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  • 1.
    Aditya, Pawar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Designhögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Prototyping boundary objects: Boundary objects as means for negotiating a cultural imaginary2015Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 2.
    Ahnfelt, Nils-Otto
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Fors, Hjalmar
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Wendin, Karin
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för naturvetenskap, Forskningsmiljön Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för naturvetenskap, Avdelningen för mat- och måltidsvetenskap.
    Assessing sensory properties of the early modern medicine “Elixir amarum Hiaernei”2018Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    We are reworking the early modern medicine with focus on products, today known as Swedish Bitters or similar names, and historically as “Elixir amarum Hiaernei”. The history of the recipe dates back at least to mid-18th century. It was probably one of the Hiaerne-brothers, Ulrik Leonhard (1712-1758) or Christian Henric (1709-1794), who invented this universal medication. From a number of Linnaeus sources from later 18th century it is well known that odor, flavor and taste were used to assess pharmacological potential of medicinal herbals.

    The purpose of this study was to assess ingredients of “Elixir amarum Hiaernei” from a sensory perspective.      

    Methods

    The ingredients in “Elixir amarum Hiaernei” according to the 18th century recipes: agarikon, aloe, gentian, myrrh, rhubarb, saffron, Theriac Andromachalis, zedoary together with alcohol and sugar.

    These ingredients were assessed by a trained sensory panel using a slightly modified version of the Flavor Profile Method®. Each ingredient was evaluated with respect to odor, taste and flavor.

    Results

    All ingredients were intense in taste, flavor and odor. The ingredients could be described due to its sensory characteristics, in which they differed largely. However, they had in common that they were high in bitterness.

    Discussion

    The ingredients of this historic medication had intense tastes, flavors and odors in line with historical sources. It points for example out that the senses, especially olfaction, was of high importance for the apothecary during the 18th century. In order to find the right blend of ingredients the sensory profiles were of highest importance, both ingredients and blended medication were valuated due to this by physicians as well as patients. Sensory evaluation was also of major importance in the quality assessment of medical herbals by the early modern apothecary.

     

    Sensory profiles of the medical ingredients will be presented at the Eurosense symposium.

  • 3.
    Almgren White, Anette
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Skolnära forskning, Språk-, litteratur- och mediedidaktik. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Lärandepraktiker i och utanför skolan (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    An overview of diverse representation in children’s books from publishing houses in Sweden2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 4.
    Anders, Lind
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för estetiska ämnen i lärarutbildningen.
    Voyage One - Mobile Phone Orchestra 2020 Conducted by Animated Notation2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    University of Oregon, USA.
    Fanning, J.
    University of Oregon, USA.
    Neville, Helen J.
    University of Oregon, USA.
    Monolingual and bilingual 6-8 year old children display N400 responses mediated by proficiency and age of acquisition2009Inngår i: 2009 SRCD Biennial Meeting, Society for Research in Child Development: Denver, Colorado, USA, April 2-4, 2009, 2009Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 6.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    University of Oregon, USA.
    Fanning, Jessica L.
    University of Oregon, USA.
    Neville, Helen J.
    University of Oregon, USA.
    An ERP study of nonword rhyming in 3- to 8-year old monolinguals and 6- to 8-year old bilinguals investigating the effects of age and proficiency2009Inngår i: The 2nd Conference of the Swedish Association for Language and Cognition: 2009, June 10–12, Stockholm University, Sweden, 2009Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of phonological awareness (PA) for later acquired skills including reading and writing have repeatedly been reported (e.g. Lundberg, Olofsson, & Wall, 1980) such that preliterate skills in PA predicts reading and writing up to at least 11 years after (MacDonald & Cornwall, 1995). In the current study behavioural measures of PA along with Event Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded. ERPs record the electrical activity of the brain online sampling millisecond by millisecond such that differences in processing between groups that may not be evident in behavioural measures are possible to discern. Previous ERP studies of auditory rhyming showed the classical phonological rhyming effect (RE; N450) to be evident in children as young as 6 years of age (Coch, Grossi, Skendzel, & Neville, 2005). ERPs to spoken nonword targets (introduced to eliminate effects of semantic skills) preceded by nonrhyming nonwords showed increased negativity (400-600ms post-stimulus-onset) in comparison to rhyming targets, and this effect was largest at posterior medial sites bilaterally. Thus the previous research suggests that the neurocognitive networks involved in processing auditory rhyme information are comparable to adults by the age of 6. The current study (1) extends this finding to younger children aged 3, 4 and 5 years and (2) to bilingual, late learners of English aged 6-8.

    Behaviourally, the proportion of monolingual children with proficiency in rhyming (production and recognition skills) increased as a function of age. When comparing the RE across age groups, no differences were found in amplitude. However, the timing of the onset of the RE decreased linearly with age, indicating faster processing of the auditory stimuli in older children. An examination of 4-year-old children with different levels of rhyming proficiency revealed similar differences in the RE. Specifically, the onset of the RE was earlier in children with higher rhyming skills as compared to children of similar age with lower rhyming skills. A late rhyming effect (600-800 ms), i.e. an increased negativity to nonrhyming targets with a different distribution than the previously reported RE, was found in high but not low proficient 4-year olds. We hypothesized that this effect was related to verbal short-term memory indicating task difficulty being higher for younger (4-year olds) than older (6-8 year olds) monolingual children. This same effect was found in native Spanish speaking bilingual children aged 6-8 with roughly 2.5 years of experience of English. The significance of these effects will be discussed in the frameworks of language proficiency and age.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Gullberg, Marianne
    Lund University.
    An ERP study of the relationship between verb semantics and events2016Inngår i: The 8th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language, 2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Languages differ in how events are described, but little is known about how semantics interacts with online event processing. This study targets this question examining placement events in Swedish. Swedish has three obligatory placement verbs for events where objects have support from below: sätta ’set’, ställa ’stand’, and lägga ’lay’. Swedish lacks a superordinate general term like English put (Gullberg & Burenhult, 2011). For every placement event the verb choice depends on object properties, and the direction of the object’s extension from the ground. We use event-related potentials (ERPs) and appropriateness ratings of verb usage to investigate the interaction between verb semantics and event properties. Typically violations of semantic congruency positively affect the amplitude of the N400 (Kutas & Hillyard, 1980). Studies also report a centro-parietal positivity (P600) when real-world knowledge is violated and verbs are incongruous to preceding contexts (Kuperberg, 2007, for a review). Previous ERP studies of visually presented images or movies of actions and events have reported an N400 followed by a P600 when the function of an object is violated (e.g., using a screwdriver as a key, Bach, et al., 2009; Balconi & Caldiroli, 2011).

    Method: Native speakers (N = 24, 18-35 years) watched still images of placement events followed by sentences visually presented word by word. Sentences described the depicted events while ERPs were recorded and time-locked to the placement verbs. Participants also did an appropriateness rating offline. Object properties (Base/Without base), symmetry (Sym/Asym), and orientation from the ground (Vertical/Horizontal) were varied and sentences with the three different placement verbs were combined with each image in a cross-subject design.

    Results: Base was important for appropriateness ratings of verb usage with symmetric objects while orientation was important for asymmetric objects. In contrast, there were no ERP effects to base (Base/Without) for symmetric objects. Asymmetric-base objects showed increased N400s and P600s with verbs incongruent with the depicted events (orientation, e.g., ‘lay’ with vertical glass). Asymmetric-Without base elicited an increased P600 when verbs were incongruent to depicted events when horizontally oriented (e.g., ‘set’ with horizontal avocado), but an increased N400 when verbs were incongruent to the atypical vertical placement of the objects (e.g., ‘lay’ with a vertical avocado).

    Discussion: Results showed an increased amplitude of both ERP effects (N400/P600) when placement verbs were incongruent with typical placement scenarios of objects that in the real-world are placed vertically or horizontally (Asymmetric-Base, e.g., a candle; cf. Bach et al., 2009). However, for objects without a base the anterior negativity was increased with a mismatch between the verb and the presented images (the depicted events), while the P600 increased for mismatches between the verb and typical real-world events. These results suggest the anterior N400 and the P600 indeed index different relationships with event processing as previously suggested for images (Sitnikova, et al., 2008). Our results agree with previous studies suggesting that the processing of verb meaning in language cannot be separated from knowledge of object handling in the real world (cf., Van Berkum, et al., 2008).

  • 8.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för svenska språket (SV).
    Gullberg, Marianne
    Lund University.
    Standing avocados, or when ratings of sentences and brain processing tells different stories2018Inngår i: The ASLA Symposium 2018, Karlstad: Karlstad University , 2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Languages differ in how placement events are described. Swedish has three obligatory placement verbs for events where objects have support from below: sätta ’set’, ställa ’stand’, and lägga ’lay’. These verbs are highly frequent yet difficult to acquire for learners of Swedish. The verb choice depends on object properties, and the direction of the object’s extension from the ground. We extend previous findings by introducing event-related potentials (ERPs) and appropriateness ratings of verb usage to investigate the interaction between verb semantics and event properties. Native speakers of Swedish watched still images of placement events followed by visually presented sentences describing these events while ERPs were recorded. Participants also did appropriateness ratings offline. Object properties (Base/Without base), symmetry (Symmetric/Asymmetric), and orientation from the ground (Vertical/Horizontal) were varied and each placement verb was combined with each image across participants. Previous ERP-studies have shown that different types of violations are related to different types of ERP effects. Semantic congruency affect a centro-medial negativity—the N400 (Kutas & Hillyard, 1980) while a centro-parietal positivity—the P600 is affected when real-world knowledge is violated (e.g., using a screwdriver as a key, Balconi & Caldiroli, 2011). Results showed an increased amplitude of both ERP effects when placement verbs were incongruent with the depicted event including objects with a base. For objects without a base the ERP effects were in addition related to incongruency with real world knowledge—e.g., avocados are usually not vertically placed i.e., standing on a table. With the inclusion of the neurophysiological measure sensitivity to event features not captured by ratings was revealed. Combined results corroborate and elucidate existing analyses of the complexity of verb semantics. A better understanding of native speakers’ processing of placement verbs opens new options for probing the difficulties of learning Swedish placement verbs for adult second language learners.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Sayehli, Susan
    Lund University.
    Gullberg, Marianne
    Lund University.
    Language background affects word order processing in a second language online but not offline2014Inngår i: Culture, Brain, Learning : Wallenberg Network Initiative: Lund University, nov 19-24, 2014 / [ed] Maja Petersson, Lund: Lund University , 2014, s. 15-15Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Different languages organize information differently, for example in different word orders. A large body of work shows that learning to use word order in a new, second language (L2) is difficult. An example is the production of verb-second (V2) word order, which requires the finite verb in main clauses to appear in second position even when the sentence does not start with a subject. V2 difficulties are ubiquitous and only partially modulated by patterns in thefirst language (L1; e.g., Ganuza, 2008 for an overview). Despite the body of work on L2 production, we know surprisingly little about how word order is processed behaviorally and neurocognitively, and how production relates to comprehension. This study therefore examined how advanced German (n=14) and English (n=14) adult learners, matched for proficiency and age of acquisition, process word order in Swedish compared to native speakers (n=20) depending on L1 background (i.e., ±similar word order in the L1; German [+V2] vs. English [-V2]), sentence-initial adverb frequency (frequent idag ‘today’ vs. infrequent hemma ‘at home’ (1)), and length of the sentence-initial constituent (short vs. long prefield; (2)).

    (1) Idag/Hemma läste hon tidningen. vs. *Idag/Hemma hon läste tidningen. Today/At home read she paper.def vs. *Today/At home she read paper.def

    (2) Idag/Hemma hos Maria läste hon tidningen. vs. *Idag/Hemma hos Maria hon läste tidningen. Today/At home at Maria’s read she paper.def vs. *Today/At home at Maria’s she read paper.def.

    We probed the production of word order in a sentence completion task and examined responses to word order (violations) in a timed acceptability judgment task during which participants were presented with sentences word by word while event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. At the end of the sentence participants judged the sentence acceptability.

    Overall, the results indicated that the two learner groups behaved similarly on behavioral measures of comprehension and production, but crucially differed in online processing. All groups, including learners, showed sensitivity to V2-violations in the ERPs. Swedish native speakers were also sensitive to length of prefield showing the typical biphasic ERP response only to violations with long prefields allowing build up of expectations. Importantly, the learners, who did not differ behaviorally, showed different responses. The German learners [+V2] showed similar ERP patterns to native Swedish speakers, whereas the English learners [-V2] showed more variation in their ERP responses. We discuss these findings in terms of theories of crosslinguistic influence and theories of native-like syntacticprocessing.

  • 10.
    Aspenberg, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för språk, litteratur och interkultur.
    The Strindberg Legacy - Panel of young scholars on Strindberg studies today: On Strindberg's world. A thematic reading of an authorship2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 11.
    Ball, Martin
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap.
    Is there phonology without meaning?2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 12.
    Ball, Martin
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap.
    Rhotic Phonemes in Modern Standard Welsh: The effect of Welsh-English Bilingualism?2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 13.
    Ball, Martin J.
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Muller, Nicole
    The phonemic status of the rhotics in Modern Standard Welsh.2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 14.
    Ball, Martin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap.
    Muller, Nicole
    Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Rhotic Phonemes in Modern Standard Welsh: The effect of Welsh-English Bilingualism?2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 15.
    Berglin, Lena
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Zetterblom, Margareta
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Textile Sound Structures2008Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe a set of sound sensitive structures based on piezoelectric technique. We have laminated piezoelectric polymer films between layers of different textile fabric structures. The initial results show that these structures register sound and the signal quality depends on the laminate set-up. Textile sound structures offer a variety of possible applications such as active sound absorbers and heart rate monitoring.

  • 16.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap.
    Understanding the Results ofConventional Qualitative ContentAnalysis for Design Research2015Inngår i: EAD 2015: The Value of Design Research, Paris, France, 2015, Vol. 11Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we look closer at content analysis as a tool in design research and question some of the, more or less explicit, assumptions about what can be achieved by such analyses. To do so, we applied a qualitative content analysis (QCA) on six interviews with service design practitioners.

    The topic of the interviews was service prototyping, inquiring the practitioners about their approaches and conceptions, but starting with some more general questions about their work process in the later stages of service design. The interviews were conducted over telephone (2) and Skype (4), most of the time not using video. So a large part of communication that can usually be accessed in physical interactions between people could not be used to enhance understanding of the material.

    Qualitative content analysis is used to create an abstract version of a larger data set. QCA is often understood as negotiating the weaknesses associated with qualitative approaches (Mayring, 2000). We discuss this understanding of QCA by looking at an instance where a conventional QCA was used. Conventional QCA is used when existing theory is limited (Hsieh & Shannon, 2005), and researchers are looking to understand a phenomenon by immersing themselves in data and letting categories emerge. This has also been called inductive category development (Mayring, 2000). Little is known about service prototyping practices, making this an appropriate approach.

    A paper by (Graneheim & Lundman, 2004) was used to decide what the approach should look like. In this study the analysis was divided into stages:

    -        Identifying meaning units

    -        Condensing the meaning units

    -        Coding

    -        Constructing Sub-categories

    -        Applying the Sub-categories to categories

    -        Generalising categories into themes

    In our approach we avoided using preconceived categories (Kondracki, Wellman, & Amundson, 2002) and instead let them emerge from the data, keeping an open attitude to the content. We see this approach as way to go from a straightforward condensation of manifest content, and then, in creating categories and themes, a shift is made to underlying meaning and thus towards the latent content of the material.

    Using this example we show the many subjective choices involved in data collection, choosing unit of analysis (and thereby excluding material), dividing the material into meaning units, and in how to understand the collected data. Unlike the idea that the result of such an approach is somehow more objective or “scientific” than other types of qualitative analysis, we argue that the strength of QCA lies in transparency of data and analysis. The bottom-up approach does not ensure that the result is a consequence of the material, but rather that choices have been made visible. The analysis becomes a rationale for the decisions made during analysis that can be accessed by external researchers. This opens up the analysis for critique but should still be seen as the consequence of subjective choices, perspectives and understanding.

  • 17.
    Boström, Lena
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för humanvetenskap, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap.
    Strzelecka, Elzbieta
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för humanvetenskap, Avdelningen för humaniora.
    Teachers’ grammar teaching strategies.2013Inngår i: / [ed] Boström, L., Augustsson, G., Evans, C., Charlesworth, Z. & Cools, E., Brno: Tribun, EU , 2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A research strategy that only focuses on students and their learning styles and does not place them within a pedagogic context only provides a fragmentary image of students’ learning. To be able to achieve a comprehensive picture of learning, all three variables in the “didactic” triangle have to be taken into account: the students, teacher and the subject have to be evaluated. The aim of this study is to learn more about teachers' perceptions of their own grammar teaching. This study is a continuation of research into learning styles and grammar in school.  The first part of the study focused on the retention of students, whereas this study focuses on the adults' stories about grammar in school. The study’s theoretical framework is based on didactic research on Swedish grammar teaching. The focus of the study is important not only because grammar is considered to be both difficult to learn and difficult to teach, but also because knowledge of grammar is now explicitly expressed in steering documents that include clear aims.

  • 18.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för film och litteratur (IFL).
    Digitale Dokumentarfilmarchive als Wissensressource für die Zivilgesellschaft2018Inngår i: „Dokumentarische Praktiken in medialer Transformation. Historische Entwicklungen und aktuelle Perspektiven“: 6.-7. Juli 2018, Universität Hamburg, 2018Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 19.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Hammarlund, Dan
    Lund University.
    Hjärthner-Holdar, Eva
    Swedish National Historical Museums.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University.
    Lindahl, Anders
    Lund University.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Possnert, Göran
    Uppsala University.
    The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database: a resource for international, multiproxy and transdisciplinary studies of environmental and climatic change2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate and environmental change are global challenges which require global data and infrastructure to investigate. These challenges also require a multi-proxy approach, integrating evidence from Quaternary science and archaeology with information from studies on modern ecology and physical processes among other disciplines. The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD http://www.sead.se) is a Swedish based international research e-infrastructure for storing, managing, analysing and disseminating palaeoenvironmental data from an almost unlimited number of analysis methods. The system currently makes available raw data from over 1500 sites (>5300 datasets) and the analysis of Quaternary fossil insects, plant macrofossils, pollen, geochemistry and sediment physical properties, dendrochronology and wood anatomy, ceramic geochemistry and bones, along with numerous dating methods. This capacity will be expanded in the near future to include isotopes, multi-spectral and archaeo-metalurgical data. SEAD also includes expandable climate and environment calibration datasets, a complete bibliography and extensive metadata and services for linking these data to other resources. All data is available as Open Access through http://qsead.sead.se and downloadable software.

     

    SEAD is maintained and managed at the Environmental Archaeology Lab and HUMlab at Umea University, Sweden. Development and data ingestion is progressing in cooperation with The Laboratory for Ceramic Research and the National Laboratory for Wood Anatomy and Dendrochronology at Lund University, Sweden, the Archaeological Research Laboratory, Stockholm University, the Geoarchaeological Laboratory, Swedish National Historical Museums Agency and several international partners and research projects. Current plans include expanding its capacity to serve as a data source for any system and integration with the Swedish National Heritage Board's information systems.

     

    SEAD is partnered with the Neotoma palaeoecology database (http://www.neotomadb.org) and a new initiative for building cyberinfrastructure for transdisciplinary research and visualization of the long-term human ecodynamics of the North Atlantic funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

  • 20.
    Carlsson, Karin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Historiska institutionen.
    The Heroine of Domestic Service? The Swedish Social Home Help Service 1944 - 19602007Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 21.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation.
    Here come the critics: Journalistic discourse in Kenya and South Africa2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 22.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Engelska.
    Early Communicative Gestures and Vocabulary Knowledge2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This poster presents work on the relationships between early communicative gestures and vocabulary knowledge in Swedish children aged 12 to 18 months. The role of gestures in early communicative development was studied using vocabulary measurements collected with the Swedish versions of the MacArthur-Bates CDI infant and toddler forms. In a larger study, correlations were calculated among communicative skills over 6-month intervals from child age 1;0 to 2;6 in a sample with varying numbers of children at different ages. The poster presents results from the first pairwise comparison using cross-sectional and cross-lagged correlations. Variables included gestures, receptive and productive vocabulary at 1;0, and productive vocabulary and the syntactic/grammatical measure M3L at 1;6 (n = 321). Gestures at 1;0 were more strongly correlated with receptive than productive vocabulary at the same age, and weakly correlated with productive vocabulary at 1;6. Additional analysis divided the gesture scale into “empty-hand” gestures and “object actions”, following Sansavini et al. (2010). Empty-hand gestures were found to be more related to productive vocabulary, while object-actions were more related to reception. Despite differences in methodology, results of the present study confirm some findings by Sansavini et al. Further analysis of the Swedish data showed that empty-hand gestures were significantly, but weakly, correlated with the percentage of nouns in children’s vocabularies at 1;6, whereas children’s use of object-actions were similarly correlated with the percentage of verbs. Results of this analysis may indicate that empty-hand gestures, which most often are deictic gestures, help infants enhance their knowledge of objects and their names, while activities with objects help them understand the concepts related to actions, particularly verbs. Such knowledge has implications for both parents and other caregivers who are invested in stimulating the language development of young children.

  • 23.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Engelska.
    von Rosen, Tatjana
    Stockholms universitet.
    Early Communicative Development in Swedish Children aged 12 to 30 months2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on child language acquisition confirms the importance of early language development for later language and literacy skills (Dickinson, Golinkoff & Hirsh-Pasek, 2010; Lee, 2011), and documents great individual variability in children’s acquisition rates (Fenson et al., 1994). Recent research has also widened the focus to include the impact of early gestures (e.g. Rowe & Goldin-Meadow, 2009). This study aims to investigate early communicative development in a sample of Swedish children based on parental report, using Swedish versions of the MacArthur-Bates CDI (Berglund & Eriksson, 2000; Eriksson & Berglund, 1999). In particular, variables such as early communicative gestures, receptive and productive vocabulary, and the syntactic/grammatical measure M3L (the Mean Length of Utterance score of the three longest utterances parents have heard their child say) are explored. The specific target group here is a subsample (from a total sample of 348) consisting of 128 children with complete records collected at six-month intervals (12, 18, 24 and 30 months of age). In the analysis, gender and children’s ability to use the pointing gesture at 12 months are used as grouping variables.

    The analysis entails first looking at general trends in the data, and thereafter examining individual trajectories, especially extreme ones. Growth curve modelling is employed to describe trajectories of productive vocabulary development, first with gender as the grouping variable, and secondly, with the pointing gesture at 12 months of age. Since preliminary results show different variation in the response between boys and girls, different covariance structures are used for modelling. Moreover, banded covariance structure is utilized to take into account strong correlations between neighboring time points (12-18, 18-24, and 24-30 months). Testing fixed effects reveals highly significantly different slopes for girls and boys. The banded covariance structure is also used in the analysis of productive vocabulary with pointing as the grouping variable. Taking into account heterogeneity in the two groups, results also indicate highly significant differences in vocabulary growth for pointers vs. non-pointers. However, separate analysis of the two groups is needed before further conclusions can be made. It must also be stressed that the data comes from parental report, and observational knowledge of both parental and child gestures is lacking. However, the results of this study definitely contribute to the international body of knowledge with data from the Swedish context. Furthermore, results regarding early communication are of interest for parents, child- and healthcare personnel, as well as educational practitioners.

  • 24.
    Dahl, Izabela A.
    Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany .
    Schweden als Zufluchtsland für jüdische Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler im Schatten des Nationalsozialismus 1933-452010Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [de]

    Skandinavische, deutsche und US-amerikanische Historiker/innen präsentierten vom 8.–10. Oktober auf diesem Symposium am Nordeuropa-Institut, das – wie Theaterstück Remembering Miss Meitner – von Jorunn Sem Fure und Izabela Dahl arrangiert wurde, Beiträge über jüdische Forscher im skandinavischen Exil:

    • Annette Vogt (Max-Planck-Institut): Lise Meitner and her colleagues in Exile
    • Ruth Lewin Sime (Sacramento City College): Lise Meitner in Schweden
    • Izabela Dahl (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin): Schweden als Zufluchtsland für jüdische Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler im Schatten des Nationalsozialismus 1933–45
    • Ola Holmgren (Södertörn Högskola): Bilingualism and exile. The crucial importance of Swedish language and Swedish exile in the aesthetic renewal of modernism in the literary works of Peter Weiss
    • Therkel Stræde (Syddansk Universitet): Berlin, Kopenhagen und der ferne Osten: Hanna Kobylinski – Jüdin, Historikerin – im dänischen Exil
    • Einhart Lorenz (Universitetet i Oslo): »Oslo ist noch nicht Endstation für mich.« Norwegen und die Wissenschaftsemigration nach 1933
    • Robert Marc Friedman (Universitetet i Oslo): Concluding Remarks

    Ein Panelgespräch mit den Zeitzeugen Prof. Dr. Jan Peters, Dr. Renate Steinitz, Peter Th. Walther wurde von den OrganisatorInnen geleitet.

    Das Theaterstück Remembering Miss Meitner, das bereits in Schweden, Norwegen und den USA vor einem großen Publikum aufgeführt worden war, schloss sich thematisch an das Symposium an. Die beiden Aufführungen – in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Maxim-Gorki-Theater – und das abschließende Publikumsgespräch, an dem der Autor des Stückes und die DarstellerInnen beteiligt waren, stellten die Krönung des zweiteiligen kulturellen Events dar.

  • 25.
    Dahlbäck, Nils
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Interaktiva och kognitiva system. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Skagerlund, Kenny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Culture, Cognitive Systems and Extended Mind – Embedding the Extended Mind within Activity Theory2011Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 26.
    de Lhoneux, Miryam
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Språkvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik och filologi.
    Nivre, Joakim
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Språkvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik och filologi.
    UD Treebank Sampling for Comparative Parser Evaluation2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 27.
    Drion, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för humaniora, Svenska språket.
    Marston, Pamela
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för humaniora, Engelska.
    Action research in Swedish LSP practice: Can we do it? Can we get FUNDED for it?2013Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Action research is an internationally established method of inquiry, primarily within education.  It is not a research method that is widely practiced within Sweden, although given its specific focus, that of a disciplined inquiry undertaken by an instructor with the intent that this research will inform and possibly change her/his teaching practices in the future, this poster will explore the possibilities of using this method within LSP.

    This poster will outline the three basic types of action research ( individual, collaborative, and institutional) and will briefly note the benefits and drawbacks of each type from a Swedish university organizational perspective.  This poster will also present several direct examples/ eventual case studies of action research areas/ types of inquiries within two disciplines, English studies and Swedish studies, at Högskolan i Gävle.

    New research methods are adapted in direct relation to their possibility of being funded, and this poster will also address this.  Several of the major funding agencies in Sweden, including VR, RJ, SI, and STINT, will be examined here in terms of the possibilities of acquiring support for action research within the context of their respective guidelines.  The poster will present various potential inroads and research cluster constellations as possible options.

  • 28.
    Ericsson, Stina
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för svenska språket (SV).
    Ottesjö, Cajsa
    University of Gothenburg.
    Children play equally: Assistant teachers’ and researchers’ interaction with children with and without language and cognitive disabilities in play with a robot2015Inngår i: Abstracts of the 14th International Pragmatics Conference, 2015, s. 590-590Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the project LekBot (Ljunglöf, P. et al. 2011) was to develop a robot to support children with severe disabilities (communicative, cognitive, physical) in play with peers that follow a typical pattern of development. Since children with disabilities have few opportunities to play independently of an adult assistant and on equal terms with other children, and more often take a passive role in interaction with more advanced children (Siperstein et al. 1997; Hestenes & Carroll 2000), we developed a speaking robot, the LekBot.

    Two groups of children, at two different pre-schools were video recorded during play, in all 2x12 play sessions. In each group there was one child with cerebral palsy and one peer, as well as a teacher assistant. A previous study (Ferm et al. 2015) focused on the children’s experience of play in this situation. The children with disabilities took an active role in some cases and there was collaboration between the children as well as enjoyment of play. But there were also times when one of the children lost interest in the play.

    The present study focuses on the adult’s actions during the play sessions. We will discuss the impact of the actions of the teacher assistant and the researchers during children’s play with the robot. In our talk we will present two examples. The first shows how the researcher intervenes when the children don’t take equal turns in commanding the robot. In the second, where the peer obviously lost interest in the play, we discuss how the assistant works hard in trying to involve the child in active play again. The analytic method is CA-inspired sequential analysis of transcribed video recordings.

    The researchers and assistants in the recorded play situations seemed all to be aware of the goal of the project, i.e. to help a child with disabilities to play more actively together with peers. The idea of taking turns was also emphasized by the adults during the children's play. The results show how different linguistic channels are used (speech, signs, gesture and gaze, as well as symbol charts) when adults target the children’s turn-taking, request that they should talk and listen to each other and cooperate in playing together. 

  • 29.
    Fahlgren, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för matematik och datavetenskap.
    Brunström, Mats
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för matematik och datavetenskap.
    Using slider tools to explore and validate2015Inngår i: CERME9 Proceedings of the Ninth Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education, 2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 30.
    Falthin, Peter
    Kungl. Musikhögskolan, Institutionen för musik, pedagogik och samhälle.
    The Meaning of Making: Mapping Strategies in Music Composition2016Inngår i: International Conference on Music Perception anc Cognition, 14th Biennial Meeting: Proceedings / [ed] Theodore Zanto, San Francisco: University of California Press, 2016, s. 183-185Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract—One way to think of creative processes is as recontextualizations of perceptions and conceptions of reality. Impressions and ideas are seen from new perspectives and connected in new ways before entered into a new context in a different form, which may or may not include shifts in modality or form of representation. This study is about how composition students give musical expression to extra-musical phenomena and how they relate their musical thinking to other forms of representation. It involves studying what mapping strategies the student composers develop in order to establish relationships between different forms of representation, but also to study the meaning making processes in both the analysis and synthesis phase of the restructuring of concepts.

    The how-questions imply a qualitative approach and method. Data comprise a wide variety of sketch material, as well as scores, performances and recordings of the finalized compositions, and in-depth interviews with the student composers in relation to these materials. In all the studied cases, composition process began with extramusical considerations in the form of narratives, imagery or some kind of physical phenomena (e.g. geometrical concepts, acoustical phenomena and tactile qualities). Typically there would appear several creative processes in different modalities converging into musical form along the composition process. Results suggest that these students intend their music to represent extramusical phenomena and concepts in as far as they take that as points of departure for developing compositional concepts, but also for shaping musical expression. To a varying degree, these extramusical considerations are meant to be conveyed in the music. 

  • 31.
    Falthin, Peter
    et al.
    Kungl. Musikhögskolan, Institutionen för musik, pedagogik och samhälle.
    Dahlstedt, Palle
    Göteborgs universitet, IT-universitetet, Chalmers.
    Creative Structures or Structured Creativity?: Investigating algorithmic composition as a pedagogical tool2010Inngår i: The 11nth International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition (ICMPC11): Book of Abstracts / [ed] Steven M. Demorest, Steven J Morrison & Patricia S Campbell, Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2010, s. 125-Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    CREATIVE STRUCTURES OR STRUCTURED CREATIVITY (Investigation algorithmic composition as a pedagogical tool) Peter Falthin, PalleDahlstedt Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Chalmers Technical University, Gothenburg peter.falthin@kmh.se palle@chalmers.se

    ABSTRACT

    This empirical study aims to depict how composers develop and structure creative resources, aided by algorithmic methods and other means of structuring material and processes. The project is not meant to be conclusive, but rather to form a point of departure and raise questions for further theoretical and empirical study in the field. Implications for teaching and learning composition and for designing interactive musical tools are expected. In specific, this paper concerns concept development within learning of music composition: if, how and to what extent this is comparable to that of language-based learning. The research project in progress sets out to study cognitive processes of composers working to integrate the outcome of composition algorithms, with the subjective compositional aim and modus operandi. However, in most cases the composer is also designer of the algorithm or at least of its specific application to the compositional problem. Consequently the strategies involved in designing and applying compositional algorithms need to be considered and discussed insofar that they too are part of the integration process. The study at hand draws from research conducted in cultural-historical psychology, cognitive psychology and linguistic theory, concerning internalization, development of concepts and syntactic and semantic aspects of musical structures. 

  • 32. Farrús, Mireia
    et al.
    Eriksson, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Filosofi och lingvistik.
    Sullivan, Kirk P. H.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Filosofi och lingvistik.
    Hernando, Javier
    Dialect imitations in speaker recognition2007Inngår i: Proceedings of the 2nd European IAFL conference on Forensic Linguistics / Language and the Law / [ed] Turell, M. Teresa; Spassova, Maria; Cicres, Jordi, Barcelona: Institut Universitari de Lingüística Aplicada. Universitat Pompeu Fabra; Documenta Universitaria , 2007Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 33.
    Ferreira Corrêa, Antenor
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan. Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, Brazil.
    Westvall, Maria
    Örebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Processos Interculturais de Ensino-Aprendizagem: Cooperação internacional e imersão musical no Brasil e na Suécia2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [pt]

    Descrição de pesquisa em andamento fruto de parceria interinstitucional entre as universidades de Brasília e Örebro (Suécia). Dentre os objetivos do projeto intenta-se ativar de modo efetivo o senso de colaboração intercultural entre as instituições por meio da implantação de atividades de imersão cultural. Ainda, busca-se compreender o que os sujeitos pesquisados pensam a respeito de sua prática para a sociedade e para eles mesmos como músicose professores de música. A metodologia aplicada envolve atividades de imersão musical e interação dos pesquisadores nos dois países. Os resultados parciais alcançados indicam que o projeto tem potencial para contribuir subsidiando reflexões e propostas ligadas à aprendizagem intercultural focadas no ensino da música; bem como, promovendo renovação ou inspirações para futuros temas e metodologias de pesquisa em música.

  • 34.
    Fjæstad, Maja
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Filosofi och teknikhistoria, Teknik- och vetenskapshistoria.
    Kaijser, Arne
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Filosofi och teknikhistoria, Teknik- och vetenskapshistoria.
    Högselius, Per
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Filosofi och teknikhistoria, Teknik- och vetenskapshistoria.
    Åberg, Anna
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Filosofi och teknikhistoria, Teknik- och vetenskapshistoria.
    The Geopolitics of Energy: Swedish International Dependencies in a Historical Perspective2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    A metaphor that is often used to describe energy supply is that of a nation’s blood circulation. Indeed, a permanent interruption in the supply of energy would be lethal to any society. Sweden – a neutral country in cold war Europe – belongs to those countries that are, and have been, very strongly dependent on imports of energy, and this implies a special vulnerability. Today two imported energy carriers – oil and uranium – each covers some 30 % of the total.

    Sweden is of course not alone in its dependence on imported fuels. The world’s energy resources are unevenly distributed, and since the mid 19th century the pursuit of coal, oil, gas and uranium has been an important constituent of international politics and economics. The strongest nations have used economical, political and if necessary military means to control energy sources in far away territories in order to secure their energy supplies at home. This is often referred to as the geopolitics of energy, and there has been quite some research about it. There has been much less research on how small nations have tried to handle their dependencies on far away countries using “soft” means rather than “hard” ones. By studying how Sweden has done this we hope to contribute to an understanding of the geopolitics of energy of small nations.

    We will focus at which actors and which motives that have been central in these decisions and whether it is possible to identify a distinct but evolving ‘Swedish model’ in actors’ attempts to deal with vulnerabilities stemming from energy import dependence, and if this model has applied to the energy system as a whole, i.e. the same model has applied to all types of fuels.

  • 35.
    Forssén Renner, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för fonetik.
    Wlodarzcak, Marcin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för fonetik.
    The surprised pupil: New perspectives in semantic processing research2016Inngår i: ISSBD 2016, 2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In the research on semantic processing and brain activity, the N400-paradigm has been long known to reflect a reaction to unexpected events, for instance the incongruence between visual and verbal information when subjects are presented with a picture and a mismatching word. In the present study, we investigate whether an N400-like reaction to unexpected events can be captured with pupillometry. While earlier research has firmly established a connection between changes in pupil diameter and arousal, the findings have not been so far extended to the domain of semantic processing. Consequently, we measured pupil size change in reaction to a match or a mismatch between a picture and an auditorily presented word. We presented 120 trials to ten native speakers of Swedish. In each trial a picture was displayed for six seconds, and 2.5 seconds into the trial the word was played through loudspeakers. The picture and the word were matching in half of the trials, and all stimuli were common high-frequency monosyllabic Swedish words. For the analysis, the baseline pupil size at the sound playback onset was compared against the maximum pupil size in the following time window of 3.5 seconds. The results show a statistically significant difference (t(746)=-2.8, p < 0.01) between the conditions. In line with the hypothesis, the pupil was observed to dilate more in the incongruent condition (on average by 0.03 mm). While the results are preliminary, they suggest that pupillometry could be a viable alternative to existing methods in the field of language processing, for instance across different ages and clinical groups. In the future, we intend to validate the results on a larger sample of participants as well as expand the analysis with a view to locating temporal regions of greatest differences between the conditions. In the future, we intend to validate the results on a larger sample of participants as well as expand the analysis with a functional analysis accounting for temporal changes in the data. This will allow locating temporal regions of greatest differences between the conditions.

  • 36.
    Fredriksson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper. Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    The Musical Landscape: Music and cultural policy in Dalarna2017Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 37.
    Frid, Johan
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Gao, Man
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Kinesiska.
    Lundmark, Malin Svensson
    Lund University.
    Schötz, Susanne
    Lund University.
    Pitch-to-segment Alignment in South Swedish and Mandarin Chinese: A Cross-language Comparison2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 38.
    Frid, Johan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Johansson, Victoria
    Lunds universitet.
    Johansson, Roger
    Lunds universitet.
    Wengelin, Åsa
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet.
    Developing a keystroke logging program into a writing experiment environment2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 39.
    Frid, Johan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Wengelin, Åsa
    Lunds universitet.
    Johansson, Victoria
    Lunds universitet.
    Johansson, Roger
    Lunds universitet.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet.
    Testing the temporal accuracy of keystroke logging using the sound card2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 40.
    Fries, Julia
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för de humanistiska och samhällsvetenskapliga ämnenas didaktik.
    Using Drama in Re-thinking Economy: An exploration of drama as a tool in imagining a sustainable economy2018Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 41.
    Gao, Man
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Kinesiska.
    A gestural coordination model of tone, consonant and cowel alignment in Mandarin Chinese2010Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 42.
    Gao, Man
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Kinesiska.
    Articulatory Phonology (AP) and tonal alignment: further testing of a proposed AP model of tone-to-segment alignment in Mandarin Chinese2010Inngår i: Tone and Intonation in Europe (TIE) 4, Stockholm, Sweden, 2010Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 43.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Nods, headshakeas and the perception of multimodal constructions in child language2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Within gesture studies, gesture and speech is often conceived of as a single communicative system. This means that human production of gestures are temporally and semantically synchronized with the concurrent verbal phrase, or vice versa. These multimodal clusters are described as constructions where the modalities add different but interrelated content to a common semantic whole, an Utterance (e.g. Goldin-Meadow, 2009, 2011; Kendon, 2004; Murillo & Belinchón, 2012). While this appears to be true for a large amount of gesture types – in particular those who fall under the heading Co-speech Gestures (i.e. gesture that by definition co-occur with a spoken utterance) – there are other gestures that are less explored as to their relation to speech and multimodal meaning. Among these other gestures we find emblems, a vaguely defined group of gestures that are often claimed to carry a semantic meaning on their own, regardless of (optional) concurrent verbalizations (McNeill, 1992). The present study investigated two emblematic gesture forms – nods and headshakes – and their appearance and use in a longitudinal, naturalistic material of child-child and child-adult interaction. The data consists of 11 Swedish children in the ages 0;9 to 5;10 years of age, recorded during a period of 2 ½ years as they interacted with siblings, parents, and friends in their home environment. In all, 22 hours of video recordings were transcribed and analyzed. From the data we could conclude two main factors: i) even emblems appear to be largely speech dependent for their interpretation; and ii) nods and headshakes appear to follow different developmental trajectories and behave rather differently throughout the ages studied. These findings will be discussed in relation to language development in general and to the perceptive system of humans in particular.

  • 44. Gerholm, Tove
    et al.
    Gustavsson, L.
    Schwarz, I.
    Marklund, U.
    Salomão, Gláucia Laís
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Tal, musik och hörsel, TMH. Institutionen för Lingvistiken, Stockholm Universitet.
    Kallioinen, P.
    Andersson, S.
    Eriksson, F.
    Pagmar, D.
    Tahbaz, S.
    The Swedish MINT Project modelling infant language acquisition2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 45.
    Gerholm, Tove
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik.
    Salomão, Gláucia Laís
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik.
    Schwarz, Iris-Corinna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik.
    The Swedish MINT Project: modelling infant language acquisition from parten-child interaction2015Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The MINT-project is a longitudinal study of verbal and nonverbal interaction between 73 Swedish children and their parents, recorded in lab environment from 3 months to 3 years of age. The overall goal of the project is to deepen our understanding of how language acquisition takes place in a multimodal and interactional framework. 

  • 46.
    Gjörloff, Per M.
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SV.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper, KV.
    The Terrible Turk: Anti-Ottoman Representations in the 19th Century Swedish Rural Press2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Islamophobia has been pack and parcel in the Western civilisation from the days of Charlemagne via the Crusades and the rise of Orientalism, as opposed to Occidentalism, to the modern day reporting of Islamic terrorist threat. The images have, however, not always been in negative perspective, as one might perceive today. Emperor Napoleon had in fact a great admiration for the Ottoman Empire and founded the study subject of Orientalism. Many were fascinated by the degree of civilisation and the exoticism of the Ottomans, especially the sexual virtues (or lack thereof) were of particular interest of the travellers into the Ottoman Empire and the defamation from the clergy who did not visit the Middle East. This image quickly came to change by the mid 19th century when clashes between the British Empire and the Ottomans were increasingly common, especially in India who were part of the British Empire with a large Muslim population whose loyalties were with the Sultan of Istamboul.

     

    Sweden in the 19th century had no extraordinary dealings with the Ottoman Empire other than normal affairs of state. Instead, the dealing were a hundred years earlier when Charles XII sought refuge in Ottoman city of Bender whilst evading a pursuing Russian army.

     

    We will use a theoretical framework with the foundation in Mary Douglas’ definition of dirt and Edward Saïd’s orientalism as well as modern Islamic frame theory as published by professor Stig-Arne Nohstedt of Örebro University and professor Jesper Strömbäck och University of Mid Sweden.

     

    Research questions

    The broader aim of this cross-disciplinary paper is, through the use of both theories used by media studies scholars as well as traditional historians to explore how the Swedish people represented Muslims through the eyes of the rural press in the 19th century. In particular, which frames were used depicting the Ottomans and did the coverage of the Ottoman Empire change during the 19th century?

     

    Methodology

    Textual analysis on historical material has been the subject of much debate during the latter part of the 19th century and onwards. Classical historicism states that a present day researcher should aim to understand the historical sources in the light of its context. In other words, we can never understand the anti-muslim publications in the 19th century rural Swedish press unless we understand 19th century rural Sweden itself. This, however, is not the within the scope of this paper. Rather, we will aim to interpret the source material cross-disciplinary in the light of the theoretical framework.

     

    For this thesis, we will be using framing theory as a method of categorising the sample of article. The sample will then be subject of a near-reading, interpreting the images used to represent the Ottoman Empire.

  • 47.
    Goldenzwaig, Gregory
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för kultur och lärande, Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Music Use in the Digital Media Age: A Study of Music Cultures in Stockholm and Moscow2013Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The poster presents early insights from an ongoing study of music cultures among young audiences in Stockholm and Moscow. The 3-year research project ”Music Use in the Digital Media Age” is conducted by a research group at Södertörn University, Sweden. The cross-cultural study focuses on the impact of the Internet on music use and meanings of music in everyday life. Transformations in music use are observed from a user-centred audience perspective. The project sets focus on Moscow/Russia and Stockholm/Sweden: two geo-cultural frameworks in Northerrn and Eastern Europe.

  • 48.
    Gunneriusson, Håkan
    et al.
    Försvarshögskolan, Militärvetenskapliga institutionen (MVI), Krigsvetenskapliga avdelningen (KVA), Sektionen för markoperationer (KV Mark).
    Bachmann, Sascha
    University of Bournemouth.
    Terrorism and Cyber Attacks as Hybrid Threats: Defining a Comprehensive Approach for Countering 21st Century Threats to Global Risk and Security2013Inngår i: A Multidisciplinary Conference on Cyberterrorism: Final Report / [ed] Macdonald, S., Jarvis, L. & Chen, T., Birmingham: Swansea University , 2013, s. 12-Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 49.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholms universitet, Antikens kultur och samhällsliv.
    Dancing with decorum: The eclectic uses of kalathiskos dancers in Roman visual culture2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 50.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Antikens kultur och samhällsliv.
    Dancing with decorum: The eclectic uses of kalathiskos dancers in Roman visual culture2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
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