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  • 1.
    Andersson, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Division of Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food, Box 7033, SE-750 50 Uppsala, Sweden; HELIX - Competence Centre, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden .
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. HELIX - Competence Centre, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden .
    Rydberg, A.
    Lean-inspired development work in agriculture: Implications for the work environment2020In: Agronomy Research, ISSN 1406-894X, E-ISSN 2228-4907, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 324-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Farmers operate in a turbulent environment that includes international competition, weather conditions and animal behaviour, for example, and is difficult for them to control. However, economy and productivity always have a high priority. As a consequence, farms have started to implement lean-inspired work systems. At the same time, health and safety are of urgent concern in the sector. This article explores how famers apply lean-inspired work processes. It identifies work environment changes during and after a lean implementation, as well as possible developments in the work environment following implementation of the lean philosophy. Data were collected from three groups: lean, lean-light and development-inclined reference farms (in total 54 farms), using a questionnaire and interviews. The results indicate that a majority of the lean farms were applying several lean principles and tools, and the lean philosophy. The lean-light farms applied parts of the lean concept, while the reference farms applied some of the more general tools, used in lean and elsewhere, such as visualisation in various forms and to various extents. The results showed positive effects of lean on the psychosocial work environment, better work structure and improved information, communication and co-operation. The physical work environment was improved to some extent by lean, where advantages such as a more structured and practical work environment with less physical movements and locomotion could be noticed. The lean concept provided a more structured and systematic approach to dealing with work and production environmental issues, for managers as well as for employees.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Karin
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Linköping University, Sweden.
    Eklund, J.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Linköping University, Sweden.
    Anna, Rydberg
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lean-inspired development work in agriculture: Implications for the work environment2020In: Agronomy Research, ISSN 1406-894X, E-ISSN 2228-4907, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 324-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Farmers operate in a turbulent environment that includes international competition, weather conditions and animal behaviour, for example, and is difficult for them to control. However, economy and productivity always have a high priority. As a consequence, farms have started to implement lean-inspired work systems. At the same time, health and safety are of urgent concern in the sector. This article explores how famers apply lean-inspired work processes. It identifies work environment changes during and after a lean implementation, as well as possible developments in the work environment following implementation of the lean philosophy. Data were collected from three groups: lean, lean-light and development-inclined reference farms (in total 54 farms), using a questionnaire and interviews. The results indicate that a majority of the lean farms were applying several lean principles and tools, and the lean philosophy. The lean-light farms applied parts of the lean concept, while the reference farms applied some of the more general tools, used in lean and elsewhere, such as visualisation in various forms and to various extents. The results showed positive effects of lean on the psychosocial work environment, better work structure and improved information, communication and co-operation. The physical work environment was improved to some extent by lean, where advantages such as a more structured and practical work environment with less physical movements and locomotion could be noticed. The lean concept provided a more structured and systematic approach to dealing with work and production environmental issues, for managers as well as for employees.

  • 3.
    Halvarsson Lundkvist, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindskog, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Ståhl, Jenny
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Andersson, Karin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Melin, Martin
    Management Martin Melin AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Barth, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping, Sweden.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Conditions Enabling Development in National Lean Programmes2016In: Leadership & Organization Development Journal, ISSN 0143-7739, E-ISSN 1472-5347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this article is to identify work practices and activities at programme and local levels which constitute conditions that enable development in workplace development programmes (WPDPs). These are introduced by public agencies as change agents that provide the resources for local organizational change. Design/methodology/approach – The study constituted separate interactive research projects in three WPDPs conducted through a total of 256 interviews and documentation from meetings. The findings were compared in a qualitative content analysis. Findings – The outcomes of development processes in the programmes and local Lean implementation are enabled by the interplay of three conditions: a) organized learning activities with the stakeholders involved, b) key stakeholders’ active ownership and c) support for employee participation. The three conditions thus support programme management in leading the programme development processes. Research limitations/implications - The findings operationalize broad theoretical concepts. However, the research projects involved were not originally designed for this comparative study, which created some difficulties when performing the analysis. The longitudinal design and vast amount of data partly compensate for this. Practical implications – This knowledge will be helpful in the formation of new WPDPs that support local organizational development and for those who lead such processes. Originality/value – The novelty of the findings is the operationalization of broad theoretical concepts, such as the conditions that support development programmes. Moreover, this article shows a set of work practices and activities that management may be used in organizing WPDPs.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Work environment, Lean and Agriculture2014In: PROCEEDINGS: 11th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organisational Design and Management & 46th Annual Nordic Ergonomics Society Conference: Volume I + II, IEA Press , 2014, p. 661-666Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean has become the predominant management concept in industry, but its effect on the work environment is debated. Lean has now reached farms and garden nurseries. This paper aims to identify consequences for the physical and psychosocial work environment when Lean was applied in micro-businesses in the agricultural sector. Observations, a questionnaire and interviews were used as methods. It was concluded that the psychosocial work environment became more structured and less stressful. The physical work environment was partly improved by less transportation on the farm. However, consideration of the physical work environment was insufficient.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Andersson, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lean Projects and Sustainability in the Swedish Agricultural Sector2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
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