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  • 1.
    Vogiazides, Louisa
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Urban Dynamics.
    'Legal Empowerment of the Poor' versus 'Right to the City': Implications for access to housing in urban Africa2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The challenge of urban deprivation and exclusion in the urban South has given rise to varied and shifting policies and ideas. Two sets of ideas have gained great currency in recent years in international policy and academic circles. The Legal Empowerment of the Poor approach, rooted in neoliberal thinking, focuses on the legal rights of the urban poor as the means to secure access to basic services and needs. The Right to the City perspective, on the other hand, stresses issues of citizenship and the appropriation and uses of urban space. This Policy Dialogue analyses the different ideological and normative foundations of the two perspectives and discusses how they lead to different policy formulations. It then takes a closer look at how the two perspectives find expression in contemporary discussions on and approaches to access to housing in urban Africa. To this end, it compares what each approach identifies as the source of the problem and recommends as the policy solution.

  • 2.
    Vogiazides, Louisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Return migration, transnationalism and development: Social remittances of returnees from Sweden to Bosnia and Herzegovina2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores the effects of return migration on development through the case of returnees from Sweden to Bosnia and Herzegovina. Based on thirteen in-depth interviews and observation, it examines returnees’ ‘social remittances’, which consist of ideas, practices, and social capital (or social connections) that migrants bring to their countries of origin. The thesis adopts a transnational perspective highlighting returnees’ simultaneous connections in their host and home countries. It identifies various types of social remittance transfers such as ideas and practices in the areas of health, the environment and work, as well as social connections with investors, business partners, and political and academic actors in Sweden. One major finding is that returnees’ knowledge of the Swedish language, the market, work and business culture contribute to building trust with actors in Sweden, which facilitates trade and investment between the countries. The thesis also highlights a number of economic, political and personal constraints faced by returnees in their return process which, in turn, affect their capacity to transfer social remittances. It concludes that returnees can potentially contribute to development, but their contributions are largely conditioned by the existing social, economic, legal and political environment.

  • 3.
    Vogiazides, Louisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Trafficking for forced labour and labour exploitation in Sweden: examples from the restaurant and the berry industries2013In: Exploitation of migrant workers in Finland, Sweden, Estonia and Lithuania: uncovering the links between recruitment, irregular employment practices and labour trafficking / [ed] Natalia Ollus, Anniina Jokinen and Matti Joutsen, Helsinki: European Institute for Crime Prevention and Control, affiliated with the United Nations , 2013, 171-237 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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