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  • 1.
    Abdollahian, Somaje
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Engelska institutionen.
    Perspectivation in narratives in Persian L2 English2011Inngår i: EUROSLA 21, 21st Annual Conference of the European Second Language Association, Stockholm University, 8-10 September 2011: Book of Abstracts, 2011, s. 216-216Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 2.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Språkvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för nordiska språk.
    Muhammad’s Miracles: Science, Faith, and the Prophet’s Tricks in Medieval East Norse Texts2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I talk about the lives of the Prophet Muhammad found in vernacular saints’ lives (Old Swedish Legendary), devotional works (Consolation of the Soul), and travel descriptions (John Mandeville) from fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Denmark and Sweden. The paper focuses on stories about how Muhammad deceived people into believing that he was a Prophet using tricks, natural phenomena, and his alleged medical condition: trained animals to appear to worship him, used magnets to create a floating coffin, and epilepsy to give the impression of divine ecstasy.

    These lives of Muhammad are adaptations of works in Latin and German, while their presentation of Muhammad as a false prophet is traceable to Byzantine polemical authors, such as John of Damascus. The East Norse portrayal of Muhammad as a trickster owes a debt of gratitude to Gautier de Compiègne’s Otia de Machometi (before 1150). However, rather than the East Norse lives of Muhammad being free-standing works, they are found as integrated sections in collections of devotional and didactic works aimed at teaching and nurturing Christian piety in their readers. This is perhaps an unexpected textual context: why, for example, would a false Prophet be found in a collection of Christian saints’ lives? When the Qur’ān attributes no miracles to the Muhammad whatsoever, what is the reason for these Christian writers to do so and then to set about exposing them as false? Hermeneutical argumentation and strawman-polemics are key to understanding the purpose of “Muhammad’s miracles” among a readership that had little, if any, chance of ever coming into contact with Islam.

  • 3.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Identification of ICF-CY categories for participation focused code sets for pre-schoolers: A Delphi process2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 4.
    Adrià, Carbonell
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Arkitekthögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Rethinking the urban: ecology, infrastructure, urbanization2015Inngår i: ASA15 Symbiotic anthropologies: theoretical commensalities and methodological mutualisms, University of Exeter , 2015, s. 64-64Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will explore a new notion of urbanity in the context of planetary urbanisation, through the investigation and analysis of the following themes: urban-ecology, urban-infrastructure, and new processes of urbanisation.

  • 5.
    af Burén, Ann
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för historia och samtidsstudier, Religionsvetenskap.
    Multiplicity of religious self-descriptions among semi-secular Swedes2015Inngår i: Abstract Book: XXI Quinquennial World Congress of the Interna-tional Association for the History of Religions (IAHR), Erfurt, Germany, August 23-29, 2015, 2015, s. 280-Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 6. Agbetsoamedo, Yvonne
    et al.
    Ameka, Felix
    Atintono, Samuel
    Koptjevskaja Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Temperature terms in the Ghanaian languages in a typological perspective2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This talk deals with the conceptualisation of temperature in some of the Ghanaian languages as reflected in their systems of central temperature terms, such as hot, cold, to freeze, etc. We will discuss these systems in the light of a large-scale cross-linguistic collaborative project, involving 35 researchers (including the present authors) and covering more than 50 genetically, areally and typologically diverse languages (Koptjevskaja-Tamm ed. 2015). The key questions addressed here are how the different languages carve up the temperature domain by means of their linguistic expressions, and how the temperature expressions are used outside of the temperature domain. Languages cut up the temperature domain among their expressions according to three main dimensions: TEMPERATURE VALUES (e.g., warming vs. cooling temperatures, or excessive heat vs. pleasant warmth), FRAMES OF TEMPERATURE EVALUATION (TACTILE, The stones are cold; AMBIENT, It is cold here; and PERSONAL-FEELING, I am cold), and ENTITIES whose “temperature” is evaluated.  Although the temperature systems are often internally heterogeneous, we may still talk about the main temperature value distinctions for the whole system. The Ghanaian languages favour the cross-linguistically preferred two-value systems, with water often described by a more elaborated system. An interesting issue concerns conventionalisation and frequency of expressions with a primary meaning outside of the temperature domain, for temperature uses. For instance, the conventionalised expressions for talking about ‘warm/hot’ in Ewe involve sources of heat (‘fire’) and bodily exuviae (‘sweat’). The Ghanaian languages often manifest numerous extended uses of their temperature terms. However, strikingly, none of them conforms to one of the most widely quoted conceptual metaphors, “affection is warmth” (Lakoff & Johnson 1999:50), which is also true for many other languages in (West) Africa and otherwise.

  • 7.
    Aggeklint, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för Asien-, Mellanöstern- och Turkietstudier.
    M+: looking at the world from a Hong Kong perspective2015Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    M+ is the Museum of Art and Visual Culture in Hong Kong that is currently under construction. The new Hong Kong museum will open its doors to the world in 2019. The idea of placing a museum like M+ in the larger cultural infrastructure project of West Kowloon Cultural District (WKCD) came from a group of people that the Hong Kong Government put together in 2006. This group, known as the Museum Advisory Group, was to think through what kind of museum Hong Kong needed besides the already existing museums it already had. The initiative for this new museum thus initially came from the Hong Kong government. The funding comes from the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and the decision to move ahead came in 2008–but it took until 2010 until Lars Nittve, at the time director of Moderna Museet in Stockholm, was contacted and asked to become its visionary leader. M+ is a distinct Hong Kong project, looked upon with scepticism from Beijing. This paper puts the project of M+ in the contexts of the rising international interest in contemporary Chinese art after the turn of the millenium, the rising prices on this art on the international market, the rising economic status of contemporary Chinese art on the mainland, adding the ambitious museum building boom on the mainland since around the Shanghai Expo in 2010. What are the main differences between the art museum projects on the mainland and the building of M+ in Hong Kong? How is it to work with this museum project in the Hong Kong SAR environment? What does the existence of a museum like M+ mean to China and the World?

  • 8.
    Aggeklint, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för Asien-, Mellanöstern- och Turkietstudier.
    Ho, Hang Kei
    Introducing M+ as capital for a Hong Kong specific cultural identity2015Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade the Hong Kong government has shown an interest in promoting large scale cultural development projects including Art Basel Hong Kong, the West Kowloon Cultural District (WKCD) as well as M+ The Museum of Arts and Visual Culture, all presenting Hong Kong as a cultural hub. The development of those projects can be seen as a way for the city to diversify its economy through creative industries (CI) and urban entrepreneurship (Raco and Gilliam, 2012), making the place more appealing for international workers and global tourism. However, ongoing grassroots political movements such as the 2014 Umbrella Movement suggest that the Beijing government is keen to intervene with Hong Kong’s affairs. As a result, its cultural identity is being challenged. In this paper we argue that the study of the yet conceptual M+ museum contribute with accruing capital of cultural identity when compared to likewise huge museum projects in mainland China. We will further argue that the Hong Kong museum will represent an original that other museums in the world may wish to copy.

  • 9.
    Ahlquist, Sharon
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Arbete i skolan (AiS). Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Humaniora.
    Making a difference: Storyline in teacher education2016Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 10.
    Ahlquist, Sharon
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Arbete i skolan (AiS). Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Humaniora.
    The storyline approach in teacher education2016Inngår i: Lärarlärdom 2016: Högskolan Kristianstad / [ed] Claes Dahlqvist & Stefan Larsson, Högskolan Kristianstad: Kristianstad University Press , 2016Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    For many primary student teachers, English at school was characterized by a diet of textbooks, public teacher correction and peer ridicule. Such students approach English in teacher education with a lack of enthusiasm, even dread. If we are to produce competent, enthusiastic professionals, this must change. In English didactics, the objectives at Kristianstad University are 1) that students develop language proficiency and theoretical knowledge 2) understand how English can be taught creatively and be able to demonstrate this in practical and written assignments.

    Classroom relationships are often said to lie at the heart of successful language learning (Stevick, 1980). One example of a relational pedagogy, which fosters cooperation and mutual support, is Storyline, in which a fictive world is created in the classroom. A story develops as learners, in small groups as characters in a story, work on a range of meaningful tasks, combining theoretical and aesthetic subjects. At Kristianstad University, student teachers work for two weeks intensively on a Storyline about families moving into a new street in a fictive English town, using English in different ways. At the same time, they analyse what they are learning and how. This has a number of benefits. By working with Storyline, as opposed to just reading about it, the students experience its pedagogical benefits, and not just for the teaching of English. At the same time, their proficiency develops, not least because they are working closely and intensively together on motivating tasks in a supportive classroom atmosphere.

    Hattie (2009) contends that achievement is higher where there is enjoyment. Storyline helps to raise achievement levels because it engages affectively and cognitively, helps to forge closer classroom relationships and through practical work makes visible abstract content (for example, educational and linguistic theories), thus facilitating student learning, as this paper will demonstrate.

  • 11.
    Ahlstrand, Pernilla
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Björkholm, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, CeHum.
    Frohagen, Jenny
    Stockholms universitet.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Idrotts- och hälsovetenskap. Stockholms universitet, CeHum.
    Learning Study as a way to inquire the meaning of knowing what is to be known: The meaning of knowing how to move in specific ways2013Inngår i: WALS - World Association of Lesson Studies, International conference 2013: Lesson and Learning Study as teacher research, 5-9 september: Conference Programme and Abstracts of papers, 2013, s. 82-82Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The Learning Study inquires teaching and learning in relation to a specific object of learning. The meaning of knowing the specific object of learning is specified in the research process – in the planning and analysis of the pre-test as well as in designing and analysis of research lessons. In this symposium the focus will be on different aspects of the knowledge generation in a Learning Study concerning the meaning of knowing what is expected to be known. By inquiring teaching and learning of a specific content our knowledge regarding that content will be differentiated and deepened. The meaning of knowing a specific object of learning is a dynamic knowledge object – depending on the specific group of students in interaction with a specific content. Each new group of students will make it possible to discern new aspects of the learning object. By analyzing student difficulties as well as interactions in the classroom new aspects of the learning object will be discerned. In the symposium four different Learning Studies from different school subjects will be presented. The meaning of knowing will be explored and discussed from different angles – from the perspective of the learners (in the pre-tests) and  the teachers (in the teacher discussions) as well as from how it is constituted in the classroom interaction (documented in the videos from the research lessons).

    Chair: Ingrid Carlgren

    Discussant: Ference Marton

     

    Contributions:

    Pernilla AhlstrandLearning Study as a way to inquire about progress in acting and presence on stage.

    Theatre is a subject in upper secondary school in Sweden as part of the national aesthetic program. The new kind of syllabus is organized in relation to content areas as well as subject specific capabilities for the students to develop. The syllabus also includes criteria for the assessment of students’ capabilities – to be used when giving marks to the students and working with formative assessment or assessment for learning (Black & Wiliam, 1998, Gipps 1995. The criteria are expressed in general, non-subject specific terms. This is for example formulated as the difference between a simple and complex way of being able to express something in the theatre syllabus. In my research I investigate how learning study as a research approach and phenomenography as a method of analyzing pretests can be used as another and deepened way to describe different levels of knowing in relation to the national criteria.

    Theatre knowledge and the way knowledge is transferred is in previous research to a great extent described as tacit (Lagerström 2005, Järleby 2003, Johansson 2012). This gives theatre teachers even further challenges, trying to formulate what is described as tacit knowing (Polanyi 1958/1998 &1967/2009, Johannessen 1988, 1999, 2002, Janik 1995, 1996, Schön 1983).

    The capability of being present was found suitable as an object of learning, as it is something that teachers have experienced difficulties with when teaching and instructing. Presence is a core quality in acting and it is one of the criteria teachers agree on being of great importance when assessing a student but in what way can the knowing of the capability of being present be described?

    It will be discussed whether an outcome space (in relation to filmed material) can be a way to develop teachers and students understanding of the meaning of knowing as a help to work with assessment for learning.

     

    Eva Björkholm - The meaning of knowing how to construct a  linkage mechanism. Discerning aspects of the object of learning by analyzing classroom interactions

    This presentation describes a Learning Study within primary technology education focusing on the capability to construct a specific linkage mechanism. What one has to know in order to be able to construct a linkage mechanism is, however, not self-evident. The study reported here explores the meaning of this specific knowing. The study was conducted in collaboration with two primary school teachers and their two classes (children aged 6-7 years). Throughout the whole study step by step, starting with the analysis of the pre-test, followed by three cycles of planning and evaluation of research lessons, and the analysis of post-test, the meaning of the object of learning was specified (Marton & Pang, 2006; Carlgren, 2012). The presentation will focus on knowledge generated from the video recorded lessons by analyzing the classroom interactions and students’ difficulties that were made visible through these interactions. Teacher-student interactions as well as student-student interactions were analyzed. By analyzing students’ difficulties regarding the specific object of learning, critical aspects of the expected knowing were discerned and in this way the meaning of knowing what is expected to be known was made explicit.

    The results are presented in the form of critical aspects of what it means to know how to construct a linkage mechanism for this group of students. The critical aspects identified in the pre-test were further elaborated in the research lessons and by analyzing the classroom interactions in terms of student difficulties, additional aspects that were critical for students’ learning were identified. By gradually identifying the critical aspects, the collective understanding of the meaning of the object of learning was developed and specified.

     

    Jenny Frohagen – The meaning of knowing how to make expressions in artifacts: generating knowledge through designing lesson tasks   

    The school subject sloyd derives from a practical knowledge tradition which covers knowing in craft and art (Mäkelä, 2011; Hasselskog, 2010; Borg, 2001). However, sloyd teachers express difficulties when trying to explain and deal with aesthetic aspects when teaching sloyd (Fransson, 2010; Borg, 2007). There has been a tendency of trivializing the subject content into a shallow form of craft knowledge understood as ‘merely’ working with traditional craft techniques (Borg, 2008; Skolverket, 2005). There is a need to articulate the aesthetical features of knowing in sloyd. In my contribution I will present results from a Learning Study in sloyd focusing on the knowing of interpreting symbolic expressions in sloyd artefacts.

    In my presentation I will focus on how the iterative process of designing (short) lesson tasks given to the students during the research lessons and also in pre- and post-tests in each cycle, can be a way of understanding the object of learning. Since explicit tests of the students knowing are rarely found in sloyd education, conducting Learning Studies in sloyd can be a meaningful way of developing subject specific tasks. In this Learning Study different designs of tasks has been explored during the process as a way to inquire the knowing of interpreting symbolic expressions in sloyd artefacts. The results from this study show how the articulation of an object of learning in sloyd can be specified and validated throughout the process of designing and carrying out subject specific tests and lesson tasks. Depending on how the object of learning was articulated, the tasks/tests changed focus and the meaning of the knowing differed. By analyzing the students learning outcomes and redesigning the pre- and post-test in a Learning study as well as the given lesson tasks, new aspects of the learning object can be discerned.

     

    Gunn NybergThe meaning of knowing how to move in specific ways: embodied understanding as somatic grasping

    The subject physical education has a tradition of being a ‘practical’ subject. However, practical forms of knowing such as for example bodily awareness and capability to move (e.g. jumping, running or dancing) do not, neither for teachers nor pupils, seem to be a main issue of learning in PE (Tinning, 2010; Redelius et al, 2009,). The knowing involved in moving is not easily articulated and may, according to Polanyi (1954), “often result in explaining away quite genuine practices or experiences” (p. 385). The aim of this study is to explore and articulate the meaning of knowing how to move in a specific way exemplified through a movement called ‘house hop’.

    The study takes as it’s starting point an epistemological perspective on capability to move corresponding with Ryle’s (1949) “knowing how”, not separating mental and physical skills. Accordingly, a phenomenographic analysis of students’ experiencing of the learning object (‘house hop’) have been used.

     

    The paper draws mainly on data from video recordings of the pre-test and transcripts of two video recorded lessons from a Learning Study in upper secondary school. The findings show the meaning of knowing house hop as different ways of knowing the movement as well as several aspects to discern in order to know the movement in a powerful way.

    This presentation will focus on how students’ experiencing of a movement are expressed in their way of moving. Taking this as a starting point when teaching and learning movements can contribute to an approach to capability to move as comprising mental and physical processes as one process. Conceiving the knowing involved in ‘house hopping’ (as well as other ways of moving) this way could also contribute to a discussion concerning subject specific knowledge in PE and particularly it’s ‘practical’ dimension.

     

     

     

  • 12.
    Ahlstrand, Pernilla
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Carlgren, Ingrid
    Stockholms universitet.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Idrotts- och hälsovetenskap. Stockholms universitet.
    Learning Study as a way to inquire the meaning of knowing what is to be known: The meaning of knowing how to move in specific ways2013Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The Learning Study inquires teaching and learning in relation to a specific object of learning. The meaning of knowing the specific object of learning is specified in the research process – in the planning and analysis of the pre-test as well as in designing and analysis of research lessons. In this symposium the focus will be on different aspects of the knowledge generation in a Learning Study concerning the meaning of knowing what is expected to be known. By inquiring teaching and learning of a specific content our knowledge regarding that content will be differentiated and deepened. The meaning of knowing a specific object of learning is a dynamic knowledge object – depending on the specific group of students in interaction with a specific content. Each new group of students will make it possible to discern new aspects of the learning object. By analyzing student difficulties as well as interactions in the classroom new aspects of the learning object will be discerned. In the symposium four different Learning Studies from different school subjects will be presented. The meaning of knowing will be explored and discussed from different angles – from the perspective of the learners (in the pre-tests) and  the teachers (in the teacher discussions) as well as from how it is constituted in the classroom interaction (documented in the videos from the research lessons).

    Pernilla AhlstrandLearning Study as a way to inquire about progress in acting and presence on stage.

    Theatre is a subject in upper secondary school in Sweden as part of the national aesthetic program. The new kind of syllabus is organized in relation to content areas as well as subject specific capabilities for the students to develop. The syllabus also includes criteria for the assessment of students’ capabilities – to be used when giving marks to the students and working with formative assessment or assessment for learning (Black & Wiliam, 1998, Gipps 1995. The criteria are expressed in general, non-subject specific terms. This is for example formulated as the difference between a simple and complex way of being able to express something in the theatre syllabus. In my research I investigate how learning study as a research approach and phenomenography as a method of analyzing pretests can be used as another and deepened way to describe different levels of knowing in relation to the national criteria.

    Theatre knowledge and the way knowledge is transferred is in previous research to a great extent described as tacit (Lagerström 2005, Järleby 2003, Johansson 2012). This gives theatre teachers even further challenges, trying to formulate what is described as tacit knowing (Polanyi 1958/1998 &1967/2009, Johannessen 1988, 1999, 2002, Janik 1995, 1996, Schön 1983).

    The capability of being present was found suitable as an object of learning, as it is something that teachers have experienced difficulties with when teaching and instructing. Presence is a core quality in acting and it is one of the criteria teachers agree on being of great importance when assessing a student but in what way can the knowing of the capability of being present be described?

    It will be discussed whether an outcome space (in relation to filmed material) can be a way to develop teachers and students understanding of the meaning of knowing as a help to work with assessment for learning.

    Gunn NybergThe meaning of knowing how to move in specific ways: embodied understanding as somatic grasping

    The subject physical education has a tradition of being a ‘practical’ subject. However, practical forms of knowing such as for example bodily awareness and capability to move (e.g. jumping, running or dancing) do not, neither for teachers nor pupils, seem to be a main issue of learning in PE (Tinning, 2010; Redelius et al, 2009,). The knowing involved in moving is not easily articulated and may, according to Polanyi (1954), “often result in explaining away quite genuine practices or experiences” (p. 385). The aim of this study is to explore and articulate the meaning of knowing how to move in a specific way exemplified through a movement called ‘house hop’.

    The study takes as it’s starting point an epistemological perspective on capability to move corresponding with Ryle’s (1949) “knowing how”, not separating mental and physical skills. Accordingly, a phenomenographic analysis of students’ experiencing of the learning object (‘house hop’) have been used.

     

    The paper draws mainly on data from video recordings of the pre-test and transcripts of two video recorded lessons from a Learning Study in upper secondary school. The findings show the meaning of knowing house hop as different ways of knowing the movement as well as several aspects to discern in order to know the movement in a powerful way.

    This presentation will focus on how students’ experiencing of a movement are expressed in their way of moving. Taking this as a starting point when teaching and learning movements can contribute to an approach to capability to move as comprising mental and physical processes as one process. Conceiving the knowing involved in ‘house hopping’ (as well as other ways of moving) this way could also contribute to a discussion concerning subject specific knowledge in PE and particularly it’s ‘practical’ dimension.

     

     

  • 13.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    From Buenos Aires to Finland and Japan: The tango's unusual migration2014Inngår i: List of Abstracts for Conference Transcultural Identity Constructions in a Changing World, Dalarna University, Sweden, April 2-4, 2014, 2014, s. 19-20Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In Finland, thousands of miles away from Buenos Aires, people crowd the dance floors of restaurants and dance halls nightly to dance to tango music, while the tango has also caught the heart of the people on the other side of the world in Japan. The popularity of the tango in both Finland and Japan, however, is not very well known to the outside world.

    Though some scholars have stated that the tango reflects the personality, mentality and identity of the Finnish and Japanese people, this may only be partially true. Moreover, it is difficult to generalize what the Finnish or Japanese personality is. I argue that the tango's success in these two countries also has significant connections to historical and social factors. As being a dancer myself, I also believe that the 'liminality' (originally a term borrowed from Arnold van Gennep's formulation of rites de passage) of tango dancing plays an important role in these two nations that went through difficult struggles to recover from the damage caused by the war. “The liminal phase is considered sacred, anomalous, abnormal and dangerous, while the  pre- and post-liminal phases are normal and a profane state of being (Selänniemi 1996) and “the regular occurrence of sacred-profane alternations mark important periods of social life or even provide the measure of the passage of time itself”(Leach 1961).

    In this paper, I will discuss motives and paths of how a culture travels, settles and shapes into a new form, using the tango as an example.

  • 14.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Improving Intercultural Competence for the Distance Students in Sweden through Online Joint-Seminars in Japanese with University Students from the United States2014Inngår i: Next Generation Learning Conference, March 19–20 2014, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden: Book of abstracts, Falun: Högskolan Dalarna, 2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    There have been quite a few studies (Helm 2009, Chun 2011, Schenker 2012, Kitade 2012, etc.) regarding the development of intercultural competence through online exchanges. Most of these exchanges, however, are between native speakers and learners of that language. The benefit of such exchanges can be maximized if both parties are learning each other’s language and they both have the opportunity to utilize the languages they are learning during the exchange, but often times, this is not the case.  Byram (1997) suggests that intercultural competence can be assessed using the following components: knowledge, skills, attitudes, and critical awareness.  If ‘intercultural competence’ means not just learning about the target culture, but also about becoming aware of one’s own culture (Liaw 2006), connecting students from different countries who are studying the same target language and culture would be an ideal setting in order for the students to evaluate both their own and target cultures critically. Having learners of a target language from different countries in a virtual classroom also helps create an environment which mimics the language classroom in the target country enabling them to experience studying abroad without leaving their home countries.

    It is often said to be difficult or almost impossible for students in distance courses to develop intercultural competence because of the lack of opportunity to study abroad or the lack of an international atmosphere in the classroom (Tyberg 2009). Thus, the goal of this study is to provide opportunities for all students, regardless of their circumstances, to develop intercultural competence.  In this study, a group of intermediate/advanced level Japanese students from a university in Sweden (all distance students) and a group from a university in the U.S. were brought together in a virtual classroom using an online video conferencing system.  Through their interactions and post-seminar reflections, I examined how students develop intercultural competence.

     

    The results from this study show that through interactions with university students from other countries who study Japanese at the same level, the students can gain not only Japanese skills, but expand their horizons and deepen their understanding of another culture as well as of the topics discussed during the meetings thus satisfying each of the criteria in Byram's model. Not everyone has the opportunity to study abroad, but today's technology allows every student to be a part of the internationalization process, develop his/her cultural-literacy and reflect on his/her identity.

  • 15.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Intercultural communicative competence: the challenges and implications of teaching Japanese politeness strategies to Swedish learners of Japanese2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching communicative competence is extremely important in language instruction. One can avoid embarrassing situations and conflicts caused by misunderstandings if she/he understands the differences in intercultural pragmatics. Politeness discourse varies in complexity according to social distance, relative power between the speakers, and situations. The data I have collected during the past 6 years indicates that Swedish learners of Japanese often do not see the necessity of learning the polite/honorific discourse and often view these negatively as Swedish society is one of the most egalitarian in the world. As a consequence, Swedish students often fail to utilize appropriate politeness strategies when speaking in Japanese. However, it is important to point out to foreign language learners that cultural and social norms are not interchangeable and that one must adapt to the language one is using and the culture one is in. Thus Swedish Learners of Japanese should consider politeness discourse as a part of the rules of the language rather than something that can be modified based on one’s opinion.

    The current study investigates the differences in politeness strategies between Swedish and Japanese discourse. Student surveys and analysis of students’ errors have revealed clear differences in the use of politeness strategies in Swedish and in Japanese context. While the politeness, respect, and formality are closely intertwined in Japanese; the Swedes perceive respect and politeness as separate matters. It is also found that while the Japanese are inclined to using verbal politeness strategies, the Swedes express their respect more through non-verbal actions or behaviors. Various Japanese and Swedish utterances have also been examined to determine the Discourse Politeness Default suggested by Usami (2006) in order to systematize the politeness strategies in ways similar to grammatical rules.

                                                                                                                                                                          

                                                                          

                                                                                                                                                                          

  • 16.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Issues on cross-cultural pragmatics: Swedish learners' attitudes regarding the learning of Japanese politeness strategies2016Inngår i: Abstracts, 2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching communicative competence is considered extremely important in today’s language instruction. One can avoid embarrassing situations and conflicts caused by misunderstandings if one understands the differences in intercultural pragmatics. This study investigates the differences in politeness strategies between Swedish and Japanese discourse and how Japanese politeness strategies can be taught effectively to the Swedish learners of Japanese. Politeness discourse varies in complexity according to social distance, relative power between the speakers, and situations. It has been indicated in the course evaluations and comments from the students that Swedish learners of Japanese often do not see the necessity of learning the polite/honorific discourse and they often view these negatively as Swedish society is one of the most egalitarian in the world. As a consequence, Swedish students often fail to utilize appropriate politeness strategies when speaking in Japanese. However, it is important to point out to foreign language learners that cultural and social norms are not interchangeable and that one must adapt to the language one is using and the culture one is in. Thus Swedish Learners of Japanese should consider politeness discourse as a part of the rules of the language rather than something that can be modified based on one’s opinion. Student surveys and analysis of students’ errors I have complied during the past six years have revealed clear differences in the use of politeness strategies in Swedish and in Japanese context. While politeness, respect, and formality are closely intertwined in Japanese; the Swedes perceive respect and politeness as separate matters. It is also found that while the Japanese are inclined to use verbal politeness strategies, the Swedes express respect more through non-verbal actions or behaviors. This paper suggests ways in which learners of Japanese may overcome these differences.

  • 17.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Investigating the use of the verbs ”naru” in Japanese and ”bli” in Swedish through translation2013Inngår i: Nordic Association of Japanese and Korean Studies (NAJAKS): Abstracts for 2013, 2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how use of the Swedish verb “bli” corresponds to the Japanese verb “naru” using translated materials as a corpus.  

     

    Japanese is said to be a situation-oriented language, while English is person-oriented.

              e.g., Mariko wa kekkon surukotoni NARImashita.

                       (It became so that Mariko will be married.)

                       ‘Mariko will get married’ in English.

     

    The Swedish verb ”bli” usually means ’to become’ or ’to be (as an auxiliary verb),’ yet is used more widely than these English meanings.

              e.g., Det blir 100 kronor, tack.

                       (100 kr ni NARI-masu.)

                       ’It makes/will be 100kr.’

     

    Examples like this lead to the observation that ”bli” is used in a context more similar to the Japanese verb ”naru.” than English verb “become.” Comparison of some translated materials also shows that “bli” is often translated into Japanese as “naru” while it is more likely to be replaced by a transitive or intransitive verb in English.

     

    However, erros such as

               *okoru ni NARU (verb ‘to be upset’+naru)

                  [okoru: a verb]

               *annshin ni NARU (noun ‘feeling at ease’ +naru)   

                  [annshin suru: a verb derived from a noun]

    which are made by Swedish learners of Japanese indicate that the translation of “bli” into Japanese is not so straight forward.

     

    In this study, we examined the following questions:

    1. How is ”bli” translated into Japanese/English?
    2. If ”bli” is translated into ”naru” in Japanese, in what grammatical context(s) does it occur?
    3. How are these variations related to the errors students make in translating ”bli” into  Japanese?

     

    In order to examine the above research questions, we conducted two separate studies:

     

    Study I: Examining how Swedish bli is translated into Japanese in literature translation

     

    Using children´s novels “Sommerboken” by Tove Jansson and “Pippi Långstrump” by Astrid Lindgren as the data source, all the sentences that contain bli were extracted along with their translations into English and Japanese. The extracted sentences were, then, categorized according to the various types of usage of the verb bli, and the translation into Japanese for each of those categories was analyzed.

     

    Study II: The translation of various uses of bli into Japanese by Swedish students

     

    Study I above showed usages of the verb bli in various context. In Study II, we tried to see if some of these usages cause more problems than the others for the Swedish students. The students in the Japanese-English translation course at Högskolan Dalarna (Sweden) were given 7 Swedish sentences containing various usages of bli, and were asked to translate them into Japanese. Then the accuracy of the translation and the translation techniques used were analyzed.

     

    The results from Study I showed that there were numerous usages of the verb bli, such as describing conditions, describing the changes of conditions, indicating certain emotional status, and so on, which naturally led to the variety in Japanese translation. Furthermore,  apart from the most literal translation, which is to use the verb naru, various types of compound verbs (main verb – help verb combinations) were used in order to express different nuances.

     

    In some of the usages identified above, translation shifts were obligatory when translated into Japanese; i.e. the literal translation was impossible, and the translator has to make minor changes from the ST (source text) to the TT (target text), such as changes of grammatical categories or of voice (e.g. passive to active).

     

    The results from the Study II show that the sentences which require more complicated translation shifts tend to cause more errors when students translate them into Japanese.

     

    Clarifying how the use of “bli” correlates with the use of “naru” will not only help Swedish students understand the use of the somewhat difficult concept of “naru,” but also help translators deal with this issue. Finding a more systematic way to translate “bli” into Japanese using more tokens from various genres would be necessary in order to achieve this.

     

  • 18.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Takamiya, Yumi
    University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA.
    Beikoku to sueeden no nihongo gakushusha wo tsunaida jissen: aidentiti wo teemanishita torikumi2016Inngår i: : , 2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [ja]

    言語教育におけるソーシャルネットワーキングアプローチ(以下 SNA)では、「他者の発見、自己の発見、つながりの実現」を理念に、従来の「わかる」「できる」能力に加え、新たに「つながる」能力を 重要視する(當作 2013)。SNAに基づいてことばと文化を学ぶことで、学習者の人間的成長が促され、社会力も獲得される。  本発表では、上記の教育理念を念頭に、異なる文化圏で学ぶ日本語学習者をオンラインでつないだ取り組みについて紹介する。実践には米国とスウェーデンの大学で中上級レベルの日本語を学ぶ学習者10名が参加した。1学期間、アイデンティティをテーマに授業を行い、非同期型ツールであるブログ、同期型ツールであるビデオ会議システムを利用して双方を継続的につないだ。  アンケート、インタビュー、観察データを分析した結果、学習者はこのようなオンラインでの交流により、言語面だけでなく、自己・他者のアイデンティティや文化について肯定的な視点を持つようになるという変化が見られた。これは自己・他者の新たな発見といえる。また、参加者は、日本に興味があるという共通点があるため、様々なトピックについて積極的に探求し、互いに教え学びあう関係を築くことが容易にできた。さらに「つながり」が形成されていくに従い、日本だけでなく米国やスウェーデンについてもより知りたいと考えるようになり、好奇心の幅が広がった。これはつながりの理想的な実現であるといえよう。  通常、海外の日本語学習者は、日本の英語学習者と交流するケースが多いが、この場合、母語話者に教えてもらうという一方向的な形のコミュニケーションをとりやすい。一方、異なる場所で学ぶ日本語学習者同士の交流の場合、対等な形でのコミュニケーションがとれ、場所によって日本の捉え方も違うことに気づくことで、多元的な視点で日本を捉え直すきっかけにもなる。これは学習者の言語・文化面、精神面での成長にとって大きな意義がある。発表では、学習者、教師だけでなく、教室内外の多くの人たちをつなぐことを可能にするオンラインツールについて紹介し、その効果的な使い方や交流を成功させるための具体的な提案も行う。

  • 19.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Takamiya, Yumi
    The University of Alabama at Birmingham.
    Improving intercultural competence through online joint-seminars with university students from the U.S. and Sweden2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    There have been quite a few studies regarding the development of intercultural competence through online exchanges (Helm 2009, Chun 2011, Schenker 2012, Kitade 2012, etc.). Most of these exchanges, however, are between native speakers and learners of that language. The benefit of such exchanges may be maximized if both parties are learning the same foreign language and have the opportunity to utilize the language they are learning during the interaction. As defined by Byram (1997) and Liaw (2006), 'intercultural competence' is not just learning about the target culture, but also about becoming aware of one's own culture, and connecting students from different countries who are studying the same target language and culture would be an ideal setting in order for the students to evaluate both their own and target cultures critically.

    It is often said to be difficult or almost impossible for students in distance courses to develop intercultural competence because of the lack of opportunity to study abroad or the lack of an international atmosphere in the classroom (Tyberg 2009). Thus another goal of this study is to investigate the possibility of providing opportunities for all students, regardless of their circumstances, to develop intercultural competence.

    During the spring semester 2012, a group of fourth level (intermediate to advanced level) Japanese students from Gettysburg College in the United States and from Högskolan Dalarna (Dalarna University) in Sweden took part in a study of how Japanese learners from different countries benefit from communicating with each other in Japanese. Throughout the term, the students exchanged ideas and views regarding the topics surrounding the issues of “identity” via blogs and joint-seminars using an online video conferencing system. The topic “identity” was selected since both parties can discuss the issue from different perspectives such as 'foreigners in Japan', 'foreigners in the U.S./Sweden', 'Japanese people living in the U.S./Sweden', as well as from the students' 'own identities.'

    The student survey showed that the students from both Sweden and the United States found the project to be fun, interesting and a new and positive experience. One student epitomized the comments from the majority of the participants. – “We were actively discussing identity with students raised in another culture in a class setting, which lends an air of understanding and interest to the discussion.”

    The results from this study suggest that through interactions with university students from other countries who study Japanese at the same level, the students can gain not only Japanese skills, but expand their horizons and deepen their understanding of another culture as well as the topics discussed during the meetings. Not everyone has an opportunity to study abroad, but today's technology allows every student to be a part of the internationalization process, develop his/her cultural-literacy and reflect on his/her identity.

    In this session, the process, benefits, and limitations of our online exchanges will be discussed and some suggestions on how one should conduct and what are required for in ordered to have a successful international online exchanges will also be presented based on our experiences.

    The target audience of this session are teachers and educators as well as administrators who recognize the importance of acquisition of intercultural competence, not limited to but especially, in language education, and those who are considering the possibilities of allowing students to participate in the internationalization process without traveling abroad.

    References:

    Byram, M. (1997). Teaching and assessing intercultural communicative competence. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

    Byram, M., Gribkova, B., & Starkey, H. (2002). Developing the intercultural dimension in language teaching: A practical introduction for teachers. Strasbourg, France: Council of Europ.

    Chun, D. M. (2011). Developing Intercultural communicative competence through online exchanges. CALICO Journal, 28 (2), 392-419.

    Helm, F. (2009). Language and culture in an online context: what can learner diaries tell us about intercultural competence. Language and Intercultural Communication, 9 (2), 91-104.

    Högskoleverket. (2008). En högskola i världen: internationalisering för kvalitet. Högskoleverkets rapportserie 2008:15R.

    Kitade, K. (2012). An exchange structure analysis of the development of online intercultural activity. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 25 (1), 65-86.

    Liaw, M-L. (2006). E-learning and the development of intercultural competence. Language Learning &Technology, 10(3), 49-64.

    Schenker, T. (2012). Intercultural competence and cultural learning through telecollaboration. CALICO Journal, 29(3), 449-470.

    Tyberg, E. (2009). Internationalisering: perspektivbyte, förhållningssätt och fredsprojekt. In Martin Stigmar, (Ed.). Högskolepedagogik: att vara professionell som lärare i högskolan, Chapter 12. Stockholm: Liber.

  • 20.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Berge, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    That’s funny!: The humorous effect of misappropriating disciplinary-specific semiotic resources2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The socialization of disciplinary outsiders into an academic discipline has been described both in terms of becoming fluent in a disciplinary discourse (Airey, 2009; Airey & Linder, 2009; Northedge, 2002) and achieving disciplinary literacy (Airey, 2011, 2013; Geisler, 1994). In this paper we investigate disciplinary boundaries by documenting the responses of academics to a semiotic disciplinary hybrid. The hybrid we use is the Physikalisches Lied, a bogus piece of sheet music into which disciplinary-specific semiotic resources from the realm of physics have been incorporated to humorous effect.

    The piece is presented to three distinct disciplinary focus groups: physicists, musicians and a group of academics who have had little contact with either discipline. In order to elicit disciplinary responses that are free from researcher prompts, each focus group is first asked the simple, open-ended question What do you see here? Once discussion of this question is exhausted the focus groups are asked to identify as many puns as they can—essentially all the disciplinary items that they feel have been misappropriated—and to attempt to explain what this means from a disciplinary standpoint. The differences in the responses of the three groups are presented and analysed.

    We argue that semiotic material focused on by each of the three groups and the nature of the explanation offered, provide evidence of the degree of integration into the disciplines of physics and music. Our findings shed light on the process of becoming a disciplinary insider and the semiotic work involved in this process.

     

    References

    Airey, J. (2009). Science, Language and Literacy. Case Studies of Learning in Swedish University Physics. Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis. Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology 81. Uppsala Retrieved 2009-04-27, from http://publications.uu.se/theses/abstract.xsql?dbid=9547

    Airey, J. (2011). The Disciplinary Literacy Discussion Matrix: A Heuristic Tool for Initiating Collaboration in Higher Education. Across the disciplines, 8(3).

    Airey, J. (2013). Disciplinary Literacy. In E. Lundqvist, L. Östman & R. Säljö (eds.), Scientific literacy – teori och praktik (pp. 41-58): Gleerups.

    Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2009). A disciplinary discourse perspective on university science learning: Achieving fluency in a critical constellation of modes. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 46(1), 27-49.

    Geisler, C. (1994). Academic literacy and the nature of expertise: Reading, writing, and knowing in academic philosophy. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

    Northedge, A. (2002). Organizing excursions into specialist discourse communities: A sociocultural account of university teaching. In G. Wells & G. Claxton (eds.), Learning for life in the 21st century. Sociocultural perspectives on the future of education (pp. 252-264). Oxford: Blackwell Publishers.

  • 21.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Fredlund, Tobias
    Uppsala universitet.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala universitet.
    On the disciplinary affordances of semiotic resources2014Inngår i: Book of abstracts: The First Conference of the International Association for Cognitive Semiotics(IACS-2014), September 25-27, 2014 Lund University, 2014, s. 54-55Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 70’s Gibson (1979) introduced the concept of affordance. Initially framed around the needs of an organism in its environment, over the years the term has been appropriated and debated at length by a number of researchers in various fields. Most famous, perhaps is the disagreement between Gibson and Norman (1988) about whether affordances are inherent properties of objects or are only present when they are perceived by an organism. More recently, affordance has been drawn on in the educational arena, particularly with respect to multimodality (see Linder (2013) for a recent example). Here, Kress et al. (2001) have claimed that different modes have different specialized affordances. Then, building on this idea, Airey and Linder (2009) suggested that there is a critical constellation of modes that students need to achieve fluency in before they can experience a concept in an appropriate disciplinary manner. Later, Airey (2009) nuanced this claim, shifting the focus from the modes themselves to a critical constellation of semiotic resources, thus acknowledging that different semiotic resources within a mode often have different affordances (e.g. two or more diagrams may form the critical constellation).

    In this theoretical paper the concept of disciplinary affordance (Fredlund et al., 2012) is suggested as a useful analytical tool for use in education. The concept makes a radical break with the views of both Gibson and Norman in that rather than focusing on the discernment of one individual, it refers to the disciplinary community as a whole. Put simply, the disciplinary affordances of a given semiotic resource are determined by those functions that the resource is expected to fulfil by the disciplinary community. Disciplinary affordances have thus been negotiated and developed within the discipline over time. As such, the question of whether these affordances are inherent or discerned becomes moot. Rather, from an educational perspective the issue is whether the meaning that a semiotic resource affords to an individual matches the disciplinary affordance assigned by the community. The power of the term for educational work is that learning can now be framed as coming to discern the disciplinary affordances of semiotic resources.

    In this paper we will briefly discuss the history of the term affordance, define the term disciplinary affordance and illustrate its usefulness in a number of educational settings.

  • 22.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Uppsala University.
    Fredlund, Tobias
    Uppsala University.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    On the Disciplinary Affordances of Semiotic Resources2014Inngår i: Book of Abstracts: The First Conference of the International Association for Cognitive Semiotics (IACS-2014), September 25-27, 2014, 2014, s. 54-55Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 70’s Gibson (1979) introduced the concept of affordance. Initially framed around the needs of an organism in its environment, over the years the term has been appropriated and debated at length by a number of researchers in various fields. Most famous, perhaps is the disagreement between Gibson and Norman (1988) about whether affordances are inherent properties of objects or are only present when they are perceived by an organism. More recently, affordance has been drawn on in the educational arena, particularly with respect to multimodality (see Linder (2013) for a recent example). Here, Kress et al. (2001) have claimed that different modes have different specialized affordances. Then, building on this idea, Airey and Linder (2009) suggested that there is a critical constellation of modes that students need to achieve fluency in before they can experience a concept in an appropriate disciplinary manner. Later, Airey (2009) nuanced this claim, shifting the focus from the modes themselves to a critical constellation of semiotic resources, thus acknowledging that different semiotic resources within a mode often have different affordances (e.g. two or more diagrams may form the critical constellation).

    In this theoretical paper the concept of disciplinary affordance (Fredlund et al., 2012) is suggested as a useful analytical tool for use in education. The concept makes a radical break with the views of both Gibson and Norman in that rather than focusing on the discernment of one individual, it refers to the disciplinary community as a whole. Put simply, the disciplinary affordances of a given semiotic resource are determined by those functions that the resource is expected to fulfil by the disciplinary community. Disciplinary affordances have thus been negotiated and developed within the discipline over time. As such, the question of whether these affordances are inherent or discerned becomes moot. Rather, from an educational perspective the issue is whether the meaning that a semiotic resource affords to an individual matches the disciplinary affordance assigned by the community. The power of the term for educational work is that learning can now be framed as coming to discern the disciplinary affordances of semiotic resources.

    In this paper we will briefly discuss the history of the term affordance, define the term disciplinary affordance and illustrate its usefulness in a number of educational settings.

  • 23.
    Ajanovic, Midhat
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för ekonomi och it, Avd för medier och design.
    Titoism and the Idea of “The Third Road” as Ideological Foundation of Zagreb School for Animated Film2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Geographically, and ideologically, Yugoslavia stood on the border between two confronted blocks during the Cold War, but belonged to neither. The idea of ‘the third road’ was extremely popular; people really saw their country as an alternative to imperialist West and bureaucratic East.

    Yugoslav regime was rarely criticized for lack of democracy; it was more fiercely attacked by the nationalist right wing, which sheds much light on the catastrophe that happened after Tito’s death.

    Yugoslav film makers rarely confronted the system; they were mostly its ardent propagators. The ‘third road’ idea was popular even among the creators of Yugoslav’s best films – members of the Zagreb School of Animated film. Still, satire was an important element of Zagreb films, but the satirical razor was directed towards actual global problems, racism, colonialism, pollution, hunger, poverty, fear of the A-bomb, war, etc. Criticism was present, but it did not include social criticism. Yugoslav system was not only spared of criticism, it was, indirectly but indisputably, celebrated. The idea of a small, spiteful country existing on the borderline between two gigantic and hostile worlds was interwoven in many films made in the Zagreb studio. A small freedom oasis, surrounded by pressures, terror and danger, was an all-present motif in animated anecdotes of the leading school’s masters. A small man abused by his surrounding, who, despite the troubles, kept fighting for his way of life, his independence and neutrality was a common denominator of the authors of the Zagreb school, regardless of their artistic profile and their filmic and visual expression.

    Soon after Tito’s death in 1980, the idea of the ‘third road’ turned out to be completely ‘unrealistic reality’, just like La Grande Illusion. After Gorbachov, perestroika, the fall of the Berlin wall, and the end of the cold war, the idea of the ‘third road’ and a country in between lost its initial meaning. Yugoslavia lost its international position, and moreover, dissolved in a bloody war.

  • 24.
    Ajanović, Midhat
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för ekonomi och it, Avd för medier och design.
    Sketching Out the ”Proxy Space”2016Inngår i: / [ed] Franziska Bukner, 2016, s. 15-15Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Animation is usually defined as the moving image that
 is not recorded from a real-time movement but the
 movement created artificially. My concern here is the 
visualisation of the space inaccessible for either pho
tographic film image or our sensory apparatus. I see it
 as the crucial attribute of animated image that is equally 
important for understanding of the animation medium
as the movement making. What the philosopher Paul 
Crowther labelled as "proxy space in animated film"
(quoted by Donald Crafton 2013: 147) could in my own
interpretation be distinguished as the creation of the diegetic space that only exists in the viewers' imagination, and only in the moment while they are watching the film. Mise-en-scène in animation is always a symbol for a space, no matter how convincing an illusion of three dimensions is created in some particular film. Actually, many animators who are active in our time exploit the fact that digital animation made a possible perception of space totally inaccessible to the photographic film technique. For instance the penetrating camera (fly-through) dissolves the restrictions associated with the pictorial space so that we can reach what we cannot see beyond the picture's surface. However, in this short presentation I aim to examine that aspect of animation in the realm of traditionally made animated films in order to verify the view on the "proxy space" being always an essential part of the animated image regardless technical or production conditions.In order to explore varied approaches toward the creation of "proxy space" I will look at some canonical films produced during the golden age of Zagreb School of Animation. Those films made by Vladimir Kristl, Dušan Vukotić, Borivoj Dovniković, Vatroslav Mimica and Nedeljko Dragić, provide lot of evidences that prove that animation space stands for an inherent liberation from the limitations of the laws of physics and entering into the world of the fantastic, symbolical and metaphorical. Employing various minimalistic methods the Zagreb animators created a complex multi-dimensional representation of space. By using several film examples I am going to emphasise five different methods in this paper.

  • 25.
    Ajanović, Midhat
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för ekonomi och it, Avd för medier och design.
    Swedish animated film - 100 Years: Animated children's films, commercials, animated documentaries, as well as films influenced by comics made by distinct individualists are the cornerstones this cinematic phenomenon is based on.2015Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 26.
    Ajanović, Midhat
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för ekonomi och it, Avd för medier och design.
    The Puppet-Actor in Virtual Environment: Theatrical puppetry, cinema puppetry, digital puppetry2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    My concern is animated puppetry in the digital era. Actually, this presentation is a brief depiction of a much larger "to-be-a book" project.

    Puppet comes from pupa, Latin for "small creature that portray human".

    The idea about a movable, humanlike object emerged in puppet theatre but blossomed in animated film. By using an inanimate objects as an actor puppet animators create worlds we recognize as a deeper, metaphorical truth of own world. Animators are tasked with creating expressions and emotions for their artificial figures, thus turning them into characters.

    That is why probably no other form of creating moving pictures is lavished with as much time, care and passion as stop-motion. In difference to live-action directors that direct living people, the animation director directs his or her own deepest feelings through the material, which allows practically unlimited space for individualism and creativity. By touching the models the animator leaves traces of his life on them so the feelings and spiritual state emanate from puppet-films as some sort of fantastic reportage about the dreams hidden deep in their creators.A great number of important puppet-animators such as Starewitz, Zeman, Ewald, O?Brien, Moss, Trnka, Pall, Kajer, Kawamoto, Borowczyck, Barta, Shorina, Svankmajer or Burton developed the type of iconoclastic aesthetic of the three-dimensional animation.

    But what happened with the illusion of "living" object in the modern 3D computer animation? Can we consider the three-dimensional figures created with the help of some software application as puppetry?

    I argue that digital puppetry could be seen as a new stage in the development of this form of expression whose basic characteristics largely coincide with cinema puppetry and theatrical puppetry.

    In this presentation I focus on a phenomenon sometimes called "uncanny valley",or rather a reduced emotional response, which I see as one of the main reasons for some doubts and confusion in recent discussions concerning digital animation. Absence of human touch and tactile sensation in digital pictures contributes to a form of dehumanization in 3D CGI animation because of the fact that mathematic accuracy in digitally created characters may not elicit the intended empathetic response in the viewer.

    I present three ways in which the problem is usually addressed by animators: (1) creating puppet characters that are in appearance markedly non-human or non-realistic, based on a tradition inherited from theatrical and cinema puppetry, (2) employing some documentary methods, (3) applying a kind of surreal quality to the performing puppet.

  • 27.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Images of Devotion in Swedish Wall Paintings2006Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In the first paper, devotional activities such as praying and worshipping in wall paintings, will be analysed. The wall paintings were the illiterate man's manual where he was taught the essentials of Christian faith and devotion.

  • 28.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för lärarutbildning (LUT), Forskning om utbildning och lärande inom lärarutbildningen (FULL).
    Kristendomens roll i en ny läroplan och ny lärarutbildning: Didaktiska och högskolepedagogiska perspektiv på undervisningen i religionskunskap2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    I samband med de nya läroplanerna i religionskunskap för grundskolan och gymnasiet har religionen kristendom kommit att fortsatt ha en särställning, trots att detta inte var inskrivet i Skolverkets förarbete. Kristendom är den enda religion som explicit skrivs ut i läroplanerna och därmed ställs specifika krav på lärare i religionskunskap. Undervisning om kristendom har alltid funnits med i lärarutbildningen men har många gånger kommit att behandlas som ett utomstående kompetensområde med liten didaktisk koppling till läraryrket. För att möta kraven i läroplanerna är det därför av största vikt att dels ge lärarstudenter kunskaper och kompetenser i hur kristendom kan utgöra en del i undervisningen i religionskunskap, samt dels utforma en relevant och praxisnära undervisning om kristendom i den religionsdidaktiska utbildningen. På så vis kan blivande lärare utrustas i arbetet som religionskunskapslärare i den nya grund- och gymnasieskolan.

    Min presentation bygger på en forskningsstudie i mötet mellan ämnesdidaktik och högskolepedagogik som kommer att bedrivas under våren 2014 vid Göteborgs universitet och Högskolan i Halmstad. Underlaget för studien har inhämtats dels i form av två enkäter till lärarstudenter i religionsdidaktik och dels i form av en workshop med fokus på hur kunskaper i religionen kristendom kan omformas i praktisk didaktik. En sådan studie om kristendomens roll i en ny läroplan och ny lärarutbildning har möjlighet att inte bara skapa förutsättningar för en mer praxisnära religionsdidaktisk undervisning i religionen kristendom utan även i förlängningen ge elever möjlighet att nå de nya målen i religionskunskap.

  • 29.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Prayer Practices among Ordinary People in the Late Middle Ages2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I will present key findings of my concluded project on the prayer life of peasant communities in late medieval Sweden, conducted at the University of Gothenburg 2005–2010. The aim of the project has been to identify, explain and delineate praying among peasant communities in late medieval Sweden. Four aspects have been examined through the perspectives of ideals and practices, namely the standards of prayer, devotional prayer, prayer in times of need and prayer cultures. Focus in my paper will be practices of prayer, especially those occurring in connection with the praying for miracles.

  • 30.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Praying outside the churchbuilding2011Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 31.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Saluting Aron Gurevich and His Legacy: A Round Table Discussion2010Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A Round Table Discussion on the Legacy of the late A. Gurevich and a book dedicated to his memory and ideas Saluting Aron Gurevich: Essays in History, Literature and Other Related Subjects (Brill, Spring 2010). The session will unite the contributors of the volume, its editor, illustrator, as well as Gurevich's longtime friends, colleagues, and disciples. It should interest and attract all those interested in historians' role in history, Soviet historiography, medieval popular culture, Scandinavian medieval history, historical anthropology, and historical research in general. Participants include Viktor Aldrin (Göteborgs Universitet), John H. Arnold (Birkbeck College, University of London), Michael Clanchy (Institute of Historical Research, University of London), Francisca Shilova (Independent Scholar, Amsterdam), and Yury Zaretskiy (State University, Higher School of Economics, Moscow).

  • 32.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Saluting Aron Gurevich and His Legacy: A Round Table Discussion2010Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    A Round Table Discussion on the Legacy of the late A. Gurevich and a book dedicated to his memory and ideas Saluting Aron Gurevich: Essays in History, Literature and Other Related Subjects (Brill, Spring 2010). The session will unite the contributors of the volume, its editor, illustrator, as well as Gurevich's longtime friends, colleagues, and disciples. It should interest and attract all those interested in historians' role in history, Soviet historiography, medieval popular culture, Scandinavian medieval history, historical anthropology, and historical research in general. Participants include Viktor Aldrin (Göteborgs Universitet), John H. Arnold (Birkbeck College, University of London), Michael Clanchy (Institute of Historical Research, University of London), Francisca Shilova (Independent Scholar, Amsterdam), and Yury Zaretskiy (State University, Higher School of Economics, Moscow).

  • 33.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Skolmyndigheters riktlinjer för religiös pluralism idag och igår: Skolverkets nuvarande riktlinjer och 1967 års riktlinjer från Skolöverstyrelsen2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 34.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    The Pious Education of the Young in the Late Medieval Church2005Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 35.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Use of Prayers as Protection against the Evils of Nature2008Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper concerns the issue of how prayers were used by the laity in late medieval Scandinavia. Often prayers were used, not only to communicate with God, but also to avoid fear and illness.

  • 36.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    The Use of Prayers as Protection against the Evils of Nature2008Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper concerns the issue of how prayers were used by the laity in late medieval Scandinavia. Often prayers were used, not only to communicate with God, but also to avoid fear and illness.

  • 37.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    To Explore the Divine Will in Prayer2010Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    How were holy persons selected as recipients for prayer? Most often, miracle stories only tell of the praying person having already made the decision of recipient, but there were exceptions from this pattern: the habit of casting lots to explore the divine will of whom to address in prayer. Lot casting, a seldom studied religious habit will be in focus in my paper.

  • 38.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    To Explore the Divine Will in Prayer2010Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    How were holy persons selected as recipients for prayer? Most often, miracle stories only tell of the praying person having already made the decision of recipient, but there were exceptions from this pattern: the habit of casting lots to explore the divine will of whom to address in prayer. Lot casting, a seldom studied religious habit will be in focus in my paper.

  • 39.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    University teachers as role models for being sustainable: Doing sustainability together with students through the use of professional ethics2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 40.
    Alfvén, Valérie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Romanska och klassiska institutionen.
    La question de la 'violence gratuite' et de l’ adolescent-bourreau dans les romans pour adolescents contemporains à travers l’étude de la réception de deux romans suédois en France: Définition problèmes, esthétique2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [fr]

    La littérature de jeunesse est une littérature traditionnellement sous surveillance mais, en France, elle tente de se dégager, depuis les trente dernières années, d’une fonctionnalité éducative et moralisante. Lorsque deux romans pour adolescents suédois Faire le mort de Stefan Casta et Quand les trains passent de Malin Lindroth paraissent en France au début des années 2000, le débat sur le « peut-on tout dire aux adolescents/enfants » se réanime et ces deux romans sont, avec d’autres accusés par la critique de contribuer à « noircir » la littérature de jeunesse, voire à la rendre « malsaine ». Qu’est-ce qui dérange dans ces deux romans venus du Nord et pourquoi cet accueil français ? Ces deux romans mettent en scène une violence relativement inédite en France, celle de la violence gratuite entre des adolescents. Depuis la parution de Sa Majesté des mouches de William Golding (1954) au début des années 2000, peu de romans ont osé mettre aussi clairement en scène des adolescents-bourreaux se déchainant violemment contre un des leur sans (à priori) raisons particulières. Devant la nouveauté de cette thématique si sensible mais plus tabou, nous nous proposons de nous interroger ici, et à travers la réception de ces deux romans, sur la notion de « violence gratuite » à l’aide notamment du philosophe René Girard et les conséquences que cela implique en littérature de jeunesse. Nous nous attacherons ensuite à l’esthétique de la violence dans ces romans et sa mise en place,  en comparaison avec celle française, pour montrer comment finalement, malgré la sensibilité du sujet, se met en place un « respect du lecteur ».

  • 41.
    Alkenäs, Dan
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för musik och bild (MB).
    Musikalisk komposition – process och produkt – som konstnärligt forskningsprojekt2016Inngår i: Presented at Musikforskning idag: Växjö, 14-16 juni 2014, 2016, 2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inom ramen för doktorandstudier i Musikalisk gestaltning (Göteborgs universitet) avser jag att som ett konstnärligt forskningsprojekt komponera ett oratorium baserat på temat ”De Sju Dygderna”. Under konferensen ”Musikforskning idag” presenteras projektet med fokus på frågor kring metod. Syfte med projektet är att undersöka och musikaliskt gestalta några centrala samtida frågeteman jag identifierat och hur människor reflekterar över dessa, samt problematisera gestaltningsprocessen. Genom oratorieformatet finns möjlighet att arbeta med text och musik i ett större sammanhang. Projektet förväntas synliggöra, undersöka samt diskutera kompositionsmetoder och kreativa processer. Ett centralt element är att finna vägar där konstverket, och den kreativa processen till den konstnärliga produkten, kan vara aktiv i samtida diskussioner. Jag söker därför efter olika redskap för att involvera olika målgrupper, både i den kreativa processen och i det slutliga konstnärliga resultatet. Valet av frågeteman att undersöka och gestalta har sitt ursprung i reflektioner över de terrordåd som ägde rum i Paris 13 november 2015. På grundval av denna händelse lades frågan om medmänsklighet i fokus för projektet. För att sätta in begreppet i ett större sammanhang föddes idén om att komponera ett oratorium kring De Sju Dygderna, där begreppet medmänsklighet ingår. I den kreativa processen, som görs i samarbete med Svenska Kyrkan och utbildningsprogrammet El Sistema, ingår bland annat att erbjuda människor att genom användande av en websida, och deltagande i workshops, vara aktiva deltagare och bidra med egna reflektioner kring frågetemats olika begrepp. Genom att studera det insamlade materialet kan jag som forskare/konstnär analysera och utforska möjliga ledmotiv och sammanhang, vilka sedan kan bli översatta till konstnärliga uttryck. För att möjliggöra musicerande med olika målgrupper planeras att i kompositionenlåta enkla musikaliska beståndsdelar möta och kommunicera med komplexa.De kreativa processerna dokumenteras, analyseras och problematiseras.

  • 42.
    Alkenäs, Dan
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för musik och bild (MB).
    Musikkomposition i samarbete med barn inom El Sistema2017Inngår i: Abstracts PhD in progress: The 22nd Annual Conference of the Nordic Network for Research in Music Education March 14-16 2017, Göteborg: University of Gothenburg, 2017, s. 92-94Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inom ramen för doktorandstudier i Musikalisk gestaltning (vid Göteborgs universitet) avser jag att som ett konstnärligt forskningsprojekt utföra och undersöka ett kompositionsarbete i samarbete med barn inom El Sistema. Syftet med projektet är att musikaliskt gestalta några frågeteman jag identifierat, och hur människor reflekterar över dessa, samt problematisera gestaltningsprocessen. Projektets frågeteman berör begrepp som beskriver hur människor tänker om och agerar gentemot varandra, begrepp som exempelvis ödmjukhet, generositet och medmänsklighet. Valet av frågeteman har sitt ursprung i mina reflektioner över de terrordåd som ägde rum i Paris 13 november 2015. På grundval av denna händelse har frågan om medmänsklighet lagts i fokus för projektet, och en drivkraft är att inom ramen för ett musikaliskt kompositionsarbete integrera perspektiv som berör social hållbarhet och mångfald.

    Planen är att ett team bestående av mig, 4-5 elever inom El Sistema och en musiklärare tillsammans skapar melodiska, rytmiska och harmoniska teman samt sångtextmaterial som jag sedan kan utveckla till större kompositioner. Arbetet dokumenteras med hjälp av filmkamera och kompositionsprogrammet ”Soundtrap” (beskrivs nedan). Dokumentationen kommer i efterhand analyseras och ligga till grund för undersökning av processen i arbetet. Projektet förväntas synliggöra, undersöka samt diskutera kompositionsmetoder och kreativa processer. Ett förväntat resultat är att jag under processen, som konstnär och forskare, i möten med människor skall kunna lyssna, uppleva, undersöka, samtala om hur individer känner, tänker och uppfattar ord som ödmjukhet, generositet, medmänsklighet. Att låta deras personliga berättelser och uttryck sjunka in i min begrepps- och upplevelsevärld, så att jag sedan musikaliskt kan gestalta dem med verktyg från min konstnärliga praktik. Genom att studera det insamlade materialet kan jag som forskare/konstnär analysera och utforska möjliga ledmotiv och sammanhang, vilka sedan kan bli översatta till konstnärliga uttryck. Exempelvis kan platsbesöken mynna ut i ett antal enkla visor, vilka kan dokumenteras och framföras som enskilda verk, samt bearbetas och utvecklas till mer komplexa konstnärliga produktioner.

    En anledning till att jag valt att arbeta med barn är att de besitter en spontanitet och kreativitet som jag ser vara mycket värdefull i en konstnärlig process. Dessutom utgör de våra kommande generationer, och är därför en viktig del i kulturers utveckling, exempelvis konstnärligt, kreativt, etiskt och socialt. Musikskapande kan för barnen vara ett sätt att bearbeta tankar och erfarenheter.

    Under konferensen presenteras projektet med fokus på frågor kring metod. Under vårterminen 2017 kommer jag göra nio workshops med barn och lärare vid El Sistema. Barnen kommer från års- kurs 4. I mitt metodval har jag tagit inspiration av modeller som hämtats från ämnet design. En grund till metodvalet är att jag länge reflekterat över att designprocesser på olika sätt påminner om de processer som förekommer inom musikalisk komposition. Jag har funderat över likheter och skillnader mellan design- och kompositionsprocesser, och om det finns något att lära genom att integrera dessa processer. Efter att ha studerat metodernas huvudsakliga utgångspunkter har jag i det inledande arbetet valt att fokusera två metoder, Bonded Design och Informant Design, och undersöka möjligheter att utgå från dem.

    Bonded Design används ofta i samband med utveckling av dator-mjukvara. Metoden är en utveckling av designmetoder som involverar olika former av kompetenser i processen. Inom metoden betonas ett generation-överskridande partnerskap som arbetar mot ett gemensamt mål (Large et al. 2006). Ett specifikt särdrag är att deltagarna under hela designprocessen arbetar tillsammans. Ett syfte är att ta tillvara den mångfald som finns inom gruppen. Här undersöks också vilken typ av samarbete som sker mellan vuxna och barn inom teamet.

    Informant Design utgår från lågteknologiska kreativa verktyg vilka noggrant förklaras för deltagarna i designprojektet. Designern försöker inspirera barnen att ge olika förslag och låter dem sedan veta om förslagen är genomförbara. Ett grundläggande antagande i metoden är att barn är en viktig resurs vad gäller att föreslå idéer till motiverande och rolig pedagogisk programvara (Scaife et al. 1997). En viktig skillnad mellan Bonded Design och Informant Design är att den förstnämnda igenom hela processen ser barnen som fullvärdiga gruppmedlemmar.

    Flera forskare har samarbetat med barn för att utveckla ny design. Druin föreslår att barn kan ha fyra olika roller i en designprocess: användare, testare, informant samt designpartner (Druin 2002, 3). Hon lyfter fram de olika rollernas möjligheter att skapa förståelse för befintliga teknikers inverkan på användaren, att få kännedom om hur tekniken möter upp designens mål, hur de påverkar riktningen under skapandeprocessen samt skapar tillgång till design-idéer under hela processen. Jag finner det intressant att utveckla och översätta denna idé till musikalisk komposition. Vilka roller kan barn ha här? Hur kan det påverka den kreativa processen och det konstnärliga skapandet?

    Det musikaliska arbetet utförs och dokumenteras i kompositionsprogrammet ”Soundtrap”, ett online- verktyg som bland annat fokuserar musikskapande i samarbete. Textskapandet utgår från samtal med deltagarna. Utifrån samtalen ombeds deltagare formulera reflektioner. Reflektioner kan formuleras i text eller i bild (exempelvis teckningar).

    En drivkraft i studien är att undersöka om och hur jag med hjälp av musikaliskt skapande kan arbeta för förståelse och dialog kring social hållbarhet. För mig har denna drivkraft motiverat mig att placera kompositionsprocess-studien i en kontext utanför mitt privata arbetsrum. I placerandet av studien i en sådan kontext uppstår utöver själva musikskapandet även mänskliga möten och möjligheter till lärande. Det är därför tänkbart att studien kan föra in ny kunskap till områden inom musikaliskt lärande, exempelvis inom Musikpedagogik. Det kan finnas intresse i hur elevers kreativa arbete kan transformeras till större sammansatta konstnärliga verk. För att inte börja i ett vakuum och försöka uppfinna några hjul har jag som ambition att designa min studie så att jag kan koppla till befintliga forskningsfält inom närliggande och för studien relevanta ämnesövergripande områden. Förhoppnings- vis kan studiens resultat också kommuniceras och spridas i en mångdisciplinär kontext. 

  • 43.
    Alkenäs, Dan
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för musik och bild (MB).
    Musikkomposition i samarbete med barn inom El Sistema2017Inngår i: Musikforskning idag : Program: Musikhögskolan, Piteå, 12–14 juni 2017, Piteå, 2017, s. 14-15Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inom ramen för doktorandstudier inom Musikalisk gestaltning avser jag att som ett konstnärligt forskningsprojekt undersöka ett kompositionsarbete i samarbete med barn inom utbildningen El Sistema. Syftet med projektet är att musikaliskt gestalta några frågeteman jag identifierat och hur människor reflekterar över dessa, samt att problematisera gestaltningsprocessen. Projektets frågeteman knyter an till området hållbar utveckling utifrån en social dimension och har sitt ursprung i mina reflektioner över de terrordåd som ägde rum i Paris 13 november 2015.

    De frågeställningar jag för närvarande arbetar med kan sammanfattas:

    • Hur kan jag som kompositör samarbeta med barn i ett kompositionsprojekt?

    • Hur kan reflektioner kring specifika frågeteman gestaltas i musik?

    • Hur kan kreativa processer beskrivas utifrån det aktuella projektet?

    • Hur kan ett insamlat material, bestående av ett flertal mindre komplexa kompositioner, transformeras till en större komplex komposition?

    Jag har länge reflekterat över att designprocesser påminner om processer inom musikalisk komposition, och ställt frågan om det finns något att lära genom att integrera dessa processer. I metodvalet har jag därför inspirerats av modeller som hämtats från designämnet.

    Under en fältstudie kommer ett team bestående av mig, 4–5 elever och en musiklärare att tillsammans komponera musik- och sångtextmaterial som jag sedan kan utveckla till större kompositioner. Arbetet dokumenteras med hjälp av filmkamera och kompositionsprogrammet ”Soundtrap”. Dokumentationen kommer att ligga till grund för undersökning av projektets konstnärliga processer och produkter. I samband med konferensen har fältstudien genomförts, och jag planerar att presentera några resultat.

    Här bör betonas att projektet har ett konstnärligt fokus och problemområde. Syftet är att nå konstnärliga resultat och mål. Det är tänkbart att resultat kan framkomma i fråga om barns lärande, identitetsskapande, didaktiska metoder, musikens påverkan, etcetera. Dessa resultat kommer dock inte att behandlas. Utgångspunkten är att avhandlingen behandlar konstnärliga processer och produkter.

  • 44.
    Alm-Arvius, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Ädel, Annelie
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Engelska.
    Figurative and Non-figurative Aspects of Polysemy in the Word Language2012Inngår i: The Stockholm 2012 Metaphor Festival : Table of Contents : Abstracts, 2012, s. 6-7Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 45.
    Almgren White, Anette
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Lärandepraktiker i och utanför skolan (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Culture and identity: Popular culture as characterizing device in Håkan Nesser’s sister novels Kim Novak badade aldrig i Genesarets sjö (1998) and Och Piccadilly Circus ligger inte i Kumla (2002)2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Nesser’s most popular crime novel Kim Novak and its pendant Piccadilly, set in the 1960’s in Midsweden, share time, location, and the adolescence’s search for identity. In that quest the merging popular culture plays an important role. (Grossberg 1997) Nesser catches the characteristics of the time; Erik, 14 years, reads and writes comics; Mauritz, 17 years, listens to the latest pop music and constantly adds to his album collection. He also writes poetry and reads classics while listening to his rock music. The preferences of music, film and literature as well as the media practices by the protagonists convey authenticity to the setting but also serve as a narrative device to characterize the protagonists. The paper illustrates how the references to popular culture are used to depict the complexity and the dynamics of the main characters’ development.

  • 46.
    Almgren White, Anette
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Lärandepraktiker i och utanför skolan (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    "No country for artsy women?": Bilderboksrepresentationer av svenska konstnärer och konstnärskap på den svenska marknaden2016Inngår i: Nordisk forskarkonferens 2016: Med bilden i fokus., 2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    Konstetablissemanget speglar en patriarkal värld i vilken olika spelregler gäller för kvinnor och män. Detta förhållande påkallar en undersökning för hur förutsättningarna ter sig för manligt och kvinnligt konstnärskap i bilderböcker i barnlitteraturen. Den västerländska bilderboken är ett lämpligt undersökningsobjekt eftersom den sedan modernismen har varit en konstform som uttrycker, speglar och experimenterar med bildkonst och konstnärskap. (Beckett 2012, Druker 2008). Beckett undersöker i sin översikt av crossover-bilderböcker en del av detta fenomen, nämligen bilderböcker som alluderar till bildkonst. I hennes redogörelse framkommer det att anmärkningsvärt få böcker handlar om kvinnliga konstnärer, liksom om konst skapad av kvinnor, Frida Kahlo undantagen. Om Becketts översikt är representativ bekräftar den att framställningar av kvinnligt konstnärskapande är försummat i bilderböcker. 

    Syftet med mitt paper är sålunda att studera hur bildkonstnärer och konstnärlig aktivitet representeras på den svenska bilderboksmarknaden med hänsyn till genus. Till min hjälp har jag genusstudier utförda på barnlitteratur (Andrae 2001, Söderberg et al. 2013) och på bilderböcker (Österlund 2009). Min metod är att jämföra framställningar av kvinnliga och manliga konstnärliga aktiviteter ur ett genusperspektiv. Min analys kommer också att inkludera en inledande kvantitativ undersökning av bilderböcker som behandlar konstnärer och konstnärlig kreativitet på marknaden. Hur många är de? Hur många representerar kvinnors konstskapande? Min avsikt är att kvantifiera antalet böcker som behandlar kvinnliga konstnärer i förhållande till manliga, liksom att skissera typiska karakteristiska i dessa bilderböcker för konstnärskap och konstnärlighet med hänsyn till genusmönster.

    Föredraget kommer att ge exempel på representationer av konstnärskap i vilken också paratexter (biografier och marknadsföring) har undersökts. Den preliminära studien är ur ett genusperspektiv betraktad en besvikelse (2014). Det finns inte en enda bilderbok som endast ägnar sig åt en svensk kvinnlig konstnär. I de fall de förekommer är de i egenskap av hustru, till exempel Karin Larsson i böcker om maken Carl.

    Eftersom den kvinnliga konstnären är marginaliserad är nästa steg att finna ut om och hur kvinnligt konstnärskap kan definieras i andra termer än manligt? I så fall, hur ser villkoren ut? Eftersom materialet är så tunt med historiska karaktärer kommer jag att inkludera bilderböcker som porträtterar fiktiva karaktärers kreativa aktiviteter, till exempel Lundbergs Vita Streck, Wirséns Nallen och Höglunds Mina, vilka kan betecknas som konstnärliga, om än inte utifrån ett konventionellt synsätt. 

  • 47.
    Almgren White, Anette
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Lärandepraktiker i och utanför skolan (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Transmediations of the Anthropocene – Climate change and its effect on the relation between Man and other Species in Children’s Picture books2016Inngår i: Transmediatons! Communications across Media Borders:: Abstracts., 2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to investigate transmediations of the Anthropocene discourse into two picture books from the northern hemisphere, both published in 2007, I skogen (In the wood) by Eva Lindström and Winston of Churchill: One Bear’s Battle Against Global Warming by Jean Davis Okimoto.  The analysis is focused on how the combined pictorial and verbal narrative transmediate scientific media of climate change and its threat to biodiversity. The focus is on how the representation of man as a species is transmediated as well as its relation to other species of fauna and flora. In the Anthropocene discourse nature is no longer a passive and static context for human actions. (Crutzen 2002).  Rachel Carson was among the first to state that the human control of nature is an illusion born in an age “when it was supposed that nature exists for the convenience of man”. (2002)[1962]. Since Darwin man is defined as one species among many and since the rise of Ecology man is defined as a species subsumed into an ecosystem. Ecologist Tormod Valaand Burkey sketches an ethics where economy and man´s practices and values must adapt to a larger ecological context (2013). In this paper I will direct my attention to how man is depicted in relation to other species of fauna and flora from an ecological perspective. The analysis will concentrate on attitudes, actions and ethical values shown by protagonists when dealing with climate change in relation to an Anthropocene ethics where human rights are closely knit with animal rights and biodiversity. 

  • 48.
    Almér, Elin
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk. Jyväskylä universitet.
    Barns uppfattningar om språk: en studie av samtal om språk med barn på en finskspråkig förskoleavdelning i Sverige och en svenskspråkig daghemsavdelning i Finland2017Inngår i: Nordand 13: Abstrakt, 2017, s. 9-9Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    Följande studie om barns uppfattningar om språk utgör en del av ett större forskningsprojekt (Child2ling 2013–2017) som studerar uppfattningar om tvåspråkighet kring barn. Projektet Child2ling är finansierat av Finlands akademi och har Jyväskylä universitet som huvudman. Följande studie syftar till att jämföra små barn i Finland och Sveriges (3–5 år) egna uppfattningar om språk. Forskningsfrågorna är sålunda:• Vilka uppfattningar om språk, språkbruk och flerspråkighet uttrycker tvåspråkiga barn (3–5 år) på en finskspråkig förskoleavdelning i Sverige sinsemellan och i interaktion med forskaren?• Vilka uppfattningar om språk, språkbruk och flerspråkighet uttrycker tvåspråkiga barn (3–5 år) på en svenskspråkig förskoleavdelning i Finland sinsemellan och i interaktion med forskaren?Studiens fältarbete skedde i två olika steg. Det första steget var etnografiskt och det andra steget bestod av olika "lek-metoder" som syftade till att stimulera samtalsämnet "språk" mellan mig och barnen. De etnografiska observationerna och fältanteckningarna analyserades med diskursanalytiskt anslag genom begreppen interaktiv agens (Nijnatten 2013) och historisk kropp (Scollon och Scollon 2004). Inspelningarna och transkriptionerna av samtalen har analyserats med samtalsanalytiska verktyg (Lindström 2014). Detaljanalyser av interaktionen möjliggjorde en högre grad av validering än vad som är möjligt via analys av observationer och fältanteckningar.Det preliminära resultatet visar ingen skillnad mellan barnens uppfattningar om språk mellan de olika länderna. De kontextuella aspekter som aktualiseras i samtal och utsagor är knutna till samtalet som sådant och till barnens närmiljö. Den främsta uppfattningen som barnen uttrycker är att språkkunskap är likställd med annan kunskap.

  • 49.
    Alsarve, Daniel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    The Art of Being Big, Strong and Full of Power: Swedish Combat Sports, Norms and Gender from the 1990s up until today2016Inngår i: 9th Meeting of the Transnational Working Group for the Study of Gender and Sport: 24th-26th November 2016, Bochum, Germany, 2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Generally, men have dominated the field of modern sports. Consequently, many sports carry associations where traditional ‘male’ characteristics and qualities are valued and traditional ‘female’ characteristics and qualities are devalued (see eg Messner, 1992). More precisely, many sports ‘create’ men and ideals of masculinities. In this paper combat sports (MMA, boxing, karate, Japanese jujitsu etcetera) are studied as examples of sports that shape gender and body ideals. Combat sports express at least two typical ideals of masculinity: muscle strength and (sanctioned) control of violence (Brace-Govan , 2004; Gill, 2007). Women who have exercised these sports have thus been challenging men’s ‘monopoly’ of being strong, big, violent and powerful and other traditionally ‘male’ norms. The aim of this paper is to study, from a gender perspective, how Swedish combat sports have changed since the 1990s. The main question is: How is the increased number of women in combat sports to be understood? Is it a sign of a (feminist) emancipation or has the inclusion of women been on exclusive terms - that is, do men’s domination find new ways to exercise its powers? In the end, this paper also raises questions of the changing contents of violence and muscularity. In so far, the material consists of focus group interviews and individual interviews with combat sports women, from the elite to the recreational level. Magazines will be analysed during 2016-2017. Theoretically, the paper draws on theories of hegemony and gender (Connell, 1983, 2005, Hearn, 2015). The preliminary results show that women, on one hand, portray active subjects that challenge male (sporting) traditions and male norms. Combat sports, some women tell, are increasing ones self-esteem and self-confidence. On the other hand, the female versions of combat sports are not taken as seriously as the male version, which becomes obvious by lower compensation and less media attention. Women are also expected to act as feminine subjects and are thereby ‘forced’ to relate their bodies, clothes etcetera to social and more general understandings of feminine ideals (cf. Clasen, 2001).

  • 50.
    Altes Arlandis, Alberto
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Arkitekthögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Lieberman, Oren
    Arts University Bournemouth.
    Immediate Architectural Interventions, Durations and Effects: Apparatuses, Things and People in the Making of the City and the World2013Inngår i: Rethinking the social in architecture: The Reader / [ed] Staffan Lundgren, Stockholm: Umeå School of Architecture , 2013, s. 119-121Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
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