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  • 1.
    Hunka, Agnieszka D.
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Vanacore, Emanuela
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Medin, Ingrid
    Swedish Food Agency, Sweden.
    Gjona, Ermela
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Kautto, Arja Helena
    Swedish Food Agency, Sweden; SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Official Control in Slaughter and Game Handling: Expectations and Prerequisites for Implementation of Remote Meat Inspection in Sweden2024In: Journal of Food Protection, ISSN 0362-028X, E-ISSN 1944-9097, Vol. 87, no 1, article id 100196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remote meat inspection is currently not permitted under the European Union food control legislation. However, the environmental impact of travelling to and from abattoirs and increasing shortages of qualified veterinary staff make remote controls a potential future scenario. This paper reports the results of a qualitative study conducted with a sample of nineteen official veterinarians and food business operators in Sweden. We investigated attitudes, perceived risks, and prerequisites for remote meat controls in semi-structured interviews. Results indicate both positive attitudes towards remote meat inspection, and concerns related to technical challenges, reliability and security of data transfer, and possibilities of manipulation of the remote system. Respondents also noted both negative effects, such as physical hurdles for good control, and positive impacts on animal welfare, such as shortened waiting times for slaughter. Considering the current regulatory framework, only 21% of the respondents have had any prior experience with (pilot) remote meat inspections and the additional 11% carried out remote inspections of Food Chain Information documents. Nevertheless, all participants, including the majority without any prior experience in remote inspections, assumed that remote inspections would be done via video streaming. The optimal setting for a remote meat inspection, according to our respondents, seems to be a combination of cameras at fixed locations with body cameras worn by assisting abattoir personnel. Overall, remote meat inspections are possible to introduce but not without significant legal and technical adaptations as well as definition of the conditions for this type of control flexibility.

  • 2.
    Melkamu Daniel, Aemiro
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Hunka, Agnieszka D.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Vanacore, Emanuela
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Habibi, Shiva
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Medin, Ingrid
    Swedish Food Agency, Sweden.
    Kautto, Arja H.
    Swedish Food Agency, Sweden; SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Expert elicitation of remote meat inspection prerequisites in Sweden using best-worst scaling (case 1)2024In: Food Control, ISSN 0956-7135, E-ISSN 1873-7129, Vol. 162, article id 110460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remote work technologies offer unprecedented flexibility to modernise official meat inspection (MI). Remote meat inspections, alongside on-site controls have a potential to make MI more sustainable when it comes to working conditions, logistic control hurdles and travel-related emissions. Nevertheless, preferences of meat control staff for features and technological set up of remote MI remain unknown. The paper investigates preferences of official Swedish MI staff for different features of remote MI. The study utilises a quantitative method, namely best-worst scaling to compare the relative importance of six aspects of remote inspections: camera location and settings, connectivity, availability of personnel at abattoirs, communication and language, security and fraud prevention, and ability to relay olfaction and haptics. The survey, administered in September–October 2023 was answered by 54.7% of the Swedish meat control staff employed by the Swedish Food Agency. The results show that respondents rate security and fraud prevention (Security) as the most important aspect for remote MI followed by connectivity and camera placement (Camera). Communication and language (Communication) and ability to relay olfaction and haptics (Senses) are considered the least important aspects. The latter findings can be explained by the fact that Official Veterinarians, which represent the majority of respondents (49%), do not routinely communicate directly with slaughter personnel who are often seasonal workers coming from outside Sweden. Moreover, olfaction and haptics could be considered naturally impractical with remote technologies. The study also finds that respondents from different administrative units and job titles have different preferences for the features of remote MI. Respondents from the headquarter generally have higher preferences for connectivity than respondents from other units. Additionally, respondents with more hands-on experience in MI, such as Official Veterinarians, tend to rate security issues higher than respondents with leading or support roles. Overall, it seems possible to meet the control staff expectations and preferences regarding the prerequisites of remote MI by legal and technical adaptations needed for this type of control flexibility. © 2024 The Authors

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  • 3.
    Hunka, Agnieszka D.
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Habibi, Shiva
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    What drives demand for paid access to a sharing box with underused items?: A choice experiment with Swedish consumers2023In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 393, article id 135793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Determinants of consumer demand for subscription to a sharing platform for underused tools and hobby items were investigated in a series of choice experiments. The stated-preference study with a census-representative sample of 702 Swedish adults, tested four types of offers (sharing boxes) containing: gardening and power tools, photo and video equipment, kitchen and household tools and outdoor/sport equipment. Respondents faced hypothetical buying scenarios: they were asked to choose a subscription to a maintained and insured sharing box located in a public space and containing premium-segment items from one of the above categories. Results show that a possible location for a sharing box depends on its content - for instance, the sharing box with garden tools was preferred by small garden owners. It was also tested, in a demand simulation scenario, how measures aimed at managing utilisation of shared items, such as booking in advance, booking limits or location of the sharing box would affect the preference for the offer. Findings suggest that respondents would be willing to accept these inconveniences of sharing, provided the subscription price was set accordingly (25% lower than the average used across all experiments). Moreover, respondents seem to be using familiar digital subscriptions as a benchmark to determine a fair price for the offers used in the study. © 2022 The Author(s)

  • 4.
    Bour, Agathe
    et al.
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    Budde Christensen, Thomas
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    Hunka, Agnieszka D.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Palmqvist, Annemette
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    Skjold, Else
    Royal Danish Academy, Denmark.
    Syberg, Kristian
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    Implications of circular textile policies for the future regulation of hazardous substances in textiles in the European Union2023In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 896, article id 165153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The textile industry's business model is currently unsustainable and systemic changes must be made. The transition to a circular textile economy can be a major lever for this. However, it faces multiple issues, including the (in)ability of current legislations to provide sufficient protection regarding hazardous chemicals in recirculating materials. It is therefore crucial to identify legislative gaps that prevent the implementation of a safe circular textile economy, and to identify which chemicals could jeopardize this process. With this study, we aim to identify hazardous substances that could be found in recirculated textiles, to identify and discuss gaps in current regulations covering chemicals in textiles, and to suggest solutions to ensure better safety of circular textiles. We compile and analyze data on 715 chemicals and their associated functions, textile production stage, and hazard data. We also present how chemicals have been regulated over time and discuss regulations' strengths and weaknesses in the perspective of circular economy. We finally discuss the recently proposed Ecodesign regulation, and which key point should be included in the future delegated acts. We found that most of the compiled chemicals present at least one recognized or suspected hazard. Among them, there were 228 CMR (carcinogenic, mutagenic, reprotoxic substances), 25 endocrine disruptors, 322 skin allergens or sensitizers, and 51 respiratory allergens or sensitizers. 30 chemicals completely or partially lack hazard data. 41 chemicals were found to present a risk for consumers, among which 15 recognized or suspected CMR and 36 recognized or suspected allergens/sensitizers. Following the analysis of regulations, we argue that an improved risk assessment of chemicals should consider chemicals specific hazardous properties and product's multiple life cycles, instead of being limited to the product's end-of-life stage. We especially argue that implementing a safe circular textile economy requires that chemicals of concern are eliminated from the market.

  • 5.
    Hunka, Agnieszka D.
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Vanacore, Emanuela
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Mellquist, Ann-Charlotte
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Fuertes-Gine, Letitia
    University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    How to increase the uptake of circular public procurement?: Lessons learned from local authorities in Sweden2023In: Journal of Public Procurement, ISSN 1535-0118, E-ISSN 2150-6930, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 245-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Circular procurement is assumed to foster innovation and influence demand for and supply of goods through criteria setting and dialogue with suppliers. However, even in countries placed at the forefront of sustainability practices such as Sweden, examples of procurement that can truly be considered to be circular are rare. This paper aims to examine circular public procurement practices in a selection of Swedish municipalities and regions through the lens of the Advocacy Coalition Framework. The authors propose a categorisation of municipalities by circular procurement uptake and identify factors that support the acceleration of the circular transition in Sweden. Design/methodology/approach: Using the key informant approach, the authors conducted semi-structured interviews with employees of seven municipalities, one region and one external procurement agency, as well as seven suppliers of various sizes. The authors also analysed procurement documents received from municipalities. Participating organisations represented a variety of Swedish local government structures and local conditions. Findings: The authors proposed a categorisation of circular procurement uptake. Notably, beginners differ from leaders in circular procurement, most importantly by the level of flexibility policy brokers have within their organisations and by policy brokers’ ability to accommodate changes that materialise between existing organisational structures and set routines. Social implications: The fragmented uptake of circular procurement poses a challenge for local businesses interested in implementing circular business models. It also both highlights and exacerbates inequalities in access to resources between sparsely populated, rural municipalities and more urbanised areas. Originality/value: Despite existing national government guidelines for the circular economy transition in Sweden, circular procurement is not fully realised at the local level. In this paper, the authors examine the Swedish experience with circular procurement and propose several steps to improve the uptake of circular procurement by the public authorities. The authors' findings concerning the role of policy brokers may well be generalised to similar socio-cultural contexts.

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  • 6.
    Fuertes Giné, Leticia
    et al.
    University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Vanacore, Emanuela
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Hunka, Agnieszka D.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Public Procurement for the Circular Economy: a Comparative Study of Sweden and Spain2022In: Circular Economy and Sustainability, ISSN 2730-597X, E-ISSN 2730-5988, Vol. 2, p. 1021-1041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the relationship between circular economy and public procurement by regarding green procurement as an enabler for the transition from sustainable to circular public procurement. Considering the different green procurement uptakes under the common legal framework of the European Union, and particularly, the contrasting practice results of Spain and Sweden and the opposed legal configuration of their procurement Acts, a comparative law study of the exclusion of suppliers, awarding criteria and special conditions of performance’s Articles is conducted.

  • 7.
    Hunka, Agnieszka
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Can chemical regulation in the European union keep up with the evolution of the circular economy?2021In: Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management, ISSN 1551-3777, E-ISSN 1551-3793, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 1095-1097Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Boyer, Robert
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Hunka, Agnieszka
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Whalen, Katherine
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Consumer demand for circular products: Identifying customer segments in the circular economy2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 22, article id 12348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding consumer preferences in the circular economy can help producers develop profitable strategies, lowering the risk involved in transitioning to circular business models and circular product design. This study uses a choice experiment to identify customer segments for mobile phones and robot vacuum cleaners at different levels of circularity. The experiment observes how a product’s theoretical Circular Economy Score (ranging from 0 to 100) influences consumer preferences as compared to other product attributes like price, appearance, warranty, battery life, reseller type, or ease of repair. Drawing from 800 UK respondents, the results indicate the presence of three customer segments that are sensitive to a product’s Circular Economy Score, including two that appear willing to purchase recirculated items and one that expresses a preference against them. The results offer initial evidence that a market for recirculated consumer electronics exists and that circularity labeling is a marketable option. The results also present a strong rationale for further research that probes a greater variety of products and contexts. © 2021 by the authors

  • 9.
    Hunka, Agnieszka
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Linder, Marcus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Habibi, Shiva
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Determinants of consumer demand for circular economy products. A case for reuse and remanufacturing for sustainable development2021In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 535-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate determinants of consumer demand for circular (reused and remanufactured) products. Based on exploratory choice-based conjoint experiments with a sample of 800 adults in the United Kingdom, we examine two types of premium segment electronic appliances: a mobile phone and a robot vacuum cleaner. We find that consumers prefer partly circulated products over fully or not at all circulated products and that circular products can likely successfully enter the existing market at the retail price of a new product. Interestingly, circular products compete for market share primarily with new products, leaving the market share of second-hand options less affected. The results show a promising path for firms considering a transition to circular business models. © 2020 The Authors.

  • 10.
    Boyer, Robert
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Hunka, Agnieszka
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Linder, Marcus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Whalen, Katherine
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Habibi, Shiva
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Product Labels for the Circular Economy: Are Customers Willing to Pay for Circular?2021In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 27, p. 61-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While existing research has probed consumer responses to products of different recirculation pathways (recycling, reuse, refurbishment, etc), little work has examined consumer responses to an explicit “circular economy” product label or how willingness to pay is influenced by a continuum of circularity levels. This paper reports on the results of an online survey experiment that tests whether customers are willing to pay more for products with a theoretical multi-level Circular Economy score. Conjoint analysis was used on 800 respondents in the United Kingdom to test their willingness to pay for mobile phones and robot vacuum cleaners at different levels of circularity alongside other product attribute combinations. Results indicate that the average customer almost always prefers a more “circular” product when compared to products with otherwise identical attributes, and that customers are consistently willing to pay more for products with low or moderate levels of circular content. However, analysis suggests that willingness to pay more for products disappears, and in some cases declines, as the proportion of recirculated content increases. Results offer evidence that applying a numerical circular economy label at low levels of recirculated content could be a profitable strategy for producers of mobile phones and robot vacuum cleaners. Such a strategy is less certain for heavily refurbished products, fully reused products, or other product types. © 2020 The Authors

  • 11.
    Boyer, Robert
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Mellquist, Ann-Charlotte
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Williander, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Fallahi, Sara
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Nyström, Thomas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Linder, Marcus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Algurén, Peter
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Vanacore, Emanuela
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Hunka, Agnieszka
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Rex, Emma
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Whalen, Katherine
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Three-dimensional product circularity2021In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 824-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Understanding product circularity as ?three-dimensional? could anchor the Circular Economy to common principles while affording its followers flexibility about how to measure it in their specific sectors and disciplines and within their organization's means. Inspired by a heuristic developed for the urban planning profession to cope with the inherent conflicts of Sustainable Development, this article argues that measuring product-level circularity should consider ways to achieve (1) high material recirculation, (2) high utilization, and (3) high endurance in products and service offerings. Achieving all three dimensions ensures that material flowing through the economy is recovered from prior use phases, that it is used intensely, and that it retains its value in spite of exogenous changes. The article argues further that these three dimensions ought to be measured and reported separately rather than as a composite metric and that certain applications will have opportunities to improve circularity through certain dimensions better than others. The article also explains how researchers at RISE (Research Institutes of Sweden AB) are working with industry and government partners to measure the three dimensions and how diverse actors interested in the Circular Economy can use the three dimensions to take the first steps in their transition to circularity.

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  • 12.
    Pesch, Udo
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Huijts, Nicole
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Bombaerts, Gunter
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Doorn, Neelke
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Hunka, Agnieszka
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Creating ‘Local Publics’: Responsibility and Involvement in Decision-Making on Technologies with Local Impacts2020In: Science and Engineering Ethics, ISSN 1353-3452, E-ISSN 1471-5546, Vol. 26, p. 2215-2234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper makes a conceptual inquiry into the notion of ‘publics’, and forwards an understanding of this notion that allows more responsible forms of decision-making with regards to technologies that have localized impacts, such as wind parks, hydrogen stations or flood barriers. The outcome of this inquiry is that the acceptability of a decision is to be assessed by a plurality of ‘publics’, including that of a local community. Even though a plurality of ‘publics’ might create competing normative demands, its acknowledgment is necessary to withstand the monopolization of the process of technology appraisal. The paper presents four ways in which such an appropriation of publicness takes place. The creation of dedicated ‘local publics’, in contrast, helps to overcome these problems and allows for more responsible forms of decision-making. We describe ‘local publics’ as those in which stakeholders from the different publics that are related to the process of technology implementation are brought together, and in which concerns and issues from these publics are deliberated upon. The paper will present eight conditions for increasing the effectiveness of such ‘local publics’. © 2020, The Author(s).

  • 13.
    Linder, Marcus
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Boyer, Robert
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Dahllöf, Lisbeth
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Vanacore, Emanuela
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Hunka, Agnieszka
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Product-level inherent circularity and its relationship to environmental impact2020In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 260, article id 121096Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circular Economy scholarship has developed multiple metrics for assessing product-level circularity. To date, however, many product-level indicators either conflate circularity and environmental impact, or have been validated using a very limited sample of products. This study applies a single metric, “C”, to a sample of 18 products in the Swedish marketplace, and compares their C-scores with scores for lifecycle assessment (LCA). LCA scores for sample products are normalized by LCA scores of very similar reference products, allowing for comparison of LCAs across different product varieties. A test for correlation between products’ C-scores and LCA ratios reveals a strong, significant, and inverse association between levels of circularity and products’ relative environmental impact. The results offer evidence that products whose economic value is composed of relatively more recirculated material have a relatively low impact on the environment. Future research will benefit from applying similar tests to a broader variety of products and developing tools to expedite the accurate measurement of circularity and lifecycle impacts.

  • 14.
    Langan, Laura M.
    et al.
    University of Plymouth, School of Biological Sciences, Plymouth, United Kingdom.
    Cheng, Yuanyuan
    Suzhou University of Science and Technology, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Suzhou, Jiangsu, China.
    Hunka, Agnieszka D.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Empirically supported out-of-the-box strategies for science communication by environmental scientists2019In: Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management, ISSN 1551-3777, E-ISSN 1551-3793, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 499-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientists are expected to communicate their research to a wide audience, while often lacking appreciable training. Environmental science poses many value-laden and ethical questions. This necessitates the identification and use of specific strategies or guidelines, which encourage 2-way communication and enable trust in both the experts and the scientific results. The objective of this paper is to give environmental scientists tools for effective science communication based on sound scientific evidence that does not require further specialization in communication studies. Using common scientific search engines in Europe, scientific communication literature that met specific parameters was identified. The summarized data contextualize the importance of science communication in environmental sciences but also highlight the need of scientists for communication experts to aid in establishing objectives for particularly complex topics and audiences. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2019;15:499–504.. © 2019 SETAC

  • 15.
    Langan, Laura
    et al.
    University of Plymouth, UK.
    Cheng, Yuanyuan
    Suzhou University of Science and Technology, China.
    Hunka, Agnieszka
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, Viktoria. Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Empirically supported out-of-the-box strategies for science communication by environmental scientists2019In: Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management, ISSN 1551-3777, E-ISSN 1551-3793, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 499-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientists are expected to communicate their research to a wide audience, while often lacking appreciable training. Environmental science poses many value-laden and ethical questions. This necessitates the identification and use of specific strategies or guidelines, which encourage 2-way communication and enable trust in both the experts and the scientific results. The objective of this paper is to give environmental scientists tools for effective science communication based on sound scientific evidence that does not require further specialization in communication studies. Using common scientific search engines in Europe, scientific communication literature that met specific parameters was identified. The summarized data contextualize the importance of science communication in environmental sciences but also highlight the need of scientists for communication experts to aid in establishing objectives for particularly complex topics and audiences.

  • 16.
    Selck, Henriette
    et al.
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Adamsen, Peter B.
    Ramboll Environ, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Backhaus, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Banta, Gary T.
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Bruce, Peter K.H.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Burton Jr., G. Allen
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
    Butts, Michael B.
    DHI Group, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Boegh, Eva
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Clague, John J.
    Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.
    Dinh, Khuong V.
    Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Doorn, Neelke
    Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Gunnarsson, Jonas S.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Hazlerigg, Charles
    Enviresearch, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
    Hunka, Agnieszka D.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Jensen, John
    Aarhus University, Silkeborg, Denmark.
    Lin, Yan
    Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Oslo, Norway.
    Loureiro, Susana
    Department of Biology & CESAM, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal.
    Miraglia, Simona
    Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Munns Jr., Wayne R.
    US Environmental Protection Agency, Narragansett, Rhode Island, USA.
    Nadim, Farrokh
    Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo, Norway.
    Palmqvist, Annemette
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Rämö, Robert A.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Seaby, Lauren P.
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Syberg, Kristian
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Tangaa, Stine R.
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Thit, Amalie
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Windfeld, Ronja
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Zalewski, Maciej
    European Regional Centre for Ecohydrology (Polish Academy of Sciences), Lodz, Poland.
    Chapman, Peter M.
    Chapema Environmental Strategies, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
    Assessing and managing multiple risks in a changing world – The Roskilde recommendations2017In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 7-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Roskilde University (Denmark) hosted a November 2015 workshop, Environmental Risk—Assessing and Managing Multiple Risks in a Changing World. This Focus article presents the consensus recommendations of 30 attendees from 9 countries regarding implementation of a common currency (ecosystem services) for holistic environmental risk assessment and management; improvements to risk assessment and management in a complex, human-modified, and changing world; appropriate development of protection goals in a 2-stage process; dealing with societal issues; risk-management information needs; conducting risk assessment of risk management; and development of adaptive and flexible regulatory systems. The authors encourage both cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to address their 10 recommendations: 1) adopt ecosystem services as a common currency for risk assessment and management; 2) consider cumulative stressors (chemical and nonchemical) and determine which dominate to best manage and restore ecosystem services; 3) fully integrate risk managers and communities of interest into the risk-assessment process; 4) fully integrate risk assessors and communities of interest into the risk-management process; 5) consider socioeconomics and increased transparency in both risk assessment and risk management; 6) recognize the ethical rights of humans and ecosystems to an adequate level of protection; 7) determine relevant reference conditions and the proper ecological context for assessments in human-modified systems; 8) assess risks and benefits to humans and the ecosystem and consider unintended consequences of management actions; 9) avoid excessive conservatism or possible underprotection resulting from sole reliance on binary, numerical benchmarks; and 10) develop adaptive risk-management and regulatory goals based on ranges of uncertainty. © 2016 SETAC

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  • 17.
    Hunka, Agnieszka D.
    et al.
    Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark & Faculty of Behavioural Sciences, Department of Philosophy, 3TU.Ethics Centre, University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands.
    Meli, Mattia
    Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Palmqvist, Annemette
    Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Thorbek, Pernille
    Syngenta Jealott's Hill International Research Centre, Bracknell, United Kingdom .
    Forbes, Valery E
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, United States.
    Ecological risk assessment of pesticides in the EU: What factors and groups influence policy changes?2015In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 1165-1183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the last couple of years, European environmental risk assessment (ERA) regulations have undergone significant changes. The new 1107/2009 directive which came into effect in 2011 has triggered an on-going debate on defining specific protection goals for ERA. During this period, we conducted a study on policy change among the most influential ERA stakeholders from Europe. We interviewed 43, purposively sampled, participants from the European safety authorities, plant protection product industry and academia. Transcribed interviews underwent thematic analysis conducted separately by two coders. As we followed the advocacy coalition framework, our findings focus on stakeholders processes, interrelations and values behind the ERA policy change. The main challenges emerging from our analysis turned out to be the slow uptake of scientific developments into ERA and very broadly defined protection goals. The use of safety factors and cut-off criteria left risk assessors with many uncertainties. With ERA in its current form it turned out to be impossible to determine whether the current scheme is over- or under-protective. Still, the study shows that the problem of over- or under-protectiveness lies deep in the perception of stakeholders and depends greatly on their priorities. Academics strive for better ecological relevance as a priority. They have concerns that ERA is oversimplified. Regulators worry that ERA relies too much on risk mitigation and is possibly not protective enough, but at the same time, the majority believes that the assessment is well established and straightforward to follow. Industry representatives would like to see ERA based more on probabilistic risk assessment. Recent changes, according to risk assessment and management practitioners have led to an inevitable increase in complexity, which is not perceived as a positive thing, and does not necessarily translate into better risk assessment. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  • 18.
    Hunka, Agnieszka D.
    et al.
    University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands .
    Palmqvist, Annemette
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Forbes, Valery E
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, United States .
    Effective environmental risk communication—Success stories or urban legends?2015In: Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management, ISSN 1551-3777, E-ISSN 1551-3793, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 173-174Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Mälgand, Miina
    et al.
    Roskilde University, Department of Environmental Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde, Denmark .
    Bay-Mortensen, Nikolai
    Roskilde University, Department of Environmental Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde, Denmark .
    Bedkowska, Beata
    Roskilde University.
    Hansen, Frederik
    Roskilde University, Department of Environmental Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde, Denmark .
    Schow, Marco
    Roskilde University, Department of Environmental Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde, Denmark .
    Thomsen, Amalie
    Roskilde University, Department of Environmental Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde, Denmark .
    Hunka, Agnieszka D.
    Roskilde University, Department of Environmental Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde, Denmark & University of Twente, Faculty of Behavioural Sciences, Department of Philosophy, Enschede, Netherlands .
    Environmental awareness, the Transition Movement, and place: Den Selvforsynende Landsby, a Danish Transition initiative2014In: Geoforum, ISSN 0016-7185, E-ISSN 1872-9398, Vol. 57, p. 40-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Transition Movement, originating in Ireland and the United Kingdom, gathers and supports community-led actions to meet the global challenges of climate change, peak oil and energy descent. In our study we analysed a Transition Network project, a Danish village built from scratch by its inhabitants and named the Self Sufficient Village (SSV). Employing the theories of constructed landscapes and placeattachment, we studied how the Transition Movement ideology shaped the constructed landscape of thevillage and influenced the inhabitants' attachment. The research team, following the grounded theory approach, conducted a field study staying in SSV. We collected data with focus groups, individual interviews and participatory observations, taking part in daily life of the community. The analysis revealed three, intertwined themes which altogether create the constructed landscape of SSV. They were named Community, Ideology, and Individual impact, respectively. Our findings showed that the community and strong social ties were predominant factors in shaping place attachment. Transition ideology and environmental awareness, although less pronounced, still turned out to be vital for the feelings of belongingness and empowerment, resulting in a positive impact of the village on the local scale. Using our case study as an example we discuss the importance of environmental concern and place attachment for similar grass-root initiatives. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 20.
    Hunka, Agnieszka D.
    et al.
    Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Palmqvist, Annemette
    Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Thorbek, Pernille
    Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Forbes, Valery E
    Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Risk communication discourse among ecological risk assessment professionals and its implications for communication with nonexperts2013In: Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management, ISSN 1551-3777, E-ISSN 1551-3793, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 616-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Risk communication, especially to the general public and end users of plant protection products, is an important challenge. Currently, much of the risk communication the general public receives is via the popular press, and risk managers face the challenge of presenting their decisions and their scientific basis to the general public in an understandable way. Therefore, we decided to explore the obstacles in risk communication, as done by expert risk assessors and managers. Using the discourse analysis framework and readability tests, we studied perspectives of 3 stakeholder groups-regulators, industry representatives, and academics across Europe. We conducted 30 confidential interviews (10 participants in each group), with part of the interview guide focused on communication of pesticide risk to the general public and the ideas experts in the field of risk assessment and management hold of the public perception of pesticides. We used the key informant approach in recruiting our participants. They were first identified as key stakeholders in ecological risk assessment of pesticides and then sampled by means of a snowball sampling technique. In the analysis, first we identified main motifs (themes) in each group, and then we moved to studying length of the sentences and grammar and to uncovering discoursespresent in the text data. We also used the Flesch Reading Ease test to determine the comprehension difficulty of transcribed interviews. The test is commonly used as a standard for estimating the readability of technical documents. Our results highlight 3 main obstacles standing in the way of effective communication with wider audiences. First of all, ecological risk assessment as a highly technical procedure uses the specific language of ecological risk assessment, which is also highly specialized and might be difficult to comprehend by nonexperts. Second, the idea of existing "expert-lay discrepancy," a phenomenon described in risk perception studies is visibly present in the experts' opinions. Finally, the communicationflow among stakeholders was perceived as flawed, e.g., our participants did not consider themselves fully included in the communication process, despite taking part in many networks. Interestingly, both studies on the role of trust in risk perception, and research on links between daily choices and perceived risk, show that the public is more likely to rely on experts they can trust, than the experts in our study were inclined to think. © 2013 SETAC

  • 21.
    Hunka, Agnieszka D.
    et al.
    Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Meli, Mattia
    Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Thit, Amalie
    Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Palmqvist, Annemette
    Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Thorbek, Pernille
    Syngenta, Jealott's Hill International Research Centre, Bracknell, Berkshire, United Kingdom.
    Forbes, Valery E
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska Lincoln, United States.
    Stakeholders' Perspective on Ecological Modeling in Environmental Risk Assessment of Pesticides: Challenges and Opportunities2013In: Risk Analysis, ISSN 0272-4332, E-ISSN 1539-6924, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 68-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article closely examines the role of mechanistic effect models (e.g., population models) in the European environmental risk assessment (ERA) of pesticides. We studied perspectives of three stakeholder groups on population modeling in ERA of pesticides. Forty-three in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with stakeholders from regulatory authorities, industry, and academia all over Europe. The key informant approach was employed in recruiting our participants. They were first identified as key stakeholders in the field and then sampled by means of a purposive sampling, where each stakeholder identified as important by others was interviewed and asked to suggest another potential participant for our study. Our results show that participants, although having different institutional backgrounds often presented similar perspectives and concerns about modeling. Analysis of repeating ideas and keywords revealed that all stakeholders had very high and often contradicting expectations from models. Still, all three groups expected effect models to become integrated in future ERA of pesticides. Main hopes associated with effect models were to reduce the amount of expensive and complex testing and field monitoring, both at the product development stage, and as an aid to develop mitigation measures. Our analysis suggests that, although the needs of stakeholders often overlapped, subtle differences and lack of trust hinder the process of introducing mechanistic effect models into ERA. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  • 22.
    Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin
    et al.
    Aachen University.
    Hunka, Agnieszka D.
    Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Meli, Mattia
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Calow, Peter
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
    Bridging the Gap between Risk Perception and Ecotoxicology Research―How Can We Communicate to Improve Our Outreach?2013In: SETAC Globe, ISSN 2310-3086, Vol. 14, no 6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 22 of 22
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