Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Myrbeck, Åsa
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Salomon, Eva
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Bark, Linnea
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Deliverable 4.3 Assessment of effects of manure/pasture management on nitrogen and phosphorus losses2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The POWER project aimed to examine the effectiveness of innovations and best practise in achieving improved pig welfare in Europe. Free-range pasture systems for pigs support the organic principles of natural living, but intensive free-range production is characterized by high risks of nutrient losses, such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) leaching to surrounding water bodies and also ammonia (NH3) emissions. The scope of this grazing study, with housing pigs on pasture, was eight pig farms located in four countries: Austria, Denmark, Germany and Sweden. Collected farm data showed a large range in values, reflecting the diversity of pasture systems. Average animal density in paddocks per farm varied between 10 and 480 pigs per hectare, with a density in falling order as weaners>fatteners>sows. Vegetation in paddocks varied greatly between farms and also in paddocks within the same farm. Climate, animal density and soil type are important parameters influencing the risk of nutrient losses. Nutrient loads from faeces and urine in paddocks varied with animal density. The calculated loads were rather high in relation to fertilizing needs in crop production at some of the studied farms. This highlights the importance of having enough area for the pigs and/or to limit the period they are hold in the same paddock in order to apply nutrient loads balanced to subsequent crop or vegetation needs. With the highest N load registered in the study, pigs could be held in the paddock approximately one and a half month per year before exceeding the EU regulation of maximum application of 170 kg N per ha with animal manure.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Bark, Linnea
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Stress kopplat till larm och statistik från automatiska mjölkningssystem (AMS)2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Automatic milking systems (AMS), also called milking robots, have become more common and in 2018 one third of all dairy cows in Sweden was milked in AMS. Advantages with AMS is that it improves the physical working environment, it allows for more flexible working hours and it collects individual data of milk production, milk quality and animal health. The milking robot works day and night, and it is common with one robot serving the total herd. Since downtime in the robot can result in reduced production and animal welfare, the system is more vulnerable compared to a manual milking system. Therefore, there is an alarm system connected to the milking robot that informs the farmer whenever there is a stoppage in the robot. Previous studies on work environment in AMS have shown that the farmers experienced that psychological work environment had deteriorated due to the need for constant readiness to solve any stoppage. Furthermore, they also experienced an overflow of information from the robot that made it hard to overview. The aim of this study was to investigate how Swedish farmers and service technicians experience stress related to alarms and data from the milking robot and how the stress is prevented. In this study, interviews were performed with farmers that had AMS (n=6), farmers that have had AMS but changed over to manual milking (n=3) and service technicians. Beside the interviews the farmers also filled a questionnaire where they graded the experience of stress. The results show that the farmers that had AMS experienced little stress related to alarm and data, while farmers that had given up AMS experienced more stress. The farmers experienced that stress related to alarms could partly be prevented by having a lower number of cows per AMS and by having access to more than one milking unit. Stress related to being on call could be prevented by having access to a network of persons that could relief the farmer from the alarm, especially if the farmer easily gets stressed, experience a high alarm frequency, or have great need of time off work in periods. Farmers that have had AMS experienced more stress related to data compared to farmers that had AMS. However, the interviews did not result in concrete solution in how to prevent stress. The service technicians were in general content with their work, but the on-call service was a negative part of the work. It takes long time to get into the job and it is therefore necessary to have a functioning system where more experienced colleagues can support the less experienced.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Arvidsson Segerkvist, Katarina
    et al.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Brunsø, Karen
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Brønd Laursen, Klaus
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Cherono Schmidt Henriksen, Julie
    Økologisk Landsforening, Denmark.
    Elsmark, Jenny
    Svenskt Kött, Sweden.
    Esbjerg, Lars
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Hessle, Anna
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Holtz, Emma
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Karlsson, Anders H
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Lind, Ann-Kristina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Stenberg, Elin
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Strand, Theres
    Svenska Köttföretagen, Sweden.
    Tønning Tønnesen, Mathilde
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Bark, Linnea
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Åkesson, Ulrika
    Agroväst Livsmedel, Sweden.
    Consumer driven innovation towards improved beef and lamb meat quality: Partnership project summary2021Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Sindhøj, Erik
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Bark, Linnea
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Potential alternatives to high-concentration carbon dioxidestunning of pigs at slaughter2021In: Animal, ISSN 1751-7311, Vol. 15, no 3, article id 100164Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using carbon dioxide (CO2) for stunning pigs at slaughter is common in Europe. The use of group stunning is amajor advantagewith CO2,which is donewithout restraining the pigs and with minimized human contact. However,high concentrations of CO2 have been known for decades to cause pain, fear and distress in pigs before lossof consciousness, and the stunning method is clearly associated with animal welfare concerns. This studyreviewed the scientific literature to find recent developments or evaluations of alternative methods that couldlead to the replacement of CO2 for stunning pigs at slaughter. Potential alternative methods found in the literaturewere described and then assessed to identify specific research and development needs for their further development.Only 15 empirical studies were found in the search of peer-reviewed literature since 2004, which is lessthan one per year. Furthermore, half of the studies focused on evaluatingmethods to improve high-concentrationCO2 stunning rather than an alternative to CO2. Since no clear alternative has emerged, nor a method to improveCO2 stunning, there is obviously a strong need to focus research and development to find solutions for improvinganimal welfare when stunning pigs at slaughter.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Sindhoj et al 2021_Review stunning pigs_In press
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf