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  • 1.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    From Buenos Aires to Finland and Japan: The tango's unusual migration2014Inngår i: List of Abstracts for Conference Transcultural Identity Constructions in a Changing World, Dalarna University, Sweden, April 2-4, 2014, 2014, s. 19-20Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In Finland, thousands of miles away from Buenos Aires, people crowd the dance floors of restaurants and dance halls nightly to dance to tango music, while the tango has also caught the heart of the people on the other side of the world in Japan. The popularity of the tango in both Finland and Japan, however, is not very well known to the outside world.

    Though some scholars have stated that the tango reflects the personality, mentality and identity of the Finnish and Japanese people, this may only be partially true. Moreover, it is difficult to generalize what the Finnish or Japanese personality is. I argue that the tango's success in these two countries also has significant connections to historical and social factors. As being a dancer myself, I also believe that the 'liminality' (originally a term borrowed from Arnold van Gennep's formulation of rites de passage) of tango dancing plays an important role in these two nations that went through difficult struggles to recover from the damage caused by the war. “The liminal phase is considered sacred, anomalous, abnormal and dangerous, while the  pre- and post-liminal phases are normal and a profane state of being (Selänniemi 1996) and “the regular occurrence of sacred-profane alternations mark important periods of social life or even provide the measure of the passage of time itself”(Leach 1961).

    In this paper, I will discuss motives and paths of how a culture travels, settles and shapes into a new form, using the tango as an example.

  • 2.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Intercultural communicative competence: the challenges and implications of teaching Japanese politeness strategies to Swedish learners of Japanese2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching communicative competence is extremely important in language instruction. One can avoid embarrassing situations and conflicts caused by misunderstandings if she/he understands the differences in intercultural pragmatics. Politeness discourse varies in complexity according to social distance, relative power between the speakers, and situations. The data I have collected during the past 6 years indicates that Swedish learners of Japanese often do not see the necessity of learning the polite/honorific discourse and often view these negatively as Swedish society is one of the most egalitarian in the world. As a consequence, Swedish students often fail to utilize appropriate politeness strategies when speaking in Japanese. However, it is important to point out to foreign language learners that cultural and social norms are not interchangeable and that one must adapt to the language one is using and the culture one is in. Thus Swedish Learners of Japanese should consider politeness discourse as a part of the rules of the language rather than something that can be modified based on one’s opinion.

    The current study investigates the differences in politeness strategies between Swedish and Japanese discourse. Student surveys and analysis of students’ errors have revealed clear differences in the use of politeness strategies in Swedish and in Japanese context. While the politeness, respect, and formality are closely intertwined in Japanese; the Swedes perceive respect and politeness as separate matters. It is also found that while the Japanese are inclined to using verbal politeness strategies, the Swedes express their respect more through non-verbal actions or behaviors. Various Japanese and Swedish utterances have also been examined to determine the Discourse Politeness Default suggested by Usami (2006) in order to systematize the politeness strategies in ways similar to grammatical rules.

                                                                                                                                                                          

                                                                          

                                                                                                                                                                          

  • 3.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för ABM.
    Closing panel: Sharing wisdom and reflections on the enduring questions2013Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a written contribution to the concluding session of the conference on displacement and resettlement at the University of Oxford. Parts of this text has been incorporated in the final paper "Concluding Session: Reflections on the Enduring Questions in Development-Induced Displacement and Resettlement" chaired by Susan Tamondong (main author).

  • 4.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för ABM.
    The Local Landscape - an arena of knowledge exchange: natural heritage, tourism and business  2010Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the multitude of relations between local people and their environment and the demands of the tourists for authentic experiences in their encounter with people and landscape. The argument is that their is a need to bridge the gap between theory and practice in the academic view on the topic.  

  • 5.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för ABM.
    The Reestablishment of Routine Cultures in Displaced Societies2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to contribute to the longitudinal studies of DFDR by presenting ethnographic material from the Zimapán resettlement project in Mexico. The data is analyzed through a lens of anthropological and heritage theories. The role of anthropology in contested projects is also discussed.

  • 6.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för ABM.
    Downing, Theodore E
    University of Arizona.
    Five Sides of the Same Coin: The Place of Global Policy Frameworks in the Setting of Negotiation Agendas of Involuntary Resettlement2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contributes to the discussion of the role of policy guidelines in involuntary resettlement projects in the light of the World Bank´s revision of its safeguards Environmental and Social Safeguards (2014). The paper concludes that the present and proposed guidelines do not take into consideration the complexity on the ground in these kinds of stressful projects.  The authors have a unique possibility to compare "inside and outside" events and decisions as one of the author was embedded in the local culture while the other one was the assigned resettlement expert of the lenders.

  • 7.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för ABM.
    Utan, Ûnal
    Who Owns the Local Landscape?: Local Peoples' Rights and Tourism2006Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of a rich intangible and tangible cultural heritage is closely connected to the tourist industry and its economic potentials. But who earns? Who develops? And what is the dynamics between the external and local agents? The purpose ot this paper is to explore these complex and dialectic relations between local and foreign adventure enterprises that operate in the tourist industry.

  • 8.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Filosofi och teknikhistoria, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö.
    Constructing the pasts of polar futures: the Janus face of polar heritage2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 9.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Filosofi och teknikhistoria, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö.
    Creating sustainable development in the Arctic: abandoned extraction sites as assets for new Arctic futures2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The impacts of climate change on polar cultural heritage have received an increasing attention in recent years within the field of heritage research. Less attention has been place on other processes of global change affecting the Arctic, where cultural heritage plays an important role – industrialization and de-industrialization. In recent years the circumpolar Arctic has been affected by a global mining boom, triggered by high world market prices on minerals as well as notions of the Arctic as a future arena for resource extraction in the wake of climate change. This mining boom is affecting communities in much of the Arctic region and holds a central place in debates about sustainable development there. A central item of these discussions focus on the question of how to handle the physical remains of mining sites once the boom is over and the activities have seized. The attitudes to abandoned mining sites differ across the Arctic. In some cases they have been perceived as unwanted legacies of problematic pasts, making land reclamation a preferred strategy. In other cases abandoned mines and associated infrastructures have been re-defined as cultural heritage and have become anchor points for local identities and a resource for new economies.

    The objective of this paper is to present a research project aiming to explain these differences in order to understand under which circumstances abandoned large-scale resource extraction sites can be turned into resources for new futures in post-industrial Arctic communities. The focus is on the European Arctic, but in a circumpolar and bi-polar comparative perspective. The main questions are: how have different groups of actors interpreted and used physical remains of abandoned resource extraction operations, and why? Which policies are needed to turn abandoned resource extraction sites into resources for constructing new futures in the Arctic? By addressing these questions, the field of heritage studies can make an important contribution to the discussion on sustainable futures in the Arctic.

  • 10.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Filosofi och teknikhistoria, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö.
    Creating sustainable development in the Arctic: abandoned extraction sites as assets for new futures2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The impacts of climate change on polar cultural heritage have received an increasing attention in recent years within the field of heritage research. Less attention has been place on other processes of global change affecting the Arctic, where cultural heritage plays an important role – industrialization and de-industrialization. In recent years the circumpolar Arctic has been affected by a global mining boom, triggered by high world market prices on minerals as well as notions of the Arctic as a future arena for resource extraction in the wake of climate change. This mining boom is affecting communities in much of the Arctic region and holds a central place in debates about sustainable development there. A central item of these discussions focus on the question of how to handle the physical remains of mining sites once the boom is over and the activities have seized. The attitudes to abandoned mining sites differ across the Arctic. In some cases they have been perceived as unwanted legacies of problematic pasts, making land reclamation a preferred strategy. In other cases abandoned mines and associated infrastructures have been re-defined as cultural heritage and have become anchor points for local identities and a resource for new economies.

    The objective of this paper is to present preliminary results from a research project aiming to explain these differences in order to understand under which circumstances abandoned large-scale resource extraction sites can be turned into resources for new futures in post-industrial Arctic communities. The focus is on the European Arctic, but in a circumpolar and bi-polar comparative perspective. The main questions are: how have different groups of actors interpreted and used physical remains of abandoned resource extraction operations, and why? Which policies are needed to turn abandoned resource extraction sites into resources for constructing new futures in the Arctic? By addressing these questions, the field of industrial heritage studies can make an important contribution to the discussion on sustainable futures in the Arctic.

  • 11.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Filosofi och teknikhistoria, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö.
    The Greening of Arctic Mining Landscapes: The Politics of Industrial Heritage at Svalbard2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 12.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Filosofi och teknikhistoria, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö.
    Valfångst, industriarv och geopolitik i Sydatlanten2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 13.
    Berg, Linda
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS).
    “‘25 dollar rebel’. Identity politics, Legislation and Class in stories from Lesbian Activists in Nicaragua”2010Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 14.
    Berg, Linda
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS).
    Berg, Linda, 2012. “On sticky positions and tricky decisions within hbtqi-discourses in Central America”2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 15.
    Berg, Lovisa
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Arabiska.
    Syrian Drama Series - Pressure Cooker or Steam Vent?2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 16.
    Berg, Martin
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle, Centrum för samhällsanalys (CESAM).
    Improve me! 100 days of wristband guidance2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Body monitoring devices are increasingly turning into machines that not only track personal activity but also provide suggestions on how to lead a life that is assumed to be continuously improved. By measuring, interpreting and correlating various data sources, these devices are assumed to provide an understanding that goes beyond everyday self knowledge. Although these devices most certainly can provide information on how to run faster or sleep better, it remains unclear how it feels to gain a deeper understanding of oneself by means of a technological device. This paper approaches this question in an auto-ethnographic study (by the author of this paper) where the Jawbone UP wristband and the ”Smart Coach” insight and coaching ”engine” will be used and the suggestions for improvement slavishly followed during 100 days. This system crunches personal data in various ways in order to provide ”actionable insights and uniquely personalized guidance” (jawbone.com).

  • 17.
    Billore, Soniya
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF).
    Rosén, Christina
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    A Cross-cultural Study of Attitudes to Digital Tools Among Students and Teachers in the European Language Classroom2016Inngår i: International Digital Humanities Symposium, Växjö, 7-8 Nov 2016: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Koraljka Golub & Marcelo Milrad, Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2016, s. 18-20Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 18.
    Brodén Gyberg, Veronica
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Aiding transitions: climate and environment in Swedish research aid policy 1988-20162017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Strong local scientific research capacities remain a central piece of the puzzle when it comes to producing relevant knowledge and solutions to various development challenges. There is still great inequality concerning resources for higher education and research globally, however, and in order to be able to tackle climate change – international aid and collaboration is often upheld as key. The amount of aid that is classified as climate and environment related is on the rise, but similar support related to the sustainable use and management of resources and the environment have constituted part of Swedish (and other) aid for many decades. This paper focuses on Swedish aid and takes its empirical point of departure in 1988, when the environment was included among the aid goals. Using discourse analysis, I will narrow in on the case of research aid policy and analyze in what ways changing environments and climate change have been portrayed as important for development between 1988 and 2016. What can we learn from the recent past and how does it compare to today? What is sustainable development in this context; how have problems and solutions been described and what is perceived to be the role of scientific research in creating transitions from less to more “sustainable”?

  • 19.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för film och litteratur (IFL).
    Creating heritage and memory: digital film archives as sites of knowledge production2017Inngår i: From Dust to Dawn : Archival Studies After the Archival Turn: Uppsala 15–17 November 2017, Uppsala University, 2017, s. 13-13Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Situated at the intersection of archivology, film studies and memory studies, my paper offers critical perspectives on the archive as a site of knowledge production. It investigates the construction of audiovisual heritage in digital film archives, based on my research project “The Cultural Heritage of Moving Images” (VR, 2016–2018). Drawing on theorizations of the archive by Foucault and Derrida, I regard the archive as an agent in its own right. In order to challenge the ongoing tendencies in film studies to focus on the preservation of film stock, my talk will foreground the role of the archivist as a curator. In my paper I will examine the use of metadata for the creation of a polyvocal cultural memory.

  • 20.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för film och litteratur (IFL).
    Who has the right to the memory of the city?: Appropriating mediated memories in times of gentrification2017Inngår i: Creating the city : Identity, memory and participation: Malmö 9–10 February 2017 : Conference program, 2017, s. 29-29Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Situated at the interface of memory studies and film studies, my research looks at the ways mediated transcultural memories travel through different, often conflicting discursive contexts. How does cultural memory tie in with processes of gentrification? My paper argues that mediated regional and transcultural memories are mobilized by different – and often conflicting – stakeholders, for instance the heritage industries, official politics of city branding or antigentrification struggles. Drawing on my case study of Manchester‘s contemporary politics of city branding, I will outline modes of appropriating cultural memory in times of urban reconstruction. My paper will look at the power relations involved in adapting (white homosocial) postpunk memories into the self- fashioning of Manchester as a creative city. I argue that subcultural or popular memories are not emancipatory per se, but can easily tie into neoliberal politics. This has been possible, among others, because Manchester’s postpunk memory culture has excluded feminist and queer positions as well as the recollections of Black and Asian Britons. In short, while travelling through various transmedia contexts, Manchester's postpunk memories have been streamlined memories in favour of consent instead of celebrating difference.

  • 21.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för mediestudier, Modevetenskap.
    Cuerpos de Emulación Pecuniaria: Estrellas de Hollywood como elemento homogeneizador de la femineidad e identidad nacional en los Estados Unidos2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [es]

    Cuerpos de emulación pecuniaria: Estrellas de Hollywood como elemento homogeneizador de la femineidad e identidad nacional en los Estados Unidos El fin del siglo XIX acarreó cambios sustanciales para las mujeres en los Estados Unidos. El cambio de paradigma que permitió a hombres y mujeres compartir la esfera pública, el creciente rol de la mujer en el ámbito laboral, el surgimiento del culto a la “personalidad,” y la consolidación de la industria del cine tuvieron incidencia directa en la reconfiguración de la femineidad y la búsqueda de una identidad nacional entre las jóvenes inmigrantes de la clase trabajadora de los Estados Unidos. Lentamente, las estrellas de cine ganaron prestigio como símbolos de belleza y movilidad social para miles de jóvenes mujeres gracias a la circulación de imágenes en suplementos dominicales y revistas especializadas en cine. En breve, la industria del cine Estadounidense comenzó a replicar los formatos de revistas como Photoplay y Motion Picture Magazine para los países de habla hispana, propagando su hegemonía a lo largo y a lo ancho del continente. Parte fundamental del proceso de identificación está ligado al creciente uso de estrellas de cine en publicidades de productos de belleza y moda. La agencia de publicidad J. W. Thompson fue el eje fundamental de dicha dinámica. La empresa contaba con un grupo de mujeres ejecutivas a cargo de las cuentas correspondientes as productos de belleza. Estas mujeres, en su mayoría pertenecientes al movimiento sufragista de los Estados Unidos, tuvieron un rol fundamental en el desarrollo de productos y campañas orientadas al público femenino. La presentación dará un paneo histórico sobre la transición de estos cuerpos de emulación pecuniaria con el fin de comprender el cambio cultural que llevó a las estrellas de Hollywood de símbolos la “Americanization” de la diáspora en los Estados Unidos a convertirse en sinónimo de glamour y sofisticación para mujeres alrededor del mundo.

  • 22.
    Cheruiyot, David
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation.
    Toussaint, Nothias
    Stanford University.
    A “hotbed” of digital empowerment?: Media criticism in Kenya between playful engagement and co-option2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 23.
    Dahlström, Mats
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Digital utgivning av källmaterial2016Inngår i: Digital publishing and research, Helsingfors: Helsingfors universitet , 2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 24. Dahlström, Mats
    Digitizing cultural heritage material2017Inngår i: Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries 2017, Göteborg: University of Gothenburg , 2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 25.
    Dahlström, Mats
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Lights and shadows: digitization, digital  facsimiles and scholarly editing2017Inngår i: Digital Scholarly Editing and Modern Greek studies / [ed] Anna-Maria Sichani, Athens: National Library of Greece , 2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 26.
    Dahlström, Mats
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Utgåvor som fönster2015Inngår i: Digitale kildeutgivelser, Oslo: Nasjonalbiblioteket , 2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 27.
    Engström, Maria
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Språkvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för moderna språk.
    Новая опричнина и идея 'сакрального террора' в современной России2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 28.
    Eriksson, Jonnie
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle, Kontext & kulturgränser (KK).
    Diffractions of the Digital: Godard and the Kinetics of the History-Image2015Inngår i: In the flow – People, Media, Materialities: ACSIS conference 15-17 June 2015, Norrköping / [ed] Johanna Dahlin & Tove Andersson, Norrköping: ACSIS, Linköpings universitet , 2015, s. 127-128Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    As exemplified by Eloge de l'amour (2001), Jean-Luc Godard's work after Histoire(s) du cinéma (1988–98) – which critiqued cinema's treatment of its contemporary cultural and oplitical history, – has made use of digital technology in order to explore the remaining potential of the medium after its purported demise and ethical failure. By drawing on concepts from Gilles Deleuze and Karen Barad, this paper aims to elucidate the techno-aesthetic conditions of Godard's implied method of imaging the dual flux of temporality: becoming history and becoming future. In this diffracting process, Godard's late films embody the present condition of visual culture as it splits between past and future from the point of a present crisis of its material conditions of representation. Neither virtual reality nor classical realism, a diffractive method of digital filmmaking explores the new materiality of motion pictures. 

  • 29.
    Eriksson, Jonnie
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Språk, kultur och samhälle.
    Filming a New Earth: Ecopolitical Imagination in Cinema and Deleuze's Geophilosophy of Utopia2017Inngår i: ACSIS 2017: Sessions, Panels & Abstracts, 2017, s. 7-7Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the concept of utopia in Gilles Deleuze’s philosophy and its significance for cinema, placing his and Félix Guattari’s “geophilosophy” in the context of posthumanist ecocriticism. It relocates the notion of utopia from out of a paradigm of political fiction and speculations of a possible social progress, towards Deleuze & Guattari’s ideas of a geography and topology of time as conditions for creative thought. Considering the importance of the concepts of becoming and virtuality in this philosophy, a utopian image is no mere speculation or representation, but a force of creation. Deleuze’s notion that philosophers and artists share the task of resisting the present in creatively thinking “a new people” and “a new earth” can be developed to view film as a medium for re-imagining nature, creating a new set of earth-images or geosigns for future thought. 

  • 30.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Ryan Bengtsson, Linda
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    A spatial approach to fan labour: Conceptualizing fan mobilization in transmedia marketing2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    When Swedish artist Tove Styrke released her album Kiddo (2015) on Spotify, she mobilized her fans through an immersive marketing campaign that stretched across and beyond media platforms: an 8-bit game, Spotify, Facebook, Twitter, Dreamhack, and a major Swedish music festival were key campaign platforms. The campaign construction was hardly unique, but rather illustrative of current trends in cultural production, including transmedia marketing and the increasing reliance on fan labor.This paper argues that informed spatial approaches to fan labor, and business strategies aimed to cultivate such labor, are missing in the existing research on cultural production. While descriptions of our transmediatized culture often-times do include spatial metaphors, such as “flow”, “stream”, “fluid”, and “liquid”, our conviction is that a more serious engagement with geography is vital for understanding, mapping, and ultimately critiquing industry practices that potentially are exploitive, unethical, and even harmful.Therefore, this paper suggests a theoretical framework for exploring the geographies of fan labor and presents exemplifying cartographies of authentic music marketing campaigns. The framework is influenced by two recent ‘turns’ in media and communication studies: the labor turn and the spatial turn. From labor theory, we borrow the idea that consumer engagement can be read as labor that is typically unpaid, affective, and voluntarily given. Spatial theory, next, provides us with a conceptual toolbox to disentangle the spatiality of transmedia marketing, including the relationship between physical and virtual elements.The notion of ‘transmediascape’ is brought in to describe the embodiment of transmedia marketing – in mediated and non-mediated spaces and flows. Such transmediascapes, the paper argues, can be read as the perfect soil for fan labor since they mobilize consumers in more than one respect: they assemble fan affect and, at the same time, encourage physical as well as virtual fan movement. Due to its multifaceted connotation – pointing towards both affectivity and mobility – the term ‘mobilization’ fruitfully bridges labor theory and spatial theory and serves, ultimately, as a key concept for analyzing contemporary forms of cultural production

  • 31.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Ryan Bengtsson, Linda
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Geographies of free labor: Mobilizing consumers across immersive transmediascapes2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    When Swedish artist Tove Styrke released her album Kiddo on Spotify in 2015, she simultaneously released an 8-bit game for her fans to play on kiddogame.com. By sharing high scores, users could win merchandise especially put together by the artist. The game was also promoted by one of the most well-known Swedish gaming streamers, posting his own Kiddo Game competition to his followers. A week after the release, Tove performed at Dreamhack, which also shared the game on their website and on Twitter. Later that summer, a live version of the game was staged at a major Swedish music festival, where Tove also performed. The game was easily shared via Facebook and twitter, and while playing the game the album played via Spotify.Worldwide, the music industry struggles to come to terms with how to make profit in times of illegal downloading, streaming, and Spotifyication. One apparent strategy is to rely on consumer engagement. The Tove Styrke campaign could be read as a contemporary example of so called transmedia marketing; that is, as a “holistic content creation approach” (Zeiser, 2015: xv) that simultaneously involves multiple content platforms. The attraction of transmedia marketing lies in its potential to foster engaged consumers who are ready to “haunt” a brand experience across several content platforms. In this paper, we join with the burgeoning critical scholarship that interprets consumer “engagement” as a form of labor. Since much of this labor gets paid in affect rather than money, such labor has rightfully been recognized as a form of free labor.While both transmedia marketing and free labor has been subjected to many studies over the last decade, there is a lack of research initiatives that explicitly address the spatiality of both of these phenomena (though see e.g. Stork’s [2014] engagement with the “transmedia geography” of the Glee franchise). What is more; if it is rare to talk about the geographies of transmediality in the first place, it is equally rare to talk about transmediality, at all, in relation to music. Perhaps not so surprisingly but all the more inaccurately, there seems to be a prevailing perception that transmedia productions are exclusive to, at least traditionally, more narrative-bound franchises such as television, film, game, or comic books. However, storytelling is becoming all the more important also to music brands. Consequently, we identify a need for studies that acknowledge that 1) the notion of transmediality is applicable also to music, and 2) that the spatiality of transmedia endeavors is worthy scholarly review. Our conviction is that just as work-places constitute obvious research objects in relation to other kinds of labor, so do the transmedia “social factories” warrant scholarly attention.As to compensate for the identified research lack then, this paper investigates several actual cases of transmedia marketing in the music industry – and the free labor that such marketing potentially engenders – by way of qualitative content analyses that employ a cross-disciplinary conceptual framework. The framework combines theoretical perspectives from the ‘spatial turn’ and the ‘labor turn’ in media studies and allows us to approach, and visually present, transmedia marketing as a landscape – what we call a transmediascape. Such transmediascapes, our results indicate, can be read as the perfect soil for free labor since they mobilize consumers in more than one respect: they assemble consumer affect and, at the same time, encourage physical as well as virtual fan movement. Thus, due to its multifaceted connotation, pointing towards both affectivity and mobility, we find that the term ‘mobilization’ serves as a fruitful link between spatial theory and labor theory and a key concept for analyzing the geographies of free labor.

    The era of transmediatization is marked by increased reliance, in all the more societal spheres, on content that transcend singular media platforms and, accordingly, by new modes of media consumption. Much research has recognized, confirmed, and explored this transformation, and ‘transmediality’ has hitherto been subjected to relatively extensive theorization. Nonetheless, the spatiality of transmediality remains largely undertheorized. As to correct for this shortage, this paper proposes transmediascape as an analytical tool for discerning the complex topographies of media ownership, technologies, texts, meanings, and practices that constitute today’s transmediatized culture. With inspiration from work in both the ‘spatial turn’ and ‘labor turn’ in media studies, we recognize the transmediascape as an arena of labour, where both paid and unpaid forms of work are carried out. Ultimately, we argue, the concept of transmediascape works as a tool for mapping geographies of free labour across institutional, technological, and textual levels. The present study illuminates current modes of ‘transmediascaping’ – or the practice of cultivating good “soil” for profitable consumer engagement – by focusing the transmedia marketing campaign that launched British/Irish boyband One Direction’s album ‘Made in the A.M’, in 2015.

  • 32. Fejes, Andreas
    et al.
    Olson, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för de humanistiska ämnenas didaktik (CeHum). Högskolan Dalarna, Högskolan i Skövde.
    Rahm, Lina
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Individualisering genom det kollektiva i svensk folkhögskola2015Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper presentation is to identify how the principles of democracy and the market are played out in Swedish adult education. More specifically, we focus on how collective and individually oriented notions of what it means to be a citizen, shape student subjectivity. By focusing on both formal adult education (municipal adult education) and non-formal adult education (folk high schools) we wish to illustrate how these principles are mobilized differently, thus shaping different kinds of citizen subjectivities. Drawing on a post structural theorization inspired by the work of Michel Foucault, we analyse interviews with students and teachers at one school for municipal adult education, as well as one folk high school. Our analysis illustrates how an individually oriented citizen is shaped through discourses mobilized in both settings. However, in the folk highs school, individualization is shaped through discourses on collectivization. We argue that such shaping are in line with neoliberal forms of governance.

  • 33. Fejes, Andreas
    et al.
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Olson, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för de humanistiska och samhällsvetenskapliga ämnenas didaktik. Högskolan Dalarna, Högskolan i Skövde.
    The last exodus? Discourses on the production of citizens in adult education2015Inngår i: Abstract book, 2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 34.
    Ferm-Almqvist, Cecilia
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Musik och dans.
    Ekberg, Niclas
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Pedagogik språk och Ämnesdidaktik.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Musik och dans.
    Allan, Jon
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Medier ljudteknik och upplevelseproduktion och teater.
    Burkhart, Patrick
    Evolving Bildung in the Nexus of Streaming Services, Art andUsers : Spotify as a Case 2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The changed landscape of media, with digital distribution as a keyfactor, creates new conditions for people’s access to cultural expressions. This has mainly been studied through technical and financial perspectives, focusing on the record industry, file sharing, human–technology interaction, and click frequency. New questionsare necessary for an understanding of what functions streamed musicand art expressions can have in people’s lives, and how companies such as Spotify relate to these functions.The aim of the study is to explore Bildung in the nexus of streaming services, art and users, with Spotify as a case study. Research questions: How and to what extent do technical, legal, economic, and ethical factors control possibilities for meaningmaking in the interaction between streaming media such as Spotify, arts, and human beings? How does the quality of art/music distributed through streaming influence opportunites for Bildung? How do users make meaning in the specific contexts? To what extent is the user involved in her own Bildung via the algorithms making up the participation?

    To achieve this aim and address the research questions an interdisciplinary study is needed, which makes it possible to understand the complex phenomena of a streaming media platform in relation to Bildung. Technicians and researchers from the humanities and social sciences will approach the research problem and form a holistic understanding of streaming media in relation to human beings, art, and technology. Hence, combinations of methodological approaches are required. Big-data analysis will provide access to how varied demographics use Spotify. The Spotify users’ activities, experiences of streaming media interactions, and meaning-making will be accessed through qualitative netnographical observations, shadowing, and interviews. Sound quality analysis will clarify what aesthetic values are involved in the most appreciated listening experiences, which will be related to Bildung.

  • 35.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för kultur och lärande, Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Hidden Assumptions and Implicit Normative Conclusions: a Constructivist Critique of the Research on Eastern Euro-visions : Narratives of Europe in the ESC2014Inngår i: Communication for Empowerment: Citizens, Markets, Innovations : 5th European Communication Conference : 12-15 November, Lisboa, Portugal : Book of Abstracts, Universidade Lusófona , 2014, s. 267-Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Union is looking for new narratives of Europe. But which was the old one and was there really just one? Do narratives of Europe in the so-called ‘new’ east Europe offer alternatives for redefining European identity? In order to approach these issues, this paper looks at how Europe is narrated in east European popular music, focusing the Eurovision Song Contest (ESC).

    A wide range of symbols struggle for identifying or signifying Europe (Fornäs 2012). The post-1989 EU enlargement has intensified such redefinition efforts. Popular music offers a fascinating field for such narrative identifications, with the ESC as an influential arena, linking cultural, social and political discourses. Music matters (Hesmondhalgh 2013) to people on many influential levels, combining emotive pleasure with social interaction in ways that offer rich resources for identifying practices. Being perhaps the most successful pan-European venture, the ESC is therefore an excellent source for investigating narratives of Europe.

    Written within an interdisciplinary project on east European ‘Narratives of Europe’, this paper analyses songs from ESC finals since 1989. Using a methodological model for analysing narratives, inspired by Genette (1972/1980), Ricoeur (1981) and Ryan (2004), it looks for who acts in a narrative (setup), what happens in which order (process), how or in what format the story is told (mode) and what identity it constructs for Europe (meaning).

    More than 70 songs were chosen, 40 of them from east Europe. Preliminary results in­dicate an overwhelming dominance of one master narrative of redemptive resur­rection, with a set of sub-variants. In other contexts than the ESC, popular songs may depict Europe as an eternally happy place or as falling from greatness into misery, but the ESC format strongly favours a narrative where Europe had a glorious past but then has been deeply torn by internal strife, wars and suffering, from which it now finally will recover by uniting in mutual co-operation and love. Some variants say little or nothing about the initial golden age, some less triumphantly place the resurrection as a dream for the future, and some east European song narratives add freedom from oppression to peace after internal war as core values, but the master narrative is never really abandoned.

    This resurrection narrative resonates with the founding myth expressed in EU’s key symbols. The inclusion of former Soviet Bloc countries into the European integration process has given new impetus to those founding narratives, and the ESC’s east European narratives indicate important continuities between the old and the new.

    While offering a methodological example of narrative analysis of media texts in the seldom-studied format of televised popular music, the paper also contributes to the understanding of how east European voices construct Europe’s history and future in the processes of transformation that challenge inherited ideas of what Europe means.

  • 36.
    Foss Lindblad, Rita
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    The Imagined Real of Sweden: Utopias with/out hopes2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 37.
    Fredriksson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper. Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Musical collaboration – or cooperation?: Exploring newspeak in Swedish arts policy2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent years have seen a process of regionalisation in Swedish culture and arts policy. This change goes under the name Kultursamverkansmodellen, which on the government’s webpage translates to “the cultural cooperation model” (Government Offices of Sweden 2015).

    The way samverkan is used in daily talk it should rather translate to collaboration – discussions, exchange of ideas and mutually beneficial activities. However, my material suggests elements of hierarchy in the system of cultural policy and funding where the term samverkan seem to signify a logic of consensus, in effect making it hard for cultural actors to challenge a system where certain music and art forms hold a hegemonic position.

    Drawing on Michel De Certeau’s concept of tactics and strategy (1984) and Ruth Finnegan’s pathways (Finnegan 1989), this paper uses a discourse logics approach (Glynos and Howarth 2007) to disseminate the term samverkan in multiple musicking contexts: in policy, by musicians, regional government officials and concert organisers, as well as in connection with other nodes such as “quality” and “projects”.

    The paper is part of the author’s on-going PhD project, which aims to shed light on how conditions for music making are constructed, protected and challenged by studying the intersection between governing and musical processes.

  • 38.
    Fredriksson, Daniel
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper. Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Pathways of pop: Arts and educational policy, cultural industries and studieförbund2017Inngår i: Popular Music Studies Today: Abstracts for the conference of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music, June 26–30, Kassel, Germany / [ed] Julia Merrill, Jan Hemming, 2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Through the Swedish voluntary education organisations called studieförbund bands get access to musical education, rehearsal space, gear and gigs. It’s a modest but long time funding without any demands on return. Studieförbund are considered to be one of the most important factors for the success of the Swedish music industry due to the educational role it plays for amateur musicians. As musicians gain experience they tend to “outgrow” the studieförbund. There are often no institutional aids to continue their progress, since arts policy regards pop genres to be commercial by default. Recently, former musicians and festival arrangers have developed regional coaching programs for pop bands, leaning on policies of “cultural and creative industries” instead of arts policies. Drawing on Michel De Certeaus concept of tactics and strategy (1984), as well as Ruth Finnegans pathways (1989), this paper discusses these efforts as tactical manoeuvres by music creators as they navigate regional spaces of education, arts policies and industry strategies.

  • 39.
    Goldenzwaig, Gregory
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för kultur och kommunikation, Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap. Moscow State University, Russia.
    Promoting Music on the Russian Social Media: Who Is Doing The Job?2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    To find new forms for music promotion is an important effort to support both established companies and new entrepreneurs. Russian online music and media landscape is nowadays more diverse than ever. The audience involvement in promoting music on the social media results in decreasing costs for the industry, reaching wider audiences, connecting live and online activities. At the same time, the pleasure driven audience involvement relies on time and energy investment. The presentation sheds light on the practices of users’ activities in music promotion on VKontakte and other relevant Russian SNS.

  • 40.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV).
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för medieteknik (ME).
    Ping Huang, Marianne
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Tolonen, Mikko
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Bergsland, Andreas
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Mats, Malm
    University of Gothenburg.
    The Nordic Hub of DARIAH-EU: A DH Ecosystem of Cross-Disciplinary Approaches2017Inngår i: Presented at Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries 2nd Conference, Gothenburg, 14–16 March 2017, 2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION

    The particular exploration of new ways of interactions between society and Information Communication Technologies (ICT) with a focus on the Humanities has the potential to become a key success factor for the values and competitiveness of the Nordic region, having in mind recent EU and regional political discussions in the field of Digital Humanities (European Commission, 2016; Vetenskapsrådet’s Rådet för forskningens infrastrukturer, 2014). Digital Humanities (DH) is a diverse and still emerging field that lies at the intersection of ICT and Humanities, which is being continually formulated by scholars and practitioners in a range of disciplines (see, for example, Svensson & Goldberg, 2015; Gardiner & Musto, 2015; Schreibman, Siemens, & Unsworth, 2016). The following are examples of current areas of fields and topics: text-analytic techniques, categorization, data mining; Social Network Analysis (SNA) and bibliometrics; metadata and tagging; Geographic Information Systems (GIS); multimedia and interactive games; Music Information Retrieval (MIR); interactive visualization and media.

    DARIAH-EU (http://dariah.eu), is Europe’s largest initiative on DH, comprising over 300 researchers in 18 countries, thereby opening up opportunities for international collaboration and projects. Among the Nordic countries, Denmark is the full partner with four universities, Copenhagen, Aarhus, Aalborg and University of Southern Denmark (DARIAH-DK). Danish DARIAH-EU activities are facilitated by the national DH Infrastructure DIGHUMLAB, hosted at the DARIAH-DK coordinating institution, Aarhus University. Sweden’s first academic institution, Linnaeus University, joined in May 2016 as a collaborative partner. Finland (University of Helsinki) and Norway (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) also became collaborative partners, in November 2016. The Nordic Hub of DARIAH-EU (DARIAH-Nordic) held its first meeting on 8 November in Växjö, Sweden, in connection with the International Symposium on Digital Humanities (Växjö, 7-8 November, https://lnu.se/en/research/conferences/international-digital-humanities-symposium/).

    The Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries (DHN) organisation was established in 2015 in order to create a venue for interaction and collaboration between the Nordic countries, including the Baltic countries. The ambitions behind the DHN initiative thus largely overlap with the recently formed Nordic Hub of DARIAH-EU. The panel would like to present different perspectives on Nordic contributions to DH as well as the aims of the DARIAH-Nordic and discuss possible joint opportunities and challenges in Nordic DH. With its tradition in supporting the Humanities research and development, Nordic countries may serve as a bastion for (Digital) Humanities. The Nordic Hub of DARIAH-EU and DHN may pave the way forward towards reaching that aim.

    A DH ECOSYSTEM OF CROSS-DISCIPLINARY APPROACHES

    Mats Malm (previous chair of DHN) will present the visions and ambitions behind DHN and the recently established Centre for Digital Humanities at the University of Gothenburg, which will start a Master programme in Digital Humanities in the autumn of 2017. While both the Centre for Digital Humanities and DHN aim at broad inclusiveness, he will here focus on the use of textual databases for re-examining the history and cultural heritage of the Nordic countries. This implies collaboration on common textual resources and technologies for mining, at the same time as it raises a number of questions concerning cross-disciplinarity and exchange of perspectives and methods.

    Mikko Tolonen will present the ongoing developments at the University of Helsinki (and in Finland) regarding Digital Humanities. This includes the recently launched Heldig (Digital Humanities Centre, https://www.helsinki.fi/en/researchgroups/helsinki-digital-humanities) and how it can relate to collaboration in DARIAH-EU. Tolonen will particularly discuss the relationship between the Digital Humanities infrastructure designed to be implemented at the University of Helsinki and how it relates to ongoing grassroot research projects.

    Andreas Bergsland will discuss the role that the arts might play within Digital Humanities. As a starting point, he will take the work that has been done at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU): establishing ARTEC, an interdisciplinary task force at the intersection of art and technology. He will argue how some of ARTEC’s initiatives might have both opportunities and challenges partly converging with those of the DH field, but might also expand and enrich current practices. One such initiative, Adressaparken, is a commons area in Trondheim for exploration of sensor-based digital storytelling and an open arena for test and experimentation of new experiences and new digital media. While most DH initiatives in Europe seem to focus on computational humanities projects, Bergsland will explore the unique potential of integrating artistic and creative practices into DH/ARTEC initiatives at NTNU.

    Koraljka Golub and Marcelo Milrad will present and analyse the cross-sector and cross-disciplinary Digital Humanities Initiative at Linnaeus University (LNU) along the axes of its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. Their long-term vision is to: 1) create a leading and innovative educational programme in this field; and, 2) to establish a prominent research regional centre that combines in novel ways already existing expertise from different departments and faculties working in close collaboration and co-creation with people and different organizations (both public and private sector) from the surrounding society. The main goals of this new initiative (launched in February 2016) at the first phase (12-15 months) are twofold; first, to establish the foundations for the creation of a DH educational programme and second, to carry out research and create an innovation centre at the wider region surrounding LNU, encompassing east southern Sweden. A combination of cross-disciplinary, cross-sector and international aspects would provide a solid ground to build a more or less unique international distance Master-level programme. Addressing future societal challenges would be eventually possible, 1) by highly skilled professionals whose education has been markedly enhanced by practice-informed education, and, 2) through joint, cross-sector innovation.

    Marianne Ping Huang will present DARIAH-EU related activities in a Danish and European context, focusing on initiatives for cultural creative participation, including born digital cultural data and a presentation of open cross-sectoral innovation with DARIAH-EU Humanities at Scale (2015-2017). DARIAH-EU will set up its new Innovation Board in 2017 and host the first DARIAH-EU Innovation Forum with the Creativity World Forum in Aarhus, November 2017, intersecting with Aarhus European Capital of Culture 2017. DARIAH-EU’s move towards digitally enhanced public humanities, closer collaboration with GLAM (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums) institutions, and public-private innovation will be discussed in light of the scope of DH and the Nordic Hub of DARIAH-EU.

    DISCUSSION POINTS: PROSPECTS AND CHALLENGES

    The great breadth of cross-disciplinary and organizational initiatives presented above presents significant potential for DH in Nordic countries. Major opportunities lie in the collaborative democratic tradition that supports re-combining already existing expertise and resources encompassing 1) different universities, 2) various disciplines, and 3) the wider community through input from related public and private sectors. These points serve to unite and consolidate already existing expertise in order to create new constellations for collaboration leading to new knowledge and products (expertise, education, research, public and relevant commercial services). Possibilities to collaborate across Nordic countries can take place at a number of levels, including joint research and innovation, education efforts, expertise and experience exchange, bringing in international views to address more regional challenges. Ensuing important value for the general public could be a (re)-affirmation of the value of humanities in particular, and academic practices in general.

    Challenges would be discussed in terms of the emerging job market, the low number of students pursuing carriers in humanities at the Master level (e.g., in Sweden), and the fact that DH as a field is still in its infancy, leading to it being quite difficult to get funding and grants to carry out long-term research that sustain our efforts over time. Related to sustainability is the question on how to promote a dialogue and collaboration with potential industrial partners in order to run collaborative projects that go beyond just research. Not the least, epistemological, conceptual and terminological differences in approaches by the different disciplines and sectors may present further challenges and therefore may require additional resources to reach an understanding. Further, while there is a strong collaborative spirit across Nordic countries, there will certainly be administrative issues with cross-university collaboration as the current working structures are based on individual units.

  • 41.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV).
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för medieteknik (ME).
    Ping Huang, Marianne
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Tolonen, Mikko
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Matres, Inés
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Bergsland, Andreas
    Norwegian University for Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway.
    Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries: Current efforts, perspectives and challenges2016Inngår i: International Symposium on Digital Humanities, Växjö, 7-8 November 2016: Book of Abstracts, Linnaeus University , 2016, s. 9-11Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 42.
    Grahn, Wera
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Genus. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Gender and heritage2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 43.
    Grahn, Wera
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Genus. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    The becoming heritage of a church2013Inngår i: Theorizing the becoming heritage , 2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 44.
    Grahn, Wera
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Genus. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. wera.grahn@liu.se.
    Theorizing gender in heritage studies.2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 45.
    Grahn, Wera
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Genus. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. wera.grahn@liu.se.
    Vega as a World Heritage Site – between local and authorized understandings of heritage2010Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 46.
    Gunnarsson, David
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för etnologi, religionshistoria och genusvetenskap, Etnologi.
    Who is the same as me? On studying guided tours of a mosque2015Inngår i: Conference Booklet, 2015, s. 21-21Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    For my thesis, I have analysed the guided tours of the great mosque in Stockholm from a postcolonial perspective. Part from participant observations of the tours, I have interviewed both guides and visitors. In this paper, I wish to explore how the knowledge production is affected by the makings of differences between both researcher and researched as well as between different participators in the study. What is the role of the body and appearance as a base for my analyses and interpretations of the tours? In the intersecting field of religion, race and gender bodily signs are interpreted and connected with certain frames of intelligibility, for example, making a female white Muslim guide coming off as eerie to one of the visitors. Further, in the analyses and descriptions of the tours I have been much more cautious about how I describe the (mostly Middle Eastern) guides than I have been in describing white Swedish visitors resulting in that I have described many of them as quite one dimensional and less complex in the analyses. This is, on the one hand, the result of taking into consideration the on-going othering of Muslims in Sweden and the Western world. On the other hand, in trying to resist that very othering of Muslims I reiterate it instead, in the sense that I as a researcher seem to perceive the guides as more other and therefore become more vigilant of what I believe that I can grasp. 

  • 47.
    Górska, Magdalena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Genus. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Matterwork Politics: Forcefulness of Anxious and Panicky Becomings2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 48.
    Górska, Magdalena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Genus. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Vulnerable Politics, Affective Resistances.2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 49.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Antikens kultur och samhällsliv.
    Intertextuality and Roman visual culture: A new approach to Roman ideal sculpture2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this project is to acquire new knowledge regarding the role of ideal sculpture in the Roman world. Since the mid-19th century, such sculptures have been studied primarily as Roman copies of Greek originals, using the method of copy criticism. During the last two decades, the dominating influence of this approach has been repeatedly criticized as it does not investigate the place of such sculptures in the Roman cultural context. Yet, no alternative approach has managed to rival that of copy criticism. This project aims to formulate a new mode of studying this fascinating material, an approach that has great potential to produce new insights into the role of ideal sculptures in Roman society. Turning to the concept of intertextuality, this project also aims to introduce a theoretical and multidisciplinary element to the current debate on how to interpret Roman ideal sculpture.

  • 50.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Antikens kultur och samhällsliv.
    The impact of restoration: The example of "The dancing satyr" in the Uffizi2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
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