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  • 1.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    From Buenos Aires to Finland and Japan: The tango's unusual migration2014Inngår i: List of Abstracts for Conference Transcultural Identity Constructions in a Changing World, Dalarna University, Sweden, April 2-4, 2014, 2014, s. 19-20Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In Finland, thousands of miles away from Buenos Aires, people crowd the dance floors of restaurants and dance halls nightly to dance to tango music, while the tango has also caught the heart of the people on the other side of the world in Japan. The popularity of the tango in both Finland and Japan, however, is not very well known to the outside world.

    Though some scholars have stated that the tango reflects the personality, mentality and identity of the Finnish and Japanese people, this may only be partially true. Moreover, it is difficult to generalize what the Finnish or Japanese personality is. I argue that the tango's success in these two countries also has significant connections to historical and social factors. As being a dancer myself, I also believe that the 'liminality' (originally a term borrowed from Arnold van Gennep's formulation of rites de passage) of tango dancing plays an important role in these two nations that went through difficult struggles to recover from the damage caused by the war. “The liminal phase is considered sacred, anomalous, abnormal and dangerous, while the  pre- and post-liminal phases are normal and a profane state of being (Selänniemi 1996) and “the regular occurrence of sacred-profane alternations mark important periods of social life or even provide the measure of the passage of time itself”(Leach 1961).

    In this paper, I will discuss motives and paths of how a culture travels, settles and shapes into a new form, using the tango as an example.

  • 2.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Intercultural communicative competence: the challenges and implications of teaching Japanese politeness strategies to Swedish learners of Japanese2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching communicative competence is extremely important in language instruction. One can avoid embarrassing situations and conflicts caused by misunderstandings if she/he understands the differences in intercultural pragmatics. Politeness discourse varies in complexity according to social distance, relative power between the speakers, and situations. The data I have collected during the past 6 years indicates that Swedish learners of Japanese often do not see the necessity of learning the polite/honorific discourse and often view these negatively as Swedish society is one of the most egalitarian in the world. As a consequence, Swedish students often fail to utilize appropriate politeness strategies when speaking in Japanese. However, it is important to point out to foreign language learners that cultural and social norms are not interchangeable and that one must adapt to the language one is using and the culture one is in. Thus Swedish Learners of Japanese should consider politeness discourse as a part of the rules of the language rather than something that can be modified based on one’s opinion.

    The current study investigates the differences in politeness strategies between Swedish and Japanese discourse. Student surveys and analysis of students’ errors have revealed clear differences in the use of politeness strategies in Swedish and in Japanese context. While the politeness, respect, and formality are closely intertwined in Japanese; the Swedes perceive respect and politeness as separate matters. It is also found that while the Japanese are inclined to using verbal politeness strategies, the Swedes express their respect more through non-verbal actions or behaviors. Various Japanese and Swedish utterances have also been examined to determine the Discourse Politeness Default suggested by Usami (2006) in order to systematize the politeness strategies in ways similar to grammatical rules.

                                                                                                                                                                          

                                                                          

                                                                                                                                                                          

  • 3.
    Berg, Martin
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle, Centrum för samhällsanalys (CESAM).
    Improve me! 100 days of wristband guidance2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Body monitoring devices are increasingly turning into machines that not only track personal activity but also provide suggestions on how to lead a life that is assumed to be continuously improved. By measuring, interpreting and correlating various data sources, these devices are assumed to provide an understanding that goes beyond everyday self knowledge. Although these devices most certainly can provide information on how to run faster or sleep better, it remains unclear how it feels to gain a deeper understanding of oneself by means of a technological device. This paper approaches this question in an auto-ethnographic study (by the author of this paper) where the Jawbone UP wristband and the ”Smart Coach” insight and coaching ”engine” will be used and the suggestions for improvement slavishly followed during 100 days. This system crunches personal data in various ways in order to provide ”actionable insights and uniquely personalized guidance” (jawbone.com).

  • 4.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för film och litteratur (IFL).
    Creating heritage and memory: digital film archives as sites of knowledge production2017Inngår i: From Dust to Dawn : Archival Studies After the Archival Turn: Uppsala 15–17 November 2017, Uppsala University, 2017, s. 13-13Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Situated at the intersection of archivology, film studies and memory studies, my paper offers critical perspectives on the archive as a site of knowledge production. It investigates the construction of audiovisual heritage in digital film archives, based on my research project “The Cultural Heritage of Moving Images” (VR, 2016–2018). Drawing on theorizations of the archive by Foucault and Derrida, I regard the archive as an agent in its own right. In order to challenge the ongoing tendencies in film studies to focus on the preservation of film stock, my talk will foreground the role of the archivist as a curator. In my paper I will examine the use of metadata for the creation of a polyvocal cultural memory.

  • 5.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för film och litteratur (IFL).
    Who has the right to the memory of the city?: Appropriating mediated memories in times of gentrification2017Inngår i: Creating the city : Identity, memory and participation: Malmö 9–10 February 2017 : Conference program, 2017, s. 29-29Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Situated at the interface of memory studies and film studies, my research looks at the ways mediated transcultural memories travel through different, often conflicting discursive contexts. How does cultural memory tie in with processes of gentrification? My paper argues that mediated regional and transcultural memories are mobilized by different – and often conflicting – stakeholders, for instance the heritage industries, official politics of city branding or antigentrification struggles. Drawing on my case study of Manchester‘s contemporary politics of city branding, I will outline modes of appropriating cultural memory in times of urban reconstruction. My paper will look at the power relations involved in adapting (white homosocial) postpunk memories into the self- fashioning of Manchester as a creative city. I argue that subcultural or popular memories are not emancipatory per se, but can easily tie into neoliberal politics. This has been possible, among others, because Manchester’s postpunk memory culture has excluded feminist and queer positions as well as the recollections of Black and Asian Britons. In short, while travelling through various transmedia contexts, Manchester's postpunk memories have been streamlined memories in favour of consent instead of celebrating difference.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Jonnie
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle, Kontext & kulturgränser (KK).
    Diffractions of the Digital: Godard and the Kinetics of the History-Image2015Inngår i: In the flow – People, Media, Materialities: ACSIS conference 15-17 June 2015, Norrköping / [ed] Johanna Dahlin & Tove Andersson, Norrköping: ACSIS, Linköpings universitet , 2015, s. 127-128Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    As exemplified by Eloge de l'amour (2001), Jean-Luc Godard's work after Histoire(s) du cinéma (1988–98) – which critiqued cinema's treatment of its contemporary cultural and oplitical history, – has made use of digital technology in order to explore the remaining potential of the medium after its purported demise and ethical failure. By drawing on concepts from Gilles Deleuze and Karen Barad, this paper aims to elucidate the techno-aesthetic conditions of Godard's implied method of imaging the dual flux of temporality: becoming history and becoming future. In this diffracting process, Godard's late films embody the present condition of visual culture as it splits between past and future from the point of a present crisis of its material conditions of representation. Neither virtual reality nor classical realism, a diffractive method of digital filmmaking explores the new materiality of motion pictures. 

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Jonnie
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Språk, kultur och samhälle.
    Filming a New Earth: Ecopolitical Imagination in Cinema and Deleuze's Geophilosophy of Utopia2017Inngår i: ACSIS 2017: Sessions, Panels & Abstracts, 2017, s. 7-7Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the concept of utopia in Gilles Deleuze’s philosophy and its significance for cinema, placing his and Félix Guattari’s “geophilosophy” in the context of posthumanist ecocriticism. It relocates the notion of utopia from out of a paradigm of political fiction and speculations of a possible social progress, towards Deleuze & Guattari’s ideas of a geography and topology of time as conditions for creative thought. Considering the importance of the concepts of becoming and virtuality in this philosophy, a utopian image is no mere speculation or representation, but a force of creation. Deleuze’s notion that philosophers and artists share the task of resisting the present in creatively thinking “a new people” and “a new earth” can be developed to view film as a medium for re-imagining nature, creating a new set of earth-images or geosigns for future thought. 

  • 8.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Ryan Bengtsson, Linda
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    A spatial approach to fan labour: Conceptualizing fan mobilization in transmedia marketing2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    When Swedish artist Tove Styrke released her album Kiddo (2015) on Spotify, she mobilized her fans through an immersive marketing campaign that stretched across and beyond media platforms: an 8-bit game, Spotify, Facebook, Twitter, Dreamhack, and a major Swedish music festival were key campaign platforms. The campaign construction was hardly unique, but rather illustrative of current trends in cultural production, including transmedia marketing and the increasing reliance on fan labor.This paper argues that informed spatial approaches to fan labor, and business strategies aimed to cultivate such labor, are missing in the existing research on cultural production. While descriptions of our transmediatized culture often-times do include spatial metaphors, such as “flow”, “stream”, “fluid”, and “liquid”, our conviction is that a more serious engagement with geography is vital for understanding, mapping, and ultimately critiquing industry practices that potentially are exploitive, unethical, and even harmful.Therefore, this paper suggests a theoretical framework for exploring the geographies of fan labor and presents exemplifying cartographies of authentic music marketing campaigns. The framework is influenced by two recent ‘turns’ in media and communication studies: the labor turn and the spatial turn. From labor theory, we borrow the idea that consumer engagement can be read as labor that is typically unpaid, affective, and voluntarily given. Spatial theory, next, provides us with a conceptual toolbox to disentangle the spatiality of transmedia marketing, including the relationship between physical and virtual elements.The notion of ‘transmediascape’ is brought in to describe the embodiment of transmedia marketing – in mediated and non-mediated spaces and flows. Such transmediascapes, the paper argues, can be read as the perfect soil for fan labor since they mobilize consumers in more than one respect: they assemble fan affect and, at the same time, encourage physical as well as virtual fan movement. Due to its multifaceted connotation – pointing towards both affectivity and mobility – the term ‘mobilization’ fruitfully bridges labor theory and spatial theory and serves, ultimately, as a key concept for analyzing contemporary forms of cultural production

  • 9.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Ryan Bengtsson, Linda
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Geographies of free labor: Mobilizing consumers across immersive transmediascapes2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    When Swedish artist Tove Styrke released her album Kiddo on Spotify in 2015, she simultaneously released an 8-bit game for her fans to play on kiddogame.com. By sharing high scores, users could win merchandise especially put together by the artist. The game was also promoted by one of the most well-known Swedish gaming streamers, posting his own Kiddo Game competition to his followers. A week after the release, Tove performed at Dreamhack, which also shared the game on their website and on Twitter. Later that summer, a live version of the game was staged at a major Swedish music festival, where Tove also performed. The game was easily shared via Facebook and twitter, and while playing the game the album played via Spotify.Worldwide, the music industry struggles to come to terms with how to make profit in times of illegal downloading, streaming, and Spotifyication. One apparent strategy is to rely on consumer engagement. The Tove Styrke campaign could be read as a contemporary example of so called transmedia marketing; that is, as a “holistic content creation approach” (Zeiser, 2015: xv) that simultaneously involves multiple content platforms. The attraction of transmedia marketing lies in its potential to foster engaged consumers who are ready to “haunt” a brand experience across several content platforms. In this paper, we join with the burgeoning critical scholarship that interprets consumer “engagement” as a form of labor. Since much of this labor gets paid in affect rather than money, such labor has rightfully been recognized as a form of free labor.While both transmedia marketing and free labor has been subjected to many studies over the last decade, there is a lack of research initiatives that explicitly address the spatiality of both of these phenomena (though see e.g. Stork’s [2014] engagement with the “transmedia geography” of the Glee franchise). What is more; if it is rare to talk about the geographies of transmediality in the first place, it is equally rare to talk about transmediality, at all, in relation to music. Perhaps not so surprisingly but all the more inaccurately, there seems to be a prevailing perception that transmedia productions are exclusive to, at least traditionally, more narrative-bound franchises such as television, film, game, or comic books. However, storytelling is becoming all the more important also to music brands. Consequently, we identify a need for studies that acknowledge that 1) the notion of transmediality is applicable also to music, and 2) that the spatiality of transmedia endeavors is worthy scholarly review. Our conviction is that just as work-places constitute obvious research objects in relation to other kinds of labor, so do the transmedia “social factories” warrant scholarly attention.As to compensate for the identified research lack then, this paper investigates several actual cases of transmedia marketing in the music industry – and the free labor that such marketing potentially engenders – by way of qualitative content analyses that employ a cross-disciplinary conceptual framework. The framework combines theoretical perspectives from the ‘spatial turn’ and the ‘labor turn’ in media studies and allows us to approach, and visually present, transmedia marketing as a landscape – what we call a transmediascape. Such transmediascapes, our results indicate, can be read as the perfect soil for free labor since they mobilize consumers in more than one respect: they assemble consumer affect and, at the same time, encourage physical as well as virtual fan movement. Thus, due to its multifaceted connotation, pointing towards both affectivity and mobility, we find that the term ‘mobilization’ serves as a fruitful link between spatial theory and labor theory and a key concept for analyzing the geographies of free labor.

    The era of transmediatization is marked by increased reliance, in all the more societal spheres, on content that transcend singular media platforms and, accordingly, by new modes of media consumption. Much research has recognized, confirmed, and explored this transformation, and ‘transmediality’ has hitherto been subjected to relatively extensive theorization. Nonetheless, the spatiality of transmediality remains largely undertheorized. As to correct for this shortage, this paper proposes transmediascape as an analytical tool for discerning the complex topographies of media ownership, technologies, texts, meanings, and practices that constitute today’s transmediatized culture. With inspiration from work in both the ‘spatial turn’ and ‘labor turn’ in media studies, we recognize the transmediascape as an arena of labour, where both paid and unpaid forms of work are carried out. Ultimately, we argue, the concept of transmediascape works as a tool for mapping geographies of free labour across institutional, technological, and textual levels. The present study illuminates current modes of ‘transmediascaping’ – or the practice of cultivating good “soil” for profitable consumer engagement – by focusing the transmedia marketing campaign that launched British/Irish boyband One Direction’s album ‘Made in the A.M’, in 2015.

  • 10.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för kultur och lärande, Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Hidden Assumptions and Implicit Normative Conclusions: a Constructivist Critique of the Research on Eastern Euro-visions : Narratives of Europe in the ESC2014Inngår i: Communication for Empowerment: Citizens, Markets, Innovations : 5th European Communication Conference : 12-15 November, Lisboa, Portugal : Book of Abstracts, Universidade Lusófona , 2014, s. 267-Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Union is looking for new narratives of Europe. But which was the old one and was there really just one? Do narratives of Europe in the so-called ‘new’ east Europe offer alternatives for redefining European identity? In order to approach these issues, this paper looks at how Europe is narrated in east European popular music, focusing the Eurovision Song Contest (ESC).

    A wide range of symbols struggle for identifying or signifying Europe (Fornäs 2012). The post-1989 EU enlargement has intensified such redefinition efforts. Popular music offers a fascinating field for such narrative identifications, with the ESC as an influential arena, linking cultural, social and political discourses. Music matters (Hesmondhalgh 2013) to people on many influential levels, combining emotive pleasure with social interaction in ways that offer rich resources for identifying practices. Being perhaps the most successful pan-European venture, the ESC is therefore an excellent source for investigating narratives of Europe.

    Written within an interdisciplinary project on east European ‘Narratives of Europe’, this paper analyses songs from ESC finals since 1989. Using a methodological model for analysing narratives, inspired by Genette (1972/1980), Ricoeur (1981) and Ryan (2004), it looks for who acts in a narrative (setup), what happens in which order (process), how or in what format the story is told (mode) and what identity it constructs for Europe (meaning).

    More than 70 songs were chosen, 40 of them from east Europe. Preliminary results in­dicate an overwhelming dominance of one master narrative of redemptive resur­rection, with a set of sub-variants. In other contexts than the ESC, popular songs may depict Europe as an eternally happy place or as falling from greatness into misery, but the ESC format strongly favours a narrative where Europe had a glorious past but then has been deeply torn by internal strife, wars and suffering, from which it now finally will recover by uniting in mutual co-operation and love. Some variants say little or nothing about the initial golden age, some less triumphantly place the resurrection as a dream for the future, and some east European song narratives add freedom from oppression to peace after internal war as core values, but the master narrative is never really abandoned.

    This resurrection narrative resonates with the founding myth expressed in EU’s key symbols. The inclusion of former Soviet Bloc countries into the European integration process has given new impetus to those founding narratives, and the ESC’s east European narratives indicate important continuities between the old and the new.

    While offering a methodological example of narrative analysis of media texts in the seldom-studied format of televised popular music, the paper also contributes to the understanding of how east European voices construct Europe’s history and future in the processes of transformation that challenge inherited ideas of what Europe means.

  • 11.
    Foss Lindblad, Rita
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    The Imagined Real of Sweden: Utopias with/out hopes2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 12.
    Goldenzwaig, Gregory
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för kultur och kommunikation, Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap. Moscow State University, Russia.
    Promoting Music on the Russian Social Media: Who Is Doing The Job?2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    To find new forms for music promotion is an important effort to support both established companies and new entrepreneurs. Russian online music and media landscape is nowadays more diverse than ever. The audience involvement in promoting music on the social media results in decreasing costs for the industry, reaching wider audiences, connecting live and online activities. At the same time, the pleasure driven audience involvement relies on time and energy investment. The presentation sheds light on the practices of users’ activities in music promotion on VKontakte and other relevant Russian SNS.

  • 13.
    Hjortfors, Lis-Marie
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för samisk forskning (CeSam). Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Laestadianismens importance for Sami identity in the Lule Sami area2016Inngår i: Gränser, mobilitet och mobilisering: Boundaries, mobility and mobilisation : Nationell konferens för genusforskning = Swedish conference for gender research / [ed] Silje Lundgren, Maja Lundqvist, Björn Pernrud, Göteborg: Nationella sekretariatet för genusforskning , 2016, s. 113-114Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 14.
    Ho, Hang Kei
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kulturgeografiska institutionen.
    Hong Kong at a crossroad: Exploring its changing relationship with China and the West through foreign real estate investment, education and consumption practice2015Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been eighteen years since Hong Kong's sovereignty was transferred from Britain to back to mainland China. Although Hong Kong was promised that its autonomy and way of life would remain unchanged for fifty years until 2047, the ongoing political uncertainty and the influx of the underprivileged as well as super-rich mainland Chinese have impacted Hongkongers' everyday life. Some Hongkongers have welcomed the wealth and opportunities that the mainland Chinese bring to the Special Administrative Region, whilst others have been less approving of their lack of respect for Hong Kong's culture and society. Moreover, the recent Umbrella Movement that took place in September 2014 has further challenged the identity of Hong Kong citizens in which they are even more concerned, confused and consternated about their future.

    This working paper examines the ways that Hongkongers deal with internal and external uncertainties through the way they invest in foreign real estates, decide on their children's education and everyday consumption practices.

    This research draws on my previous doctoral work on the geographies of consumption in Hong Kong and my current postdoctoral research on the way that Hong Kong investors purchase residential properties in the UK and other parts of the world. This paper provides a snapshot of 2015's Hong Kong and how Hongkongers confront the conflicting relationship between the consumption of western values and their traditional Chinese identity.

  • 15.
    Holfve Sabel, Mary-Anne
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Modified Attitudes Towards School, Teacher And Peers Are Found In Networks Of Mixed Ethnicity2015Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 16.
    Holfve Sabel, Mary-Anne
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Orlenius, Kennert
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Gaini, Firouz
    Norwegian Centre for Child Research (NOSEB) Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Ethical Attitudes Among Young People In Late Modernity2015Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 17.
    Höglund, Johan
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Digital Humanities and Games Research Across the Disciplines2016Inngår i: International Symposium on Digital Humanities: Växjö 7-8 November 2016 : Book of Abstracts, Växjö: Linnaeus University , 2016, s. 35-36Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of violent computer games on individuals and on society has been the object of a great number of studies reaching across different disciplines, including traditional Humanities, International Relations Studies, and Psychology. Unfortunately, studies conducted within one discipline pay very limited attention to research conducted in other fields. Thus, important research data is rarely shared. The reasons for this lack of cross-disciplinary consideration can be attributed to many different factors. Humanities oriented research is often published in journals other than IR studies, or psychological studies. The various fields engaged in this type of research also employ different methodologies that highlight different aspect while obscuring others. Finally, the research is funded by different agencies, with different agendas. 

    This presentation first describes the current situation through studies belonging to the Humanities, International Relations Studies and Psychology. These studies share an interest in the computer game genre commonly known as the First Person Shooter (FPS), a violent game genre where the gamer controls an armed avatar and observes the game world through a first-person perspective. The presentation discusses how the general research context (funding body, audience, problem formulation), the theoretical framework, and the methodologies of the different studies inform the research. Here, it is noted that Humanities research is often state-sponsored and conducted within Humanities departments or by one of few DH research centres that exist globally. Since the late 1990s, Humanities research has either focussed on discussing how participatory digital games function differently from other forms of culture such as literature or film (see Juul 2005, Malliet 2007), or it has conducted an often Foucauldian or Baudrillardian interrogation of the games, discussing them as deeply ideological spaces (Wark 2007). The methodological tools employed by this research are virtually always qualitative and hermeneutic. International Relations research also comes out of state-sponsored or private universities, but is sometimes connected to organisations such as the Institute of World Politics. Following the cultural turn of IR during the last two decades (Van Veeren 2009), this research has become increasingly attentive to the way that military games engage with global politics and future military conflict. The focus of game studies conducted within the confines of IR studies is thus the way in which the FPS imagines future global conflict. This research is often qualitative and does discuss the narratives and discourses of the games, but it also employs interviews and quantitative methods to investigate how gamers’s ideas about global relations are affected by the games (Zamaróczy 2016). Finally, psychological research into violent games comes from a large number of funding bodies, from state-run universities to private foundations, the health care sector, and the US Department of Defence (DoD) (Höglund 2008). The research produced by these various agencies focuses primarily on to what extent violent games produce violent behaviour or not (Anderson et al., 2002), but it also includes studies on how games can train soldiers before combat or help treat veterans suffering from post traumatic stress disorder (Rizzo et al 2006). The link between violent computer games and aggressive behaviour is notoriously difficult to study in laboratory experiments, and a few alternative ways of assessing the relationship have been suggested (Sauer and Nova 2015). Even so, this research is firmly quantitative and often disregards the qualitative aspect.

    The question that the presentation will address in relation to these studies is how these different fields may benefit from cross-disciplinary exchange. The presentation suggests that by considering results gained in psychological studies, and by making some use of the quantitative and laboratory methods common in this discipline, the humanities or IR researcher would be in a considerably better position to discuss the effect that the FPS has on the individual. In other words, broadening the disciplinary perspective would make it possible to consider not only the ideological, political and aesthetic content of the material, but also how gamers actually respond to the material. Similarly, humanities and IR related research could help researchers working in the field of psychology to ask more relevant and precise questions that take into consideration the qualitative content of a particular game before examining its effects in a laboratory setting. In other words, by considering humanities and IR research, the simple question if games encourage aggression in gamers may be rephrased into the more complex question if games encourage aggression against particular groups in society, or support state aggression against certain nationalities. This discussion may be of interest to scholars conducting research on digital games, but it may also be of general interest to Digital Humanities since the formation of games research takes place in the crossroads of several different disciplines. 

    REFERENCES

    Anderson, C. A, B. J. Bushman. (2002) Violent Video Games and Hostile Expectations: A Test of the General Aggression Model. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 28.12): 1679-1686.

    Höglund, J. (2008). Electronic Empire: Orientalism Revisited in the Military Shooter. Game Studies. 8.1. http://gamestudies.org/0801/articles/hoeglund

    Juul, J. (2005). Half-Real: Video Games between Real Rules and Fictional Worlds, Cambridge: The MIT Press,

    Malliet, Steven. (2007).  Adapting the Principles of Ludology to the Method of Video Game Content Analysis. Game Studies 7.1. http://gamestudies.org/0701/articles/malliet

    Rizzo. A, J, et al. (2006). A Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy Application for Iraq War Military Personnel with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: From Training to Toy to Treatment. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Novel Approaches to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. IOS Press, Washington D.C., 235-250

    Sauer, J. D, A Drummond, and N. Nova. (2015). Violent video games: The effects of narrative context and reward structure on in-game and postgame aggression. Journal of Experimental Psychology Applied. 21.3. 205-214.

    Van Veeren, Es. (2009). The ‘Cultural Turn’ in International Relations: Making Sense of World Politics.  E-International Relations. May 10. http://www.e-ir.info/2009/05/10/the-‘cultural-turn’-in-international-relations-making-sense-of-world-politics/. 

    Wark, M. (2007). Gamer Theory. Cambridge, Harvard University Press.

    Zamaróczy, N de. (2016). Are We What We Play? Global Politics in Historical Strategy Computer Games. International Studies Perspectives. 0.1, 1–20.

  • 18.
    Höglund, Johan
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    The First Person Shooter: Narrating Your Own Imperial Adventure2017Inngår i: International Society for the Study of narrative: 2017 Narrative Conference, Lexington Kentucky, 2017Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    “The First Person Shooter: Narrating Your Own Imperial Adventure” notes that recent scholarship understands games such as the Call of Duty: Black Ops series as a form of imperial primer similar to the late-Victorian British imperial adventure narratives. With this in mind, the paper addresses the apparent conflict between game rules and narrative that have concerned scholars since the inception of the field of game studies in the 1990s. Thus, the paper attempts to address the question how game rules, defined as the limitations and possibilities of the game world, interact with the narrative that structures the progress of the game. Are the game rules an extension of the narrative, or do the rules allow for a manipulation of this same narrative?

  • 19.
    Höglund, Johan
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Wither the Past: The US Slasher and New Nordic Horror2017Inngår i: The Twenty-Fifth Biennial Conference of the Nordic Association for American Studies, SDU, Odense, May 22-24, 2017: American Colors : Across the Disciplinary Spectrum, 2017Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The wildly popular genre of Nordic Noir has been seen to elucidate ‘dark aspects of the welfare state model’ and to ‘portray violence and human darkness as “normal” parts of contemporary life’ (Brodén 2008). Crucial to this reading of Nordic Noir is the notion that the welfare state is premised on a Nordic modernity that furtively supported eugenics, colonialism and predatory capitalism (Keskinen et al 2009, Naum and Nordin 2013). Influenced by this trend, new Nordic Gothic in general, and Nordic B-Movie Gothic in particular, can also be seen to interrogate the demise of the welfare state and to open up society to the possibility of senseless violence. Increasingly, the Nordic gothic B-movie industry is now finding purchase for the bloody narratives that were successful in the US during the late 70’s and 80’s, and which were during this period largely banned in Sweden and other European countries.

    From this vantage point, the present chapter examines the violent B-movie gothic of Swedish director Sonny Laguna. Inspired by, and frequently referencing, US splatter and gore cinema, Laguna explores a Nordic geographic and social context with the help of US gore and slasher cinema. Frequently set in the cabin endemic to low-budget US horror, the terror that rises to rend bodies asunder in Laguna’s films is located in a complex historical past. Madness (2010) portrays the emigrant Swede (canonized in Swedish national literature) as monstrous redneck, and Blood Runs Cold (2011) and Wither (2012) allow horror to ascend from a Swedish mythological, underground past. Thus, Laguna’s movies show a present that, in gothic fashion, is rent asunder by a past that refuses to forget the violence and injustice whitewashed by historiography, and which demands terrible retribution exacted on the society that has neglected it. 

    Brodén, Daniel. Folkhemmets skuggbilder, Stockholm: Ekholm & Tegebjer, 2008.

    Keskinen, Suvi, Salla Tuori, Sari Irni and Diana Mulinari. Ed. Complying with Colonialism: Gender, Race and Ethnicity in the Nordic Region, Farnham: Ashgate 2009.

    Naum, Magdalena och Jonas M. Nordin. Ed. Scandinavian Colonialism and the Rise of Modernity: Small Time Agents in a Global Arena, New York: Springer, 2013.

  • 20.
    Höglund, Johan
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    “You’re a terrorist, that’s why I’m doing it to you”: Torture and Discipline in Zero Dark Thirty2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction to Foucault’s study Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison describes the public execution of Robert-François Damiens who in 1757 attempted to assassinate King Louis XV of France. Foucault describes how Damiens had the flesh of his body torn from his chest, arms and legs with red-hot pinchers, how sulphur, lead and boiling oil was poured into his wounds, and how his body was drawn apart by four horses assisted by his executioner, until only his dismembered torso remained to be burnt at the stake.

     

    Foucault’s revolutionary thesis is that in the decades that follow, discipline ceased to be a public spectacle. While this tremendously important observation has revolutionized our understanding of the operations of discourse, power and institutions in our society, it has become increasingly obvious that the practices Foucault describes as essentially pre-modern in fact never disappeared. Steven Pierce and Anupama Rao show in Discipline and the Other Body (2006) that torture was routinely used to discipline the subaltern in the European colonies during the nineteenth century. In reconstruction US, black Americans were tortured and mutilated, sometimes in front of crowds of thousands, in ways that directly recall the treatment of Damiens in 1757. In 2004, images from the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq were made public and circulated in the press, on television and on the Internet.

     

    From this perspective, it is not strange that torture has retained a central position in literature and film concerned with the meeting between the (imperial) state and its enemies. In Rudyard Kipling’s 1890 short story “The Mark of the Beast,” the narrator applies red-hot iron to the strung-up body of a literally faceless Indian leper who has cursed one of his friends. In D. W. Griffith’s racist epic Birth of a Nation (1915), the freedman Gus is castrated (in an eventually censored scene) and then murdered by the budding Ku Klux Klan for desiring a white woman.

     

    With this history in mind, the present paper examines Katherine Bigelow’s controversial movie Zero Dark Thirty. Torture is a brutal practice in Bigelow’s movie, but within the dramatic structure of the film, which opens with authentic sound recordings from the World Trade Centre and ends with the retributive killing of Osama bin Laden, it comes across as a deplorable but essential tool for justice. At the same time, the film often makes it clear, as in the title to this paper, that a certain category of people must be tortured. The fact that public torture and execution have continued to be a way to discipline the enemies of the imperial state indicates that these enemies are not perceived as possible to control with the aid of discourse or social institutions. As with Damiens, their transgressions, real or imaginary, must be manifested on their bodies as a lesson that cannot be misunderstood. Thus, this paper argues that torture is not only a current practice, it is also imagined by contemporary culture as a necessary form of violence designed to maintain the impossibly porous borders between metropol and periphery.

  • 21.
    Hübinette, Tobias
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för språk, litteratur och interkultur.
    Nordic whiteness at play in a contemporary Swedish context2015Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 22.
    Inose, Hiroko
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Aronsson, Mattias
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Franska.
    Fjordevik, Anneli
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Tyska.
    Fan activities applied to online university education2016Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation discusses a possible way of adapting internet fan activities to the academic level online education. At the Dalarna University (Sweden), which is specialized in online education, there was a three-year project called “Informal Learning Environment”, which explored the educational aspects of fan activities, and the possible ways to apply them in language (French, German, Japanese, Portuguese) and literature courses.

    The educational effects of fan activities are mentioned by various authors (e.g. James Paul Gee), and we focused on two activities, Fan Fiction and Scanlation.

    In the Fan Fiction exercise, the students in French and German Literature had an introduction on Fan Fiction, then were asked to choose one of the literary works studied during the semester, and write a short fictional story based on it. Each student uploaded his/her text to the learning platform and then received peer-feedback from others.

    In the Scanlation exercise, a group work was designed for the Translation course (Japanese-English translation). Students formed groups of threes and fours and each group translated two different chapters from Shisso Nikki, a manga by Hideo Aduma. They had two weeks to work together, and then the translations were uploaded to the learning platform. Each student then gave comment and feedback to the chapters translated by other groups.

    In all courses, students were asked to evaluate the activities afterwards. The evaluation focused on if they enjoyed the activity, what they learned, and what the peer-feedback meant to them. Since we teach only online courses, the web-based interaction becomes very central. This is also the case in fan communities. Therefore, our hypothesis is that connecting fan activities with web-based teaching may be a way to develop and improve the formal academic learning environment.

  • 23.
    Johansson, Sofia
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för kultur och lärande, Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Werner, Ann
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för kultur och lärande, Genusvetenskap.
    Articulations of Gender and Nation in Music Use in Stockholm and Moscow2013Inngår i: [Conference] Music, Gender & Difference: Intersectional and postcolonial perspectives on musical fields, Vienna, October 10-12, 2013: Books of abstracts, Wien, 2013, s. 85-Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown that uses of media technologies (Gray 1992, Lally 2002) as well as music consumption (DeNora 2000) are gendered practices, while scholars have also emphasized how national context and ideas about nation, ethnicity and race play into the uses of media technologies (Miller & Slater 2000) and music cultures (Roy 2010).  Drawing on such analyses, this paper investigates contemporary practices in music use from an intersectional feminist perspective. It takes as its starting point the Internet as a core music platform, which is transforming listening modes and potentially also meanings of music.

    Posing questions about how to understand emerging trends in music use in relation to music as a gendered and place-bound practice, the paper presents one part of a larger study of music use online among young adults in Stockholm and Moscow. The study is ongoing and is conducted by the presenters and their colleagues. Analyzing focus group interviews with young adult men and women, the paper explores how – primarily – gender and nation is articulated (Hall 1996) in the talk about music and online media technologies. Through discussions about their favorite music as well as their favorite media to use when listening to music, and how music is intricately intertwined in their social networks, the participants display ideas about themselves in a context of gender, place, ethnicity and race. We argue that the way they listen to music and use media technology such as Spotify and Last FM can be understood as interplaying with the process of articulation of gender and nation, and that this articulation may differ between different places.  

  • 24.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    Malmö University.
    K and The 'Lob'2011Inngår i: EASS, Umeå, 2011Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    A recurring theme in critical sport studies is the issue of whether the element of competition -- measuring, comparing and ranking performances (Loland 2002) – in sports is fascistoid (Tännsjö 2000, 2001), and, whether sports constrains the potential of human movement, and its creativity, rather then enhancing it (Eichberg 2010). In this essay, I will argue that the element of competition is vital for the creativity of movement-potential in sports. Still, the alleged ‘fascistoid’ or ‘creativity constraining’ element could be ‘hi-jacked’. As an example of this kind of hi-jacking, an autoethnographical (Chang 2008) account of my participation in recreational table-tennis will be seen through a process-philosophical lens. Deleuze’s conceptual pair ‘minor’ and ‘major’ (Bene & Deleuze, 1979; Deleuze & Guattari, 1986) will in the essay be extended to sport. The argument is that prolonging elements in athletic contests could be understood as ‘minor sport’, which in the essay is exemplified by defensive strokes, like chops and lobs, in table-tennis. ‘Major sport’, then, is understood as equivalent with ’the structural goal of sport’, namely, to produce winners by comparing, ranking and measuring bodily performances (Loland 2002). As a table-tennis player in the corporative/recreational series, my way of playing has rendered different conceptions among the other players, ranging from joyful to provoked. This manner could be described with ‘minor’ actions like ‘suspending the game’, ´delaying the outcome’, and ‘never having learned to smash’. When contestants are equivalent in competence and desire to win, competitions tend to produce ‘sweet tension of uncertainty of outcome’ (Loland 2002). My way of playing is directed towards maximizing the ‘sweet tension of uncertainty’. Hereby focus is shifted from sport as context where winners are produced, towards sport as a context where ‘sweet tension’ is produced. This stance combines the benefits of both protagonists and antagonists of competition.

  • 25.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Cabin Porn for Digital Humanists2013Inngår i: Infrastructure, Space and Media: A Book from the Media Places Symposium in Umeå December 5-7, 2012, Peter Wallenberg Foundation , 2013, s. 53-54Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 26.
    Jørgensen, Kristine
    et al.
    University of Bergen.
    Sandqvist, Ulf
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Ekonomisk historia.
    Sotamaa, Olli
    University of Tampere.
    Tyni, Heikki
    University of Tampere.
    From Hobbyism to Industry. Tracing the Historical Origins of the Nordic Game Industry2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 27.
    Kotkina, Irina
    Södertörns högskola, Centrum för Östersjö- och Östeuropaforskning (CBEES).
    “Etnogenez” Eurasian Science Fiction Project: Bio-Politics and Ethno-Vitalism in Contemporary Russian Utopianism2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 28.
    Kotkina, Irina
    Södertörns högskola, Centrum för Östersjö- och Östeuropaforskning (CBEES).
    Eurasianism as a New Instrument of Cultural Politics2013Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays Eurasianism is gradually transformed from a philosophical doctrine known only to experts into cultural and political practice. The attempts of reintegration of the former Soviet Union made by Kremlin encourage population to reflect on the historical mission of Russia and its ‘civilizational’ identity. Vladimir Putin in his article published in “Izvestya” in October 2011 made clear division between the supporters and opponents of the Eurasian Union. Russia’s contemporary Minister of Culture, Vladimir Medinsky, warmly supports the idea of the Eurasian integration and even called it the major “macro-task” of Russia. In his writings and documents of his ministry, Medinsky actively entertains the idea of Eurasian union and considers Eurasianism one of the most fruitful doctrines aiming at Russian inner and foreign politics.  In my presentation I am going to analyze the recent documents and statements of the Ministry of Culture concerning Eurasianism as a force of cultural and political re-integration of Russia with former Soviet territories and other neighboring countries.

  • 29.
    Kotkina, Irina
    Södertörns högskola, Centrum för Östersjö- och Östeuropaforskning (CBEES).
    Russian Ministry of Culture between 'Effective Management' and the 'Ministry of Truth': New Policy towards Arts and Culture in Russia 20142014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 30.
    Kotkina, Irina
    Södertörns högskola, Centrum för Östersjö- och Östeuropaforskning (CBEES).
    Utopia of Russian Culturalness: Re-branding Russian Identity2013Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 31.
    Lafauci, Lauren E
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Genus. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Botanic Knowledge and Civil War2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 32.
    Lafauci, Lauren E
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Genus. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    "The Body": Keywords for C19 Environmental Humanities2018Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 33.
    Lafauci, Lauren E
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Genus. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    The Great White North: Environmental Safety in Sweden and Norway2017Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 34.
    Lentina, Alda Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Portugisiska.
    Breviário do Brasil de Agustina Bessa-Luís: uma Poética da Relação2017Inngår i: XXVI Congresso Internacional da ABRAPLIP “Ensino e pesquisa da literatura portuguesa no Brasil e no mundo”, realizado na Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR), em Curitiba (BRASIL), entre os dias 02 e 06 de outubro de 2017., 2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [pt]

    Propomo-nos analisar o diário de viagem, Breviário do Brasil (1991), no qual a autora portuguesa, Agustina Bessa-Luís, explora as relações Luso-brasileiras. Uma relação que, segundo Anamaria Filizola, se constrói entre “ressentimento/fascínio” e “o que nos aproxima” e na qual a literatura desempenha um papel preponderante para “preencher os silêncios”, reativando a memória do passado e revelando um conhecimento partilhado. O nosso trabalho tentará abordar este diário de viagem à luz das ideias desenvolvidas por Edourad Glissant com o conceito de “poética da relação”, enquadrando-o também no que Gisele Sapiro e Pascale Casanova, entre outros, definem como uma “Literatura-mundo”.

  • 35.
    Lindström, Kati
    Filosofi och historia, KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Filosofi och teknikhistoria, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö.
    On Dogs, Aurora and Ships: Bipolar Imagination in Japan2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Japan is a relative newcomer in the Arctic politics as it has no territorial claims in the Arctic, nor an early history of Arctic expeditions. Instead, modernizing Japan focused its attention to Antarctica from as early as 1910. Today, Japan is showing increasing interest in Arctic politics and management, insisting that important decisions should not be taken only by the Arctic States and the Arctic Ocean coastal States. The Japanese government view is that the Arctic “should be recognized as a part of the common heritage of mankind. The international community should protect this area and use it for peaceful purposes”. Japan explains its polar interests by being a maritime country and although the country’s main activities in the polar regions pertain to scientific research, many consider Japan’s real motivation to be in the potential Northern shipping routes. Accordingly, the Arctic figures in the government documents as empty fields of water, ice and hidden treasures, subjected to international scientific research and management – quite like the Antarctic. Indigenous people are almost invisible. I will present an ongoing research project into the commonalities in the Japanese imagination of the two poles. Through the analyses of museum exhibits and other cultural phenomena, I will discuss a variety of images where the perception of the two poles gets blurred, notably the Japanese obsession with Aurora borealis, snow fields, but also the moving bodies of icebreakers, whales – and dogs. A telling example is the story of 15 Japanese Karafuto breed dogs whose tragic fate after the first Japanese Antarctic overwinter camp has become the dominant cultural narrative of polar research. The block-buster movie of the expedition, “Tales of Antarctica”, is largely shot in the Canadian Arctic and it can be argued that the origin of the dogs in the former Northern territories of Japan (Sakhalin) helps to project Japan as a place with deep cultural ties to Arctic

  • 36.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Filosofi och teknikhistoria, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö. University of Tartu.
    Semiotic study of landscapes between bodies and representations2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 37.
    Lindström, Kati
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Filosofi och teknikhistoria, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö. University of Tartu.
    Nugin, Raili
    Tallinn University.
    Palang, Hannes
    Tallinn University.
    Jaago, Tiiu
    University of Tartu.
    Kannike, Anu
    Kull, Kalevi
    Printsmann, Anu
    Siim, Pihla Maria
    Piirirohkus ja mälu: (Memory and multiplicity of boundaries)2014Inngår i: Eesti kultuuri süvamehhanismid / [ed] Tasa, Monika; Rumm, Kaija, 2014, s. 13-Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 38.
    Ljungcrantz, Desireé
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Att skriva hiv: - en känslo-förkroppsligande läsakt.2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    Abstract: Att skriva hiv – känslo-förkroppsligande hiv-blivande

    Hiv kan vara ett slags trauma som skapar affekt, känslor och kroppsliga reaktioner, särskilt med tanke på olika fördomar som kretsar kring sjukdomen. Negativa föreställningar landar på vissa kroppar mer än andra. Genom att läsa två samtida svenska (själv)biografier som handlar om att leva med hiv; Ophelias resa (2006) och Mitt positiva liv (2013); tillsammans med Sara Ahmeds begrepp negerad fenomenologi utforskar jag hur känslor och kroppslighet skildras. Vidare fokuserar jag hur läsaren och texten samskapas i sitt blivande. Denna presentation är en läsning där flera jag möts. Det här är en känslo-förkroppsligande läsakt.

  • 39.
    Ljungcrantz, Desireé
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Composition n:o HIV:: a reading-listening-writing (text) performance.2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 40.
    Ljungcrantz, Desireé
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Encountering Feminist Figurations and an Exploration of Shame:: Abrasions and the Comic Feminine Grotesque.2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 41.
    Ljungcrantz, Desireé
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    In-te(a)r-vein.: A work-in-progress (feminist) figuration.2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In-te(a)r-vein – a Companion Concept

    In the personal-political-work in progress of my PhD project focusing HIV, relations and disclosure I am using the concept in-te(a)r-vein. Since HIV is a virus and a diagnosis connected to individual and collective experiences of (im)possible past-present-futures, that is also dependent upon non-human actors the concept must include multiple aspects of matter, identities and emotions as well as accountability and situated knowledge. In-te(a)-vein is my companion concept bringing in:

    in: at a point within an area or space, forming the whole or the part of something/somebody; inter: between one to another, inter-agency and to bury a dead person; ter: three; tear: to damage something by pulling it apart or into pieces, to injure a muscle, move quickly, liquid from the eye; vein: tubes that carry the blood from all parts of the body towards the heart, a thin layer of mineral or metal contained in a rock or a particular style or manner; intervene: to become involved in a situation in order to improve or help it, to happen in a way that delays something or prevents it for happening; vain: vanity; in vain: without success; intravenous: of drugs or food going into a vein.

  • 42.
    Ljungcrantz, Desireé
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Performing HIV:: emo-bodied becoming.2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Through a reading of contemporary Swedish autobiographies on the theme "experiences of a life with hiv"; I will try to follow the emotions and the bodies represented in these text. How are meaning of hiv constructed when it comes to emo-bodiment?

  • 43.
    Ljungcrantz, Desireé
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Gustavson, Malena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Genus. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    A viral repolitization2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Assembling the different stories on hiv and aids we will together discuss how activism can transform health-disease narrative that would relocate the politics of virus.

  • 44.
    Petrov, Kristian
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för samhälls- och kulturvetenskap (from 2013).
    (Idé-)historiens slut?: Reflektioner om ämnets status i ljuset av erfarenheter från Karlstads universitet2017Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [sv]

    En ledande ämnesföreträdare uttryckte för tiotalet år sedan att idéhistoria som akademiskt högskoleämne står på randen till nationell avveckling. Finns det fog för påståendet och hur ska den negativa trenden i så fall bemötas? I denna presentation görs en översikt av idéhistorieämnets uppkomst, förutsättningar, utveckling, status och legitimitet i ett nationellt och internationellt perspektiv. Särskilt beaktas erfarenheter från Karlstads universitet, där idéhistoria blev ett välkommet tillskott i den nationella ämnesgemenskapen i slutet av 1990-talet, men tragiskt gick i graven 2014. Är utvecklingen oåterkallelig eller kan den vändas i konstruktiv riktning, och i så fall hur?

  • 45.
    Pettersson, Åsa
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Bildproduktion.
    Måste barn alltid lära sig av barnkulturen?2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta paper, tar sin utgångspunkt i min avhandling TV for Children (Pettersson, 2013), och studerar hur diskurser om lärande är inkorporerade i TV för barn. Den tvärvetenskapliga teoretiska grunden för studien utgörs av TV studier (ex. Ellis, 2006, Corner, 1999; Lury, 2005), Barndoms studier (ex. James, Jenks and Prout, 1998; Kehily, 2008; Lee, 2001) och Visuell kultur (ex. Mitchell, 2005; Rose, 2001; Sparrman, 2002) för att diskutera hur barn representeras, visualiseras och tilltalas som lärande individer i public service TV-program för barn. Materialet som studeras är public service TV program sända för barn under 1980, 1992 och 2007 av SVT och UR och analysen fokuserar på hur föreställningar om barn ständigt är länkade till föreställningar om lärande i dessa program. Frågor som diskuteras är om barn trots att de konstrueras som sociala aktörer i programmen också i och med att de genomgående ska lära sig saker kommer att betraktas som otillräckliga. Här blir relationen barn-TV central då den i sig också bygger på diskursiva föreställningar. Samhällsdiskurser fokuserar ofta på TV och barn som en riskabel relation, i en sådan diskurs blir det omöjligt att skapa public service TV för barn som bygger på underhållning utan programmen för barn kommer att legitimeras med ett lärande tilltal och innehåll. Detta ger en barnkultur som bygger på vuxna förväntningar och förhoppningar mer än en barnkultur som bygger på vad barn själva anser sig vilja ha.

  • 46.
    Premat, Christophe
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Romanska och klassiska institutionen.
    Digital resilience and civic engagement : the case of France after the terror attack in Nice (14 July 2016)2017Inngår i: Digital democracy: Critical Perspectives in the Age of Big Data, 2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The traumatic event has this peculiar faculty to activate a strong memory experience. The people can exactly know what they did a day when a terror attack happened. There is a collec- tive memory process which is not limited to witnesses nor bystanders. The aim of the project is to analyze live memories on Web 2.0 and study how social links are built under these circumstances. If the traditional media base their work on digital live experiences, it can be worth analyzing how these pieces of memory are reintegrated into a collective storytelling process. The mediatic echo is prevailing in the collection of these pieces of memory. The use of images (iconic forms) / symbols / texts is important to deal with collective trauma. The authorities elaborated speci c codes of con- duct with an attention to the victims, which includes categories of people more or less concerned by the attacks. Evaluating the traumatic impact is the most dif cult task of of cial authorities. We would like to analyze the collective integration of digital pieces of memory by medias around the terror attacks in Nice. The acceleration of violence, the over ow of images created a feeling of brutality. This is why it is all the more important to question how the authorities react by producing a form of digital resilience. We would like to know whether an of cial discourse on victims reac- tivates feelings of solidarity and an identi cation to the core values of society or if it encourages a form of disruption of the social link (hatred, creation of scapegoat). The social networks will be the main references as you can have an exploration of different connections and transfers of data, information, fake news, feelings of fears. A database constituted of accounts explicitly expressing a feeling or a reaction will be built. 

  • 47.
    Premat, Christophe
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Romanska och klassiska institutionen.
    Har Frankrikes kulturella diplomati nått sitt mål i Sverige?2015Inngår i: Litteraturförmedlare i Sverige från 1945 till våra dagar: Hur går det till när skönlitteratur skriven på franska, spanska och italienska förmedlas till svenska läsare? Symposiet handlar om de aktörer som ser till att litteraturen cirkulerar internationellt: förlagsredaktörer, översättare, litterära agenter, kritiker, kulturattachéer, forskare och lärare. Dessa ofta förbisedda personer,som Pierre Bourdieu kallade för ”grindvakter”, avgör vilka författarskap och skönlitterära verk som tillåts passera de osynliga gränserna mellan språk, länder och kulturer och är därmed centrala medskapare till världslitteraturen., 2015Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [sv]

    I slutet av 1930-talet satsade Franska staten på en kulturell diplomati i Sverige. Målet var att vinna svenska elitens sympatier för att begränsa det tyska inflytande i det svenska samhället. Det var då Frankrikes legation i Stockholm identifierade nyckelpersoner dvs. förmedlare för att förstärka det franska inflytande i det svenska samhället. År 1937 grundades Franska institutet som skulle ha en ny roll efter andra världskrigen. Syftet är att analysera Frankrikes kulturella diplomati i slutet av 1930-talet och efter andra världskriget för att förstå hur Frankrike utvecklade franskvänliga kretsar i Sverige.

  • 48.
    Premat, Christophe
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Romanska och klassiska institutionen.
    Reite, Torun
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Romanska och klassiska institutionen.
    The Caribbean and Postcolonial Intellectuals:  the Legacy of Frantz Fanon and Aimé Césaire in and beyond the Caribbean region2018Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Aimé Césaire (1913-2008) and Frantz Fanon (1925-1961) devoted their work to the radical criticism of colonialism. Whereas Césaire was mainly linked to the emergence of the aesthetics of négritude, Fanon analyzed everyday racism as an alienating spatial relation and considered colonization as a spatial organization – both material and mental. Torun Reite and Christophe Premat will show how the concepts of Césaire and Fanon are still used to describe material and mental borders remaining in different postcolonial contexts. They will also discuss the ways in which these concepts are rooted in the Caribbean context, but also what made them travel so well and connect with social and political movements far beyond this region. 

  • 49.
    Premat, Christophe
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Romanska och klassiska institutionen.
    Reite, Torun
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Romanska och klassiska institutionen.
    Tracing Fanon´s African connections2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from a postcolonial perspective, this study adopts the notions of travelling theories (Said, 1994), to trace Fanon´s thinking as enacted in political discourses of the Senegalese Leopold Senghor´s (Roynette, 2005;  Vivaldi, 2007) and the first Mozambican president, Samora Machel. According to Said (Said, 1993), it is precisely the geographical dispersion which allows for the renewed revolutionary potential of travelling theories and we will explore this claim through what we call the tracing of Fanon´s African connections focusing on selected political discourses from the 60s and 70s, but also providing examples of traces of Fanon´s legacy in contemporary Senegal and Mozambique. We will contextualize these with examples of Fanonian practices from other social and political movements in contemporary Africa, such as South Africa,  (Gibson, 2011).

     

    Based on analyses of a sample of political discourses, newspaper articles, memoires and secondary literature, the study discusses the Fanonian traces in these African connections and includes a discussion of acknowledged or unconscious influences, creative borrowing and the wholesale appropriation of Fanon´s thinking and relate these to his main works: Black Skin, White Masks (Fanon, 2008 , [1952]), The Wretched of the Earth (Fanon, 2004, [1961]) and Towards the African Revolution (1964). The hypothesis is that the Fanonian discourse works as a travelling memory for many African leaders since the independence.

     

    Preliminary results attest to the continued relevance of the Fanonian dual emphasis on the individual (subjective) and the social and, as his comment to Sartre, the specificity of the Fanonian perspective on the racial relationship entrenched in a colonial setting.  As a preliminary reflection we claim that the emphasis on the individual (subjective) was disregarded in the discursive superseding of the racial relationship, particularly identified among liberation movements that adopted (the most purist) socialist/marxist ideologies. We trace what we consider the erasure and invisibilization of the everyday racism and provide examples of more recent resurgences of Fanonian discourses and practices in contemporary social and political movements. We identify a renewed interest for the dual emphasis on the individual and the social and recognition of a reproduction of the colonial alienation and segregation in globalized late modernity.

     

     

    References

     

    • Fanon, F. (2008) [1952], Black Skin, White Masks. Pluto Press.
    • Fanon, F. (2004), [1961], The wretched of the earth, New York: Grove Press.
    • Gibson, N. (1999) Rethinking Fanon. The Continuing Dialogue. Humanity Books. New York.
    • Gibson, N. (2011). Fanonian practices in South Africa: from Steve Bliko to Abahlali base Mjondolo. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
    • Roynette, C. (2005). “À propos de négritude: Senghor et Fanon”, VST, Vie Sociale et Traitements, n. 87: 70-72.
    • Said, E. (1993). Orientalism. Stockholm: Ordfront.
    • Vivaldi, J.-M. (2007). Fanon: Collective Ethics and Humanism. New York: Peter Lang.

     

  • 50.
    Purcell-Sjölund, Anita
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Engelska.
    Laffing wif ’n at da Fob, paht hooz da Fob? A discussion of the comedy performances of The Laughing Samoans in New Zealand: (Laughing with and at the Fob, but who's the Fob?)2013Inngår i: The Stockholm 2013 Metaphor Festival, Stockholm University, 29 - 31 August 2013: Conference proceedings book, 2013, s. 64-65Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The Laughing Samoans is a comedy duo comprising New Zealand-born Samoan comedian Tofiga Fepulea’i, and Samoan-born actor Etuati Ete. Having performed throughout the Pacific region, The Laughing Samoans over-exaggerate and mock Samoan immigrants’ interaction with the New Zealand Pakeha (NZ-Europeans) as well as among Samoans, who are the fastest-growing immigrant group in New Zealand.

    In the Samoan culture, comic theatre is known as faleaitu (‘house of spirits’). Faleaitudeals with tensions and conflicts in the Samoan community by providing a comic mirror for the community. Fa’a Samoa (Samoan culture) is a chief-based system, wherein open criticism is discouraged. Hereniko (1994) explained that in faleaitu, actors are clowns and are seen as possessed by a spirit which criticises Samoan chiefs and institutions. Faleaitu is reminiscent of Bakhtin’s (1984) concept of the carnival, using masking and dissembling to turn the social world inside out to reconstruct social relations. The Laughing Samoans portray stereotypes of Samoans as educationally, economically, and socially backwards, in other words FOB (an importer’s acronym for “free on board”). Applied to Pacific Island immigrants, FOB became an acronym for “fresh off the boat” and is the derogatory equivalent to the term “nigger” applied to AfroAmericans.

    In their comedy sketches as a type of faleaitu, The Laughing Samoans enact the stereotypes of Samoans as well as mock Samoans’ attempts to mimic Pakeha. In their performances, The Laughing Samoans speak a variety of English called Pasifika (Pacific) English. Some of the characteristics of Pasifika English are a heavy island (Samoan) accent, slurred pronunciation of English, the mistaken use of prepositions, and switching of sentence word-order. Dominant in The Laughing Samoans’ use of Pasifika English are features such as puns, homonyms, and clichés to create (mis)communication with Pakeha characters and critically comment on aspects of Fa’a Samoa.

    An analysis of The Laughing Samoans’ performances indicates that what is going on is what Balme (2007:182) called reverse colonial mimicry, thereby contradicting Bhabha’s (1994:85-92) concept of mimicry, which may be described as reinforcing colonial cultural dominance. Through their use of Pasifika English and their mock faafafine (cross-dressing), The Laughing Samoans imitate the ways Pakeha as the dominant cultural group see themselves. In some comedy sketches the power and cultural dynamics are realigned and shifted so that Pakehabecome the FOB. In addition, The Laughing Samoans mocked the essentialist attitude many Samoan immigrants have of Fa’a Samoa, an attitude which results in the bastardisation of fundamental cultural values. Suggested in some comedy sketches of The Laughing Samoans is a fluid and contextual definition of the essence of Samoan in an immigrant destination country.

    References:

    Bakhtin, Mikhail. 1984. Rabelais and His World (Tr. Hélène Iswolsky). Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

    Balme, Christopher. 2007. Pacific Performances. Theatricality and cross-cultural encounter in the South Seas. Hampshire and New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

    Bhabha, Homi. 1994. The Location of Culture. New York: Routledge.

    Hereniko, Vilsoni. 1994. “Clowning as Political Commentary: Polynesia, then and now,” in The Contemporary Pacific 6:1, 1–28.

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