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  • 1.
    Dobryden, Illia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Scanning probe microscopy studies of interaction forces between particles: emphasis on magnetite, bentonite and silica.2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM), such as the atomic force microscope (AFM), using colloidal probes is a highly suitable technique to probe single particle-particle interactions in aqueous solution. The interaction force between a colloidal probe on the AFM cantilever and sample surface is measured. Ultrasmall intermolecular and surface forces, down to the piconewton level, can reliably be measured under controlled experimental conditions with AFM. The interaction between magnetite, bentonite and silica particles plays an important role in many different applications. One important application is in the steel production process where high-quality iron ore pellets are used. Moreover, the interaction between magnetite nanoparticles with Ca2+ ions and with silica particles has high importance in several medical applications and for nanoelectronics. It is known and widely studied that particle surface properties significantly affect the particle dispersion and aggregation. Also, the particles are often treated in aqueous suspensions or in moist conditions prior to the final aggregation, for instance in a pelletizing processes. Thus, different dissolved chemical species may modify the magnetite, bentonite and silica surfaces, which causes the surface properties to change. However, the exact mechanism how the dissolved chemical species influence the direct particle-particle interaction and particle adhesion is not well known.The main focus of this thesis was the study of magnetite particle force interaction with natural and synthetic magnetite, silica and bentonite particles in aqueous solution with SPM. In addition, complimentary methods, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), vertical scanning interferometry (VSI), energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and electrophoresis techniques were used for surface morphology investigation, chemical characterization, determination of atomic structure and measurements of zeta-potential. The particle interaction forces were examined in solutions with various Ca2+ ion concentrations and in NaCl solution to determine the effect of Ca2+ ions on the surface properties. Also, the effect of pH at various concentrations was studied. The colloidal probes in the studies were natural magnetite and bentonite particles, micrometer-sized spherical silica particles. Sample surfaces were natural magnetite particles, smooth layers of synthetic magnetite nanoparticles and bentonite flakes.Qualitative changes in adhesion forces, i.e. interaction trends, and forces on approach for magnetite-magnetite, magnetite-silica, magnetite-bentonite and bentonite-silica interaction systems with an increase of Ca2+ ion concentration and pH were measured and evaluated. The interaction trends were consistent in most cases with zeta-potential measurements. Possible surface modification and formation of calcium silicates and calcium carbonates at pH 10 on the magnetite surfaces was discussed. The long-range repulsive interaction, similar to a steric-like interaction, was observed in the interactions for bentonite-silica and magnetite-silica systems, likely due to the swelling of bentonite layers and rising of bentonite flakes from the surface. The rising of bentonite flakes in water was verified with cryo-scanning electron microcopy investigation. Furthermore, the measured adhesion forces were compared with calculated adhesion forces, which were evaluated with the use of a few contact mechanics models. The comparison revealed discrepancies, which could be explained by the particle surface roughness. Additionally, a comparison of VSI and AFM techniques for surface characterization was performed on samples possessing sharp periodic surface structures and three stage plateaux honed cast iron surface. This comparison is of high relevance to the accurate calculation of tribological surface roughness parameters. Moreover, force measurements on biological samples and between magnetic particles are also briefly discussed in the thesis.The work within this thesis shows that SPM methods can be successfully applied to measure and predict forces between natural particles, such as magnetite and bentonite, in solution. The obtained and presented results are new and of high interest in applications where the knowledge of the dispersion and aggregation of studied particle interaction is important.

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  • 2.
    Dobryden, Illia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Surface characterization and force measurements applied to industrial materials with atomic force microscopy2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis focuses on the application of force measurements with atomic force microscopy (AFM) on materials with a few surface contacts/asperities and chemically modified surfaces. The technique allows measurements of ultra-small intermolecular and surface forces, down to the piconewton level. The force measurements between surfaces of well-defined geometry are often used to measure and model the interaction between different systems of charged and neutral surfaces in various environments. However, detailed knowledge of the contacting surface profile geometry and surface properties is required to model the fundamental forces involved in the interaction. The preparation of such well-defined and idealized surfaces is often time consuming and the surfaces may not possess the behavior and properties of a source material in real processes, such as in industry. Moreover, external factors such as magnetic fields, ionic strengths and pH-values in a solution, may further complicate the evaluation. Hence, it is desirable to explore and develop techniques for trustable measurements of forces between “real” surfaces. These are often a complex composition of various force interactions and multiple surface contacts.The AFM probe technique was explored to measure force interactions between “real” particle surfaces. The work shows the applicability of the AFM technique to study the interaction forces despite the forecasted difficulties with the roughness of the particles.A technique to measure the adhesion and work of adhesion from AFM force curves was implemented and used. The thermal tune method was implemented in our commercial NT-MDT microscope to determine cantilever spring constants. The force interactions between natural microsize (m-s) magnetite particles and synthetic nanosize (n-s) magnetite particles were studied in calcium solution with concentrations of 1, 10, 100 mM and at pH values 4, 6 and 10. The changes in force interactions, due to variations in calcium concentration and pH were investigated. The adhesion force change with the concentration and pH was similar for m-s/m-s and m-s/n-s systems, and the adhesion force increased with the concentration at pH 6, except for the highest calcium concentration of 100 mM at pH 10. It was found that the magnetite surface modification could appear at the highest calcium concentration at pH 10. Moreover, the thesis contains preliminary results of the force interaction study between natural and synthetic bentonite-magnetite particles in calcium solution with concentrations of 1, 10 and 100 mM at pH 6.The influence of roughness on the calculation of contact mechanics parameters were studied with AFM and Vertical Scanning Interferometry (VSI). This is important for future development of a model to describe and characterize the force interaction between samples with multiple surface contacts. It was found that the optical artifacts, induced by VSI, have a large influence on all the roughness parameters calculated on the calibration grids, which represent extreme surface topographies.

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  • 3.
    Wärnheim, Alexander
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Division Materials and Production, Department of Corrosion, Isafjordsgatan 28A, SE-164 40 Kista, Sweden.
    Kotov, Nikolay
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Department of Materials and Surface Design, Drottning Kristinas väg 61, SE-114 28 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Telaretti Leggieri, Rosella
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Edvinsson, Camilla
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Division Materials and Production, Department of Corrosion, Isafjordsgatan 28A, SE-164 40 Kista, Sweden.
    Heydari, Golrokh
    SSAB Europe, Isafjordsgatan 28A, SE-164 40 Kista, Sweden.
    Per-Erik, Sundell
    SSAB Europe, Isafjordsgatan 28A, SE-164 40 Kista, Sweden.
    Deltin, Tomas
    Nordic United Coatings, SE-252 25 Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Johnson, C. Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Persson, Dan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Division Materials and Production, Department of Corrosion, Isafjordsgatan 28A, SE-164 40 Kista, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Nanomechanical and nano-FTIR analysis of polyester coil coatings before and after artificial weathering experiments2024In: Progress in organic coatings, ISSN 0300-9440, E-ISSN 1873-331X, Vol. 190, article id 108355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Local heterogeneities can have significant effects on the performance of anti-corrosion coatings. Even small features can act as initiation points for damage and result in corrosion of the substrate material. Analysis methods with high spatial resolution and the ability to collect information relevant to crosslinking and degradation behavior of these coatings are therefore highly relevant. In this work, we demonstrate the utility of nanomechanical AFM measurements and nano-FTIR in investigating the nanoscale mechanical and chemical properties of two polyester coil coating clearcoats before and after weathering. On the nanoscale, weathering led to a stiffer and less deformable coating with less variation in the nanomechanical properties. Chemical degradation was quantified using changes in band ratios in the IR-spectra. Macro and nano-scale measurements showed similar trends with the latter measurements showing larger heterogeneity. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of the described analysis techniques and will pave the way for future studies of local properties in other coating systems and formulations.

  • 4.
    Wärnheim, Alexander
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Kotov, Nikolay
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Telaretti Leggieri, Rosella
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Edvinsson, Camilla
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion.
    Heydari, Golrokh
    SSAB, Sweden.
    Sundell, Per-Erik
    SSAB, Sweden.
    Deltin, Tomas
    Nordic United Coatings, Sweden.
    Johnson, C. Magnus
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Persson, Dan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nanomechanical and nano-FTIR analysis of polyester coil coatings before and after artificial weathering experiments2024In: Progress in organic coatings, ISSN 0300-9440, E-ISSN 1873-331X, Vol. 190, article id 108355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Local heterogeneities can have significant effects on the performance of anti-corrosion coatings. Even small features can act as initiation points for damage and result in corrosion of the substrate material. Analysis methods with high spatial resolution and the ability to collect information relevant to crosslinking and degradation behavior of these coatings are therefore highly relevant. In this work, we demonstrate the utility of nanomechanical AFM measurements and nano-FTIR in investigating the nanoscale mechanical and chemical properties of two polyester coil coating clearcoats before and after weathering. On the nanoscale, weathering led to a stiffer and less deformable coating with less variation in the nanomechanical properties. Chemical degradation was quantified using changes in band ratios in the IR-spectra. Macro and nano-scale measurements showed similar trends with the latter measurements showing larger heterogeneity. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of the described analysis techniques and will pave the way for future studies of local properties in other coating systems and formulations. © 2024 The Authors

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  • 5.
    Kaur, Jasreen
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kelpsiene, Egle
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Gupta, Govind
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Cedervall, Tommy
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Fadeel, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Label-free detection of polystyrene nanoparticles in Daphnia magna using Raman confocal mapping2023In: Nanoscale Advances, E-ISSN 2516-0230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Micro- and nanoplastic pollution has emerged as a global environmental problem. Moreover, plastic particles are of increasing concern for human health. However, the detection of so-called nanoplastics in relevant biological compartments remains a challenge. Here we show that Raman confocal spectroscopy-microscopy can be deployed for the non-invasive detection of amine-functionalized and carboxy-functionalized polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles (NPs) in Daphnia magna. The presence of PS NPs in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of D. magna was confirmed by using transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, we investigated the ability of NH2-PS NPs and COOH-PS NPs to disrupt the epithelial barrier of the GI tract using the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29. To this end, the cells were differentiated for 21 days and then exposed to PS NPs followed by cytotoxicity assessment and transepithelial electrical resistance measurements. A minor disruption of barrier integrity was noted for COOH-PS NPs, but not for the NH2-PS NPs, while no overt cytotoxicity was observed for both NPs. This study provides evidence of the feasibility of applying label-free approaches, i.e., confocal Raman mapping, to study PS NPs in a biological system. 

  • 6.
    Nguyen, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Optoelectronics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE United Kingdom.
    Kraft, Ulrike
    Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, PI-P, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany.
    Tan, Wen Liang
    Department of Material Science and Engineering, Monash University, Wellington Rd, Clayton, VIC, 3800 Australia.
    Dobryden, Illia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, Stockholm, SE-100 44 Sweden.
    Broch, Katharina
    Institut für Angewandte Physik, University of Tübingen, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz, 72074 Tübingen, Germany.
    Zhang, Weimin
    Physical Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, 4700 KAUST, Thuwal, 23955-6900 Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
    Un, Hio‐Ieng
    Optoelectronics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE United Kingdom.
    Simatos, Dimitrios
    Optoelectronics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE United Kingdom.
    Venkateshavaran, Deepak
    Optoelectronics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE United Kingdom.
    McCulloch, Iain
    Physical Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, 4700 KAUST, Thuwal, 23955-6900 Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Mansfield Rd, Oxford, OX1 3TA United Kingdom.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, Stockholm, SE-100 44 Sweden.
    McNeill, Christopher R.
    Department of Material Science and Engineering, Monash University, Wellington Rd, Clayton, VIC, 3800 Australia.
    Sirringhaus, Henning
    Optoelectronics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE United Kingdom.
    Improving OFF‐State Bias‐Stress Stability in High‐Mobility Conjugated Polymer Transistors with an Anti‐Solvent Treatment2023In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 35, no 16, article id 2205377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conjugated polymer field-effect transistors are emerging as an enabling technology for flexible electronics due to their excellent mechanical properties combined with sufficiently high charge carrier mobilities and compatibility with large-area, low-temperature processing. However, their electrical stability remains a concern. ON-state (accumulation mode) bias-stress instabilities in organic semiconductors have been widely studied, and multiple mitigation strategies have been suggested. In contrast, OFF-state (depletion mode) bias-stress instabilities remain poorly understood despite being crucial for many applications in which the transistors are held in their OFF-state for most of the time. Here, we present a simple method of using an anti-solvent treatment to achieve significant improvements in OFF-state bias-stress and environmental stability as well as general device performance for one of the best performing polymers, solution-processable indacenodithiophene-co-benzothiadiazole (IDT-BT). IDT-BT is weakly crystalline, and we attribute the notable improvements to an anti-solvent-induced, increased degree of crystallinity, resulting in a lower probability of electron trapping and the removal of charge traps. Our work highlights the importance of the microstructure in weakly crystalline polymer films and offers a simple processing strategy for achieving the reliability required for applications in flexible electronics.

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  • 7.
    Nguyen, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Optoelectronics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE, UK, J.J. Thomson Avenue.
    Kraft, Ulrike
    Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, PI-P, Ackermannweg 10, 55128, Mainz, Germany, PI-P, Ackermannweg 10.
    Tan, Wen Liang
    Department of Material Science and Engineering, Monash University, Wellington Rd, Clayton, Victoria, 3800, Australia, Wellington Rd.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Experimental Physics, Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, SE-971 87, Luleå, Sweden.
    Broch, Katharina
    Institut für Angewandte Physik, University of Tübingen, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz, 72074, Tübingen, Germany, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz.
    Zhang, Weimin
    Physical Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, 4700 KAUST, Thuwal, 23955-6900, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, 4700 KAUST.
    Un, Hio Ieng
    Optoelectronics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE, UK, J.J. Thomson Avenue.
    Simatos, Dimitrios
    Optoelectronics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE, UK, J.J. Thomson Avenue.
    Venkateshavaran, Deepak
    Optoelectronics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE, UK, J.J. Thomson Avenue.
    McCulloch, Iain
    Physical Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, 4700 KAUST, Thuwal, 23955-6900, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, 4700 KAUST; Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Mansfield Rd, Oxford, OX1 3TA, UK, Mansfield Rd.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    McNeill, Christopher R.
    Department of Material Science and Engineering, Monash University, Wellington Rd, Clayton, Victoria, 3800, Australia, Wellington Rd.
    Sirringhaus, Henning
    Optoelectronics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE, UK, J.J. Thomson Avenue.
    Improving OFF-State Bias-Stress Stability in High-Mobility Conjugated Polymer Transistors with an Antisolvent Treatment2023In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 35, no 16, article id 2205377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conjugated polymer field-effect transistors are emerging as an enabling technology for flexible electronics due to their excellent mechanical properties combined with sufficiently high charge-carrier mobilities and compatibility with large-area, low-temperature processing. However, their electrical stability remains a concern. ON-state (accumulation mode) bias-stress instabilities in organic semiconductors have been widely studied, and multiple mitigation strategies have been suggested. In contrast, OFF-state (depletion mode) bias-stress instabilities remain poorly understood despite being crucial for many applications in which the transistors are held in their OFF-state for most of the time. Here, a simple method of using an antisolvent treatment is presented to achieve significant improvements in OFF-state bias-stress and environmental stability as well as general device performance for one of the best performing polymers, solution-processable indacenodithiophene-co-benzothiadiazole (IDT-BT). IDT-BT is weakly crystalline, and the notable improvements to an antisolvent-induced, increased degree of crystallinity, resulting in a lower probability of electron trapping and the removal of charge traps is attributed. The work highlights the importance of the microstructure in weakly crystalline polymer films and offers a simple processing strategy for achieving the reliability required for applications in flexible electronics.

  • 8.
    Wallqvist, Viveca
    et al.
    RISE.
    Johansson, Kenth
    RISE.
    Wojas, Natalia Anna
    RISE.
    Hallstensson, Karin
    RISE.
    Stevanic Srndovic, Jasna
    RISE.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE.
    Beständighet för stötupptagande beläggningar2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Slutrapporten är framtagen med ekonomiskt stöd från Trafikverket Skyltfonden. Ståndpunkter, slutsatser och arbetsmetoder i rapporten reflekterar författaren och överensstämmer inte med nödvändighet med Trafikverkets ståndpunkter, slutsatser och arbetsmetoder inom rapportens ämnesområde.

    Sammanfattning

    Stötupptagande beläggningar har i tidigare forskningsprojekt anlagts på teststräckor i Uppsala och i Lund. Dessa olika teststräckor skiljer sig åt bl.a. i anläggningsmetod, bindemedel, ålder och gummihalt. Sträckan i Uppsala har varit på plats under flera säsonger medan sträckningen i Lund anlades 2020. I detta projekt har vi följt upp sträckningen i Uppsala och jämfört med sträckningen i Lund. Vi har med konfokal ramanmikroskopi, FTIR och AFM undersökt gummigranulatens morfologi baserat på de olika förbehandlingar som gjordes inom de olika anläggningsmetoderna. Resultaten påvisar tydliga skillnader mellan de olika komponenterna och förbehandlingsmetoderna. Med konfokal ramanmikroskopi har metod för I(D)/I(G), tillämpad för första gången på dessa materialtyper, påvisat skillnader mellan gummigranulat använda i Uppsala respektive i Lund. Trots mekanisk granulering för båda sorterna uppvisar gummigranulat använda i Lund något lägre I(D)/I(G) värden än de som använts i Uppsala, vilket också kan påvisas när granulaten ingår i gummi-bitumenbladningar och i asfalt. Jämförelse mellan rent bitumen och gummi-bitumenblandning visar att Uppsalabladningen för dessa mätningar uppvisar ett högre I(D)/I(G) värde för bitumen i blandningen än enskild komponent. För övriga blandningar är situationen den motsatta, med störst skillnad för Lundblandningen. Huruvida I(D)/I(G) för dessa material beskriver grad av oordning, huruvida minskad oordning har ett samband med hur molekylerna i bitumen blir orörliga, samt om detta bidrar till ett mindre beständigt material, kan inte säkerställas efter dessa explorativa mätningar, men det är en indikation som kan utforskas närmare i kommande projekt. FTIR på två tvärsnitt av gummi-bitumenblandning från Uppsalapiloten påvisade för ena tvärsnittet att bitumen återfinns ca 400 µm in i materialet från ytan, där också åldrat (devulkaniserat) gummi förekommer. För det andra tvärsnittet finns bitumen och åldrat gummi främst vid ytan, vilket styrker hypotes om att interaktionen mellan bitumen och gummi kan orsaka åldring i gummimaterial. Resultatet indikerar att förbehandling med delvis inträngning kan ge den goda beständighet som påvisats i Uppsalapiloten. Även AFM påvisar skillnader mellan granulatsorterna, där Uppsalagranulaten har lägre Ra, högre vidhäftning och lägre styvhet än Lundgranulaten. Förbehandlade granulat från Uppsalapiloten indikerar större förändring för två undersökta ytor av tre, där förbehandlingen ger ökad Ra, minskad vidhäftning och ökad styvhet. För Lundpiloten för en undersökt yta orsakade förbehandlingen däremot minskad Ra, ökad vidhäftning och ökad styvhet. Dessa skillnader styrker att förbehandling som påverkar delar av granulatytan kan ge den goda beständighet som påvisats i Uppsalapiloten samt att ytråhet och styvhet kan indikera utfall i färdigt material.  

     

    Sammanfattningsvis visar studien att mätningar med FTIR, konfokal ramanmikroskopi och AFM kan vara värdefulla komplement till standardmätningar när det gäller att förutsäga beständighet för asfalt med gummigranulat. 

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  • 9.
    Simatos, Dimitrios
    et al.
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Sirringhaus, Henning
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Effects of Processing-Induced Contamination on Organic Electronic Devices2023In: Small Methods, E-ISSN 2366-9608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic semiconductors are a family of pi-conjugated compounds used in many applications, such as displays, bioelectronics, and thermoelectrics. However, their susceptibility to processing-induced contamination is not well understood. Here, it is shown that many organic electronic devices reported so far may have been unintentionally contaminated, thus affecting their performance, water uptake, and thin film properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify contaminants originating from the glovebox atmosphere and common laboratory consumables used during device fabrication. Importantly, this in-depth understanding of the sources of contamination allows the establishment of clean fabrication protocols, and the fabrication of organic field effect transistors (OFETs) with improved performance and stability. This study highlights the role of unintentional contaminants in organic electronic devices, and demonstrates that certain stringent processing conditions need to be met to avoid scientific misinterpretation, ensure device reproducibility, and facilitate performance stability. The experimental procedures and conditions used herein are typical of those used by many groups in the field of solution-processed organic semiconductors. Therefore, the insights gained into the effects of contamination are likely to be broadly applicable to studies, not just of OFETs, but also of other devices based on these materials. © 2023 The Authors. 

  • 10.
    Mulla, Yusuf
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Isacsson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Sweden; Ahlstrom Group Innovation, France.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. Linköping University, Sweden; Ahlstrom Group Innovation, Sweden.
    Beni, Valerio
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Östmark, Emma
    Stora Enso AB, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Karl
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Edberg, Jesper
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Bio-Graphene Sensors for Monitoring Moisture Levels in Wood and Ambient Environment2023In: Global Challenges, E-ISSN 2056-6646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood is an inherently hygroscopic material which tends to absorb moisture from its surrounding. Moisture in wood is a determining factor for the quality of wood being employed in construction, since it causes weakening, deformation, rotting, and ultimately leading to failure of the structures resulting in costs to the economy, the environment, and to the safety of residents. Therefore, monitoring moisture in wood during the construction phase and after construction is vital for the future of smart and sustainable buildings. Employing bio-based materials for the construction of electronics is one way to mitigate the environmental impact of such electronics. Herein, a bio-graphene sensor for monitoring the moisture inside and around wooden surfaces is fabricated using laser-induced graphitization of a lignin-based ink precursor. The bio-graphene sensors are used to measure humidity in the range of 10% up to 90% at 25 °C. Using laser induced graphitization, conductor resistivity of 18.6 Ω sq−1 is obtained for spruce wood and 57.1 Ω sq−1 for pine wood. The sensitivity of sensors fabricated on spruce and pine wood is 2.6 and 0.74 MΩ per % RH. Surface morphology and degree of graphitization are investigated using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis methods. © 2023 The Authors. 

  • 11.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Montanari, Celine
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Bhattacharjya, DHRUBAJYOTI
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Aydin, Juhanes
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Ahniyaz, Anwar
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Bio-Based Binder Development for Lithium-Ion Batteries.2023In: Materials, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 16, no 16, article id 5553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of rechargeable lithium-ion battery (LIB) technology has facilitated the shift toward electric vehicles and grid storage solutions. This technology is currently undergoing significant development to meet industrial applications for portable electronics and provide our society with "greener" electricity. The large increase in LIB production following the growing demand from the automotive sector has led to the establishment of gigafactories worldwide, thus increasing the substantial consumption of fossil-based and non-sustainable materials, such as polyvinylidene fluoride and/or styrene-butadiene rubber as binders in cathode and anode formulations. Furthermore, the use of raw resources, such as Li, Ni, and Mn in cathode active materials and graphite and nanosilicon in anodes, necessitates further efforts to enhance battery efficiency. To foster a global sustainable transition in LIB manufacturing and reduce reliance on non-sustainable materials, the implementation of bio-based binder solutions for electrodes in LIBs is crucial. Bio-based binders such as cellulose, lignin, alginate, gums, starch, and others can address environmental concerns and can enhance LIBs' performance. This review aims to provide an overview of the current progress in the development and application of bio-based binders for LIB electrode manufacturing, highlighting their significance toward sustainable development.

  • 12.
    Al-Maqdasi, Zainab
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Dobryden, Illia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Almqvist, Nils
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Joffe, Roberts
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Apparent Elastic Modulus of Polyethylene and its Nanocomposites Measured at Different Scales2023In: ICCM 2023 - Proceedings of the 2023 23rd International Conference on Composite Materials / [ed] Brian G. Falzon; Conor McCarthy, Queen's University Belfast , 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Zhao, Wei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering, Solid-State Electronics. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Sugunan, Abhilash
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Gillgren, Thomas
    BillerudKorsnäs AB.
    Larsson, Johan A.
    BillerudKorsnäs AB.
    Zhang, Zhi-Bin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering, Solid-State Electronics.
    Zhang, Shi-Li
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering, Solid-State Electronics.
    Sommertune, Jens
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Ahniyaz, Anwar
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Surfactant-free starch-graphene composite films as simultaneous oxygen and water vapour barriers2022In: npj 2D Materials and Applications, ISSN 2397-7132, Vol. 6, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A single coating formulation for multi-functional composites, such as a gas barrier against both oxygen and water vapour, is the holy grail for the packaging industry. Since the last decade, graphene has been touted as the ideal barrier material in composites due to its morphology and impermeability to all gases. However, this prospect is limited by either poor dispersion of graphene or excess surfactants to aid the dispersion, both leading to shortcuts that allow gas permeation through the composite. Here, we demonstrate for the first time a combined gas barrier with starch-graphene composite films made from a single formulation of surfactant-free starch nanoparticle-stabilized graphene dispersion (2.97 mg mL-1). Hence, the incorporated graphene reduces the permeability of both the oxygen and the water vapour by over 70% under all the relative humidity conditions tested. Moreover, these films are foldable and electrically conductive (9.5 S m-1). Our surfactant-free approach of incorporating graphene into an industrially important biopolymer is highly relevant to the packaging industry, thus offering cost-effective and water-based solution depositions of multi-functional composite films for wide-ranging applications, such as gas barriers or smart food packaging.

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  • 14.
    Panchal, Vishal
    et al.
    Bruker UK, Banner Lane, Coventry CV4 9GH, UK.
    Dobryden, Illia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. KTH Royal Institute of Technology School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science Drottning Kristinas väg 51 Stockholm SE‐100 44 Sweden.
    Hangen, Ude D.
    Bruker Nano GmbH, Dennewartstrasse 25 52068, Aachen, Germany.
    Simatos, Dimitrios
    Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK.
    Spalek, Leszek J.
    Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK.
    Jacobs, Ian E.
    Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK.
    Schweicher, Guillaume
    Laboratoire de Chimie des Polymères, Faculté des Sciences Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Boulevard du Triomphe, Brussels 1050, Belgium.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, Stockholm SE‐100 44, Sweden.
    Venkateshvaran, Deepak
    Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK.
    Mechanical Properties of Organic Electronic Polymers on the Nanoscale2022In: Advanced Electronic Materials, E-ISSN 2199-160X, Vol. 8, no 3, article id 2101019Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic semiconducting polymers have attractive electronic, optical, and mechanical properties that make them materials of choice for large area flexible electronic devices. In these devices, the electronically active polymer components are micrometers in size, and sport negligible performance degradation upon bending the centimeter-scale flexible substrate onto which they are integrated. A closer look at the mechanical properties of the polymers, on the grain-scale and smaller, is not necessary in large area electronic applications. In emerging micromechanical and electromechanical applications where the organic polymer elements are flexed on length scales spanning their own micron-sized active areas, it becomes important to characterize the uniformity of their mechanical properties on the nanoscale. In this work, the authors use two precision nanomechanical characterization techniques, namely, atomic force microscope based PeakForce quantitative nanomechanical mapping (PF-QNM) and nanoindentation-based dynamical mechanical analysis (nano-DMA), to compare the modulus and the viscoelastic properties of organic polymers used routinely in organic electronics. They quantitatively demonstrate that the semiconducting near-amorphous organic polymer indacenodithiophene-co-benzothiadiazole (C16-IDTBT) has a higher carrier mobility, lower modulus, and greater nanoscale modulus areal uniformity compared to the semiconducting semicrystalline organic polymer poly[2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene] (C14-PBTTT). Modulus homogeneity appears intrinsic to C16-IDTBT but can be improved in C14-PBTTT upon chemical doping. 

  • 15. Panchal, V.
    et al.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Experimental Physics, Division of Materials Science Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, SE-971 87 Sweden.
    Hangen, U. D.
    Simatos, D.
    Spalek, L. J.
    Jacobs, I. E.
    Schweicher, G.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Venkateshvaran, D.
    Mechanical Properties of Organic Electronic Polymers on the Nanoscale2022In: Advanced Electronic Materials, E-ISSN 2199-160X, Vol. 8, no 3, article id 2101019Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic semiconducting polymers have attractive electronic, optical, and mechanical properties that make them materials of choice for large area flexible electronic devices. In these devices, the electronically active polymer components are micrometers in size, and sport negligible performance degradation upon bending the centimeter-scale flexible substrate onto which they are integrated. A closer look at the mechanical properties of the polymers, on the grain-scale and smaller, is not necessary in large area electronic applications. In emerging micromechanical and electromechanical applications where the organic polymer elements are flexed on length scales spanning their own micron-sized active areas, it becomes important to characterize the uniformity of their mechanical properties on the nanoscale. In this work, the authors use two precision nanomechanical characterization techniques, namely, atomic force microscope based PeakForce quantitative nanomechanical mapping (PF-QNM) and nanoindentation-based dynamical mechanical analysis (nano-DMA), to compare the modulus and the viscoelastic properties of organic polymers used routinely in organic electronics. They quantitatively demonstrate that the semiconducting near-amorphous organic polymer indacenodithiophene-co-benzothiadiazole (C16-IDTBT) has a higher carrier mobility, lower modulus, and greater nanoscale modulus areal uniformity compared to the semiconducting semicrystalline organic polymer poly[2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene] (C14-PBTTT). Modulus homogeneity appears intrinsic to C16-IDTBT but can be improved in C14-PBTTT upon chemical doping. 

  • 16.
    Kohan, Mojtaba Gilzad
    et al.
    Luleå Univ Technol, Dept Engn Sci & Math, Div Mat Sci, S-97187 Luleå, Sweden..
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Luleå Univ Technol, Dept Engn Sci & Math, Div Mat Sci, S-97187 Luleå, Sweden.
    Forchheimer, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics. Intermodulat Prod AB, S-82393 Segersta, Sweden..
    Concina, Isabella
    Luleå Univ Technol, Dept Engn Sci & Math, Div Mat Sci, S-97187 Luleå, Sweden..
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå Univ Technol, Dept Engn Sci & Math, Div Mat Sci, S-97187 Luleå, Sweden.;Ca Foscari Univ Venice, Dept Mol Sci & Nanosyst, Via Torino 155, I-30172 Venice, Mestre, Italy..
    In-depth photocarrier dynamics in a barrier variable iron-oxide and vertically aligned reduced-graphene oxide composite2022In: npj 2D Materials and Applications, ISSN 2397-7132, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key requirement for semiconductors operating in light-harvesting devices, is to efficiently convert the absorbed photons to electronic excitations while accommodating low loss pathways for the photogenerated carrier's transport. The quality of this process corresponds to different relaxation phenomena, yet primarily it corresponds to minimized thermalization of photoexcited carriers and maximum transfer of electron-hole pairs in the bulk of semiconductor. However, several semiconductors, while providing a suitable platform for light-harvesting applications, pose intrinsic low carrier diffusion length of photoexcited carriers. Here we report a system based on a vertical network of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) embedded in a thin-film structure of iron oxide semiconductor, intended to exploit fast electron transport in rGO to increase the photoexcited carrier transfer from the bulk of the semiconductor to rGO and then to the external circuit. Using intermodulation conductive force microscopy, we locally monitored the fluctuation of current output, which is the prime indication of successful charge transfer from photoexcited semiconductor to rGO and efficient charge collection from the bulk of the semiconductor. We reveal the fundamental properties of vertical rGO and semiconductor junction in light-harvesting systems that enable the design of new promising materials for broadband optical applications.

  • 17.
    Gilzad Kohan, Mojtaba
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Dobryden, Illia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Department of Chemistry, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forchheimer, Daniel
    Nanostructure Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 114 19, Stockholm, Sweden; Intermodulation Products AB, 823 93, Segersta, Sweden.
    Concina, Isabella
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Via Torino 155, 30172, Venezia, Mestre, Italy.
    In-depth photocarrier dynamics in a barrier variable iron-oxide and vertically aligned reduced-graphene oxide composite2022In: NPJ 2D MATERIALS AND APPLICATIONS, E-ISSN 2397-7132, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key requirement for semiconductors operating in light-harvesting devices, is to efficiently convert the absorbed photons to electronic excitations while accommodating low loss pathways for the photogenerated carrier’s transport. The quality of this process corresponds to different relaxation phenomena, yet primarily it corresponds to minimized thermalization of photoexcited carriers and maximum transfer of electron-hole pairs in the bulk of semiconductor. However, several semiconductors, while providing a suitable platform for light-harvesting applications, pose intrinsic low carrier diffusion length of photoexcited carriers. Here we report a system based on a vertical network of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) embedded in a thin-film structure of iron oxide semiconductor, intended to exploit fast electron transport in rGO to increase the photoexcited carrier transfer from the bulk of the semiconductor to rGO and then to the external circuit. Using intermodulation conductive force microscopy, we locally monitored the fluctuation of current output, which is the prime indication of successful charge transfer from photoexcited semiconductor to rGO and efficient charge collection from the bulk of the semiconductor. We reveal the fundamental properties of vertical rGO and semiconductor junction in light-harvesting systems that enable the design of new promising materials for broad-band optical applications.

  • 18.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Luleå Univ Technol, Dept Engn Sci & Math, Div Mat Sci, Expt Phys, SE-97187 Luleå, Sweden..
    Korolkov, Vladimir V.
    Pk Syst UK Ltd, MediCity Nottingham, Thane Rd, Nottingham NG90 6BH, England..
    Lemaur, Vincent
    Univ Mons, Lab Chem Novel Mat, Pl Parc 20, B-7000 Mons, Belgium..
    Waldrip, Matthew
    Wake Forest Univ, Dept Phys, Winston Salem, NC 27109 USA.;Wake Forest Univ, Ctr Funct Mat, Winston Salem, NC 27109 USA..
    Un, Hio-Ieng
    Univ Cambridge, Cavendish Lab, JJ Thomson Ave, Cambridge CB3 0HE, England..
    Simatos, Dimitrios
    Univ Cambridge, Cavendish Lab, JJ Thomson Ave, Cambridge CB3 0HE, England..
    Spalek, Leszek J.
    Univ Cambridge, Cavendish Lab, JJ Thomson Ave, Cambridge CB3 0HE, England..
    Jurchescu, Oana D.
    Wake Forest Univ, Dept Phys, Winston Salem, NC 27109 USA.;Wake Forest Univ, Ctr Funct Mat, Winston Salem, NC 27109 USA..
    Olivier, Yoann
    Univ Namur, Namur Inst Struct Matter, Lab Computat Modelling Funct Mat, Rue Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur, Belgium..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Venkateshvaran, Deepak
    Univ Cambridge, Cavendish Lab, JJ Thomson Ave, Cambridge CB3 0HE, England..
    Dynamic self-stabilization in the electronic and nanomechanical properties of an organic polymer semiconductor2022In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 3076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of organic electronics has profited from the discovery of new conjugated semiconducting polymers that have molecular backbones which exhibit resilience to conformational fluctuations, accompanied by charge carrier mobilities that routinely cross the 1 cm(2)/Vs benchmark. One such polymer is indacenodithiophene-co-benzothiadiazole. Previously understood to be lacking in microstructural order, we show here direct evidence of nanosized domains of high order in its thin films. We also demonstrate that its device-based high-performance electrical and thermoelectric properties are not intrinsic but undergo rapid stabilization following a burst of ambient air exposure. The polymer's nanomechanical properties equilibrate on longer timescales owing to an orthogonal mechanism; the gradual sweating-out of residual low molecular weight solvent molecules from its surface. We snapshot the quasistatic temporal evolution of the electrical, thermoelectric and nanomechanical properties of this prototypical organic semiconductor and investigate the subtleties which play on competing timescales. Our study documents the untold and often overlooked story of a polymer device's dynamic evolution toward stability. Organic polymer nanomechanics has been explored through precise nanometre-scale stiffness measurements in a high-mobility semiconducting polymer. Higher eigen-mode atomic force microscopy is used to measure nanomechnical variations in the film texture, as well as the nanoscale order in the material.

  • 19.
    Kretschmer, M.
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ceña-Diez, R.
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Butnarasu, C.
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Silveira, V.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Visentin, S.
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Berglund, P.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Sönnerborg, A.
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Lieleg, O.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Crouzier, Thomas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Yan, Hongji
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Synthetic Mucin Gels with Self-Healing Properties Augment Lubricity and Inhibit HIV-1 and HSV-2 Transmission2022In: Advanced Science, E-ISSN 2198-3844, Vol. 9, no 32, article id 2203898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mucus is a self-healing gel that lubricates the moist epithelium and provides protection against viruses by binding to viruses smaller than the gel's mesh size and removing them from the mucosal surface by active mucus turnover. As the primary nonaqueous components of mucus (≈0.2%–5%, wt/v), mucins are critical to this function because the dense arrangement of mucin glycans allows multivalence of binding. Following nature's example, bovine submaxillary mucins (BSMs) are assembled into “mucus-like” gels (5%, wt/v) by dynamic covalent crosslinking reactions. The gels exhibit transient liquefaction under high shear strain and immediate self-healing behavior. This study shows that these material properties are essential to provide lubricity. The gels efficiently reduce human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and genital herpes virus type 2 (HSV-2) infectivity for various types of cells. In contrast, simple mucin solutions, which lack the structural makeup, inhibit HIV-1 significantly less and do not inhibit HSV-2. Mechanistically, the prophylaxis of HIV-1 infection by BSM gels is found to be that the gels trap HIV-1 by binding to the envelope glycoprotein gp120 and suppress cytokine production during viral exposure. Therefore, the authors believe the gels are promising for further development as personal lubricants that can limit viral transmission. © 2022 The Authors. 

  • 20.
    Demidova, S. I.
    et al.
    Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Russia.
    Whitehouse, M. J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Merle, R.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nemchin, A. A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden; Curtin University, Australia.
    Kenny, G. G.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Brandstätter, F.
    Natural History Museum, Austria.
    Ntaflos, T.
    Vienna University, Austria.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    A micrometeorite from a stony asteroid identified in Luna 16 soil2022In: Nature Astronomy, E-ISSN 2397-3366, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 560-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the intense cratering history of the Moon, very few traces of meteoritic material have been identified in the more than 380 kg of samples returned to Earth by the Apollo and Luna missions. Here we show that an ~200-µm-sized fragment collected by the Luna 16 mission has extra-lunar origins and probably originates from an LL chondrite with similar properties to near-Earth stony asteroids. The fragment has not experienced temperatures higher than 400 °C since its protolith formed early in the history of the Solar System. It arrived on the Moon, either as a micrometeorite or as the result of the break-up of a bigger impact, no earlier than 3.4 Gyr ago and possibly around 1 Gyr ago, an age that would be consistent with impact ages inferred from basaltic fragments in the Luna 16 sample and of a known dynamic upheaval in the Flora asteroid family, which is thought to be the source of L and LL chondrite meteorites. These results highlight the importance of extra-lunar fragments in constraining the impact history of the Earth–Moon system and suggest that material from LL chondrite asteroids may be an important component. © 2022, The Author(s)

  • 21.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Department of Chemistry, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, SE-100 44, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Korolkov, Vladimir V.
    Park Systems UK Limited, MediCity Nottingham, Thane Road, NG90 6BH, Nottingham, UK.
    Lemaur, Vincent
    Laboratory for Chemistry of Novel Materials, University of Mons, Place du Parc 20, B-7000, Mons, Belgium.
    Waldrip, Matthew
    Department of Physics and Center for Functional Materials, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, 27109, USA.
    Un, Hio-Ieng
    Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, CB3 0HE, Cambridge, UK.
    Simatos, Dimitrios
    Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, CB3 0HE, Cambridge, UK.
    Spalek, Leszek J.
    Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, CB3 0HE, Cambridge, UK.
    Jurchescu, Oana D.
    Department of Physics and Center for Functional Materials, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, 27109, USA.
    Olivier, Yoann
    Laboratory for Computational Modelling of Functional Materials, Namur Institute of Structured Matter, Université de Namur, Rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000, Namur, Belgium.
    Claesson, Per M.
    Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Department of Chemistry, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, SE-100 44, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Venkateshvaran, Deepak
    Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, CB3 0HE, Cambridge, UK.
    Dynamic self-stabilization in the electronic and nanomechanical properties of an organic polymer semiconductor2022In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 3076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of organic electronics has profited from the discovery of new conjugated semiconducting polymers that have molecular backbones which exhibit resilience to conformational fluctuations, accompanied by charge carrier mobilities that routinely cross the 1 cm2/Vs benchmark. One such polymer is indacenodithiophene-co-benzothiadiazole. Previously understood to be lacking in microstructural order, we show here direct evidence of nanosized domains of high order in its thin films. We also demonstrate that its device-based high-performance electrical and thermoelectric properties are not intrinsic but undergo rapid stabilization following a burst of ambient air exposure. The polymer’s nanomechanical properties equilibrate on longer timescales owing to an orthogonal mechanism; the gradual sweating-out of residual low molecular weight solvent molecules from its surface. We snapshot the quasistatic temporal evolution of the electrical, thermoelectric and nanomechanical properties of this prototypical organic semiconductor and investigate the subtleties which play on competing timescales. Our study documents the untold and often overlooked story of a polymer device’s dynamic evolution toward stability.

  • 22.
    Zhao, Wei
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sugunan, Abhilash
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Gillgren, Thomas
    BillerudKorsnäs AB, Sweden.
    Larsson, Johan A
    BillerudKorsnäs AB,Sweden.
    Zhang, Zhi-Bin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Zhang, Shi-Li
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sommertune, Jens
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Ahniyaz, Anwar
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Surfactant-free starch-graphene composite films as simultaneous oxygen and water vapour barriers2022In: npj 2D Materials and Applications, ISSN 2397-7132, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A single coating formulation for multifunctional composites, such as a gas barrier against both oxygen and water vapour, is the holy grail for the packaging industry. Since the last decade, graphene has been touted as the ideal barrier material in composites due to its morphology and impermeability to all gases. However, this prospect is limited by either poor dispersion of graphene or excess surfactants to aid the dispersion, both leading to shortcuts that allow gas permeation through the composite. Here, we demonstrate a combined gas barrier with starch-graphene composite films made from a single formulation of surfactant-free starch nanoparticle-stabilized graphene dispersion (2.97 mg mL−1). Hence, the incorporated graphene reduces the permeability of both the oxygen and the water vapour by over 70% under all the relative humidity conditions tested. Moreover, these films are foldable and electrically conductive (9.5 S m−1). Our surfactant-free approach of incorporating graphene into an industrially important biopolymer is highly relevant to the packaging industry, thus offering cost-effective and water-based solution depositions of multifunctional composite films for wide-ranging applications, such as gas barriers in food packaging. © 2022, The Author(s).

  • 23.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Steponavičiu̅tė, Medeina
    Institute of Chemistry, Vilnius University, LT-03225 Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Hedman, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Ulsan 44919, Republic of Korea.
    Klimkevičius, Vaidas
    Institute of Chemistry, Vilnius University, LT-03225 Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Makuška, Ričardas
    Institute of Chemistry, Vilnius University, LT-03225 Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Dėdinaitė, Andra
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Engineering Pedagogics, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden; RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Division of Bioscience and Materials, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liu, Xiaoyan
    School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062, China.
    Corkery, Robert W.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per Martin
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Local Wear of Catechol-Containing Diblock Copolymer Layers: Wear Volume, Stick–Slip, and Nanomechanical Changes2021In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 125, no 38, p. 21277-21292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymers containing catechol groups have gained a large interest, as they mimic an essential feature of mussel adhesive proteins that allow strong binding to a large variety of surfaces under water. This feature has made this class of polymers interesting for surface modification purposes, as layer functionalities can be introduced by a simple adsorption process, where the catechol groups should provide a strong anchoring to the surface. In this work, we utilize an AFM-based method to evaluate the wear resistance of such polymer layers in water and compare it with that offered by electrostatically driven adsorption. We pay particular attention to two block copolymer systems where the anchoring group in one case is an uncharged catechol-containing block and in the other case a positively charged and catechol-containing block. The wear resistance is evaluated in terms of wear volume, and here, we compare with data for similar copolymers with statistical distribution of the catechol groups. Monitoring of nanomechanical properties provides an alternative way of illustrating the effect of wear, and we use modeling to show that the stiffness, as probed by an AFM tip, of the soft layer residing on a hard substrate increases as the thickness of the layer decreases. The stick–slip characteristics are also evaluated.

  • 24.
    Ishak, Mohd I.
    et al.
    Bristol Dental School, University of Bristol, Lower Maudlin Street, Bristol, BS1 2LY, UK. School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock's Close, Bristol BS8 1TS, UK. Faculty of Engineering Technology, Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), Perlis, Malaysia.
    Dobryden, Illia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per Martin
    School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Briscoe, Wuge H.
    School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock's Close, Bristol BS8 1TS, UK.
    Su, Bo
    Bristol Dental School, University of Bristol, Lower Maudlin Street, Bristol, BS1 2LY, UK.
    Friction at nanopillared polymer surfaces beyond Amontons’ laws: Stick-slip amplitude coefficient (SSAC) and multiparametric nanotribological properties2021In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 583, p. 414-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Frictional and nanomechanical properties of nanostructured polymer surfaces are important to their technological and biomedical applications. In this work, poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) surfaces with a periodic distribution of well-defined nanopillars were fabricated through an anodization/embossing process. The apparent surface energy of the nanopillared surfaces was evaluated using the Fowkes acid-base approach, and the surface morphology was characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). The normal and lateral forces between a silica microparticle and these surfaces were quantified using colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). The friction-load relationship followed Amonton’s first law, and the friction coefficient appeared to scale linearly with the nanopillar height. Furthermore, all the nanopillared surfaces showed pronounced frictional instabilities compared to the smooth sliding friction loop on the flat control. Performing the stick-slip amplitude coefficient (SSAC) analysis, we found a correlation between the frictional instabilities and the nanopillars density, pull-off force and work of adhesion. We have summarised the dependence of the nanotribological properties on such nanopillared surfaces on five relevant parameters, i.e. pull-off force fp, Amontons’ friction coefficient μ, RMS roughness Rq. stick-slip amplitude friction coefficient SSAC, and work of adhesion between the substrate and water Wadh in a radar chart. Whilst demonstrating the complexity of the frictional behaviour of nanopillared polymer surfaces, our results show that analyses of multiparametric nanotribological properties of nanostructured surfaces should go beyond classic Amontons’ laws, with the SSAC more representative of the frictional properties compared to the friction coefficient.

  • 25.
    Wojas, Natalia A.
    et al.
    Bioeconomy and Health Division, Department of Materials and Surface Design, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Box 5607, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Surface Chemistry and Corrosion Science, Department of Chemistry, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Division of Surface Chemistry and Corrosion Science, Department of Chemistry, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallqvist, Viveca
    Bioeconomy and Health Division, Department of Materials and Surface Design, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Box 5607, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Swerin, Agne
    Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences: Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Karlstad University, SE-651 88 Karlstad, Sweden.
    Järn, Mikael
    Bioeconomy and Health Division, Department of Materials and Surface Design, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Box 5607, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Schoelkopf, Joachim
    Omya International AG, Baslerstrasse 42, CH-4665 Oftringen, Switzerland.
    Gane, Patrick A. C.
    Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems, School of Chemical Engineering, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland.
    Claesson, Per M.
    Bioeconomy and Health Division, Department of Materials and Surface Design, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Box 5607, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Surface Chemistry and Corrosion Science, Department of Chemistry, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nanoscale Wear and Mechanical Properties of Calcite: Effects of Stearic Acid Modification and Water Vapor2021In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 37, no 32, p. 9826-9837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the wear of mineral fillers is crucial for controlling industrial processes, and in the present work, we examine the wear resistance and nanomechanical properties of bare calcite and stearic acid-modified calcite surfaces under dry and humid conditions at the nanoscale. Measurements under different loads allow us to probe the situation in the absence and presence of abrasive wear. The sliding motion is in general characterized by irregular stick-slip events that at higher loads lead to abrasion of the brittle calcite surface. Bare calcite is hydrophilic, and under humid conditions, a thin water layer is present on the surface. This water layer does not affect the friction force. However, it slightly decreases the wear depth and strongly influences the distribution of wear particles. In contrast, stearic acid-modified surfaces are hydrophobic. Nevertheless, humidity affects the wear characteristics by decreasing the binding strength of stearic acid at higher humidity. A complete monolayer coverage of calcite by stearic acid results in a significant reduction in wear but only a moderate reduction in friction forces at low humidity and no reduction at 75% relative humidity (RH). Thus, our data suggest that the wear reduction does not result from a lowering of the friction force but rather from an increased ductility of the surface region as offered by the stearic acid layer. An incomplete monolayer of stearic acid on the calcite surface provides no reduction in wear regardless of the RH investigated. Clearly, the wear properties of modified calcite surfaces depend crucially on the packing density of the surface modifier and also on the air humidity. 

  • 26.
    Li, Gen
    et al.
    Biotechnology and Health, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Varga, Imre
    Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmány P. s. 1/A, 1117 Budapest, Hungary; Department of Chemistry, University J. Selyeho, 945 01 Komarno, Slovakia.
    Kardos, Attila
    Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmány P. s. 1/A, 1117 Budapest, Hungary; Department of Chemistry, University J. Selyeho, 945 01 Komarno, Slovakia.
    Dobryden, Illia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Biotechnology and Health, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M.
    Biotechnology and Health, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Bioscience and Materials, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Box 5607, SE 114 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nanoscale Mechanical Properties of Core–Shell-like Poly-NIPAm Microgel Particles: Effect of Temperature and Cross-Linking Density2021In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 125, no 34, p. 9860-9869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly-NIPAm microgel particles with two different cross-linking densities were prepared with the classical batch polymerization process. These particles were adsorbed onto modified silica surfaces, and their nanomechanical properties were measured by means of atomic force microscopy. It was found that these particles have a hard core–soft shell structure both below and above the volume transition temperature. The core–shell-like structure appears due to a higher reaction rate of the cross-linker compared to that of the monomer, leading to depletion of cross-linker in the shell region. The microgel beads with lower average cross-linking density were found to be less stiff below the volume transition temperature than the microgel with higher cross-linking density. Increasing the temperature further to just above the volume transition temperature led to lower stiffness of the more highly cross-linked microgel compared to its less cross-linked counterpart. This effect is explained with the more gradual deswelling with temperature for the more cross-linked microgel particles. This phenomenon was confirmed by dynamic light scattering measurements in the bulk phase, which showed that the larger cross-linking density microgel showed a more gradual collapse in aqueous solution as the temperature was increased. 

  • 27.
    Li, Gen
    et al.
    School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Varga, Imre
    Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmány P. s. 1/A, 1117 Budapest, Hungary. Department of Chemistry, University J. Selyeho, 945 01 Komarno, Slovakia.
    Kardos, Attila
    Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmány P. s. 1/A, 1117 Budapest, Hungary. Department of Chemistry, University J. Selyeho, 945 01 Komarno, Slovakia.
    Dobryden, Illia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M.
    School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden. Division of Bioscience and Materials, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Box 5607, SE 114 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Temperature-Dependent Nanomechanical Properties of Adsorbed Poly-NIPAm Microgel Particles Immersed in Water2021In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 1902-1912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The temperature dependence of nanomechanical properties of adsorbed poly-NIPAm microgel particles prepared by a semibatch polymerization process was investigated in an aqueous environment via indentation-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. Poly-NIPAm microgel particles prepared by the classical batch process were also characterized for comparison. The local mechanical properties were measured between 26 and 35 °C, i.e., in the temperature range of the volume transition. Two different AFM tips with different shapes and end radii were utilized. The nanomechanical properties measured by the two kinds of tips showed a similar temperature dependence of the nanomechanical properties, but the actual values were found to depend on the size of the tip. The results suggest that the semibatch synthesis process results in the formation of more homogeneous microgel particles than the classical batch method. The methodological approach reported in this work is generally applicable to soft surface characterization in situ.

  • 28.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, Stockholm, SE‐100 44 Sweden.
    Yang, Zhijie
    Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry of MOE School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Shandong, China.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, Stockholm, SE‐100 44 Sweden. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Division of Bioscience and Materials, Box 5607, Stockholm, SE 114 86 Sweden.
    Paule Pileni, Marie
    Sorbonne Université, Chemistry Department, 4 Place Jussieu, Paris, 75005 France.
    Water Dispersive Suprastructures: An Organizational Impact on Nanomechanical Properties2021In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 8, no 3, article id 2001687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water dispersive 2D and 3D suprastructures offer a large number of potential applications in energy release, biomedicine and other fields. The nanomechanical properties of two suprastructures of self‐assembled 9.6 nm Fe3O4 hydrophobic nanocrystals dispersed in water are elucidated by using atomic force microscopy. These suprastructures are either a shell consisting of a few layers of nanocrystals or spherical self‐assemblies of nanocrystals in fcc superlattices called colloidosomes and supraballs, respectively. The major difference in the preparation of these suprastructure is based on the presence or not of octadecene molecules. It is recently demonstrated that these structures behave as nanoheaters and remain self‐assembled after internalization in cancer cells. The observed differences between these suprastructures in terms of cell sensing are suggested to be related to their mechanical properties, which emphasize the importance of better understanding the nanomechanics of such suprastructures. In this study the nanomechanical properties of these suprastructures are shown to be load‐depended in aqueous medium. Colloidosomes demonstrate higher flexibility and deformability than the supraballs. These findings provide essential knowledge for understanding differences in cell internalization and implementation in biomedicine. The differences in nanomechanical properties between these types of suprastructures are mainly due to their structures (hollow core–shell or fcc supracrystals).

  • 29.
    Oguzlu, Hale
    et al.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Edmonton, AB T6G 2H9, Canada..
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Liu, Xiaoyan
    Shaanxi Normal Univ, Sch Chem & Chem Engn, Key Lab Appl Surface & Colloid Chem, Minist Educ, Xian 710062, Peoples R China..
    Bhaduri, Swayamdipta
    Univ Alberta, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Edmonton, AB T6G 2H9, Canada..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Biosci & Mat, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Boluk, Yaman
    Univ Alberta, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Edmonton, AB T6G 2H9, Canada..
    Polymer Induced Gelation of Aqueous Suspensions of Cellulose Nanocrystals2021In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 3015-3024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the gelation of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) in polyelectrolyte and neutral polymer solutions. Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with half-ester sulfate groups produced by acid hydrolysis of wood pulp were used in this study. The microstructure of CNCs/polymer suspensions was investigated in semidilute concentration regimes by selecting carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC700) as an anionic polymer and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO600) as a neutral polymer solution. Together with quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), theology, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and cryotransmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), we characterized CNCs-polymer interactions, the suspension microstructure, and the macroscopic gel flow. Significant viscosity increases at low shear rates coupled with high shear-thinning behaviors were observed in CNC colloid-CMC700 polymer mixtures, but not those CNCs in PEO600 solutions. The apparent differences between CNCs-CMC700 and CNCs-PEO600 mixtures were due to their chain confirmations. On the basis of the evaluations from STEM, cryo-TEM, and polarized optical microscopy, we proposed that the excess CMC700 molecules in solutions result in the depletion of CNCs and the formation of anisotropic domains.

  • 30.
    Li, Gen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Varga, Imre
    Kardos, Attila
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Temperature-Dependent Nanomechanical Properties of Adsorbed Poly-NIPAm Microgel Particles Immersed in Water2021In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 1902-1912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The temperature dependence of nanomechanical properties of adsorbed poly-NIPAm microgel particles prepared by a semibatch polymerization process was investigated in an aqueous environment via indentation-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. Poly-NIPAm microgel particles prepared by the classical batch process were also characterized for comparison. The local mechanical properties were measured between 26 and 35 degrees C, i.e., in the temperature range of the volume transition. Two different AFM tips with different shapes and end radii were utilized. The nanomechanical properties measured by the two kinds of tips showed a similar temperature dependence of the nanomechanical properties, but the actual values were found to depend on the size of the tip. The results suggest that the semibatch synthesis process results in the formation of more homogeneous microgel particles than the classical batch method. The methodological approach reported in this work is generally applicable to soft surface characterization in situ.

  • 31.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Yang, Z.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Pileni, M. P.
    Water Dispersive Suprastructures: An Organizational Impact on Nanomechanical Properties2021In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 8, no 3, article id 2001687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water dispersive 2D and 3D suprastructures offer a large number of potential applications in energy release, biomedicine and other fields. The nanomechanical properties of two suprastructures of self-assembled 9.6 nm Fe3O4 hydrophobic nanocrystals dispersed in water are elucidated by using atomic force microscopy. These suprastructures are either a shell consisting of a few layers of nanocrystals or spherical self-assemblies of nanocrystals in fcc superlattices called colloidosomes and supraballs, respectively. The major difference in the preparation of these suprastructure is based on the presence or not of octadecene molecules. It is recently demonstrated that these structures behave as nanoheaters and remain self-assembled after internalization in cancer cells. The observed differences between these suprastructures in terms of cell sensing are suggested to be related to their mechanical properties, which emphasize the importance of better understanding the nanomechanics of such suprastructures. In this study the nanomechanical properties of these suprastructures are shown to be load-depended in aqueous medium. Colloidosomes demonstrate higher flexibility and deformability than the supraballs. These findings provide essential knowledge for understanding differences in cell internalization and implementation in biomedicine. The differences in nanomechanical properties between these types of suprastructures are mainly due to their structures (hollow core–shell or fcc supracrystals).

  • 32.
    Wojas, Natalia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Wallqvist, Viveca
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Bioecon & Hlth Div, Dept Mat & Surface Design, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Swerin, Agne
    Karlstad Univ, Fac Hlth Sci & Technol, Dept Engn & Chem Sci Chem Engn, SE-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Jarn, Mikael
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Bioecon & Hlth Div, Dept Mat & Surface Design, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Schoelkopf, Joachim
    Omya Int AG, CH-4665 Oftringen, Switzerland..
    Gane, Patrick A. C.
    Aalto Univ, Sch Chem Engn, Dept Bioprod & Biosyst, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Nanoscale Wear and Mechanical Properties of Calcite: Effects of Stearic Acid Modification and Water Vapor2021In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 37, no 32, p. 9826-9837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the wear of mineral fillers is crucial for controlling industrial processes, and in the present work, we examine the wear resistance and nanomechanical properties of bare calcite and stearic acid-modified calcite surfaces under dry and humid conditions at the nanoscale. Measurements under different loads allow us to probe the situation in the absence and presence of abrasive wear. The sliding motion is in general characterized by irregular stick-slip events that at higher loads lead to abrasion of the brittle calcite surface. Bare calcite is hydrophilic, and under humid conditions, a thin water layer is present on the surface. This water layer does not affect the friction force. However, it slightly decreases the wear depth and strongly influences the distribution of wear particles. In contrast, stearic acid-modified surfaces are hydrophobic. Nevertheless, humidity affects the wear characteristics by decreasing the binding strength of stearic acid at higher humidity. A complete monolayer coverage of calcite by stearic acid results in a significant reduction in wear but only a moderate reduction in friction forces at low humidity and no reduction at 75% relative humidity (RH). Thus, our data suggest that the wear reduction does not result from a lowering of the friction force but rather from an increased ductility of the surface region as offered by the stearic acid layer. An incomplete monolayer of stearic acid on the calcite surface provides no reduction in wear regardless of the RH investigated. Clearly, the wear properties of modified calcite surfaces depend crucially on the packing density of the surface modifier and also on the air humidity.

  • 33.
    Li, Gen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Varga, Imre
    Eotvos Lorand Univ, Inst Chem, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary.;Univ J Selyeho, Dept Chem, Komarno 94501, Slovakia..
    Kardos, Attila
    Eotvos Lorand Univ, Inst Chem, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary.;Univ J Selyeho, Dept Chem, Komarno 94501, Slovakia..
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Luleå Univ Technol, Div Mat Sci, Dept Engn Sci & Math, S-97187 Luleå, Sweden..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Biosci & Mat, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nanoscale Mechanical Properties of Core-Shell-like Poly-NIPAm Microgel Particles: Effect of Temperature and Cross-Linking Density2021In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 125, no 34, p. 9860-9869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly-NIPAm microgel particles with two different cross-linking densities were prepared with the classical batch polymerization process. These particles were adsorbed onto modified silica surfaces, and their nanomechanical properties were measured by means of atomic force microscopy. It was found that these particles have a hard core-soft shell structure both below and above the volume transition temperature. The core-shell-like structure appears due to a higher reaction rate of the cross-linker compared to that of the monomer, leading to depletion of cross-linker in the shell region. The microgel beads with lower average cross-linking density were found to be less stiff below the volume transition temperature than the microgel with higher crosslinking density. Increasing the temperature further to just above the volume transition temperature led to lower stiffness of the more highly cross-linked microgel compared to its less cross-linked counterpart. This effect is explained with the more gradual deswelling with temperature for the more cross-linked microgel particles. This phenomenon was confirmed by dynamic light scattering measurements in the bulk phase, which showed that the larger cross-linking density microgel showed a more gradual collapse in aqueous solution as the temperature was increased.

  • 34.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Yang, Zhijie
    Shandong University China.
    Claesson, Per M.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Pileni, Marie
    Sorbonne Université, France.
    Water Dispersive Suprastructures: An Organizational Impact on Nanomechanical Properties2021In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 8, no 3, article id 2001687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water dispersive 2D and 3D suprastructures offer a large number of potential applications in energy release, biomedicine and other fields. The nanomechanical properties of two suprastructures of self-assembled 9.6 nm Fe3O4 hydrophobic nanocrystals dispersed in water are elucidated by using atomic force microscopy. These suprastructures are either a shell consisting of a few layers of nanocrystals or spherical self-assemblies of nanocrystals in fcc superlattices called colloidosomes and supraballs, respectively. The major difference in the preparation of these suprastructure is based on the presence or not of octadecene molecules. It is recently demonstrated that these structures behave as nanoheaters and remain self-assembled after internalization in cancer cells. The observed differences between these suprastructures in terms of cell sensing are suggested to be related to their mechanical properties, which emphasize the importance of better understanding the nanomechanics of such suprastructures. In this study the nanomechanical properties of these suprastructures are shown to be load-depended in aqueous medium. Colloidosomes demonstrate higher flexibility and deformability than the supraballs. These findings provide essential knowledge for understanding differences in cell internalization and implementation in biomedicine. The differences in nanomechanical properties between these types of suprastructures are mainly due to their structures (hollow core–shell or fcc supracrystals). 

  • 35.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Steponavičiu̅tė, Medeina
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Hedman, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden; Institute for Basic Science, South Korea.
    Klimkevičius, Vaidas
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Makuška, Ricardas
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Dėdinaitė, Andra
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Liu, Xioayan
    Shaanxi Normal University, China.
    Corkery, Robert
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per Martin
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Local Wear of Catechol-Containing Diblock Copolymer Layers: Wear Volume, Stick-Slip, and Nanomechanical Changes2021In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 125, no 38, p. 21277-21292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymers containing catechol groups have gained a large interest, as they mimic an essential feature of mussel adhesive proteins that allow strong binding to a large variety of surfaces under water. This feature has made this class of polymers interesting for surface modification purposes, as layer functionalities can be introduced by a simple adsorption process, where the catechol groups should provide a strong anchoring to the surface. In this work, we utilize an AFM-based method to evaluate the wear resistance of such polymer layers in water and compare it with that offered by electrostatically driven adsorption. We pay particular attention to two block copolymer systems where the anchoring group in one case is an uncharged catechol-containing block and in the other case a positively charged and catechol-containing block. The wear resistance is evaluated in terms of wear volume, and here, we compare with data for similar copolymers with statistical distribution of the catechol groups. Monitoring of nanomechanical properties provides an alternative way of illustrating the effect of wear, and we use modeling to show that the stiffness, as probed by an AFM tip, of the soft layer residing on a hard substrate increases as the thickness of the layer decreases. The stick-slip characteristics are also evaluated. © 2021 The Authors. 

  • 36.
    Li, Gen
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Varga, Imre
    Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary; University J. Selyeho, Slovakia.
    Kardos, Atilla
    Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary; University J. Selyeho, Slovakia.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Luleå University of Technology, Luleå.
    Claesson, Per M.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Temperature-Dependent Nanomechanical Properties of Adsorbed Poly-NIPAm Microgel Particles Immersed in Water2021In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 1902-1912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The temperature dependence of nanomechanical properties of adsorbed poly-NIPAm microgel particles prepared by a semibatch polymerization process was investigated in an aqueous environment via indentation-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. Poly-NIPAm microgel particles prepared by the classical batch process were also characterized for comparison. The local mechanical properties were measured between 26 and 35 °C, i.e., in the temperature range of the volume transition. Two different AFM tips with different shapes and end radii were utilized. The nanomechanical properties measured by the two kinds of tips showed a similar temperature dependence of the nanomechanical properties, but the actual values were found to depend on the size of the tip. The results suggest that the semibatch synthesis process results in the formation of more homogeneous microgel particles than the classical batch method. The methodological approach reported in this work is generally applicable to soft surface characterization in situ.

  • 37.
    Li, Gen
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Varga, Imre
    Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary; University J. Selyeho, Slovakia.
    Kardos, Attila
    Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary; University J. Selyeho, Slovakia.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nanoscale Mechanical Properties of Core-Shell-like Poly-NIPAm Microgel Particles: Effect of Temperature and Cross-Linking Density.2021In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, J Phys Chem B, Vol. 125, no 34, p. 9860-9869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly-NIPAm microgel particles with two different cross-linking densities were prepared with the classical batch polymerization process. These particles were adsorbed onto modified silica surfaces, and their nanomechanical properties were measured by means of atomic force microscopy. It was found that these particles have a hard core-soft shell structure both below and above the volume transition temperature. The core-shell-like structure appears due to a higher reaction rate of the cross-linker compared to that of the monomer, leading to depletion of cross-linker in the shell region. The microgel beads with lower average cross-linking density were found to be less stiff below the volume transition temperature than the microgel with higher cross-linking density. Increasing the temperature further to just above the volume transition temperature led to lower stiffness of the more highly cross-linked microgel compared to its less cross-linked counterpart. This effect is explained with the more gradual deswelling with temperature for the more cross-linked microgel particles. This phenomenon was confirmed by dynamic light scattering measurements in the bulk phase, which showed that the larger cross-linking density microgel showed a more gradual collapse in aqueous solution as the temperature was increased.

  • 38.
    Wojas, Natalia
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Wallqvist, Viveca
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Swerin, Agne
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Järn, Mikael
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Schoelkopf, Joachim
    Omya International AG, Switzerland.
    Gane, Patrick A C
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Claesson, Per M
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nanoscale Wear and Mechanical Properties of Calcite: Effects of Stearic Acid Modification and Water Vapor2021In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 37, no 32, p. 9826-9837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the wear of mineral fillers is crucial for controlling industrial processes, and in the present work, we examine the wear resistance and nanomech. properties of bare calcite and stearic acid-modified calcite surfaces under dry and humid conditions at the nanoscale. Measurements under different loads allow us to probe the situation in the absence and presence of abrasive wear. The sliding motion is in general characterized by irregular stick-slip events that at higher loads lead to abrasion of the brittle calcite surface. Bare calcite is hydrophilic, and under humid conditions, a thin water layer is present on the surface. This water layer does not affect the friction force. However, it slightly decreases the wear depth and strongly influences the distribution of wear particles. In contrast, stearic acid-modified surfaces are hydrophobic. Nevertheless, humidity affects the wear characteristics by decreasing the binding strength of stearic acid at higher humidity. A complete monolayer coverage of calcite by stearic acid results in a significant reduction in wear but only a moderate reduction in friction forces at low humidity and no reduction at 75% relative humidity (RH). Thus, our data suggest that the wear reduction does not result from a lowering of the friction force but rather from an increased ductility of the surface region as offered by the stearic acid layer. An incomplete monolayer of stearic acid on the calcite surface provides no reduction in wear regardless of the RH investigated. Clearly, the wear properties of modified calcite surfaces depend crucially on the packing d. of the surface modifier and also on the air humidity.

  • 39.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Department of Chemistry, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden; .
    Borgani, Riccardo
    Nanostructure Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rigoni, Federica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Venezia Mestre, Italy.
    Ghamgosar, Pedram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Concina, Isabella
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Almqvist, Nils
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Venezia Mestre, Italy.
    Nanoscale characterization of an all-oxide core-shell nanorod heterojunction using intermodulation atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods2021In: Nanoscale Advances, E-ISSN 2516-0230, Vol. 3, no 15, p. 4388-4394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The electrical properties of an all-oxide core–shell ZnO–Co3O4 nanorod heterojunction were studied in the dark and under UV-vis illumination. The contact potential difference and current distribution maps were obtained utilizing new methods in dynamic multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM) such as electrostatic and conductive intermodulation AFM. Light irradiation modified the electrical properties of the nanorod heterojunction. The new techniques are able to follow the instantaneous local variation of the photocurrent, giving a two-dimensional (2D) map of the current–voltage curves and correlating the electrical and morphological features of the heterostructured core–shell nanorods.

  • 40.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden .
    Borgani, Riccardo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Rigoni, Federica
    Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden; Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Venezia Mestre, Italy .
    Ghamgosar, Pedram
    Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden .
    Concina, Isabella
    Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden .
    Almqvist, Nils
    Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden .
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden ;Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Venezia Mestre, Italy. .
    Nanoscale characterization of an all-oxide core-shell nanorod heterojunction using intermodulation atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods2021In: Nanoscale Advances, E-ISSN 2516-0230, Vol. 3, no 15, p. 4388-4394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The electrical properties of an all-oxide core-shell ZnO-Co3O4nanorod heterojunction were studied in the dark and under UV-vis illumination. The contact potential difference and current distribution maps were obtained utilizing new methods in dynamic multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM) such as electrostatic and conductive intermodulation AFM. Light irradiation modified the electrical properties of the nanorod heterojunction. The new techniques are able to follow the instantaneous local variation of the photocurrent, giving a two-dimensional (2D) map of the current-voltage curves and correlating the electrical and morphological features of the heterostructured core-shell nanorods.

  • 41. Attias, N.
    et al.
    Reid, Michael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Mijowska, S. C.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Isaksson, M.
    Pokroy, B.
    Grobman, Y. J.
    Abitbol, T.
    Biofabrication of Nanocellulose–Mycelium Hybrid Materials2021In: Advanced Sustainable Systems, ISSN 2366-7486, Vol. 5, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthy material alternatives based on renewable resources and sustainable technologies have the potential to disrupt the environmentally damaging production and consumption practices established throughout the modern industrial era. In this study, a mycelium–nanocellulose biocomposite with hybrid properties is produced by the agitated liquid culture of a white-rot fungus (Trametes ochracea) with nanocellulose (NC) comprised as part of the culture media. Mycelial development proceeds via the formation of pellets, where NC is enriched in the pellets and depleted from the surrounding liquid media. Micrometer-scale NC elements become engulfed in mycelium, whereas it is hypothesized that the nanometer-scale fraction becomes integrated within the hyphal cell wall, such that all NC in the system is essentially surface-modified by mycelium. The NC confers mechanical strength to films processed from the biocomposite, whereas the mycelium screens typical cellulose–water interactions, giving fibrous slurries that dewater faster and films that exhibit significantly improved wet resistance in comparison to pure NC films. The mycelium–nanocellulose biocomposites are processable in the ways familiar to papermaking and are suggested for diverse applications, including packaging, filtration, and hygiene products.

  • 42.
    Attias, Noam
    et al.
    Israel Institute of Technology, Israel.
    Reid, Michael
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mijowska, Sylwia
    Israel Institute of Technology, Israel.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Marcus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Pokroy, Boaz
    Israel Institute of Technology, Israel.
    Grobman, Yasha
    Israel Institute of Technology, Israel.
    Abitbol, Tiffany
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Biofabrication of Nanocellulose–Mycelium Hybrid Materials2021In: Advanced Sustainable Systems, ISSN 2366-7486, Vol. 5, no 2, article id 2000196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthy material alternatives based on renewable resources and sustainable technologies have the potential to disrupt the environmentally damaging production and consumption practices established throughout the modern industrial era. In this study, a mycelium–nanocellulose biocomposite with hybrid properties is produced by the agitated liquid culture of a white-rot fungus (Trametes ochracea) with nanocellulose (NC) comprised as part of the culture media. Mycelial development proceeds via the formation of pellets, where NC is enriched in the pellets and depleted from the surrounding liquid media. Micrometer-scale NC elements become engulfed in mycelium, whereas it is hypothesized that the nanometer-scale fraction becomes integrated within the hyphal cell wall, such that all NC in the system is essentially surface-modified by mycelium. The NC confers mechanical strength to films processed from the biocomposite, whereas the mycelium screens typical cellulose–water interactions, giving fibrous slurries that dewater faster and films that exhibit significantly improved wet resistance in comparison to pure NC films. The mycelium–nanocellulose biocomposites are processable in the ways familiar to papermaking and are suggested for diverse applications, including packaging, filtration, and hygiene products.

  • 43.
    Ishak, Mohd I.
    et al.
    University of Bristol.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Briscoe, Wuge H.
    University of Bristol,.
    Su, Bo
    University of Bristol,.
    Friction at nanopillared polymer surfaces beyond Amontons’ laws: Stick-slip amplitude coefficient (SSAC) and multiparametric nanotribological properties2021In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 583, p. 414-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Frictional and nanomechanical properties of nanostructured polymer surfaces are important to their technological and biomedical applications. In this work, poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) surfaces with a periodic distribution of well-defined nanopillars were fabricated through an anodization/embossing process. The apparent surface energy of the nanopillared surfaces was evaluated using the Fowkes acid-base approach, and the surface morphology was characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). The normal and lateral forces between a silica microparticle and these surfaces were quantified using colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). The friction-load relationship followed Amonton's first law, and the friction coefficient appeared to scale linearly with the nanopillar height. Furthermore, all the nanopillared surfaces showed pronounced frictional instabilities compared to the smooth sliding friction loop on the flat control. Performing the stick–slip amplitude coefficient (SSAC) analysis, we found a correlation between the frictional instabilities and the nanopillars density, pull-off force and work of adhesion. We have summarised the dependence of the nanotribological properties on such nanopillared surfaces on five relevant parameters, i.e. pull-off force fp, Amontons’ friction coefficient μ, RMS roughness Rq, stick–slip amplitude friction coefficient SSAC, and work of adhesion between the substrate and water Wadh in a radar chart. Whilst demonstrating the complexity of the frictional behaviour of nanopillared polymer surfaces, our results show that analyses of multiparametric nanotribological properties of nanostructured surfaces should go beyond classic Amontons’ laws, with the SSAC more representative of the frictional properties compared to the friction coefficient. 

  • 44. Nicolas-Boluda, A.
    et al.
    Yang, Z.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Carn, F.
    Winckelmans, N.
    Péchoux, C.
    Bonville, P.
    Bals, S.
    Claesson, P. M.
    Gazeau, F.
    Pileni, M. P.
    Intracellular Fate of Hydrophobic Nanocrystal Self-Assemblies in Tumor Cells2020In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 30, no 40, article id 2004274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Control of interactions between nanomaterials and cells remains a biomedical challenge. A strategy is proposed to modulate the intralysosomal distribution of nanoparticles through the design of 3D suprastructures built by hydrophilic nanocrystals (NCs) coated with alkyl chains. The intracellular fate of two water-dispersible architectures of self-assembled hydrophobic magnetic NCs: hollow deformable shells (colloidosomes) or solid fcc particles (supraballs) is compared. These two self-assemblies display increased cellular uptake by tumor cells compared to dispersions of the water-soluble NC building blocks. Moreover, the self-assembly structures increase the NCs density in lysosomes and close to the lysosome membrane. Importantly, the structural organization of NCs in colloidosomes and supraballs are maintained in lysosomes up to 8 days after internalization, whereas initially dispersed hydrophilic NCs are randomly aggregated. Supraballs and colloidosomes are differently sensed by cells due to their different architectures and mechanical properties. Flexible and soft colloidosomes deform and spread along the biological membranes. In contrast, the more rigid supraballs remain spherical. By subjecting the internalized suprastructures to a magnetic field, they both align and form long chains. Overall, it is highlighted that the mechanical and topological properties of the self-assemblies direct their intracellular fate allowing the control intralysosomal density, ordering, and localization of NCs.

  • 45.
    Yan, Hongji
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Hjorth, Morgan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Winkeljann, Benjamin
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Lieleg, Oliver
    Crouzier, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Glyco-Modification of Mucin Hydrogels to Investigate Their Immune Activity2020In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 12, no 17, p. 19324-19336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mucins are multifunctional glycosylated proteins that are increasingly investigated as building blocks of novel biomaterials. An attractive feature is their ability to modulate the immune response, in part by engaging with sialic acid binding receptors on immune cells. Once assembled into hydrogels, bovine submaxillary mucins (Muc gels) were shown to modulate the recruitment and activation of immune cells and avoid fibrous encapsulation in vivo. However, nothing is known about the early immune response to Muc gels. This study characterizes the response of macrophages, important orchestrators of the material-mediated immune response, over the first 7 days in contact with Muc gels. The role of mucin-bound sialic acid sugar residues was investigated by first enzymatically cleaving the sugar and then assembling the mucin variants into covalently cross-linked hydrogels with rheological and surface nanomechanical properties similar to nonmodified Muc gels. Results with THP-1 and human primary peripheral blood monocytes derived macrophages showed that Muc gels transiently activate the expression of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and cell surface markers, for most makers with a maximum on the first day and loss of the effect after 7 days. The activation was sialic acid-dependent for a majority of the markers followed. The pattern of gene expression, protein expression, and functional measurements did not strictly correspond to M1 or M2 macrophage phenotypes. This study highlights the complex early events in macrophage activation in contact with mucin materials and the importance of sialic acid residues in such a response. The enzymatic glyco-modulation of Muc gels appears as a useful tool to help understand the biological functions of specific glycans on mucins which can further inform on their use in various biomedical applications.

  • 46.
    Nicolas-Boluda, A.
    et al.
    Université de Paris, France.
    Yang, Z.
    Shandong University, China.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Carn, F.
    Université de Paris, France.
    Winckelmans, N.
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Péchoux, C.
    Université Paris-Saclay, France.
    Bonville, P.
    Université Paris-Saclay, France.
    Bals, S.
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Claesson, Per M
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Gazeau, F.
    Université de Paris, France.
    Pileni, M. P.
    Sorbonne Université, France.
    Intracellular Fate of Hydrophobic Nanocrystal Self-Assemblies in Tumor Cells2020In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 30, no 40, article id 2004274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Control of interactions between nanomaterials and cells remains a biomedical challenge. A strategy is proposed to modulate the intralysosomal distribution of nanoparticles through the design of 3D suprastructures built by hydrophilic nanocrystals (NCs) coated with alkyl chains. The intracellular fate of two water-dispersible architectures of self-assembled hydrophobic magnetic NCs: hollow deformable shells (colloidosomes) or solid fcc particles (supraballs) is compared. These two self-assemblies display increased cellular uptake by tumor cells compared to dispersions of the water-soluble NC building blocks. Moreover, the self-assembly structures increase the NCs density in lysosomes and close to the lysosome membrane. Importantly, the structural organization of NCs in colloidosomes and supraballs are maintained in lysosomes up to 8 days after internalization, whereas initially dispersed hydrophilic NCs are randomly aggregated. Supraballs and colloidosomes are differently sensed by cells due to their different architectures and mechanical properties. Flexible and soft colloidosomes deform and spread along the biological membranes. In contrast, the more rigid supraballs remain spherical. By subjecting the internalized suprastructures to a magnetic field, they both align and form long chains. Overall, it is highlighted that the mechanical and topological properties of the self-assemblies direct their intracellular fate allowing the control intralysosomal density, ordering, and localization of NCs. 

  • 47.
    Kharitonov, Dimitry
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland; Belarusian State Technological University, Belarus.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Sefer, Birhan
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden; Swerim AB, Sweden.
    Ryl, Jacek
    Gdansk University of Technology, Poland.
    Wrzesińska, Angelika
    Lodz University of Technology, Poland.
    Makarova, Irina
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Bobowska, Izabela
    Lodz University of Technology, Poland.
    Kurilo, Irina
    Belarusian State Technological University, Belarus.
    Claesson, Per M
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Surface and corrosion properties of AA6063-T5 aluminum alloy in molybdate-containing sodium chloride solutions2020In: Corrosion Science, ISSN 0010-938X, E-ISSN 1879-0496, Vol. 171, article id 108658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corrosion properties of aluminum alloy AA6063-T5 were investigated in molybdate-containing NaCl solutions. Electrochemical, microscopic, and spectroscopic experiments were utilized to examine the mechanism of corrosion inhibition by molybdates. SEM-EDX, magnetic force, and intermodulation electrostatic force microscopy data suggested that the inhibition initiation preferentially occurred over Fe-rich cathodic IMPs. Spectroscopic measurements demonstrated that the formed surface layer consists of mixed Mo(VI, V, IV) species. This layer provided inhibition with an efficiency of ∼90% after 4 h of exposure. High efficacy of ∼70% was achieved even after one week of exposure. A two-step oxidation-reduction mechanism of corrosion inhibition by aqueous molybdates was proposed. © 2020 The Authors

  • 48.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Mensi, Elizaveta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Holmgren, Allan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Almqvist, Nils
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Surface Forces between Nanomagnetite and Silica in Aqueous Ca2+ Solutions Studied with AFM Colloidal Probe Method2020In: Colloids and Interfaces, ISSN 2504-5377, Vol. 4, no 3, article id 41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dispersion and aggregation of nanomagnetite (Fe3O4) and silica (SiO2) particles are of high importance in various applications, such as biomedicine, nanoelectronics, drug delivery, flotation, and pelletization of iron ore. In directly probing nanomagnetite–silica interaction, atomic force microscopy (AFM) using the colloidal probe technique has proven to be a suitable tool. In this work, the interaction between nanomagnetite and silica particles was measured with AFM in aqueous Ca2+ solution at different pH levels. This study showed that the qualitative changes of the interaction forces with pH and Ca2+ concentrations were consistent with the results from zeta-potential measurements. The repulsion between nanomagnetite and silica was observed at alkaline pH and 1 mM Ca2+ concentration, but no repulsive forces were observed at 3 mM Ca2+ concentration. The interaction forces on approach were due to van der Waals and electrical double-layer forces. The good fitting of experimental data to the DLVO model and simulations supported this conclusion. However, contributions from non-DLVO forces should also be considered. It was shown that an increase of Ca2+ concentration from 1 to 3.3 mM led to a less pronounced decrease of adhesion force with increasing pH. A comparison of measured and calculated adhesion forces with a few contact mechanics models demonstrated an important impact of nanomagnetite layer nanoroughness.

  • 49.
    Kharitonov, Dmitry S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Belarusian State Technol Univ, Chem Technol & Engn Fac, Dept Chem, Electrochem Prod Technol & Mat Elect Equipment, Minsk 220006, BELARUS.;Polish Acad Sci, Jerzy Haber Inst Catalysis & Surface Chem, PL-30239 Krakow, Poland..
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Sefer, Birhan
    Luleå Univ Technol, Dept Engn Sci & Math, Div Mat Sci, SE-97187 Luleå, Sweden.;Swerim AB, Metall Mat Corros Environm, Box 7047, SE-16407 Kista, Sweden..
    Ryl, Jacek
    Gdansk Univ Technol, Dept Electrochem Corros & Mat Engn, PL-80233 Gdansk, Poland..
    Wrzesinska, Angelika
    Lodz Univ Technol, Dept Mol Phys, PL-90924 Lodz, Poland..
    Makarova, Irina, V
    Lappeenranta Univ Technol, Sch Engn Sci, Dept Separat & Purificat, FI-53850 Lappeenranta, Finland..
    Bobowska, Izabela
    Lodz Univ Technol, Dept Mol Phys, PL-90924 Lodz, Poland..
    Kurilo, Irina I.
    Belarusian State Technol Univ, Organ Subst Technol Fac, Dept Phys Colloid & Analyt Chem, Minsk 220006, BELARUS..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Mat & Surfaces, Chem, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Surface and corrosion properties of AA6063-T5 aluminum alloy in molybdate-containing sodium chloride solutions2020In: Corrosion Science, ISSN 0010-938X, E-ISSN 1879-0496, Vol. 171, article id 108658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corrosion properties of aluminum alloy AA6063-T5 were investigated in molybdate-containing NaCl solutions. Electrochemical, microscopic, and spectroscopic experiments were utilized to examine the mechanism of corrosion inhibition by molybdates. SEM-EDX, magnetic force, and intermodulation electrostatic force microscopy data suggested that the inhibition initiation preferentially occurred over Fe-rich cathodic IMPs. Spectroscopic measurements demonstrated that the formed surface layer consists of mixed Mo(VI, V, IV) species. This layer provided inhibition with an efficiency of similar to 90% after 4 h of exposure. High efficacy of similar to 70% was achieved even after one week of exposure. A two-step oxidation-reduction mechanism of corrosion inhibition by aqueous molybdates was proposed.

  • 50.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Tokarski, Tomasz
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Cortes Ruiz, M.
    Li, Gen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Division of Bioscience and Materials, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nanoscale mapping of interphase with AFM: Polymer based nanocomposites2019In: Baltic Polymer Symposium 2019, BPS 2019 - Programme and Proceedings, Institute of Chemistry and Geosciences, Vilnius University , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 103
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