/6-311 + G(3df, 2p)//B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) model. The results obtained show that the 2,2'-diBeX-1,1'-biphenyl derivatives (X = H, F, Cl, CN) exhibit very high F-, Cl-, and CN- affinities, albeit lower than those reported before for their 1,8-diBeX-naphthalene analogs, in spite of the fact that the biphenyl derivatives are more flexible than their naphthalene counterparts. Nevertheless, some of the biphenyl derivatives investigated are predicted to have anion affinities larger than those measured for SbF5, which is considered one of the strongest anion capturers. Therefore, although weaker than their naphthalene analogs, the 2,2'-diBeX-1,1'-biphenyl derivatives can still be considered powerful anion sponges. This study supports the idea that compounds containing -BeX groups in chelating positions behave as anion sponges due to the electron-deficient nature and consequently high intrinsic Lewis acidity of these groups.

  • 7.
    Covarrubias, Adrian Suarez
    et al.
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Högbom, Martin
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bergfors, Terese
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Carroll, Paul
    Institute for Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London.
    Mannerstedt, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Parish, Tanya
    Institute for Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London.
    Jones, T Alwyn
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Mowbray, Sherry L
    Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Biomedical Center, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Structural, biochemical, and in vivo investigations of the threonine synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.2008In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 381, no 3, p. 622-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Threonine biosynthesis is a general feature of prokaryotes, eukaryotic microorganisms, and higher plants. Since mammals lack the appropriate synthetic machinery, instead obtaining the amino acid through their diet, the pathway is a potential focus for the development of novel antibiotics, antifungal agents, and herbicides. Threonine synthase (TS), a pyridoxal-5-phosphate-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the final step in the pathway, in which L-homoserine phosphate and water are converted into threonine and inorganic phosphate. In the present publication, we report structural and functional studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis TS, the product of the rv1295 (thrC) gene. The structure gives new insights into the catalytic mechanism of TSs in general, specifically by suggesting the direct involvement of the phosphate moiety of the cofactor, rather than the inorganic phosphate product, in transferring a proton from C4' to C(gamma) in the formation of the alphabeta-unsaturated aldimine. It further provides a basis for understanding why this enzyme has a higher pH optimum than has been reported elsewhere for TSs and gives rise to the prediction that the equivalent enzyme from Thermus thermophilus will exhibit similar behavior. A deletion of the relevant gene generated a strain of M. tuberculosis that requires threonine for growth; such auxotrophic strains are frequently attenuated in vivo, indicating that TS is a potential drug target in this organism.

  • 8. Ertem, Mehmed Z.
    et al.
    Cramer, Christopher J.
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    N-O bond cleavage mechanism(s) in nitrous oxide reductase2012In: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0949-8257, E-ISSN 1432-1327, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 687-698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantum chemical calculations of active-site models of nitrous oxide reductase (N2OR) have been undertaken to elucidate the mechanism of N-O bond cleavage mediated by the supported tetranuclear Cu4S core (Cu-Z) found in the enzymatic active site. Using either a minimal model previously employed by Gorelsky et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128:278-290, 2006) or a more extended model including key residue side chains in the active-site second shell, we found two distinct mechanisms. In the first model, N2O binds to the fully reduced Cu-Z in a bent mu-(1,3)-O,N bridging fashion between the Cu-I and Cu-IV centers and subsequently extrudes N-2 while generating the corresponding bridged mu-oxo species. In the second model, substrate N2O binds loosely to one of the coppers of Cu-Z in a terminal fashion, i.e., using only the oxygen atom; loss of N-2 generates the same mu-oxo copper core. The free energies of activation predicted for these two alternative pathways are sufficiently close to one another that theory does not provide decisive support for one over the other, posing an interesting problem with respect to experiments that might be designed to distinguish between the two. Effects of nearby residues and active-site water molecules are also explored.

  • 9.
    Fontana, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Conde-Alvarez, Raquel
    Ståhle, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Holst, Otto
    Iriarte, Maite
    Zhao, Yun
    Arce-Gorvel, Vilma
    Hanniffy, Sean
    Gorvel, Jean-Pierre
    Moriyon, Ignacio
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Structural Studies of Lipopolysaccharide-defective Mutants from Brucella melitensis Identify a Core Oligosaccharide Critical in Virulence2016In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 291, no 14, p. 7727-7741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structures of the lipooligosaccharides from Brucella melitensis mutants affected in the WbkD and ManB(core) proteins have been fully characterized using NMR spectroscopy. The results revealed that disruption of wbkD gives rise to a rough lipopolysaccharide (R-LPS) with a complete core structure (beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 4)-alpha-Kdop-(2 -> 4)[beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 6)-beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 4)[beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 6)]-beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 3)-alpha-D-Manp-(1 -> 5)]-alpha-Kdop-(2 -> 6)-beta-D-GlcpN3N4P-(1 -> 6)-alpha-D-GlcpN3N1P), in addition to components lacking one of the terminal beta-D-GlcpN and/or the beta-D-Glcp residues (48 and 17%, respectively). These structures were identical to those of the R-LPS from B. melitensis EP, a strain simultaneously expressing both smooth and R-LPS, also studied herein. In contrast, disruption of man-B-core gives rise to a deep-rough pentasaccharide core (beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 4)-alpha-Kdop-(2 -> 4)-alpha-Kdop-(2 -> 6)-beta-D-GlcpN3N4P-(1 -> 6)-alpha-D-GlcpN3N1P) as the major component (63%), as well as a minor tetrasaccharide component lacking the terminal beta-D-Glcp residue (37%). These results are in agreement with the predicted functions of the WbkD (glycosyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of the O-antigen) and ManB(core) proteins (phosphomannomutase involved in the biosynthesis of a mannosyl precursor needed for the biosynthesis of the core and O-antigen). We also report that deletion of B. melitensis wadC removes the core oligosaccharide branch not linked to the O-antigen causing an increase in overall negative charge of the remaining LPS inner section. This is in agreement with the mannosyltransferase role predicted for WadC and the lack of GlcpN residues in the defective core oligosaccharide. Despite carrying the O-antigen essential in B. melitensis virulence, the core deficiency in the wadC mutant structure resulted in a more efficient detection by innate immunity and attenuation, proving the role of the beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 6)-beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 4)[beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 6)]-beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 3)-alpha-D-Manp-(1 -> 5) structure in virulence.

  • 10.
    Fontana, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kovacs, Helena
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates2014In: Journal of Biomolecular NMR, ISSN 0925-2738, E-ISSN 1573-5001, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 95-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of C-13-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly C-13-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-C-13)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight (C-13-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, similar to 10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The C-13 resonances are traced using C-13-C-13 correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the C-13 resonances, the H-1 chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond H-1-C-13 correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J (CC) splitting of the C-13 resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either C-13 or H-1 detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T-2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the H-1-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the C-13-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with N-15 at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and C-13-detected (H)CACO spectra.

  • 11.
    Fontana, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lundborg, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Weintraub, Andrej
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Structural studies and biosynthetic aspects of the o antigen polysaccharide from Escherichia coli o1742012In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 354, p. 102-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of the repeating unit of the O-antigenic polysaccharide (PS) from Escherichia coli O174 has been determined. Component analysis together with H-1 and C-13 NMR spectroscopy experiments were employed to elucidate the structure. Inter-residue correlations were determined by H-1, C-13-heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation and H-1, H-1-NOESY experiments. The PS is composed of tetrasaccharide repeating units with the following structure: -> 4)-beta-D-GlcpA-(1 -> 3)-beta-D-Galp-(1 -> 3)-beta-D-GalpNAc-(1 -> vertical bar beta-D-GlcpNAc-(1 -> 2) Cross-peaks of low intensity were present in the NMR spectra consistent with a beta-D-GlcpNAc-(1 -> 2)-beta-D-GlcpA(1 -> structural element at the terminal part of the polysaccharide, which on average is composed of similar to 15 repeating units. Consequently the biological repeating unit has a 3-substituted N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residue at its reducing end.

  • 12.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Jemth, Ann-Sofie
    Gustafsson, Nina M. S.
    Färnegårdh, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Loseva, Olga
    Wiita, Elisée
    Bonagas, Nadilly
    Dahllund, Leif
    Llona-Minguez, Sabin
    Häggblad, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Henriksson, Martin
    Andersson, Yasmin
    Homan, Evert
    Helleday, Thomas
    Stenmark, Pal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Crystal Structure of the Emerging Cancer Target MTHFD2 in Complex with a Substrate-Based Inhibitor2017In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 77, no 4, p. 937-948Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To sustain their proliferation, cancer cells become dependent on one-carbon metabolism to support purine and thymidylate synthesis. Indeed, one of the most highly upregulated enzymes during neoplastic transformation is MTHFD2, a mitochondrial methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase and cyclohydrolase involved in one-carbon metabolism. Because MTHFD2 is expressed normally only during embryonic development, it offers a disease-selective therapeutic target for eradicating cancer cells while sparing healthy cells. Here we report the synthesis and preclinical characterization of the first inhibitor of human MTHFD2. We also disclose the first crystal structure of MTHFD2 in complex with a substrate-based inhibitor and the enzyme cofactors NAD(+) and inorganic phosphate. Our work provides a rationale for continued development of a structural framework for the generation of potent and selective MTHFD2 inhibitors for cancer treatment.

  • 13. Kaderavek, Pavel
    et al.
    Zapletal, Vojtech
    Fiala, Radovan
    Srb, Pavel
    Padrta, Petr
    Precechtelova, Jana Pavlikova
    Soltesova, Maria
    Kowalewski, Jozef
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Chmelik, Josef
    Sklenar, Vladimir
    Zidek, Lukas
    Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for C-13 NMR relaxation studies2016In: Journal of magnetic resonance, ISSN 1090-7807, E-ISSN 1096-0856, Vol. 266, p. 23-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of N-15 relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to C-13 relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and C-13 frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly C-13-labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions.

  • 14. Kim, Seonghoon
    et al.
    Patel, Dhilon-S.
    Park, Soohyung
    Slusky, Joanna
    Klauda, Jeffery B.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Im, Wonpil
    Bilayer Properties of Lipid A from Various Gram-Negative Bacteria2016In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 111, no 8, p. 1750-1760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipid A is the lipid anchor of a lipopolysaccharide in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. In general, lipid A consists of two phosphorylated N-acetyl glucosamine and several acyl chains that are directly linked to the two sugars. Depending on the bacterial species and environments, the acyl chain number and length vary, and lipid A can be chemically modified with phosphoethanolamine, aminoarabinose, or glycine residues, which are key to bacterial pathogenesis. In this work, homogeneous lipid bilayers of 21 distinct lipid A types from 12 bacterial species are modeled and simulated to investigate the differences and similarities of their membrane properties. In addition, different neutralizing ion types (Ca2+, K+, and Na+) are considered to examine the ion's influence on the membrane properties. The trajectory analysis shows that (1) the area per lipid is mostly correlated to the acyl chain number, and the area per lipid increases as a function of the acyl chain number; (2) the hydrophobic thickness is mainly determined by the average acyl chain length with slight dependence on the acyl chain number, and the hydrophobic thickness generally increases with the average acyl chain length; (3) a good correlation is observed among the area per lipid, hydrophobic thickness, and acyl chain order; and (4) although the influence of neutralizing ion types on the area per lipid and hydrophobic thickness is minimal, Ca2+ stays longer on the membrane surface than K+ or Na+, consequently leading to lower lateral diffusion and a higher compressibility modulus, which agrees well with available experiments.

  • 15.
    Landström, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Persson, Karina
    Rademacher, Christoph
    Lundborg, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wakarchuk, Warren
    Peters, Thomas
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Small molecules containing hetero-bicyclic ring systems compete with UDP-Glc for binding to WaaG glycosyltransferase2012In: Glycoconjugate Journal, ISSN 0282-0080, E-ISSN 1573-4986, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 491-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The alpha-1,3-glucosyltransferase WaaG is involved in the synthesis of the core region of lipopolysaccharides in E. coli. A fragment-based screening for inhibitors of the WaaG glycosyltrasferase donor site has been performed using NMR spectroscopy. Docking simulations were performed for three of the compounds of the fragment library that had shown binding activity towards WaaG and yielded 3D models for the respective complexes. The three ligands share a hetero-bicyclic ring system as a common structural motif and they compete with UDP-Glc for binding. Interestingly, one of the compounds promoted binding of uridine to WaaG, as seen from STD NMR titrations, suggesting a different binding mode for this ligand. We propose these compounds as scaffolds for the design of selective high-affinity inhibitors of WaaG. Binding of natural substrates, enzymatic activity and donor substrate selectivity were also investigated by NMR spectroscopy. Molecular dynamics simulations of WaaG were carried out with and without bound UDP and revealed structural changes compared to the crystal structure and also variations in flexibility for some amino acid residues between the two WaaG systems studied.

  • 16.
    Larsson Birgander, Pernilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biology and Functional Genomics.
    Bug, Stefanie
    Sjöberg, Britt-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biology and Functional Genomics.
    Gordon, Euan
    Dahlroth, Sue-Li
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Kasrayan, Alex
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Westman, MariAnn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biology and Functional Genomics.
    Euan, Gordon
    Sjöberg, Britt-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biology and Functional Genomics.
    Nucleotide-dependent formation of catalytically competent dimers from engineered monomeric ribonucleotide reductase protein R12005In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 280, no 15, p. 14997-15003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Each catalytic turnover by aerobic ribonucleotide reductase requires the assembly of the two proteins, R1 (α2) and R2 (β2), to produce deoxyribonucleotides for DNA synthesis. The R2 protein forms a tight dimer, whereas the strength of the R1 dimer differs between organisms, being monomeric in mouse R1 and dimeric in Escherichia coli. We have used the known E. coli R1 structure as a framework for design of eight different mutations that affect the helices and proximal loops that comprise the dimer interaction area. Mutations in loop residues did not affect dimerization, whereas mutations in the helices had very drastic effects on the interaction resulting in monomeric proteins with very low or no activity. The monomeric N238A protein formed an interesting exception, because it unexpectedly was able to reduce ribonucleotides with a comparatively high capacity. Gel filtration studies revealed that N238A was able to dimerize when bound by both substrate and effector, a result in accordance with the monomeric R1 protein from mouse. The effects of the N238A mutation, fit well with the notion that E. coli protein R1 has a comparatively small dimer interaction surface in relation to its size, and the results illustrate the stabilization effects of substrates and effectors in the dimerization process. The identification of key residues in the dimerization process and the fact that there is little sequence identity between the interaction areas of the mammalian and the prokaryotic enzymes may be of importance in drug design, similar to the strategy used in treatment of HSV infection.

  • 17.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Huazhong University of Science & Technology, People's Republic of China.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mechanism for O-O bond formation in a biomimetic tetranuclear manganese cluster - A density functional theory study2015In: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology. B: Biology, ISSN 1011-1344, E-ISSN 1873-2682, Vol. 152, no Part A, p. 162-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to study the reaction mechanism of water oxidation catalyzed by a tetranuclear Mn-oxo cluster Mn4O4L6 (L = (C6H4)(2)PO4-). It is proposed that the O-O bond formation mechanism is different in the gas phase and in a water solution. In the gas phase, upon phosphate ligand dissociation triggered by light absorption, the O-O bond formation starting with both the Mn-4(III,III,IV,IV) and Mn-4(III,IV,IV,IV) oxidation states has to take place via direct coupling of two bridging oxo groups. The calculated barriers are 42.3 and 37.1 kcal/mol, respectively, and there is an endergonicity of more than 10 kcal/mol. Additional photons are needed to overcome these large barriers. In water solution, water binding to the two vacant sites of the Mn ions, again after phosphate dissociation triggered by light absorption, is thermodynamically and kinetically very favorable. The catalytic cycle is suggested to start from the Mn-4(III,III,III,IV) oxidation state. The removal of three electrons and three protons leads to the formation of a Mn-4(III,IV,IV,IV)-oxyl radical complex. The O-O bond formation then proceeds via a nucleophilic attack of water on the Mn-IV-oxyl radical assisted by a Mn-bound hydroxide that abstracts a proton during the attack. This step was calculated to be rate-limiting with a total barrier of 29.2 kcal/mol. This is followed by proton-coupled electron transfer, O-2 release, and water binding to start the next catalytic cycle.

  • 18.
    Lindberg, Bo G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Merritt, Eleanor A.
    Rayl, Melanie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Liu, Chenxiao
    Parmryd, Ingela
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Immunogenic and Antioxidant Effects of a Pathogen-Associated Prenyl Pyrophosphate in Anopheles gambiae2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 8, p. e73868-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite efficient vector transmission, Plasmodium parasites suffer great bottlenecks during their developmental stages within Anopheles mosquitoes. The outcome depends on a complex three-way interaction between host, parasite and gut bacteria. Although considerable progress has been made recently in deciphering Anopheles effector responses, little is currently known regarding the underlying microbial immune elicitors. An interesting candidate in this sense is the pathogen-derived prenyl pyrophosphate and designated phosphoantigen (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), found in Plasmodium and most eubacteria but not in higher eukaryotes. HMBPP is the most potent stimulant known of human V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells, a unique lymphocyte subset that expands during several infections including malaria. In this study, we show that V(Y)9V delta 2 T cells proliferate when stimulated with supernatants from intraerythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum cultures, suggesting that biologically relevant doses of phosphoantigens are excreted by the parasite. Next, we used Anopheles gambiae to investigate the immune-and redox-stimulating effects of HMBPP. We demonstrate a potent activation in vitro of all but one of the signaling pathways earlier implicated in the human V(Y)9V delta 2 T cell response, as p38, JNK and PI3K/Akt but not ERK were activated in the A. gambiae 4a3B cell line. Additionally, both HMBPP and the downstream endogenous metabolite isopentenyl pyrophosphate displayed antioxidant effects by promoting cellular tolerance to hydrogen peroxide challenge. When provided in the mosquito blood meal, HMBPP induced temporal changes in the expression of several immune genes. In contrast to meso-diaminopimelic acid containing peptidoglycan, HMBPP induced expression of dual oxidase and nitric oxide synthase, two key determinants of Plasmodium infection. Furthermore, temporal fluctuations in midgut bacterial numbers were observed. The multifaceted effects observed in this study indicates that HMBPP is an important elicitor in common for both Plasmodium and gut bacteria in the mosquito.

  • 19.
    Lundborg, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Fontana, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Automatic structure determination of regular polysaccharides based solely on NMR spectroscopy2011In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 3851-3855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structural analysis of polysaccharides requires that the sugar components and their absolute configurations are determined. We here show that this can be performed based on NMR spectroscopy by utilizing butanolysis with (+)- and (-)-2-butanol that gives the corresponding 2-butyl glycosides with characteristic 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts. The subsequent computer-assisted structural determination by CASPER can then be based solely on NMR data in a fully automatic way as shown and implemented herein. The method is additionally advantageous in that reference data only have to be prepared once and from a user's point of view only the unknown sample has to be derivatized for use in CASPER.

  • 20. Mally, Manuela
    et al.
    Fontana, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    LeibundGut-Landmann, Salome
    Laacisse, Lamia
    Fan, Yao-Yun
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Aebi, Markus
    Glycoengineering of host mimicking type-2 LacNAc polymersand Lewis X antigens on bacterial cell surfaces2013In: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 112-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial carbohydrate structures play a central role in mediating a variety of host-pathogen interactions. Glycans can either elicit protective immune response or lead to escape of immune surveillance by mimicking host structures. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component on the surface of Gram-negative bacteria, is composed of a lipid A-core and the O-antigen polysaccharide. Pathogens like Neisseria meningitidis expose a lipooligosaccharide (LOS), which outermost glycans mimick mammalian epitopes to avoid immune recognition. Lewis X (Gal beta 1-4(Fuc alpha 1-3)GlcNAc) antigens of Helicobacter pylori or of the helminth Schistosoma mansoni modulate the immune response by interacting with receptors on human dendritic cells. In a glycoengineering approach we generate human carbohydrate structures on the surface of recombinant Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium that lack O-antigen. A ubiquitous building block in mammalian N-linked protein glycans is Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc, referred to as a type-2 N-acetyllactosamine, LacNAc, sequence. Strains displaying polymeric LacNAc were generated by introducing a combination of glycosyltransferases that act on modified lipid A-cores, resulting in efficient expression of the carbohydrate epitope on bacterial cell surfaces. The poly-LacNAc scaffold was used as an acceptor for fucosylation leading to polymers of Lewis X antigens. We analysed the distribution of the carbohydrate epitopes by FACS, microscopy and ELISA and confirmed engineered LOS containing LacNAc and Lewis X repeats by MALDI-TOF and NMR analysis. Glycoengineered LOS induced pro-inflammatory response in murine dendritic cells. These bacterial strains can thus serve as tools to analyse the role of defined carbohydrate structures in different biological processes.

  • 21.
    Muheim, Claudio
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Bakali, Amin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Engström, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wieslander, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Daley, Daniel O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Identification of a Fragment-Based Scaffold that Inhibits the Glycosyltransferase WaaG from Escherichia coli2016In: Antibiotics, ISSN 0066-4774, E-ISSN 2079-6382, Vol. 5, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    WaaG is a glycosyltransferase that is involved in the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide in Gram-negative bacteria. Inhibitors of WaaG are highly sought after as they could be used to inhibit the biosynthesis of the core region of lipopolysaccharide, which would improve the uptake of antibiotics. Herein, we establish an activity assay for WaaG using C-14-labeled UDP-glucose and LPS purified from a increment waaG strain of Escherichia coli. We noted that addition of the lipids phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and cardiolipin (CL), as well as the detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) increased activity. We then use the assay to determine if three molecular scaffolds, which bind to WaaG, could inhibit its activity in vitro. We show that 4-(2-amino-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)phenol inhibits WaaG (IC50 1.0 mM), but that the other scaffolds do not. This study represents an important step towards an inhibitor of WaaG by fragment-based lead discovery.

  • 22. Patel, Dhilon S.
    et al.
    Park, Soohyung
    Wu, Emilia L.
    Yeom, Min Sun
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Klauda, Jeffery B.
    Im, Wonpil
    Influence of Ganglioside GM1 Concentration on Lipid Clustering and Membrane Properties and Curvature2016In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 111, no 9, p. 1987-1999Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gangliosides are a class of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) with amphiphilic character that are found at the outer leaflet of the cell membranes, where their ability to organize into special domains makes them vital cell membrane components. However, a molecular understanding of GSL-rich membranes in terms of their clustered organization, stability, and dynamics is still elusive. To gain molecular insight into the organization and dynamics of GSL-rich membranes, we performed all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations of bicomponent ganglioside GM1 in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) phospholipid bilayers with varying concentrations of GM1 (10%, 20%, and 30%). Overall, the simulations show very good agreement with available experimental data, including x-ray electron density profiles along the membrane normal, NMR carbohydrate proton-proton distances, and x-ray crystal structures. This validates the quality of our model systems for investigating GM1 clustering through an ordered-lipid-cluster analysis. The increase in GM1 concentration induces tighter lipid packing, driven mainly by inter-GM1 carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions, leading to a greater preference for the positive curvature of GM1-containing membranes and larger cluster sizes of ordered-lipid clusters (with a composite of GM1 and POPC). These clusters tend to segregate and forma large percolated cluster at a 30% GM1 concentration at 293 K. At a higher temperature of 330 K, however, the segregation is not maintained.

  • 23. Patel, Dhilon S.
    et al.
    Re, Suyong
    Wu, Emilia L.
    Qi, Yifei
    Klebba, Phillip E.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Yeom, Min Sun
    Sugita, Yuji
    Im, Wonpil
    Dynamics and Interactions of OmpF and LPS: Influence on Pore Accessibility and Ion Permeability2016In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 110, no 4, p. 930-938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The asymmetric outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is formed of the inner leaflet with phospholipids and the outer leaflet with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Outer membrane protein F (OmpF) is a trimeric porin responsible for the passive transport of small molecules across the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. Here, we report the impact of different levels of heterogeneity in LPS environments on the structure and dynamics of OmpF using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations provide insight into the flexibility and dynamics of LPS components that are highly dependent on local environments, with lipid A being the most rigid and O-antigen being the most flexible. Increased flexibility of O-antigen polysaccharides is observed in heterogeneous LPS systems, where the adjacent O-antigen repeating units are weakly interacting and thus more dynamic, compared to homogeneous LPS systems in which LPS interacts strongly with each other with limited overall flexibility due to dense packing. The model systems were validated by comparing molecular-level details of interactions between OmpF surface residues and LPS core sugars with experimental data, establishing the importance of LPS core oligosaccharides in shielding OmpF surface epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies. There are LPS environmental influences on the movement of bulk ions (K+ and Cl-), but the ion selectivity of OmpF is mainly affected by bulk ion concentration.

  • 24. Patton, Gregory C.
    et al.
    Stenmark, Pål
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.
    Sevastik, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kursula, Petri
    Flodin, Susanne
    Schuler, Herwig
    Swales, Colin T.
    Eklund, Hans
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nordlund, Par
    Hedstrom, Lizbeth
    Cofactor mobility determines reaction outcome in the IMPDH and GMPR (beta-alpha)(8) barrel enzymes2011In: Nature Chemical Biology, ISSN 1552-4450, E-ISSN 1552-4469, Vol. 7, no 12, p. 950-958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and guanosine monophosphate reductase (GMPR) belong to the same structural family, share a common set of catalytic residues and bind the same ligands. The structural and mechanistic features that determine reaction outcome in the IMPDH and GMPR family have not been identified. Here we show that the GMPR reaction uses the same intermediate E-XMP(star) as IMPDH, but in this reaction the intermediate reacts with ammonia instead of water. A single crystal structure of human GMPR type 2 with IMP and NADPH fortuitously captures three different states, each of which mimics a distinct step in the catalytic cycle of GMPR. The cofactor is found in two conformations: an 'in' conformation poised for hydride transfer and an 'out' conformation in which the cofactor is 6 angstrom from IMP. Mutagenesis along with substrate and cofactor analog experiments demonstrate that the out conformation is required for the deamination of GMP. Remarkably, the cofactor is part of the catalytic machinery that activates ammonia.

  • 25. Perepelov, Andrei V.
    et al.
    Shashkov, Alexander S.
    Guo, Xi
    Filatov, Andrei V.
    Weintraub, Andrej
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Knirel, Yuriy A.
    Structure and genetics of the O-antigen of Escherichia coli O169 related to the O-antigen of Shigella boydii type 62015In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 414, p. 46-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The O-polysaccharide (O-antigen) of Escherichia coli O169 was studied by sugar analysis along with 1D and 2D H-1 and C-13 NMR spectroscopy. The following structure of the branched hexasaccharide repeating unit was established: [GRAPHICS] The O-polysaccharide of E. coli O169 differs from that of Shigella boydii type 6 only in the presence of a side-chain glucose residue. A comparison of the O-antigen biosynthesis gene clusters between the galF to gnd genes in the genomes of the two bacteria revealed their close relationship. The glycosyltransferase gene responsible for the formation of the beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 6)-alpha-D-Galp linkage in the O-antigen was identified in the gene cluster.

  • 26. Perepelov, Andrei V.
    et al.
    Wang, Quan
    Filatov, Andrei V.
    Xia, Xianghong
    Shashkov, Alexander S.
    Weintraub, Andrej
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wang, Lei
    Knirel, Yuriy A.
    Structures and gene clusters of the closely related O-antigens of Escherichia coli O46 and O134, both containing D-glucuronoyl-D-allothreonine2015In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 409, p. 20-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The O-polysaccharides (O-antigens) were isolated by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Escherichia coli O46 and O134. The structures of their linear tetrasaccharide repeating units were established by sugar analysis along with 1D and 2D H-1 and C-13 NMR spectroscopy: [GRAPHICS] where D-aThr indicates D-allothreonine and R indicates O-acetyl substitution (similar to 70% on aThr and similar to 15% on GalNAc) in E. coli O46 whereas the O-acetylation is absent in E. coli O134. Functions of genes in the essentially identical O-antigen gene clusters of E. coli O46 and O134 were tentatively assigned by a comparison with sequences in available databases and found to be in agreement with the O-polysaccharide structures established.

  • 27.
    Popović-Bijelić, Ana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Kowol, Christian R.
    Lind, Maria E. S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Luo, Jinghui
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Enyedy, Éva A.
    Arion, Vladimir B.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ribonucleotide reductase inhibition by metal complexes of Triapine (3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone): A combined experimental and theoretical study2011In: European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-1948, E-ISSN 1099-1948, Vol. 105, no 11, p. 1422-1431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Triapine (3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone, 3-AP) is currently the most promising chemotherapeutic compound among the class of α-N-heterocyclic thiosemicarbazones. Here we report further insights into the mechanism(s) of anticancer drug activity and inhibition of mouse ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) by Triapine. In addition to the metal-free ligand, its iron(III), gallium(III), zinc(II) and copper(II) complexes were studied, aiming to correlate their cytotoxic activities with their effects on the diferric/tyrosyl radical center of the RNR enzyme in vitro. In this study we propose for the first time a potential specific binding pocket for Triapine on the surface of the mouse R2 RNR protein. In our mechanistic model, interaction with Triapine results in the labilization of the diferric center in the R2 protein. Subsequently the Triapine molecules act as iron chelators. In the absence of external reductants, and in presence of the mouse R2 RNR protein, catalytic amounts of the iron(III)–Triapine are reduced to the iron(II)–Triapine complex. In the presence of an external reductant (dithiothreitol), stoichiometric amounts of the potently reactive iron(II)–Triapine complex are formed. Formation of the iron(II)–Triapine complex, as the essential part of the reaction outcome, promotes further reactions with molecular oxygen, which give rise to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and thereby damage the RNR enzyme. Triapine affects the diferric center of the mouse R2 protein and, unlike hydroxyurea, is not a potent reductant, not likely to act directly on the tyrosyl radical.

  • 28. Shashkov, Alexander S.
    et al.
    Wang, Tianwei
    Perepelov, Andrei V.
    Weintraub, Andrej
    Liu, Bin
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Knirel, Yuriy A.
    Structure elucidation and biosynthesis gene cluster organization of the O-antigen of Escherichia coli O1702015In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 417, p. 11-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are causative agents of diarrhea in humans as well as animals, and E. coli O170 belongs to this virotype. Upon mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of E. coli O170, the branched O-polysaccharide chain was partially cleaved at beta-D-glactofuranosidic linkages to give multiple products, including a linear tetrasaccharide and oligomers thereof. Studies of the acid degradation products and O-deacylated lipopolysaccharide by 1D and 2D H-1 and C-13 NMR spectroscopy enabled elucidation of the following O-polysaccharide structure: -> 4)-beta-D-GlcpNAc-(1 -> 4)-beta-D-GlcpA-(1 -> 3)-beta-D-Galf-(1 -> 3)-beta-D-GlcNAc-(1 -> [GRAPHICS] beta-D-Galf Functions of genes in the O-antigen biosynthesis gene cluster were tentatively assigned and found to be in agreement with the O-polysaccharide structure.

  • 29.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mutations in the D-channel of cytochrome c oxidase causes leakage of the proton pump2014In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 588, no 4, p. 545-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has experimentally been found that certain mutations close to the entry point of the proton transfer channel in cytochrome c oxidase stop proton translocation but not the oxygen reduction chemistry. This effect is termed uncoupling. Since the mutations are 20 angstrom away from the catalytic center, this is very surprising. A new explanation for this phenomenon is suggested here, involving a local effect at the entry point of the proton channel, rather than the long range effects suggested earlier. (C) 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  • 30.
    Slättegård, Rikard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Teodorović, Peter
    Hadgu Kinfe, Henok
    Ravenscroft, Neil
    Gammon, David W.
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Synthesis of Structures Corresponding to the Capsular Polysaccharide of Neisseria meningitidis Group A2005In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 3, no 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

     

     

     

    Four differently substituted trimers of the CPS repeating unit have been synthesised in order to investigate the

    dependence on oligosaccharide size, acetylation and mode of phosphorylation of glycoconjugate vaccines against

    Neisseria meningitidis

     

    group A. A spacer-containing starting monomer, a H-phosphonate elongating monomer and a

    6-

     

    O

    -phosphorylated H-phosphonate cap monomer have been synthesised and coupled together to afford, after

    deprotection, the target trimer structures differing in their acetylation and phosphorylation substitution

    pattern.

  • 31. Thorsheim, Karin
    et al.
    Siegbahn, Anna
    Johnsson, Richard E.
    Stalbrand, Henrik
    Manner, Sophie
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ellervik, Ulf
    Chemistry of xylopyranosides2015In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 418, p. 65-88Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Xylose is one of the few monosaccharidic building blocks that are used by mammalian cells. In comparison with other monosaccharides, xylose is rather unusual and, so far, only found in two different mammalian structures, i.e. in the Notch receptor and as the linker between protein and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains in proteoglycans. Interestingly, simple soluble xylopyranosides can not only initiate the biosynthesis of soluble GAG chains but also function as inhibitors of important enzymes in the biosynthesis of proteoglycans. Furthermore, xylose is a major constituent of hemicellulosic xylans and thus one of the most abundant carbohydrates on Earth. Altogether, this has spurred a strong interest in xylose chemistry. The scope of this review is to describe synthesis of xylopyranosyl donors, as well as protective group chemistry, modifications, and conformational analysis of xylose.

  • 32. Wangsell, Fredrik
    et al.
    Nordeman, Patrik
    Savmarker, Jonas
    Emanuelsson, Rikard
    Jansson, Katarina
    Lindberg, Jimmy
    Rosenquist, Asa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Larhed, Mats
    Investigation of alpha-phenylnorstatine and alpha-benzylnorstatine as transition state isostere motifs in the search for new BACE-1 inhibitors2011In: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0968-0896, E-ISSN 1464-3391, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 145-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inhibition of the BACE-1 protease enzyme has over the recent decade developed into a promising drug strategy for Alzheimer therapy. In this report, more than 20 new BACE-1 protease inhibitors based on alpha-phenylnorstatine, alpha-benzylnorstatine, iso-serine, and beta-alanine moieties have been prepared. The inhibitors were synthesized by applying Fmoc solid phase methodology and evaluated for their inhibitory properties. The most potent inhibitor, tert-alcohol containing (R)-12 (IC(50) = 0.19 mu M) was co-crystallized in the active site of the BACE-1 protease, furnishing a novel binding mode in which the N-terminal amine makes a hydrogen bond to one of the catalytic aspartic acids.

  • 33. Wu, Emilia L.
    et al.
    Engström, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jo, Sunhwan
    Stuhlsatz, Danielle
    Yeom, Min Sun
    Klauda, Jeffery B.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Im, Wonpil
    Molecular Dynamics and NMR Spectroscopy Studies of E. coli Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Dynamics2013In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 105, no 6, p. 1444-1455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes, comprises three regions: lipid A, core oligosaccharide, and O-antigen polysaccharide. Using the CHARMM36 lipid and carbohydrate force fields, we have constructed a model of an Escherichia coil R1 (core) 06 (antigen) LPS molecule. Several all-atom bilayers are built and simulated with lipid A only (LIPA) and varying lengths of 0 (LPS0), 5 (LPS5), and 10 (LPS10) O6 antigen repeating units; a single unit of 06 antigen contains five sugar residues. From H-1,H-1-NOESY experiments, cross-relaxation rates are obtained from an O-antigen polysaccharide sample. Although some experimental deviations are due to spin-diffusion, the remaining effective proton-proton distances show generally very good agreement between NMR experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results show that increasing the LPS molecular length has an impact on LPS structure and dynamics and also on LPS bilayer properties. Terminal residues in a LPS bilayer are more flexible and extended along the membrane normal. As the core and O-antigen are added, per-lipid area increases and lipid bilayer order decreases. In addition, results from mixed LPS0/5 and LPS0/10 bilayer simulation's show that the LPS O-antigen conformations at a higher concentration of LPS5 and LPS10 are more orthogonal to the membrane and less flexible. The O-antigen concentration of mixed LPS bilayers does not have a significant effect on per-lipid area and hydrophobic thickness. Analysis of ion and water penetration shows that water molecules can penetrate inside the inner core region, and hydration is critical to maintain the integrity of the bilayer structure.

  • 34. Zovko, Ana
    et al.
    Novak, Metka
    Haag, Petra
    Kovalerchick, Dimitry
    Holmlund, Teresa
    Färnegårdh, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Ilan, Micha
    Carmeli, Shmuel
    Lewensohn, Rolf
    Viktorsson, Kristina
    Compounds from the marine sponge Cribrochalina vasculum offer a way to target IGF-1R mediated signaling in tumor cells2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 31, p. 50258-50276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work two acetylene alcohols, compound 1 and compound 2, which were isolated and identified from the sponge Cribrochalina vasculum, and which showed antitumor effects were further studied with respect to targets and action mechanisms. Gene expression analyses suggested insulin like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) signaling to be instrumental in controlling anti-tumor efficacy of these compounds in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Indeed compounds 1 and 2 inhibited phosphorylation of IGF-1R beta as well as reduced its target signaling molecules IRS-1 and PDK1 allowing inhibition of pro-survival signaling. In silico docking indicated that compound 1 binds to the kinase domain of IGF-1R at the same binding site as the well known tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1024. Indeed, cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA) confirmed that C. vasculum compound 1 binds to IGF-1R but not to the membrane localized tyrosine kinase receptor EGFR. Importantly, we demonstrate that compound 1 causes IGF-1R beta but not Insulin Receptor degradation specifically in tumor cells with no effects seen in normal diploid fibroblasts. Thus, these compounds hold potential as novel therapeutic agents targeting IGF-1R signaling for anti-tumor treatment.

1 - 34 of 34
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