Change search
Refine search result
1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Comparing mail-in, interview and tournament catch rates for a recreational salmonid fisheryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2. Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Su, Zhenming
    Andersson, Magnus
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Estimating effort and catch of a recreational trolling fishery in one of Europe’s largest lakesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andreas, Seiler
    et al.
    SLU.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut och Calluna AB.
    Mörkertal i viltolycksstatistiken: resultat från enkätundersökning och analyser av olycksdata2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hidden statistics in wildlife-vehicle collision data – results from a drivers’ questionnaire and database analyses

    Among the most common causes of road accidents in Sweden are collisions with wild animals, especially ungulates. Over 50,000 ungulate accidents per year have been reported during the past 5 years and the numbers are steadily in-creasing since the 1970-ies. Despite regular campaigns, extensive investment in wildlife fencing and other preventive measures, and in contrast to declining game bag in moose and roe deer, accident statistics increase faster than what can be expected from increased traffic alone. It is obvious that wildlife-vehicle accidents in Sweden are not under control. Major contributing factors are defi-ciencies in data and uncertainty in statistics. It is well known that not all accidents are reported or show up in the official statistics, but the correction factor still used by the Swedish Transport Administration is based on over 35 years old data when traffic and wildlife conditions had been different. A better knowledge of where and when and how frequent wildlife-vehicle collisions occur is needed to more effectively plan and target mitigation actions.

    This project provides updated estimates of the hidden statistics in wildlife-vehi-cle collision data and identifies uncertainties and problems in current statistics. This was done by: i. a survey with car drivers, ii. an analysis of wildlife-related accident statistics on human injuries in the Swedish Traffic Accident Data Ac-quisition (STRADA), and iii. a comparative analysis of accident report statistics from the police and from hunters provided by the National Council on Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions (Nationella Viltolycksrådet).

    To estimate how often drivers do report and refrain from reporting wildlife-ve-hicle accidents to the police, we conducted a publicly available online-survey during Nov. 2013 to Dec. 2014 that was answered by 3981 respondents. We asked the respondents about their knowledge of and experience with wildlife-ve-hicle accidents and requested details on the most recent incident they experi-enced after 2004. More than half of all respondents (65%) reported to have been involved in wildlife-vehicle collisions at any time and around 20 % of these indi-cated that the accident was never reported to the police. About 45% of the re-spondents declared that they experienced traffic accidents with wildlife after 2004, and the proportion of non-reported incidents was estimated to between 9% (public respondents) and 19 % (control groups). We recommend therefore assuming that about 15% (± 5%) of the incidents will not be known by the police. Compared to studies from the late 1970-ies, these hidden statistics appear hence much smaller today.

    After that an incident has been reported to the police, however, there are further important sources of data loss. Depending on how the incident has been classified in the report, the records are manually transferred to secondary databases such as the traffic accident register (T-RAR). Incidents where wildlife was not the immediate cause of the accident may not be classified as wildlife-vehicle collision and thus not be found in the of-ficial police statistics. This loss has not been quantified but is estimated to be around 2%.

    Traffic accidents with human injuries (about 1.6% of all wildlife accidents) are reported to the database STRADA. Our analysis showed that on average 37% of all game-related injury accidents during 2003- 2012 was not classified as a wild-life accident and therefore probably neither was listed as such in the official police statistics.

    In most cases (74%) when an accident with wildlife is reported to the police, they notify a contracted hunter to take care of the injured animal. The hunter in turn issues a report with detailed information on the location, time and animal species. Not all of the reports (84%), however, contain complete and accurate in-formation that can be used for spatial analyses of accidents. In addition, hunt-ers’ reports seem to be biased towards larger roads and underestimate the num-ber of accidents on private and tertiary roads by about 12%.

    Technical problems in the police data system during 2012-2015 resulted in the loss of an unknown number of reported wildlife-vehicle accidents. This is why in some regions and in some years, more hunter reports were issued than police records exist. We estimate that this loss may accede 11% on average.

    In simplified terms, police statistics on wildlife-vehicle accidents during 2010 - 2015 may stand for about two-thirds of the truly occurred accidents, while hunter reports that are used in spatial analyses represent about half of the true accident frequency. However, this rule of thumb should be used cautiously as there are substantial differences in the hidden and lost statistics between the years, counties and species.

    Thus, the various shortfalls in these statistics have a significant impact on the overall estimate of wildlife-vehicle collision numbers. Depending on the data sources and on how statistics are used, different biases and data losses must be considered. Some of the causes can be easily overcome as they relate to deficien-cies in registration routines and database management. We therefore recom-mend a systematic check of the databases and improved control during registra-tion and classification of reported cases. We advocate that the different inde-pendent databases are linked through a common event ID. We also suggest de-tailed studies of how accidents are recorded and interpreted in order to better prevent future data loss.

  • 4. Backstrom, Tobias
    et al.
    Heynen, Martina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Brannas, Eva
    Nilsson, Jan
    Winberg, Svante
    Magnhagen, Carin
    Anaesthesia and handling stress effects on pigmentation and monoamines in Arctic charr2017In: Environmental Biology of Fishes, ISSN 0378-1909, E-ISSN 1573-5133, Vol. 100, no 5, p. 471-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress responsiveness differs between individuals and is often categorized into different stress coping styles. Using these stress coping styles for selection in fish farming could be beneficial, since stress is one main factor affecting welfare. In Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) carotenoid pigmentation is associated with stress responsiveness and stress coping styles. Thus this could be an important tool to use for selection of stress resilient charr. However, anaesthetics seem to affect carotenoid pigmentation, and it would be better if the method for selection could be implemented during normal maintenance, which usually includes anaesthetics. Therefore, this study investigated how the use of anaesthetics affected carotenoid pigmentation, i.e. number of spots, over time compared to no-anaesthetic treatment. Additionally, the stress indicators monoamines and glucocorticoids were investigated. The results indicate that the anaesthetic MS-222 affects number of spots on the right side. This anaesthetic also increased dopaminergic activity in the telencephalon. Both brain dopaminergic and serotonergic activity was associated with spottiness. Further, behaviour during anaesthetization was associated with spots on the left side, but not the right side. Repetition of the same treatment seemed to affect spot numbers on the right side. In conclusion, this study shows that inducing stress in charr affects the carotenoid spots. Thus, it is possible to use anaesthetics when evaluating spottiness although careful planning is needed.

  • 5.
    Bignert, Anders
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bäcklin, Britt-Marie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    9. Contaminants and Health of Aquatic Wildlife2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 73-85Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Brawn, Jeffrey D.
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,.
    3. Maintaining and Restoring Avian Habitat in Agricultural Landscapes2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 39-41Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Carpenter, Angela
    et al.
    School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, United Kingdom; Centre for Marine and Coastal Policy Research, Plymouth University, United Kingdom.
    Shellock, Rebecca
    Plymouth Marine Laboratory, United Kingdom; European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter, Truro, United Kingdom.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Stephen, Fletcher
    UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre, United Kingdom.
    Glegg, Gillian
    Centre for Marine and Coastal Policy Research, Plymouth University, United Kingdom.
    Public perceptions of management priorities for the English Channel region2018In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The English Channel region is an area of high conservational importance, as well being a contributor to economic prosperity, social well-being and quality of life of the people living around it. There is a need to incorporate societal elements into marine and coastal governance, to improve management of the Channel ecosystem. Public Perception Research (PPR) is a relatively unexplored dimension of marine science, with limited research at the scale of the Channel region. Using an online survey, this study examined the public's use of, and funding priorities for, the Channel's marine and coastal environment. It revealed that there are variations in how the English and French coastlines are used. Environmental issues were generally viewed as being more important than economic ones. Country-level differences were observed for public uses of, and priorities for the Channel region. Cleaner water and beaches, and improved coastal flood defences, were more highly prioritised by English respondents, while offshore renewable energy and sustainability of businesses were more highly prioritised by French respondents. The paper contributes to the debate on the value of PPR by addressing evidence gaps in the English Channel region, and to PPR literature more broadly. It provides baseline data to inform future engagement strategies for the marine and coastal governance of the Channel region specifically. It also identifies how this type of research has implications for the wider marine and coastal environment, including contributing to Sustainable Development Goal 14 on conserving and sustainably using the oceans, seas, and marine resources.

  • 8. Dankel, Dorothy
    et al.
    Haraldsson, Gunnar
    Heldbo, Jesper
    Hoydal, Kjartan
    Lassen, Hans
    Siegstad, Helle
    Schou, Mogens
    Sverdrup-Jensen, Sten
    Waldo, Staffan
    Ørebech, Peter
    Allocation of Fishing Rights in the NEA: Discussion paper2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This discussion paper aims to initiate an informed debate in the Nordic countries and elsewhere on how to allocate the trans-boundary fish stocks in the North East Atlantic in the future and how to resolve possible allocation conflicts. The paper maps the current legal framework and international fisheries agreements in the North East Atlantic Ocean which forms the basis for allocation agreements. It considers the relevance of the biological status of the fish stocks and the economic situation of the coastal states in the area for the allocation of fishing rights and further proposes a dynamic allocation methodology and a decision making process including the handling of allocation conflicts. The paper is compiled by an inter-disciplinary Nordic group of fisheries experts.

  • 9. Dressel, Sabrina
    et al.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Mapping social-ecological systems to understand the challenges underlying wildlife management2018In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 84, p. 105-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A holistic understanding of the complex interactions between humans, wildlife, and habitats is essential for the design of sustainable wildlife policies. This challenging task requires innovative and interdisciplinary research approaches. Using the newly implemented ecosystem-based management of moose (Alces alces) in Sweden as a case, we applied Ostrom’s social-ecological system (SES) framework to analyse the challenges that wildlife management faces throughout the country. We combined data derived from natural and social science research to operationalize the framework in a quantitative way; an approach that enabled a spatially explicit analysis on the national and regional levels. This study aimed to discover patterns in the social-ecological context of Swedish moose management. Identifying these patterns can provide input for an in-depth evaluation of the institutional fit of the current system and subsequently for national policy development. Our SES maps suggest that there are spatial variations in factors challenging moose management. In some areas, ecological aspects such as the co-occurrence of carnivores and other ungulate species burdens future management, while in other regions challenges are shaped by governance aspects, e.g. diverse property rights. These findings demonstrate that the new management system must apply adaptive learning principles to respond to local context attributes in order to be successful. Our innovative approach provides a valuable tool for the assessment of other natural resource management issues and the avoidance of panacea traps, especially when repeated over time.

  • 10.
    Drury O'Neill, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Small-Scale Fisheries Governance: Broadening Perspectives on Markets, Relationships and Benefits in Seafood Trade2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate adresses the relative ambiguity surounding benefit flows from small-scale fisheries seafood trade with a specific focus on how they may be impacted by market and social stuctures. Small-scale fishery governenace has previously taken a narrowly approach to sustainability. Focused on managing fishing activities, economic-led market interventions and overlooking the embededness of the fishers within a broader social structure. Also failing to address fisheries as interlinked social-ecological systems where feedbacks between the two can impact future sustainability. The larger PhD project takes a step towards combining these two out-of-focus areas by taking a systems perspective, through a Value Chain approach, to fisheries governance, associated market influences and the consequent benefit flows from marine ecosystem services. This licentiate begins by unpacking dynamics within the social realm that may impact benefit flows and ultimately resource extraction decisions, potentially contributing to feedbacks from the marine ecosystem. Research uses mixed-methods and is case-orientated with sites across two tropical marine small-scale fisheries in Zanzibar and the Philippines. Results present two market environments with distinct structures, conduct, reciprocity systems and notably, gender roles. However both systems experience economic transactions underlain by broader social relations and binds. These various features manifest themselves in different, yet often unexpected, ways through income equalities, distributions and reciprocal networks of fishers and trading actors. Once a broadened and diversified view of the SSF trading environment is appropriated, it is clear that benefit flows are impacted by various contextual features (e.g. gender, transaction forms and buyer types). Governance-related research or interventions should incorporate undervalued local attributes such as cultural characteristics, social relationships and market participation as they play a role in who benefits from seafood trade. Thus If governance is to be improved for sustainably increasing food and livelihood security it is necessary to unpack these benefit flow mechanisms and, in particular, the local social dynamics that mediate fishers’ everyday interplay with the marine ecosystem. Future steps include the aim to identify potential social-ecological feedbacks between the disentangled market environments and the local marine ecosystems as a result of interactions in SSF trade. 

  • 11.
    Eriksson, Max
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Umeå.
    Direct experience and attitude change towards bears and wolves2015In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 131-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how changes in the sizes of large carnivore populations affect the attitudes of the public is vital in order to mitigate social conflicts over large carnivore management issues. Using data from two Swedish postal surveys in 2004 and 2009, we examined the probable social effects of a continued increase in the Swedish populations of bear and wolf by comparing levels of direct experience of bears and wolves with public attitudes towards these animals. We report an increase in direct experience of bears and wolves, lower levels of acceptance of the existence of these animals, and a lower degree of support for the policy goals of both species in 2009 compared to 2004. We also find that these changes are more prominent in areas with local carnivore populations than in other areas of Sweden. Our results imply that attitudes towards bears and wolves are likely to become more negative as populations continue to grow. The uneven distributions of the carnivore populations are likely to generate more frequent social conflicts in the future as they could cause an increase in the attitudinal divide between those members of the Swedish public who have had direct experiences of carnivores and those who have not.

  • 12.
    Estes, Kelly
    Illinois Natural History Survey University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    4. Terrestrial Invasive Species of the Great Lakes Region2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 42-46Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Fitzgerald, Guy
    University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, CAN.
    15. Effects and Remediation of Oil Spills on Wild Birds: The St. Lawrence Estuary and Gulf Experience2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 122-127Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Fitzsimons, John D.
    et al.
    Great Lakes Laboratory for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Burlington, Canada.
    Wolgamood, Martha
    Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Mattawan, MI, USA.
    Madenjian, Charles P.
    United States Geological Survey, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    Bunnell, David B.
    United States Geological Survey, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    20. Thiamine Deficiency in Aquatic Food Chains: The Cumulative Result of Ecosystem Disruption by Clupeids?2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 167-180Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Gillespie, Thomas
    Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    24. Habitat Fragmentation and Species Barriers2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 199-200Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Gren, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Costs of traffic accidents with ungulates in Sweden2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traffic accidents with ungulates pose a serious problem in many countries, and there is a need for predicting accidents and costs at a large scale for an efficient management of the accidents. Based on the assumption that traffic accidents are determined by traffic volume and ungulate population sizes, this study provides a relatively simple method for calculating and predicting costs of current and future traffic accidents with roe deer, wild boar, and moose in Sweden. A logistic population model is assumed for all ungulates, and econometric methods are used for predicting vehicle accidents with panel data on traffic accidents, traffic load, bags, hunting licenses, and landscape characteristics for each county and year during 2003-2015. The calculated total discounted cost of traffic accidents over a period of 15 years is relatively stable around 1300 million SEK per year in present value (which corresponds to 0.03% of gross domestic product in 2015), but the allocation of costs among ungulates differs. Costs of vehicle accidents with moose account for the largest share of the cost (44%), but accidents with wild boar show the most rapid increase over a 15 year period because of the estimated relatively high intrinsic growth rate and the recent establishment of this animal in several counties. The predicted costs are, however, sensitive to the assumption of future hunting pressure and traffic volume.

  • 17.
    Hellström, Anders
    et al.
    National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Chukalova, Natalia
    AtlantNiro, Kaliningrad, Russia.
    Rodjuk, Galina
    AtlantNiro, Kaliningrad, Russia.
    Ekman, Elisabet
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Norrgren, Leif
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    8. Aquaculture and Fish Health2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 63-72Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Häggmark Svensson, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Gren, Ing-Marie
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Andersson, Hans
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Jansson, Gunnar
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Stockholm.
    Costs of traffic accidents with wild boar populations in Sweden2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traffic accidents with wild boar have increased rapidly over the last years in Sweden. This paper calculates and predicts costs of current and future accidents, totally and for different Swedish counties, based on estimates of wild boar populations. A logistic population model is assumed, and econometric methods are used for calculating populations with panel data on traffic accidents, traffic load, and landscape characteristics for each county. The results show an average growth rate of 0.48, which varies between 0.39 and 0.52for different counties. This, together with predictions on changes in traffic load, forms the basis for calculations of costs of traffic accidents for a 10 year period. In total, the predicted costs can increase from 60 million SEK in 2011 to 135 or 340 million SEK in 2021 in present value depending on hunting pressure. The variation in cost increases is, however, large among counties, increasing by tenfold in Stockholm and Södermanland where the wild boar populations are relatively small and by approximately 50% in counties with mature populations.

  • 19.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Environment.
    Antonson, Hans
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Mobility, actors and planning processes.
    Driving behaviour responses to a moose encounter, automatic speed camera, wildlife warning sign and radio message determined in a factorial simulator study2016In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 86, p. 229-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a driving simulator study, driving behaviour responses (speed and deceleration) to encountering a moose, automatic speed camera, wildlife warning sign and radio message, with or without a wildlife fence and in dense forest or open landscape, were analysed. The study consisted of a factorial experiment that examined responses to factors singly and in combination over 9-km road stretches driven eight times by 25 participants (10 men, 15 women). The aims were to: determine the most effective animal–vehicle collision (AVC) countermeasures in reducing vehicle speed and test whether these are more effective in combination for reducing vehicle speed; identify the most effective countermeasures on encountering moose; and determine whether the driving responses to AVC countermeasures are affected by the presence of wildlife fences and landscape characteristics. The AVC countermeasures that proved most effective in reducing vehicle speed were a wildlife warning sign and radio message, while automatic speed cameras had a speed-increasing effect. There were no statistically significant interactions between different countermeasures and moose encounters. However, there was a tendency for a stronger speed-reducing effect from the radio message warning and from a combination of a radio message and wildlife warning sign in velocity profiles covering longer driving distances than the statistical tests. Encountering a moose during the drive had the overall strongest speed-reducing effect and gave the strongest deceleration, indicating that moose decoys or moose artwork might be useful as speed-reducing countermeasures. Furthermore, drivers reduced speed earlier on encountering a moose in open landscape and had lower velocity when driving past it. The presence of a wildlife fence on encountering the moose resulted in smaller deceleration.

  • 20.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Environment.
    Kollisioner och olyckor med rådjur i Sverige under 10 år (2003–2012): variation i tid, geografi och kostnader2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal for this project was to create a 10-year overview of the number of deer collisions in Sweden and accidents variation in time, geography and cost, both in terms of property damage and personal injuries. Accident statistics were gathered from NVR (National Wildlife Accident Council, data on collisions), Strada (fatalities and injuries in Swedish Traffic Accident Data Acquisition) and Ofelia (collisions at railway). The results show that the number of deer collisions has increased over the 10-year period and that the increase has been much greater in the northernmost counties and Gotland. The number of deer collisions is higher during the early summer (May–June) and winter (October–December), whereas the number of fatalities and injury accidents is highest during the summer. The number of deer collisions varies during the day, but most accidents occur in the morning and evening for both property damage and personal injury accidents. For fatalities in accidents with roe deer, there are more than twice as many compared to the officially reported numbers, and the number of serious injuries is 177% higher than the official records. It is likely that the official statistics are also underestimating the number of fatalities and injuries from wildlife accidents caused by moose, deer and wild boar. This study shows that the total cost of roe deer collisions and accidents in 2012 exceeds 1 billion SEK, of which approximately 70% account for the cost of property damage.

  • 21.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Miljö, MILJÖ.
    Kollisioner och olyckor med rådjur i Sverige under 10 år (2003–2012): variation i tid, geografi och kostnader2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal for this project was to create a 10-year overview of the number of deer collisions in Sweden and accidents variation in time, geography and cost, both in terms of property damage and personal injuries. Accident statistics were gathered from NVR (National Wildlife Accident Council, data on collisions), Strada (fatalities and injuries in Swedish Traffic Accident Data Acquisition) and Ofelia (collisions at railway). The results show that the number of deer collisions has increased over the 10-year period and that the increase has been much greater in the northernmost counties and Gotland. The number of deer collisions is higher during the early summer (May–June) and winter (October–December), whereas the number of fatalities and injury accidents is highest during the summer. The number of deer collisions varies during the day, but most accidents occur in the morning and evening for both property damage and personal injury accidents. For fatalities in accidents with roe deer, there are more than twice as many compared to the officially reported numbers, and the number of serious injuries is 177% higher than the official records. It is likely that the official statistics are also underestimating the number of fatalities and injuries from wildlife accidents caused by moose, deer and wild boar. This study shows that the total cost of roe deer collisions and accidents in 2012 exceeds 1 billion SEK, of which approximately 70% account for the cost of property damage.

  • 22.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    et al.
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Miljö, MILJÖ.
    Antonson, Hans
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Mobilitet, aktörer och planering, MAP.
    Driving behaviour responses to a moose encounter, automatic speed camera, wildlife warning sign and radio message determined in a factorial simulator study2016In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 86, p. 229-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a driving simulator study, driving behaviour responses (speed and deceleration) to encountering a moose, automatic speed camera, wildlife warning sign and radio message, with or without a wildlife fence and in dense forest or open landscape, were analysed. The study consisted of a factorial experiment that examined responses to factors singly and in combination over 9-km road stretches driven eight times by 25 participants (10 men, 15 women). The aims were to: determine the most effective animal–vehicle collision (AVC) countermeasures in reducing vehicle speed and test whether these are more effective in combination for reducing vehicle speed; identify the most effective countermeasures on encountering moose; and determine whether the driving responses to AVC countermeasures are affected by the presence of wildlife fences and landscape characteristics. The AVC countermeasures that proved most effective in reducing vehicle speed were a wildlife warning sign and radio message, while automatic speed cameras had a speed-increasing effect. There were no statistically significant interactions between different countermeasures and moose encounters. However, there was a tendency for a stronger speed-reducing effect from the radio message warning and from a combination of a radio message and wildlife warning sign in velocity profiles covering longer driving distances than the statistical tests. Encountering a moose during the drive had the overall strongest speed-reducing effect and gave the strongest deceleration, indicating that moose decoys or moose artwork might be useful as speed-reducing countermeasures. Furthermore, drivers reduced speed earlier on encountering a moose in open landscape and had lower velocity when driving past it. The presence of a wildlife fence on encountering the moose resulted in smaller deceleration.

  • 23.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    et al.
    Calluna AB.
    Gren, I-M.
    IMA Miljöekonomi.
    Seiler, A.
    SLU.
    Johansson, Ö.
    Uppdatering och nya effektsamband i effektmodellen för viltolyckor. Calluna AB.2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Wildlife-vehicle accidents in Sweden are a growing problem that causes killed and injured humans, damage to vehicles and killed animals. Wildlife-vehicle accidents have socioeconomic costs that need to be quantified to calculate the cost-benefits of measures to prevent the accidents, for example game fencing or animal passages. The effect-model for wildlife-vehicle accidents was developed in the 1980s but is currently obsolete due to developments in road safety, changes in wildlife populations, data systems, knowledge and research. The existing effectmodel is based on the risk of accidents per km road per county in three traffic flow categories and divided into moose and summed up for deer and reindeer. This project aims at updating the effect-model for wildlife-vehicle accidents by including current data on wildlife collisions, considering various species of wildlife (elk, deer and wild boar) and several variables that may be of significance to the accidents: such as: population size, road standard, traffic load, vehicle speed, and landscape type. The work has mainly been divided into three parts. The first part involved the development of a model including wildlife accidents, traffic load and population size/growth and landscape variables, as well as cost estimates based on different model scenarios in long-term forecasts. Another part involved GIS analyzes of updated wildlife-vehicle accident statistics; accident rate per km road, AADT5 , road standard and fencing, and new estimates of unknown cases. The third part comprised presenting new values for damage and risk consequences (percentage probabilities for fatalities and personal injuries) for vehicle accidents in recent years. The results for the first part of the project show that wildlife-vehicle accidents will increase by 12% from 2015 to 2030, mainly due to a doubling of wild boar accidents, whereas the risk of accident with elk and deer decreases slightly. In the case of reduced hunting pressure, the results show that it is theoretically possible that wildlife accidents will instead increase by 50%. Estimated costs of game accidents in 2030 (ASEK 6) vary between 1 707 and 7 556 million SEK, depending on assumptions about hunting and injury costs. Accidents with deer are responsible for most of the accidents throughout the period, but accidents with wild boar increase most in all scenarios. Cost estimates of wildlife accidents for Västra Götaland and Skåne in a long-term forecast are included as examples. The GIS analyzes on data from 2010-2016 show that wildlife-vehicle accidents has increased constantly since 2003 and that the increase in accidents over the years occurs at a faster rate than the increase in traffic load. On minor roads accidents will increase synchronously with the traffic volume up to approximately 5 000 AADT. On larger roads, accident frequency will decline with increased traffic load. The accident frequency is highest on medium-sized roads but decreases on traffic-heavy roads and on high-speed roads. Updated values for damage consequences were based on data from STRADA6 and NVR7 2010-2016 and police reported accidents (except for calculating RPMI8 values). The results show that killed and injured persons in moose and roe deer/deer accidents have decreased and adjustments in the new values are suggested. For damage consequences, new values for moose accidents are suggested while previous values have been kept for deer and are proposed to use wild boar. Finally, assumptions in the effect-model and results based on road safety development, relevant wildlife issues, and some selected aspects regarding the implementation of the effect-model are discussed.

  • 24.
    Lampman, Richard
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    23. Emerging Vector-borne Diseases of Public Health in Europe and North America2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic Universit Press , 2012, 2, p. 191-198Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Larsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Serrano Gonzalez, Ignacio
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Eriksson, Lars-Ove
    Effects of muscle lipid concentration on wild and hatchery brown trout (Salmo trutta) smolt migration2012In: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 0706-652X, E-ISSN 1205-7533, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Annually, hatchery programs are releasing millions of salmonid smolts into the Baltic Sea. Recent estimations indicate a decline in smolt sea survival, questioning the ecological and socioeconomic values of these programs. Concurrently, hatchery smolts have increased in lipid concentration. Salmonids display partial migration, and it is suggested that the ratio of migrants/residents is affected by individual smolt energetic status. To test whether the increased energetic status of hatchery smolts could explain the noted decrease in survival, we released wild trout smolts, conventional hatchery smolts, and hatchery smolts of low energetic status into a Baltic Sea river. Using telemetry, we obtained data on the number of successful migrants, their swimming speed, and diel migratory behaviour. A much lower proportion of conventional smolts (30%) successfully migrated to the coast. No difference was found between wild (74%) and hatchery smolts of low energetic status (64%). Furthermore, conventional smolts migrated slower and showed no diel migratory pattern. The results are of high relevance for hatchery programs producing partially migrating fish.

  • 26.
    Levengood, Jeffrey M.
    et al.
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    Martineau, Daniel
    University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada.
    11. Geological, Hydrological and Anthropogenic Features2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 97-100Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Jones, Thomas E.
    Mount Fuji’s Listing as a Cultural World Heritage Site: Challenges of Fragmented Governance2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heritage management is often fragmented, and Japan is no exception with considerable horizontal fragmentation between municipal, prefectural and central government agencies. For example, the Ministry of Environment (MoE) is the legally-designated administrator of national parks but their institutional objectives are often inconsistent with those of other state agencies, such as the MAFF (a significant landowner) and MEXT (responsible for cultural heritage). This poses serious challenges for management of large mixed type heritage where objects are not easily classified as natural or cultural. Mount Fuji, UNESCO World Cultural Heritage since 2013, consists of a serial nomination of sites within Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park that overlaps with the administrative territory of 15 municipalities and two prefectures. This complex combination of multiple stakeholders can have the unintended side-effect of pitting government agencies against each other, and against private stakeholders such as mountain huts who maintain certain trails. The nomination process was challenged by the legislation and established procedures that struggle to accommodate natural landscapes functioning as cultural objects of worship and art. The fragmented management style was typified by subordination to business interests and avoidance of disrupting the status quo. One solution was to focus on sites that were already listed under national law. Site maintenance is typically split between several departments and institutions that are subjected to regular rotation of human resources. 13 However, the UNESCO listing process opened a window for greater cooperation. After tentative listing in 2007, a cross-cutting committee was formed in 2009 to standardize place names, and remove unnecessary or inferior trail signs. The simplified system of colour-coded, multi-lingual signs along 4 main trails symbolizes how the ‘carrot’ of UNESCO inscription provided an incentive to galvanize diverse stakeholders into collaborative action, but it is difficult to envisage how the momentum can maintain cross-cutting partnerships now that inscription has been achieved.

  • 28. Linkowski, Weronika Axelsson
    et al.
    Kvarnstrom, Marie
    Westin, Anna
    Moen, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ostlund, Lars
    Wolf and Bear Depredation on Livestock in Northern Sweden 1827-2014: Combining History, Ecology and Interviews2017In: Land, ISSN 2073-445X, E-ISSN 2073-445X, Vol. 6, no 3, article id 63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the twenty-first century, large carnivores have increased in human dominated landscapes after being extinct or nearly extinct. This has resulted in increasing numbers of livestock killed by large carnivores. The intent of this paper is to give a land use-historical perspective on the recent livestock-carnivore conflict in boreal Sweden. More specifically we address: (1) depredation risks (livestock killed by carnivores) and (2) local knowledge of how to protect livestock from predation and whether it survived among pastoralists until the present. This study provides numeric information on carnivores, livestock and depredation, combined with oral information from summer farmers about livestock protection. We compare recent (since 1998) and historical (late nineteenth century) depredation rates in two Swedish counties. In Dalarna recent depredation rates are higher than historical rates while the opposite pattern is seen in Jamtland. Recent depredation rates in Dalarna are twice the recent rates in Jamtland, in contrast to the historical situation. Recent and historical depredation rates are of the same order. Summer farmers traditionally graze their livestock in forested areas where carnivores reside. Interviews show that traditional knowledge of how to protect livestock from carnivores was lost during the twentieth century, but recently new knowledge has developed leading to changes in summer farming practices. The carnivore-livestock situation today differs from the historical situation, not so much in levels of depredation, but mainly regarding the possibilities of farmers to face challenges associated with increasing carnivore populations.

  • 29.
    Magnusson, Ulf
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    21. Overview of Infectious Diseases and the Wildlife-Livestock Interface2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 183-185Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Martineau, Daniel
    University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, CAN.
    17. Contaminants and Health of Beluga Whales of the Saint Lawrence Estuary2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 139-148Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Martineau, Daniel
    University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada.
    19. Fisheries of the St Lawrence River, Estuary and Gulf2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 163-166Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Miller, Philip S.
    et al.
    International Union for Conservation of Nature, Apple Valley, MN, USA.
    Citino, Scott
    White Oak Conservation Center, Yulee, FL, US.
    2. Facilitating Recovery of Threatened and Endangered Species2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 29-38Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Mörner, Torsten
    et al.
    National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Beasley, Val
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    22. Monitoring for Diseases in Wildlife Populations2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 186-190Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34. Ogmundsson, Hilmar
    Workshop om fiskeriafgifter i Vestnorden: 18-19. oktober 2016, Reykjavik, Island2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [da]

    De vestnordiske fiskeriforvaltninger står overfor og gennemgår aktuelt store og gennemgribende revisioner af landenes fiskerilove og -forvaltning. Spørgsmålene, som revisionerne omfatter, er økonomisk tung og politisk sensitive, hvilket gør, at forvaltningerne står over for krav om at levere de forvaltningsmæssigt rigtige løsninger. Formålet med at opkræve afgifter fra fiskeriet er at sikre en optimal udnyttelse af fiskeressourcerne. Denne rapport er fra en Vestnordisk workshop II, gennemført med midler fra Nordisk Ministerråds fiskerisamarbejde. Rapporten beskriver workshoppens debat om, hvorledes renten i fiskeriet skal beregnes; Hvor stor ressourcerenteafgift opkræves i de forskellige lande?; Hvad har ændret sig i landenes måde at beregne og opkræve fiskeriafgifter på?; Hvordan skal ressourcerenten fastsættes i praksis og hvordan kan man beregne et maksimalt afgiftstryk fra fiskeriet.

  • 35.
    Sandstrom, Camilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Johansson, Maria
    Sjolander-Lindqvist-, Annelie
    The management of large carnivores in Sweden: challenges and opportunities2015In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 120-121Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Sandström, Camilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Wennberg DiGasper, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Öhman, Karin
    Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Conflict resolution through ecosystem-based management: the case of Swedish moose management2013In: International Journal of the Commons, ISSN 1875-0281, E-ISSN 1875-0281, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 549-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish moose (Alces alces) management has over the years transformed from a situation similar to what Hardin (1968) defined as a tragedy of the commons – i.e. where open access and unrestricted demands lead to over-exploitation – into a situation characterized by an abundance of moose. While high numbers of moose are preferred by hunters, they damage forests through grazing, causing conflicts between hunters and forest owners. In an attempt to resolve these disputes, the Swedish government is introducing a new local ecosystem-based management system. This paper analyzes this shift from managing a single resource to the broader perspective of ecosystem management and discusses to what extent it will contribute to conflict resolution. The results suggest that some of the problems highlighted may be solved through the implementation of an ecosystem management system. However, several challenges remain to be tackled, such as how to establish robust partnerships between forest owners and hunters for managing moose on land with a fragmented property rights structure. This can lead to different and conflicting objectives and, consequently, difficulties in reaching collective action.

  • 37.
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Large-scale releases of native species: the mallard as a predictive model system2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Human alteration of natural systems, and its consequences are of great concern and the impact on global ecosystems is one of the biggest threats that biodiversity stands before. Translocations of invasive species, as well as intraspecific contingents with non-native genotypes, whether they are deliberate or unintentional, are one such alteration and its consequences are continuously being assessed. The mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) is the most numerous and widespread duck in the world and a flagship in wetland conservation. It is also an important game species which is heavily restocked for hunting purposes, especially in Europe where over three million ducklings are released every year. Because of its hunted status, its abundance, and the number of released individuals, it can serve as a model species to study effects of releases, both for conservation and restocking for hunting, on wild populations. In this thesis the status of the mallard was assessed in the Nordic countries and the effects of releases on the wild populations were studied by mining historical ringing data, comparing morphology of present-day wild, farmed, and historical mallards, and analyzing phylogeography of wild and farmed mallards in Europe. The status of the mallard population in the Nordic countries are generally good, however, a joint effort of European countries is needed to monitor and manage the population. A significant difference between wild and farmed mallards concerning longevity, migration, bill morphology and genetic structure was also found, together with signs of cryptic introgression of farmed genotypes in the wild population with potential fitness reduction as a result. The effect is however limited by that only a fraction of released farmed mallards reach the breeding season due to low survival. A natural captive environment is crucial to keep individuals wild-like with high survival rates after release. However, with an introgression of potentially maladapted farmed genotypes leading to a reduction in fitness, a low survival of released mallards would favor the wild population. A legislative change regarding obligation to report numbers, provenance, and release sites of farmed mallard should be considered, together with practical solutions of ringing and genetic monitoring of released mallards.

  • 38.
    Söderquist, Pär
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Utsatta änder – så går det för dem2014In: Svensk jakt, ISSN 0039-6583, Vol. 152, no 12, p. 72-73Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Weseloh, D.V. Chip
    Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    14. Contaminants in Colonial Waterbirds of the North American Great Lakes, 1955-20072012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 116-121Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Widman, Marit
    et al.
    National Institute of Economic Research / Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Elofsson, Katarina
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Costs of Livestock Depredation by Large Carnivores in Sweden 2001 to 20132018In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 143, p. 188-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Livestock depredation by large carnivores entails economic damage to farmers in many parts of the world. The aim of this paper is to analyse and compare the costs of livestock depredation by carnivores in Sweden across different carnivore species and counties. To this end, we estimate the government's compensation cost function using Swedish data on the county level over the period of 2001 to 2013. Compensation costs due to depredation by three large carnivores are considered: the brown bear (Ursus arctos), the wolf (Canis lupus) and the lynx (Lynx lynx). The results show that a 1% increase in the density of the carnivores leads to a 03-0.4% increase in compensation costs, whereas a 1% increase in the density of sheep results in a 0.8 and 1.1% increase in the compensation costs for brown bears and wolves, respectively. A larger share of unfenced pastures is associated with higher compensation costs for brown bear. The marginal cost of an additional carnivore individual varies considerably between counties, ranging between 1 and 82 EUR for lynxes, 0 and 266 EUR for brown bears, and 52 and 1067 EUR for wolves. (C) 2017 The Authors. 

  • 41.
    Ziegler, F.
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Hornborg, S.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Valentinsson, D.
    Skontorp Hognes, E.
    Søvik, G.
    Ritzau Eigaard, O.
    Same stock, different management: Quantifying the sustainability of three shrimp fisheries in the Skagerrak from a product perspective2016In: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 73, no 7, p. 1806-1814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis L.) stock in the Skagerrak is shared by Sweden, Norway, and Denmark. Although the fishery is regulated by an annual agreement between the EU and Norway, there are also national regulations as well as differences in fleet composition and shrimp markets. In early 2014, the World Wildlife Fund gave all Skagerrak shrimp a red light in their seafood consumer guide, which led to an extensive debate, especially in Sweden, about the sustainability of this fishery. The aim of this study was to quantify a set of indicators that together give a broad picture of the sustainability of the three fisheries to provide an objective basis for a discussion on needed measures. The different indicators concerned environmental, economic or social aspects of sustainability and were quantified per tonne of shrimp landed by each country in 2012. The Danish fishery was most efficient in terms of environmental and economic indicators, while the Swedish fishery provided most employment per tonne of shrimp landed. Fuel use in all fisheries was high, also when compared with other shrimp fisheries. Interesting patterns emerged, with smaller vessels being more fuel efficient than larger ones in Sweden and Norway, with the opposite trend in Denmark. The study also demonstrated major data gaps and differences between the countries in how data are collected and made available. Various improvement options in the areas data collection and publication, allocation of quotas and enforcement of regulations resulted. Product-oriented studies could be useful to follow-up performance of fisheries over time and to identify how to best utilize the Skagerrak shrimp stock. This could involve evaluating novel solutions in terms of technology and management, based on current and future scenarios aiming to maximize societal benefits generated from this limited resource, at minimized environmental impacts. © 2016 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea 2016. All rights reserved.

  • 42.
    Zwiernik, Matthew
    et al.
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.
    Vermeulen, Frouke
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.
    Bursian, Steven
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.
    16. Contaminants in Semi-aquatic Wildlife: Lessons from the Laurentian Great Lakes2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 2, p. 128-138Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf