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  • 1.
    Ainiala, Terhi
    et al.
    Helsinki University.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Henkilönnimet viittomakielessä (Arv. teos: Henkilöviittomien synty ja kehitys suomalaisessa viittomakieliyhteisössä/ Päivi Rainò - Helsinki 2004)2005Ingår i: Virittäjä, ISSN 0042-6806-109, Vol. 109, nr 141–144Artikel, recension (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 2.
    Björkstrand, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Wallin, Lars
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Bäckström, Joel
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Jonsson, Mats
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Bergman, Brita
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Gunnarsson, Magnus
    TeckLex: En förenklad visning av Svenskt teckenspråkslexikon2010Övrigt (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 3.
    Börstell, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Wallin, Lars
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Segmenting the Swedish Sign Language corpus: On the possibilities of using visual cues as a basis for syntactic segmentation2014Ingår i: Workshop Proceedings: 6th Workshop on the Representation and Processing of Sign Languages: Beyond the Manual Channel / [ed] Onno Crasborn, Eleni Efthimiou, Evita Fotinea, Thomas Hanke, Julie Hochgesang, Jette Kristoffersen, Johanna Mesch, Paris: ELRA , 2014, 7-10 s.Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the possibility of conducting syntactic segmentation of the Swedish Sign Language Corpus (SSLC) on the basisof the visual cues from both manual and nonmanual signals. The SSLC currently features segmentation on the lexical level only, whichis why the need for a linguistically valid segmentation on e.g. the clausal level would be very useful for corpus-based studies on thegrammatical structure of Swedish Sign Language (SSL). An experiment was carried out letting seven Deaf signers of SSL each segmenttwo short texts (one narrative and one dialogue) using ELAN, based on the visual cues they perceived as boundaries. This was latercompared to the linguistic analysis done by a language expert (also a Deaf signer of SSL), who segmented the same texts into whatwas considered syntactic clausal units. Furthermore, these segmentation procedures were compared to the segmentation done for theSwedish translations also found in the SSLC. The results show that though the visual and syntactic segmentations overlap in manycases, especially when a number of cues coincide, the visual segmentation is not consistent enough to be used as a means of segmentingsyntactic units in the SSLC.

  • 4.
    Börstell, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för datorlingvistik.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Gärdenfors, Moa
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Towards an Annotation of Syntactic Structure in the Swedish Sign Language Corpus2016Ingår i: Workshop Proceedings: 7th Workshop on the Representation and Processing of Sign Languages: Corpus Mining / [ed] Eleni Efthimiou, Stavroula-Evita Fotinea, Thomas Hanke, Julie Hochgesang, Jette Kristoffersen, Johanna Mesch, Paris: ELRA , 2016, 19-24 s.Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes on-going work on extending the annotation of the Swedish Sign Language Corpus (SSLC) with a level of syntactic structure. The basic annotation of SSLC in ELAN consists of six tiers: four for sign glosses (two tiers for each signer; one for each of a signer’s hands), and two for written Swedish translations (one for each signer). In an additional step by Östling et al. (2015), all ¨ glosses of the corpus have been further annotated for parts of speech. Building on the previous steps, we are now developing annotation of clause structure for the corpus, based on meaning and form. We define a clause as a unit in which a predicate asserts something about one or more elements (the arguments). The predicate can be a (possibly serial) verbal or nominal. In addition to predicates and their arguments, criteria for delineating clauses include non-manual features such as body posture, head movement and eye gaze. The goal of this work is to arrive at two additional annotation tier types in the SSLC: one in which the sign language texts are segmented into clauses, and the other in which the individual signs are annotated for their argument types.

  • 5. Clark, Becky
    et al.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    A global perspective on disparity of gender anddisability for deaf female athletes2016Ingår i: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the significance of gender and disability issues has graduallyincreased in the global society during the past three decades,there are only few studies with regard to the deaf community andsport. This article examines the level of Deaf or Hard-of-Hearingwomen’s participation in sports and the factors for their continuedunderrepresentation. The WomenSport International’s Task Force onDeaf and Hard of Hearing Girls and Women in Sport conducted aworld-wide survey to determine and assess the needs of deaf andhard of hearing girls and women in sport. A snapshot of the resultsand issues and future aspirations are provided.

  • 6.
    Crasborn, Onno
    et al.
    Radboud University Nijmegen.
    Kooij, Els van der
    Radboud University Nijmegen.
    Waters, Dafydd
    UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience.
    Woll, Bencie
    Deafness, Cognition and Language Research Centre, UCL.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Frequency distribution and spreading behavior of different types of mouth actions in three sign languages2008Ingår i: Sign Language and Linguistics, Vol. 11, nr 1, 45–67- s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a comparative study of mouth actions in three European sign languages: British Sign Language (BSL), Nederlandse Gebarentaal (Sign Language of the Netherlands, NGT), and Swedish Sign Language (SSL). We propose a typology for, and report the frequency distribution of, the different types of mouth actions observed. In accordance with previous studies, we find the three languages remarkably similar — both in the types of mouth actions they use, and in how these mouth actions are distributed. We then describe how mouth actions can extend over more than one manual sign. This spreading of mouth actions is the primary focus of this paper. Based on an analysis of comparable narrative material in the three languages, we demonstrate that the direction as well as the source and goal of spreading may be language-specific.

  • 7.
    Crasborn, Onno
    et al.
    Radboud University Nijmegen.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Waters, Dafydd
    University College London.
    Nonhebel, Annika
    Radboud University Nijmegen.
    Woll, Bencie
    University College London.
    Bergman, Brita
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Sharing sign languague data online: Experiences from the ECHO project2007Ingår i: International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, ISSN 1384-6655, Vol. 12, nr 4, 537-564 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [sv]

    This article describes how new technological possibilities allow sign language researchers to share and publish video data and transcriptions online. Both linguistic and technological aspects of creating and publishing a sign language corpus are discussed, and standards are proposed for both metadata and transcription categories specific to sign language data. In addition, ethical aspects of publishing video data of signers online are considered, and suggestions are offered for future corpus projects and software tools.

  • 8. Jantunen, Tommi
    et al.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Börstell, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    GIVE or TAKE: Transitivity prominence of Finnish Sign Language and Swedish Sign Language verbs2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we apply methodology presented in Kimmelman (2016) and investigate the transitivityprominence of verbs in Finnish Sign Language (FinSL) and Swedish Sign Language (SSL). Specifically,we ask how similar or different FinSL and SSL verbs are in terms of their transitivity prominence,and how the transitivity prominence of FinSL and SSL verbs compares with that of verbs inother languages. The term transitivity prominence refers to the relative frequency with which a verboccurs with an object. Haspelmath (2015) has shown that in spoken languages, verbs form a rankedcontinuum between those that are highly transitivity prominent and those that occur with no objectat all. Recently, Kimmelman (2016) has argued that Haspelmath's ranking applies also to the verbsof Russian Sign Language (RSL).Our investigation is based on annotated corpus data comprising narratives, conversations andpresentations. For FinSL, we use material from 20 signers (2h 40min, 18446 sign tokens) and forSSL from 28 signers (1h 54min, 15186 sign tokens). From this data, we identified 18 verb lexemeswhich all have enough tokens and which are all comparable between languages. In FinSL, the totalnumber of verb tokens is 745 and in SSL the corresponding number is 579. All the verbs were annotatedfor overt direct and indirect objects and for overt clausal complements. The annotation workwas carried out by different annotators following common guidelines.Concerning the results, our data suggests that there are clear similarities in what verbs rankhighest (e.g. GIVE, TAKE) and what lowest (e.g. HAPPY, COLD) in terms of their transitivity prominencein FinSL and SSL. On the basis of Haspelmath (2015) and Kimmelman (2016), these are thesame verbs that are ranked highest and lowest also in spoken languages and in RSL (Table 1).However, the data also shows that certain verbs (e.g. SEARCH, TALK, PLAY) may differ considerablyin the position they occupy in the ranking. Although some of these differences can be assumed to betrue differences between languages, we suspect that some may, despite our best efforts, be traceableback to issues relating to the type of data as well as to the way the samples were formed and objectsannotated. In our presentation, we will present the results of our comparative study and discuss thedata and methodology-related issues in more detail.

  • 9. Jantunen, Tommi
    et al.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Puupponen, Anna
    Aspects of the rhythm in Finnish and Swedish Sign Language2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we investigate a hypothesis, derived from the intuitions of native signers, that there is a rhythmic difference between two historically related sign languages, Finnish Sign Language (FinSL) and Swedish Sign Language (SSL). We define the notion of rhythm as 'the organization of units in time' and presume that the rhythmic feel of a language is determined by the phonetic properties and events that are used in the marking of the areas and borders of temporally ordered units such as signs and sentences (Patel & Daniele 2003; Patel 2006). In previous studies (Boyes Braem 1999; Sandler 2012), it has been suggested that the markers of rhythmic sequences in signed language are, for example, temporal duration, punctual indices (e.g. head nods), and articulatory contours. Accordingly, we approach our hypothesis with three main research questions: (i) Are the signing speed and sign duration different in FinSL and SSL, (ii) Are head nods aligned differently in terms of syntactic units in FinSL and SSL, and (iii) Is the motion of the head different in terms of its articulatory contour in FinSL and SSL sentences? The study is based on narratives collected with identical tasks in both languages (5 Snowman and Frog, where are you? stories per language). The total amount of video material is one hour (30+30 minutes) and it includes signing from twenty (10+10) signers. All of the material has been annotated for signs, sentences and nods. The material also includes 3D numerical data on the head motion of signers (the yaw, pitch, and roll angles). The 3D data has been obtained with computer-vision technology implemented in SLMotion software (Karppa et. al 2014). Concerning question (i), we have not so far found any significant differences in the signing speed and sign duration of the two languages. With a pilot sample of 4+4 signers and 1100 signs per language, we have determined the average signing speed to be two signs per second in both languages, and the average duration of (the core of) the sign to be 0.27 seconds in SSL and 0.29 seconds in FinSL. Concerning (ii), the average number of nods per story was higher in FinSL than in SSL but both languages tended to align nods with syntactic boundaries: of the total number of nods, 81% in FinSL and 77% in SSL occurred on a syntactic boundary, and generally also at the end of the sentence (Figure 1). Concerning question (iii), our initial tests with Snowman revealed that, for example, the amplitude of the tilting-like (roll) motion of the head decreased similarly toward the end of sentences in both languages (Figure 2) but FinSL signers employed this particular type of motion more often in the marking of syntactic junctures than SSL signers (Figure 3). The preliminary results indicate some differences between FinSL and SSL. In our presentation we will present the final results and discuss them in detail with respect to our initial hypothesis.

  • 10. Jantunen, Tommi
    et al.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Puupponen, Anna
    Laaksonen, Jorma
    On the rhythm of head movements in Finnish and Swedish Sign Language sentences2016Ingår i: The Proceedings of Speech Prosody 2016 / [ed] Jon Barnes, Alejna Brugos, Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel, Nanette Veilleux, 2016, 850-853 s.Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates, with the help of computer-vision technology,the similarities and differences in the rhythm of themovements of the head in sentences in Finnish (FinSL) andSwedish Sign Language (SSL). The results show that themovement of the head in the two languages is often very similar:in both languages, the instances when the movement of thehead changes direction were distributed similarly with regardto clause-boundaries, and the contours of the roll (tilting-like)motion of the head during the sentences were similar. Concerningdifferences, direction changes were found to be usedmore effectively in the marking of clause-boundaries in FinSL,and in SSL the head moved nearly twice as fast as in FinSL. However, the small amount of data means that the results canbe considered to be only preliminary. The paper indicates theroll angle of the head as a domain for further work on head related rhythm.

  • 11. Kristensson, Christy
    et al.
    Steiner, Edit
    Mesch, Urban
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    110 fantastiska år med Idrottsklubben Surd2015Bok (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 12.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Att använda ELAN: Bruksanvisning för annotering och studie av teckenspråkstexter: Version 22009Övrigt (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 13.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Att använda ELAN: Bruksanvisning för annotering och studie av teckenspråkstexter: Version 32011Övrigt (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 14.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Available but not accessible: Options for adapting old Swedish Sign Language archives to modern documentation conventions2014Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Video is an important medium for linguistic and historic research on signed language. Video recordings of Swedish Sign Language (SSL), mainly from the 1970s, have been preserved for the next generation, but the organizing, archiving, and sharing of this material is not standardized. The Swedish National Association for the Deaf (SDR) has been one of the biggest producers of SSL material, before the production moved to Swedish Broadcasting (SVT). A large amount of video recordings, produced 1970-1990, are in the SDR archive, preserved but not systematically archived and documented. SSL material by SVT since 1974 is available through streaming in their “open archive” (“Öppet arkiv”)—about 72 entries—and the Swedish Media Database at the National Library of Sweden (KB)—about 7,100 entries. The CLARIN Research Infrastructure and the national Swedish consortium SWE-CLARIN is one way for scholars in the humanities and social sciences to access data, and provides tools for exploring, annotating, and analyzing data (Nilsson Björkenstam et al, 2014). Corpus-based work on SSL started in 2003, preceding the SSL Corpus project (2009-2011), and this work provides a model for annotation work, and metadata and archiving procedures. This could be applied to older archives, such as the SDR material.

  • 15.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Dialog, kollektivt lärande och språkresurser: Möjligheter och problem med campusutbildning och nätbaserad utbildning för studenter i ämnet teckenspråk (lingvistik)2012Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 16.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    International Sign: Linguistic, Usage, and Status Issues, edited by Rachel Rosenstock and Jemina Napier (Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press, 2016)2017Ingår i: Sign Language Studies, ISSN 0302-1475, E-ISSN 1533-6263, Vol. 17, nr 3, 403-406 s.Artikel, recension (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 17.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Manual backchannel responses in signers' conversations in Swedish Sign Language2016Ingår i: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 50, 22-41 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study aims to determine the manual backchannel responses that signers use in Swedish Sign Language discourse by analyzing a subset of the SSL Corpus. The investiga- tion found 20% of the backchannel responses in this data to be manual. The study focuses on the manual backchannel responses that consist of signs (mostly the sign gloss YES) and gesture-like signs (PU “palms up”), and other manual activities, which can occur at a relatively low height in signing space. With respect to age groups, younger signers engage in more weak manual activity than older signers.

  • 18.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Narratives in Tactile Sign Language2006Ingår i: The Deaf Way II Reader : Perspectives from the Second International Conference on Deaf Culture / [ed] Goodstein, Harvey, Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press , 2006, 344-348 s.Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 19.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Perspectives on the concept and definition of International Sign2010Övrigt (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 20.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Påminner nationella teckenspråk varandra?2006Ingår i: Teckenspråk: Sociala och historiska perspektiv / [ed] Karin Hoyer, Monica Londen och Jan-Ola Östman, Helsingfors: Nordica Institutionen för nordiska språk och nordisk litteratur, Helsingfors universitet , 2006, 71-95 s.Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 21.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Ruotsalaisen ja suomalaisen viittomakielen välisistä yhteyksistä2008Ingår i: Kieliviesti, ISSN 0280-350X, nr 4, 9-12 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 22.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Sex och samlevnad2007Övrigt (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 23.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Sign Language: Tactile2016Ingår i: The SAGE Deaf Studies Encyclopedia / [ed] Genie Gertz, Patrick Boudreault, Sage Publications, 2016, 820-821 s.Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 24.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Svensk teckenspråkskorpus - dess tillkomst och uppbyggnad2015Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 25.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Swedish Sign Language Corpus2012Ingår i: Deaf Studies Digital Journal, ISSN 2158-1398, Vol. 3Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 26.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Tactile signing with one-handed perception2013Ingår i: Sign Language Studies, ISSN 0302-1475, E-ISSN 1533-6263, Vol. 13, nr 2, 238-263 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Tactile signing among persons with deaf-blindness is not homogenous;rather, like other forms of language, it exhibits variation, especiallyin turn taking. Early analyses of tactile Swedish Sign Language,tactile Norwegian Sign Language, and tactile French Sign Languagefocused on tactile communication with four hands, in which partiallyblind or functionally blind signers use both hands for productionand perception in the conversation dyad. In this article, I add to thisbody of research by focusing on tactile one-handed perception inSwedish Sign Language, in which a signer uses the left hand to produceand receive signs, and an addressee uses the right hand not onlyto receive but also to produce signs after taking a turn. As part ofthis discussion, I also look at issues of conversation regulation, handmovement during the turn change, and variation in the backchannelsignals. The study shows that in tactile signing, interlocutors mustchange hand position when taking turns.

  • 27.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Teckenrummet i taktilt teckenspråk av personer med förvärvad dövblindhet: en förstudie2013Ingår i: Kropslig og taktil sprogudvikling: En antologi om forskellige sprogmodaliteters muligheder og umuligheder, undersøgt med afsæt i personer med medfødt døvblindhed / [ed] Jesper Dammeyer & Anja Nielsen, Aalborg: Materialecentret , 2013, 157-166 s.Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Signing space in tactile signing for persons with acquired deafblindness - a pilot study

    The article describes how signing space is used in tactile Swedish Sign Language. Signers with acquired deafblindness, partly or fully deaf-blind, who have grown up using sign language, communicate with each other and other people who use sign language with hand contact and using signing space (the so-called spatial room) as a joint signing space. The signing space has two different functions - both for turn-taking and also for the produc­tion of signs in the neutral position in front of the signer, with the possibi­lity of modifying the direction/location of the articulator/s. The spatial part of the sign language also has an important role in the creation of mental images (pictures), which requires a visual concept.

  • 28.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Teckenspråk i IT-stödd undervisning2013Ingår i: Lärarkonferens 2013 :, 2013Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    Svenskt teckenspråk är ett gestuellt-visuellt språk. På sistone har det skett en förändring när det gäller undervisningsformer och analysverktyg för lingvistiska studier i teckenspråk vid Institutionen för lingvistik, Stockholms universitet. Att utveckla IT-stödd undervisning ställer större krav på videoteknik och ämnesdidaktik. I presentationen delger vi våra erfarenheter för a) webbaserad kommunikation via Adobe Connect och Skype, b) redovisning och inlämningsuppgift på teckenspråkoch c) digitala språkresurser.

  • 29.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Teckenspråk i taktil form2006Ingår i: Teckenspråk: Sociala och historiska perspektiv / [ed] Karin Hoyer, Monica Londen och Jan-Ola Östman, Helsingfors: Nordica, Institutionen för nordiska språk och nordisk litteratur, Helsingfors universitet , 2006, 129-143 s.Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 30.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik. Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Teckenspråk i taktil form: Turtagning och frågor i dövblindas samtal på teckenspråk1998Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focuses on turn-taking and questions in conversations between deaf-blind persons using tactile sign language, i.e. communicating by holding each others hands, and how sign language utterances change in the tactile mode when the nonmanual signals characteristic of turntaking and interrogative sentences in (visual) sign language are not used. The material consists of six video-recorded conversations (four with deaf-blind pairs and two where one person is deaf and one is deaf-blind). Parts of the material, viz. 168 sequences with questions and answers, has been transcribed and analyzed.

    The analysis shows that deaf-blind signers use their hands in two different conversation positions. In the monologue position both the signer's hands are held under the hands of the listener, whereas in the dialogue position both participants hold their hands in identical ways: the right hand under the other person's left hand and the left hand on top of the other person's right hand. It is described how the two positions affect the structure of one- and twohanded signs and how back channeling, linguistic as well as non-linguistic (with different kinds of tapping), is used in the two positions.

    The analysis shows that differences in the vertical and the horizontal planes are used in turn-taking regulation. Using four different conversational levels the signer can signal e.g. turn change by lowering his/her hands from the turn level to the turn change level at the end of his/her turn. The horizontal plane is devided into three different turn zones. The turn holder uses his/her own turn zone close to the body and finishes the turn by moving the hands to the joint zone midway between the interlocutors or into the listener's zone.

    The analyzed utterances function as questions, yes/no-questions (82) as well as wh-questions (55). It is hypothesized that yes/no-questions are marked with the manual signal extended duration of the last sign of the utterance, one of the interrogative signals of visual signing, but this was only true for 46 % of the yes/no-questions in the material. Since extended duration of the last sign also signals turn change in e.g. statements it is not regarded as an interrogative signal. Additional markers of yes/no-questions are among others the sign INDEX-adr ('you') with its variant INDEX-adr-long, used as a summons signal, and repetitions of signs or sentences. As for the wh-questions a majority are made with a manual wh-sign. Generally, if there are no interrogative signals the context and the content of the utterance will account for its interpretation as a question.

    To avoid misunderstandings, questions and non-linguistic signals are used in checking turns, where the signer requests back channeling or the listener requests repetition or clarification.

     

  • 31.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Variations in tactile signing - the case of one-handed signing2011Ingår i: ESUKA – JEFUL, nr 2-1, 273-282 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Tactile sign language is a variety of a national sign language.Tactile signing among persons with deafblindness also includessome minor variations. Early analyses of tactile Swedish Sign Language(e.g. Mesch 1998, 2001) show how interactants use both theirhands in tactile communication in two different positions: dialogueposition and monologue position. This paper examines the signingvariations that partially or functionally blind signers encounter whenusing one hand to communicate with each other in a conversationdyad in what is one of the most advanced types of sign languagecommunication. In tactile one-handed signing, the signer uses herright hand both for producing and receiving signs, while the addresseeuses her left hand not only for receiving but also for producing signsafter turn-taking, even though it is the non-dominant hand and, therefore,is not normally used to produce one-handed signs. In this study,conversation analysis was conducted on the discourse of four groups.The results show that some variations depend on the linguistic backgroundof individuals and their everyday communication. A comparativestudy of a two-handed and a one-handed system is thenpresented, focusing on issues of simplicity, flexibility, turn-taking, andfeedback. Some results showing changes in the sign structures ofboth communication types are also presented.

  • 32.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Viipleme koos. Teavet taktiilse viipekeele kohta2005Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 33.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Viitotaan yhdessä. Tietoa taktiilista viittomakielestä2004Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 34.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Viittomien glossit ja ajalliset pituudet [The glosses and temporal durations of signs questions relating to sign language annotation]: annotointityöskentelyyn liittyviä kysymyksiä [questions relating to sign language annotation]2010Ingår i: Näkökulmia viittomaan ja viittomistoon [Perspectives on sign and lexicon] / [ed] Tommi Jantunen, Jyväskylä: University of Jyväskylä , 2010Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, questions relating to sign language annotation are discussed. ELAN, the computer-assisted annotation tool that has been applied in and tested for sign language annotation since 2002, has already shown its potential in synchronizing sign language texts in video format with transcription. However, during the annotation work two questions have arisen. The first concerns the selection and nature of the gloss for the sign, and the second the duration of the glossed annotation, that is, the question of where the sign begins and ends on a video. These questions have emerged especially from work on the large corpora of sign language texts, and in the teaching of sign language linguistics. The findings discussed here suggest that more unified linguistic transcription conventions should be developed for glossing so that, for example, searching the annotations in ELAN would be easier in the larger sign language corpora made available for researchers and students.

  • 35.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Bäckström, Joel
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Siffertecken2008Övrigt (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 36.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Clark, Becky
    Birley, Dawn Jani
    WSI on Breaking Barriers and Empowering Deaf and Hard of Hearing Girls and Women in Sport2014Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 37.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Kaneko, Michiko
    Eye gaze in creative sign language2013Ingår i: Sign Language Studies, ISSN 0302-1475, E-ISSN 1533-6263, Vol. 13, nr 3, 372-400 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the role of eye gaze in creative sign language. Because eye gaze conveys various types of linguistic and poetic information,it is an intrinsic part of sign language linguistics in generaland of creative signing in particular. We discuss various functions ofeyegaze in poetic signing and propose a classification of gaze behaviorsbased on the observation of a number of poems in British SignLanguage and Swedish Sign Language.

  • 38.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Kaneko, Michiko
    Signed renga: Exploration of collaborative forms in sign language poetry2017Ingår i: African Studies, ISSN 0002-0184, E-ISSN 1469-2872, Vol. 76, nr 3, 381-401 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    South African Sign Language (SASL) poetry is still exploring many forms of poetry genres. This article describes the recent development of a new ‘genre’ in sign language poetry: signed renga (group poetry). The article will outline the form – what it is, how it has developed and spread, and why it is an apparently successful poetic genre. A sketch of a workshop from Signing Hands Across the Water 2 (SHAW 2) will also be provided to illustrate how renga emerges out of group work. First we will briefly explain common features of signed renga, drawing on a body of signed renga in British, Irish and Swedish Sign Languages. The second half of the article is an in-depth analysis of one signed renga, titled South Africa, which emerged from the SHAW 2 festival, with a focus on transitions as collaborative performance using shared signing space and eye gaze direction

  • 39.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Mesch, Urban
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Den framstående idrottsmannen Johan Alfred Selenius Dahlström2013Bok (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 40.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Raanes, Eli
    Sør-Trøndelag University College, Department Faculty of teacher and interpreter education, Trondheim, Norge.
    Joint attention through shared movements - analyzing deafblind signers’ expressions in dialogues2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    When signing in the tactile modality, the interlocutors produce signs while holding each other's hand/s. This presentation is based on a comparative study of some specific expressions which are found in videotaped materials of conversations with Swedish and Norwegian signers with deafblindness (Mesch, 2001, Raanes, 2006). In some of the signing expressions in tactile modality, the signer uses her/his own or the other interlocutor’s hand or body part as part of the utterance. The examples point to these expressions as being part of sign language in the tactile modality when the sign refers to objects and activities.

    Two different theories are combined in this linguistic study of dialogue material in Norwegian and Swedish tactile sign language. Based on the theory of place of articulation and signing space (e.g., Engberg-Pedersen, 1993; Bergman 1990) and cognitive grammar (Fauconnier & Turner, 2002) we present a preliminary study of how joint attention is constructed. The theory of cognitive grammar is brought in to examine how the expressions are formed and how interaction builds on the input given by touch and by involving the interlocutor's body part in the constructions of tactile expressions involved (Rommetveit, 1974; Taub, 2001; Fauconnier & Turner, 2002; Liddell, 2003; Wertsch, 2003,). We discuss different approaches to describe the meaning potential in conversations in the tactile modality.

    Our findings point to principles which are as yet not well described on how language may be used and how information may be presented in tactile signing. This study considers expanding the view of possible repertoires for human use of communication and language. We discuss how cognitive grammar may be able to describe the meaning construction in two different sign languages in the tactile modality.

  • 41.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Raanes, Eli
    Ferrara, Lindsay
    Co-forming real space blends in tactile signed language dialogues2015Ingår i: Cognitive Linguistics, ISSN 0936-5907, E-ISSN 1613-3641, Vol. 26, nr 2, 261-287 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on a linguistic study examining the use of real space blending in the tactile signed languages of Norwegian and Swedish signers who are both deaf and blind. Tactile signed languages are typically produced by interactants in contact with each other’s hands while signing. Of particular interest to this study are utterances which not only consist of the signer producing signs with his or her own hands (or other body parts), but which also recruit the other interactant’s hands (or another body part). These utterances, although perhaps less frequent, are co-constructed, in a very real sense, and they illustrate meaning construction during emerging, embodied discourse. Here, we analyze several examples of these types of utterances from a cognitive linguistic and cognitive semiotic perspective to explore how interactants prompt meaning construction through touch and the involvement of each other’s bodies during a particular type of co-regulation.

  • 42.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Rohdell, Maya
    Wallin, Lars
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Annoterade filer för svensk teckenspråkskorpus. Version 2.2014Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 43.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Schönström, Krister
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för svenska som andraspråk för döva.
    A second language learner corpus in Swedish Sign Language2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes work on an ongoing learner corpus in Swedish Sign Language (SSL) as a second language (L2). The purpose of this learner corpus is to provide a solid database for second language research in SSL, as there is a lack of research regarding how adults learn a signed language as a second language, and the availability of such a corpus for research would ultimately lead to new insights in the field. Work on this SSL learner corpus started in 2013 (Schönström & Mesch, 2014), and it now contains longitudinal data collected from 2013 to 2016. The corpus consists of data from two groups of learners. Data collection for the first group was completed in 2014 and contains 9:06 hours of data from a total of 18 learners. Data collection from the second group is ongoing.

    The longitudinal data collection consisted of interviews as well as picture and video retellings recorded on four occasions over a period of 1.5 years. The learners consisted of students from a sign language interpreter program at university level. The first collection began one month after course onset, and the second one 1.5 years after onset. The aim was to obtain a wider range of data illustrating the learners’ different developmental stages. The recorded material has been annotated and transcribed in the multimodal annotation tool ELAN using current SSL annotation conventions, especially for annotation of glosses as well as a special annotation schema for L2 analysis according to our particular research objectives.

    For those who are learning SSL, we hypothesize that simultaneous and spatial structures in a gestural-visual modality are challenging to learn (cf. Ortega & Morgan, 2015). Earlier we began analyzing the mouth actions of L2 learners (Mesch, Schönström, Riemer-Kankkonen & Wallin, 2016). Data was annotated according to annotation tiers for mouthing categories, such as mouth movements borrowed from Swedish (mouthing without sound), and mouth gestures, as well as L2 tiers. The next step is to analyze a set of complex sign categories (i.e. signs modified according to meaning and space). We are interested in how learners acquire depicting signs as well as other complex sign categories, i.e. modified signs and indicating signs. This overlaps partly with the use of space for meaning and reference, which is a challenge to annotate. In our presentation, we will show our annotation scheme and discuss the challenges of annotating these structures in an L2 context. 

  • 44.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Schönström, Krister
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för svenska som andraspråk för döva.
    Riemer Kankkonen, Nikolaus
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Wallin, Lars
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    The interaction between mouth actions and signs in Swedish Sign Language as an L22016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we observed several patterns related to interaction and the synchronization of mouth actions and hands among L2 learners of Swedish Sign Language (SSL) compared to native signers. Previous research on signed languages has examined the synchronization of mouthings and mouth gestures (e.g. the edited volume by Boyes Braem & Sutton-Spence 2001; Crasborn et al. 2008; Johnston et al. in press). Another line of sign language research has investigated phonological errors made by L2 learners of sign languages (adult learners of signing as a second language) across a limited number of languages, primarily in the use of manual parts (e.g. Rosen 2004) as well as in the use of non-manual parts (e.g. McIntire & Reilly 1988), not including mouth actions. The current study draws from both of these research areas in an effort to answer two questions: (i) Do L2 learners use mouthings borrowed from spoken language to a greater extent than L1 (native) signers? And (ii) how do borrowed mouthings and mouth gestures interact with manual signs? In other words, what are the distribution and the scope of mouthings with respect to prosodic constituents of SSL? We based this study on an analysis of an L2 Swedish Sign Language corpus (Mesch & Schönström 2014), which consists of 9:06 hours of data from 17 different L2 signers, and a control group of 3 deaf native L1 signers who provided 0:34 hours of video. For the analysis, we sampled data consisting of various materials (interviews, picture and video retellings) from six L2 learners and compared it to parallel data from the control group. With respect to question (i), our analysis revealed a greater use of mouthings borrowed from spoken Swedish among the L2 group, and for (ii), we found a lack of prosodic features in spreading/interaction between mouthings and signs in SSL as an L2. Compared to the L1 control group, L2 learners either overused or avoided mouthing. Among L2 speakers, our analysis also revealed that Swedish function words (e.g. som ‘as’) often appeared as mouthings without corresponding manual signs, thus being articulated simultaneously with a “mismatched” sign (as in Example 1). Furthermore, the interaction of signs and mouthing was often dependent on Swedish mouthing: whereas L1 signers produced the pattern in Example 2, in which mouthing belonging to the first unit spread to the second unit, the L2 learners’ mouthings often followed a strict 1-to-1 pattern, in which mouthings accompanied single manual signs and rarely spread across sign boundaries. As shown in this study, linguistic factors impacting SSL as an L2 include bilingualism and different modalities, i.e. how mouthing and signs interact. This has implications for L2 teaching, in how L2 learners should be taught to use “unvoiced” articulations of spoken words with manual signs. For future research, it would be useful to compare these results with those of deaf people who are late learners of SSL, since they rarely have a spoken language as an L1 (and thus lack that type of interference).

  • 45.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Wallin, Lars
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    From meaning to signs and back:Lexicography and the Swedish Sign Language Corpus2012Ingår i: Proceedings of the 5th Workshop on the Representation and Processing of Sign Languages: Interactions between Corpus and Lexicon., 2012, 123-126 s.Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we will present the advantages of having a reference dictionary, and how having a corpus makes dictionary making easier and more effective. It also gives a new perspective on sign entries in the dictionary, for example, if a sign uses one or two hands, or which meaning “genuine signs” have, and it helps find a model for categorization of polysynthetic signs that is not found in the dictionary. Categorizing glosses in the corpus work has compelled us to revisit the dictionary to add signs from the corpus that are not already in the dictionary and to improve sign entries already in the dictionary based on insights that have been gained while working on the corpus.

  • 46.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Wallin, Lars
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Gloss annotations in the Swedish Sign Language Corpus2015Ingår i: International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, ISSN 1384-6655, E-ISSN 1569-9811, Vol. 20, nr 1, 102-120 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Sign Language Corpus (SSLC) was compiled during the years 2009–2011 and consists of video-recorded conversations with 42 informants between the ages of 20 and 82 from three separate regions in Sweden. The overall aim of the project was to create a corpus of Swedish Sign Language (SSL) that could provide a core data source for research on language structure and use, as well as for dictionary work. A portion of the corpus has been annotated with glosses for signs and Swedish translations, and annotation of the entire corpus is ongoing. In this paper, we outline our scheme for gloss annotation and discuss issues that are relevant in creating the annotation system, with unique glosses for lexical signs, fingerspelling and productive signs. The annotation guidelines discussed in this paper cover both one- and two-handed signs in SSL, based on 33,600 tokens collected for the SSLC.

  • 47.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Wallin, Lars
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    The non-dominant hand as delimitation between inner element and outer element2013Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In previous studies, Liddell (2003), Liddell, Vogt-Svendsen & Bergman (2004), Vogt-Svendsen & Bergman (2007) and Nilsson (2007) described buoys in American, Norwegian and Swedish sign languages, as in the list buoy, THEME buoy, POINTER buoy and point buoy. Common to all of these is that they are realized with the non-dominant hand or weak hand, which “are held in a stationary configuration as the strong hand continues producing signs” (Liddell, 2003:223).

    In this paper, we present an additional sign (usually consisting of all fingers relaxed gathered and slightly bent at both distal knuckles with the thumb in opposition, or lateral), which, with respect to performance, matches the description of other buoys but differs in function/content from previously described buoys with the partial exception of POINT-B (Vogt-Svendsen & Bergman, 2007). In the Swedish Sign Language Corpus, we have tentatively annotated this sign as DELIMIT (translated from the Swedish AVGRÄNS) because, in our initial analysis (of 84 preliminary tokens on 45 annotated texts (of dialogue) with 26 informants of different ages and genders), the sign seems to represent a form of delimitation between an “inner” element – represented by the space in front of the hand’s palmar side – and an “outer” element – represented by the space in front of the hand’s dorsal side – as if someone is inside and another is outside, or there is an island surrounded by sea.

    A typical example using DELIMIT is shown in the series of pictures below (see figure 1). The (left-handed) informant is initially describing a comic strip about a lonely man on an island with a palm tree in the middle of the sea. The first photograph shows the dominant hand performing the sign of the island (O-hand is moved up) with the non-dominant hand initiating the execution of DELIMIT, which is completed in the second photograph, while the dominant index hand is making a circular motion in the space in front of palmar side of DELIMIT, which now represents the inner elements, or the island. After the third photograph, in which the dominant hand is performing the sign of the sea, the following three photographs show the informant describing the sea as an outer element by using the dominant hand to make a sweeping motion forward past DELIMIT's dorsal side – further in front of DELIMIT – and ending on the contralateral side of the space.

    DELIMIT is typically carried out in the space in front of the body. However, one example in our data uses the neck as the location for DELIMIT by representing the space beneath the non-dominant hand with the palmar side down for the chest and downwards, and the dorsal side of the space above the hand for the head.

    Together  the buoys described in this presentation show how the use of the non-dominant hand can be regarded as more important at the discourse level than the dominant hand in individual signs, and thus, is not particularly “weak” at all.  

      …

    Figure 1.

    References:

    Bergman, B. & Vogt-Svendsen, M. 2007. Point buoys. The weak hand as a point of reference for time and space. In Vermeerbergen, M., Leeson, L. & Crasborn, O. (eds.), Simultaneity in Signed Languages: Form and Function. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

    Liddell, S. K. 2003. Grammar, Gesture and Meaning in American Sign Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Liddell, S. K., Vogt-Svendsen, M. & Bergman, B. 2007. A crosslinguistic comparison of buoys. Evidence from American, Norwegian, and Swedish Sign Language. In Vermeerbergen, M., Leeson, L. & Crasborn, O. (eds.), Simultaneity in Signed Languages: Form and Function. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

    Nilsson, A-L. 2007. The non-dominant hand in a Swedish Sign Language discourse. In Vermeerbergen, M., Leeson, L. & Crasborn, O. (eds.), Simultaneity in Signed Languages: Form and Function. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

    Mesch, J., Wallin, L., Nilsson, A-L. & Bergman, B. 2012. Datamängd. Projektet Korpus för det svenska teckenspråket 2009-2011 (version 1). Avdelningen för teckenspråk, Institutionen för lingvistik, Stockholms universitet. (http://www.ling.su.se/teckensprakskorpus)

  • 48.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Wallin, Lars
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Use of sign language materials in teaching2008Ingår i: Construction and Exploitation of Sign Language Corpora / [ed] Crasborn, Onno et al (eds), LREC2008 , 2008, , pp. 134-137 s.Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 49.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Wallin, Lars
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Björkstrand, Thomas
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Sign Language Resources in Sweden: Dictionary and Corpus2012Ingår i: Proceedings of the 5th Workshop on the Representation and Processing of Sign Languages: Interactions between Corpus and Lexicon., 2012, 127-130 s.Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sign language resources are necessary tools for adequately serving the needs of learners, teachers and researchers of signed languages. Among these resources, the Swedish Sign Language Dictionary was begun in 2008 and has been in development ever since. Today, it has approximately 8,000 sign entries. The Swedish Sign Language Corpus is also an important resource, but it is of a very different kind than the dictionary. Compiled during the years 2009–2011, the corpus consists of video recorded conversations among 42 informants aged between 20 and 82, from three separate regions in Sweden. With 14 % of the corpus having been annotated with glosses for signs, it comprises total of approximately 3,600 different signs occurring about 25,500 times (tokens) in the 42 annotated sign language discourses/video files. As these two resources sprang from different starting points, they are independent from each other; however, in the late phases of building the corpus the importance of combining work from the two became evident. This presentation will show the development of these two resources and the advantages of combining them.

     

  • 50. Mesch, Urban
    et al.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Den uppländska dövhistorien: Profiler, pionjärer och dövas föreningsliv i Uppland2017Bok (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
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