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  • 1.
    Almqvist, Gustaf
    et al.
    University of Stockholm, Stockholm Sweden.
    Andersen, Michael
    Danish Fishermen’s Association, Fredericia, Denmark.
    Willestofte Berg, Casper
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Broadgate, Wendy
    The Fisheries Secretariat (FISH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bryan, Meaghan
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Miami, United States.
    Campana, Steven
    Fisheries and Oceans Canada Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Canada.
    Cardinale, Max
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Dierking, Jan
    Leibniz-Institut für Meereswissenschaften, Kiel, Germany.
    von Dorrien, Christian
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Eero, Margit
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Efimov, Yuri
    Russian Federal Research Institute of Fisheries & Oceanography (VNIRO), Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Department of Inland Fisheries, Silkeborg, Denmark.
    Hjelm, Joakim
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Noél
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Horbowy, Jan
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Hüssy, Karin
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Johansson, Reine
    Baltic Sea Advisory Council, Dyrön, Sweden.
    Jonusas, Stanislovas
    DGMare, Brussels, Belgium.
    Kornelius, George
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR) 8 Daugavgrivas Str. Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Köster, Fritz
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Kraak, Sarah
    Thünen Institute, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Large, Scott
    International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Larsson, Staffan
    Swedish Cod Fishermen’s Producer Organisation, Lycke, Sweden.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Maguire, Jean-Jacques
    Godefroy, Quebec, Canada.
    Mosegaard, Henrik
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Anders
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Norrström, Niclas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Stepputtis, Daniel
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Stern, Edward
    The Fisheries Secretariat (FISH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Strehlow, Harry Vincent
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Svedäng, Henrik
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Trenkel, Verena
    Ifremer Nantes Centre, Nantes, France.
    Wæver Pedersen, Martin
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Zimmermann, Christopher
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Report of the Benchmark Workshop on Baltic Cod Stocks (WKBALTCOD)2015Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICES Benchmark Workshop on Baltic Cod Stocks (WKBALTCOD), chaired by External Chair Jean-Jacques Maguire, Canada and ICES Chair Marie Storr-Paulsen, Denmark, and attended by two invited external experts Verena Trenkel, France and Meaghan Bryan, USA met in Rostock, Germany, 2–6 March 2015 with 39 participants and six countries represented. The objective of WKBALTCOD was to evaluate the appropriateness of data and methods to determine stock status and investigate meth-ods appropriate to use in the single-stock assessment for the cod stock in SD 22–24 and cod in SD 25–32 in the Baltic. Participants in the workshop were a large group with diverse backgrounds representing the industry, fisheries, NGOs, managers and scientists.The single-stock analytic assessment of the eastern Baltic stock was not accepted by the assessment working group (WGBFAS) in 2014 due to severe problems with the input data. The advice for the eastern Baltic cod was, therefore, based on the ICES approach for data-limited stocks. As an outcome ICES decided to establish a bench-mark for both cod stocks and to scope an integrated assessment for the Baltic cod stocks. The first meeting (WKSIBCA) was therefore meant to introduce the interces-sional work conducted since the assessment working group in April 2014, and to reach some conclusions on how to proceed both in the short term (Benchmark in March 2015) and longer term (2–3 years) and was seen as a data compilation work-shop, there is produced a separate report from this workshop. The WKBALTCOD was the 2nd meeting in the benchmark process and was intended to come up with a final stock assessment method, stock annex and input data for both stocks. As it was not possible to reach conclusive decision on the final model to be used for the east Baltic cod stock during the benchmark meeting and as more work on the preferable models was needed, it was decided by the ACOM leadership to prolong the bench-mark process until the assessment working group meeting in April 2015. This deci-sion has led to a relatively long process partly mixed with the assessment working group WGBFAS.It became clear during the benchmark process that although large effort has been put into explaining the underlying processes leading to the changes in the Baltic ecosys-tem, there is still some lack of understanding of the present situation in the eastern Baltic cod stock. Therefore, it was not possible to reach firm conclusions on the final model to be used and therefore not possible to set reference points. It was decided to continue to explore the most promising models and to continue to improve the input data until the assessment working group started in April.The main challenges still to be solved for the Eastern Baltic cod stock is the quantifi-cation of increased natural mortality and decrease in growth. Through several presentations during the workshop (both WKSIBCA and WKBALTCOD) it became clear that natural mortality very likely has increased in later years, due to decreased condition and increased parasite infection. A decrease in growth also seems plausible duo to a decrease in condition and/or selectivity-induced mortality of the largest in-dividuals. However, as none of these parameters are easily estimated, especially with the severe ageing problems, different model assumptions made the output very shaky.For the western Baltic cod, stock identification issues were examined in area SD 24, the intermediate area: based on otolith characteristics and genetics. Due to the results showing a large proportion of east cod in this area, it was decided to split the catch2 | ICES WKBALTCOD REPORT 2015and survey from SD 24 into either the western or eastern Baltic cod stock. It was pos-sible to derive proportions of eastern and western cod in SD 24 back to the mid-1990s.For the western Baltic cod stock a modelled survey indices was included in the as-sessment covering the western part of SD 24 and Area 22+23 and based on a smoothed ALK.Both cod stocks have in the past used commercial tuning fleet to have a better cov-ered of older age groups. It was decided to abound this time-series duo quality issues such as a limited coverage and problems with technical creeping.WKBALTCOD was not able to explore and define reference points for the Western Baltic cod stock during the meeting due to time constraints, but these were calculated and decided by correspondence after the meeting. The recent protocols on estimation procedures developed by WKMSYREF3 for stocks with a full analytical assessment and for data-limited stocks served as objective guidelines to obtain reference point estimates.

  • 2.
    Andersen, Michael
    et al.
    Danish Fishermen’s Association Fredericia, Denmark.
    Arula, Timo
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Clink, Sally
    Baltic Sea Regional Advisory Council, Denmark.
    Collie, Jeremy
    University of Rhode Island, USA.
    Eckeskog, Magnus
    The Fisheries Secretariat (FISH), Sweden.
    Eero, Margit
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Pehr E.
    Swedish Fisherman’s Federation Fiskets Hus, Sweden.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Russian Federation.
    Gröhsler, Thomas
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Holmgren, Noél
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Horbowy, Jan
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Poland.
    Howell, Daniel
    Institute of Marine Research, Norway.
    Jepsena, Ilona
    European Commission, Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Belgium.
    Johansson, Reine J.
    Swedish Fishermen´s Federation, Sweden.
    Janusas, Stanislovas
    European Commission Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Belgium.
    Kaljuste, Olavi
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Karpushevskiy, Igor
    AtlantNIRO, Russian Federation.
    Klaas, Kunnar
    Ministry of the Environment of Estonia, Estonia.
    Kornilovs, Georgs
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Latvia.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thûnen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Linke, Sebastian
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish Unniversity of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Poland.
    Maguire, Jean-Jacques
    International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Canada.
    Neuenfeldt, Stefan
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Norrström, Niclas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Plaganyi, Eva
    CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research (CMAR), Australia.
    Plikshs, Maris
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Latvia.
    Raid, Tiit
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Reeves, Stuart
    European Commission Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries , Belgium.
    Rindorf, Anna
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Storr- Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Strehlow, Harry V.
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Vinther, Morten
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Walther, Yvonne
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Report of the Benchmark Workshop on Baltic Multispecies Assessments (WKBALT): 4–8 February 2013, Copenhagen, Denmark2013Rapport (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 3.
    Appelberg, Magnus
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    7. Fish Communities2012Inngår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 56-62 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 4.
    Appelblad, Håkan
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kulturgeografiska institutionen.
    Fritidsfiskets ekonomi och rekreationsvärde - exempel lax2001Inngår i: Kungl. Skogs- och Lantbruksakademiens Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5350, Vol. 140, nr 10, 89-94 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 5.
    Appelblad, Håkan
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kulturgeografiska institutionen.
    Alatalo, Marita
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kulturgeografiska institutionen.
    Wild Swedish salmon: A regional development resource through recreational use?1998Inngår i: Northern waters: Management issues and practice / [ed] David Symes, Oxford: Fishing News Books , 1998, 164-174 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 6.
    Aps, R.
    et al.
    University of Tartu.
    Fetissov, M.
    University of Tartu.
    Holmgren, Noel
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Norrström, Niclas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Kuikka, S.
    University of Helsinki.
    Central Baltic Sea herring: effect of environmental trends and fishery management2011Inngår i: Ecosystems and Sustainable Development VIII / [ed] Y. Villacampa & C. A. Brebbia, Southampton: WIT Press, 2011, 69-80 s.Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Uncertainty is an endemic condition of the Baltic Sea herring (Clupea harengus membras, L) fishery management. It is a condition exacerbated by the fishing fleet overcapacity and consequent exploitation of the herring stock at a level believed to be unsustainable. Some sources of uncertainty are mainly related to biology and fishing technique: the unsolved problem of herring assessment and management units, the recruitment–environment relationship and the reduction in mean weights-at-age, uncertain ageing of fish, the problem of unaccounted fishing mortality caused by the fish selection through the trawl net. Fishing fleet overcapacity is believed to be behind of the regulatory overfishing when setting the Total Allowable Catches (TACs) higher than the scientific advice (decision overfishing) and tolerating the extensive underreporting of catches (implementation overfishing). Two scenarios for the Central Baltic Sea herring fishery management options are constructed and the Bayesian networks are used to represent and update uncertainties encountered in the process of the management related situation assessment. First scenario represents the current status of the fishery management resulting in fishing mortality (F) higher than FMSY – the fishing mortality that corresponds to the Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY). The second scenario demonstrates the assumed potential impact of economic incentives (e.g.zoning, individual transferable quotas (ITQs), territorial use rights etc.) on the reduction of excessive fishing capacity and bringing actual fishing mortality closer to FMSY.

  • 7.
    Bergenius, Mikaela
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Boje, Jesper
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Degel, Henrik
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Eero, Margit
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Management Systems, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Florin, Ann-Britt
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Grygiel, Wlodzimierz
    Sea Fisheries Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Gröhsler, Tomas
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Hjelm, Joakim
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Sweden.
    Horbowy, Jan
    Sea Fisheries Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Holmgren, Noél
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Norrström, Niclas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Kaljuste, Olavi
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Karpushevskiy, Igor
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Karpushevskaia, Anastasiia
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Kornilovs, Georgs
    Latvian Fish Resources Agency, Riga, Latvia.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Pönni, Jukka
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research, Institute Kotka Unit, Kotka, Finland.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Raid, Tiit
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Raitaniemi, Jari
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute Turku Game and Fisheries Research, Turku, Finland.
    Statkus, Romas
    Division of fishery research and science, Fishery service under Ministry of Agriculture, Klaipeda, Lithuania.
    Stoetera, Sven
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Ustups, Didzis
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Walther, Yvonne
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Report of the Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group (WGBFAS): 14-21 April 2015, ICES HQ, Copenhagen, Denmark2015Rapport (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICES Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group (WGBFAS) met 14-21 April 2015 (Chair: Mare Storr-Paulsen, Denmark), with 28 participants and 9 countries represented. The objective of WGBFAS was to assess the status of the following stocks:

    1 ) Sole in Division IIIa, SDs 20-22

    2 ) Cod in Kattegat, Cod in SD 22-24, Cod in SD 25-32

    3 ) Herring in SD 25-27, 28.2, 29 and 32, Herring in SD 28.1 (Gulf of Riga), Herring in SD 30, Herring SD 31.

    4 ) Sprat in SD 22-32

    5 ) Plaice 21-23, Plaice 2425

    6 ) Flounder 22-23; 24-25; 26+28 and 27+29-32, Brill 2232, Dab 2232, and Turbot 2232 (survey trends)

    WGBFAS also identified the data needed, for next year’s data call with some suggestions for improvements in the data call as well as in InterCatch. The report contains an introduction with the summary of other WGs relevant for the WGBFAS, country specific fishery description, the methods used, and ecosystem considerations. The results of the analytical stock assessment or survey trends for the species listed above are then presented with all the stocks with the same species in the same sections. The report ends with references, list of Working Documents, recommendations and Stock Annexes. In first quarter 2015 the Baltic cod stocks and the plaice stocks were benchmarked. As a result the Baltic cod stocks now have to apply a splitting key in SD 24 were both stocks are present. This has changed the assessment from being an area based assessment to now being a stock based assessments and has implications for the advice. The principle analytical models used for the stock assessments were XSA and SAM. For most flatfishes, CPUE trends from bottom trawl surveys were presented (except plaice 2425 and her31 using relative SSB from SAM and XSA, respectively). Ecosystem changes have been analytically considered in the following stock assessments: Herring in SD 25-27, 28.2, 29 and 32, and Sprat in SD 22-32, in form of cod predation mortality. Last year a very large retrospective pattern in the Eastern Baltic cod stock caused that the WG rejected the analytic assessment. Several uncertainties in the data lead to this conclusion i.a age reading problems with large inconsistency between and within nations as well as a change in growth and natural mortality. However, even though a data compilation workshop and a benchmark have been conducted in the intermediate time it was not possible to solve the main issue on growth. The lack of knowledge on growth caused to that even the length based data required in the data call was very uncertain for the models and in the end the WG was not able to produce a better model than was presented last year which is based on survey trends. The Her-30 (Herring in the Botnian Sea) was by the working group down scaled from a category 1 stock to a category 3 stock due to the commercial tuning fleet used in the assessment having very uncertain estimates in the last couples of years. However, during the Baltic ADG an alternative assessment was suggested were the stock is still considered a category 1 stock but the last 8 years of the commercial tuning fleet was terminated. This assessment was conducted after the working group but has been included in the report.

  • 8.
    Bergenius, Mikaela
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Cadigan, Noel
    Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada.
    Gröhsler, Tomas
    Johann-Heinrich von Thünen-Institute, Germany .
    Holmgren, Noél
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Morgado, Cristina
    International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Denmark.
    Pönni, Jukka
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Finland.
    Raitaniemi, Jari
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Finland.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Trenkel, Verena
    Ifremer Nantes Centre, France.
    Report of the Inter-Benchmark Protocol for Herring in Subdivision 30 (IBP Her30): 11–15 March 2013, By correspondence2013Rapport (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Inter-Benchmark Protocol for Herring in Subdivision 30 (IBP-Her30) worked by correspondence  between  February  28  and  March  28  2013. Verena Trenkel  (France) served as Chair with invited expert Noel Cadigan (Canada). There were six participants. The objectives of the groups were to review the work carried out in response to the benchmark working group WKPELA in 2012.

  • 9.
    Bergström, Lena
    et al.
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grimvall, Anders
    Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gårdmark, Anna
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Hamrén, Henrik
    Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Noél
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Jacob, Ute
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Kininmonth, Stuart
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Large, Scott
    ICES, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Levin, Phil
    Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, USA.
    Lehikoinen, Annukka
    Helsinki University, Kotka Maritime Research Centre, Kotka, Finland.
    Llope, Marcos
    Instituto Español de Oceanografía, Centro Oceanográfico de Cádiz, Spain.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Müller-Karulis, Bärbel
    Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möllmann, Christian
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Neuenfeldt, Stefan
    DTU Aqua, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Norrström, Niclas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Olsson, Jens
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Otto, Saskia
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Pekcan-Hekim, Zeynep
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Rau, Andrea
    Thuenen-Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Reid, David
    Marine Institute, Rinville, Galway, Ireland.
    Tomczak, Maciej, T.
    Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Torres, Marian
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Ustups, Didzis
    Institute of Food safety, Animal Health and Environment, Riga, Latvia.
    Uusitalo, Laura
    Finnish Environment Institute, Marine Research Centre, Helsinki, Finland.
    Wesslander, Karin
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Marine Environment, Västra Frölunda, Sweden.
    Report of the ICES/HELCOM Working Group on Integrated Assessments of the Baltic Sea (WGIAB)2015Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICES/HELCOM Working Group on Integrated Assessments of the Baltic Sea(WGIAB) was established in 2007 as a forum for developing and combining ecosystembasedmanagement efforts for the Baltic Sea. The group intends to serve as a scientificcounterpart and support for the ICES Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group(WGBFAS) as well as for efforts and projects related to Integrated Ecosystem Assessments(IEA) within ICES and HELCOM. The group works in cooperation with similargroups within the ACOM/SCICOM Steering Group on Integrated Ecosystem Assessments(SSGIEA).The 2015 WGIAB meeting was held in Cádiz, Spain, from 9–13 March, back-to-backwith the meeting of its counterpart in the Working Group on Ecosystem Assessmentof Western European Shelf Seas (WGEAWESS). The meetings had joint sessions as wellas WG specific work, and some participants effectively participated in both meetings.The WGIAB meeting was attended by 27 participants from nine countries. The meetingwas chaired by Christian Möllmann, Germany, Laura Uusitalo, Finland and Lena Bergström,Sweden.This was the last year of the ongoing three-year Terms of Reference (ToR) for WGIAB.The main working activities in 2015 were to i) conduct studies on Baltic Sea ecosystemfunctioning with the goal to publish case studies from different parts of the Baltic Seain peer-reviewed journals, ii) work on the demonstration exercise to develop ecosystem-based assessment and advice for Baltic fish stocks focusing on cod (DEMO) withmultiple approaches, iii) plan further how to integrate the social and economic aspectsmore tightly in the WGIAB work, and iv) discuss the future focus and format of theWGIAB work.The Baltic ecosystem functioning activity focused on identifying and exploring keytrends and linkages in the Baltic Sea foodweb. This was pursued by presentation andfurther discussion of ongoing intersessional work on foodweb modelling and integratedanalyses, and by exercises to develop conceptual models Baltic Sea foodwebsand the links to ecosystem function. Long-term monitoring datasets on the abiotic andbiotic parts of the Baltic Sea Proper ecosystem were updated for use in the continuedwork to develop environmental indicators for fisheries and marine management.The focus of the DEMO 3 (DEMOnstration exercise for Integrated Ecosystem Assessmentand Advice of Baltic Sea cod) was on finding a way to use the results from theDEMO1 and DEMO2 workshops in short and midterm projections/scenarios of Balticcod dynamics based on different types of modelling, as well as designing methodologyand modelling data for practical implementation of Integrated Advice for Baltic cod.The WGIAB was positively inclined towards including social and economic aspectsinto the integrated assessment. Openings to this path were provided by presentationon ongoing project work, and discussing their linkages to ecological aspects. It wasseen as crucial that experts on social and economic analysis should be included andtake an active part in the future work of the group.The group concluded that its upcoming work should focus more closely on functionaldiversity, which was identified as a recurring issue in the Baltic Sea. This approach wasalso identified as a useful connection point between scientific and management aspectsin order for the group to continue serving as a forum for developing ecosystem-basedmanagement efforts in the Baltic Sea. A focus on functional diversity was also seen as2 | ICES WGIAB REPORT 2015a potentially feasible way of bringing together management aspects for different sectors,by linking to ecosystem services concepts.The group proposed Saskia Otto, Germany and Martin Lindegren, Denmark as newincoming Chairs, together with Lena Bergström, Sweden and Laura Uusitalo, Finland.Having four Chairs is justified due to the wide scope of the group's work, as well asthe increased work load due to the planned new foci.

  • 10.
    Bignert, Anders
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bäcklin, Britt-Marie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    9. Contaminants and Health of Aquatic Wildlife2012Inngår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 73-85 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 11.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Oslo, Norway.
    Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Classifying fishers' behaviour. An invitation to fishing styles2016Inngår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 17, nr 1, 78-100 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The study and classification of fishers’ behaviour remains a much debated topic. There is a tension between detailed empirical studies, which highlight the variety and diversity of fisheries, and the parsimony and generalization required to satisfy science and policy demands. This study contributes to this debate. The first sec- tion reviews quantitative methods currently used for classifying fishing practices. The review uncovers significant weaknesses in quantitative classification methods, which, we argue, can be improved through the complementary use of qualitative methods. To this purpose, we introduce the concept of ‘fishing style’, which integrates quantitative classification methods with qualitative analysis. We explain the scientific premises of the fishing-style concept, outline a general methodological framework and present a fishing-style analysis of Swedish Baltic Sea fisheries. Based on these results, we conclude that it is possible to classify fishing practices in a rel- atively uniform and limited number of styles that can highlight the rich, empirical diversity of fishers’ behaviour. We therefore propose that fishing-style analysis, based on an integration of quantitative and qualitative methods, can be an impor- tant step towards more effective and sustainable fisheries management.

  • 12.
    Brüchert, Volker
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geologiska vetenskaper.
    Bonaglia, Stefano
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geologiska vetenskaper.
    Raymond, Caroline
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Sediment med nyckelroll i näringsväven2014Inngår i: HavsUtsikt, ISSN 1104-0513, Vol. 1, 20-21 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    I sedimenten sker processer som kan vara helt avgörande för näringsbalansen i havsvattnet. Omvandlingen av fosfor till olika former är relativt väl känd, medan detaljerna i kvävets kretslopp är betydligt mindre kända. Mer än hälften av den årliga tillförseln av kväve till Östersjön beräknas omsättas till kvävgas i sedimentet, vilket sedan går förlorat för de flesta marina organismer.

  • 13. Daewel, Ute
    et al.
    Hjøllo, Solfrid Saetre
    Huret, Martin
    Ji, Rubao
    Maar, Marie
    Niiranen, Susa
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Travers-Trolet, Morgane
    Peck, Myron A.
    van de Wolfshaar, Karen E.
    Predation control of zooplankton dynamics: a review of observations and models2014Inngår i: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 71, nr 2, 254-271 s.Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We performed a literature review to examine to what degree the zooplankton dynamics in different regional marine ecosystems across the Atlantic Ocean is driven by predation mortality and how the latter is addressed in available modelling approaches. In general, we found that predation on zooplankton plays an important role in all the six considered ecosystems, but the impacts are differently strong and occur at different spatial and temporal scales. In ecosystems with extreme environmental conditions (e.g. low temperature, ice cover, large seasonal amplitudes) and low species diversity, the overall impact of top-down processes on zooplankton dynamics is stronger than for ecosystems having moderate environmental conditions and high species diversity. In those ecosystems, predation mortality was found to structure the zooplankton mainly on local spatial and seasonal time scales. Modelling methods used to parameterize zooplankton mortality range from simplified approaches with fixed mortality rates to complex coupled multispecies models. The applicability of a specific method depends on both the observed state of the ecosystem and the spatial and temporal scales considered. Modelling constraints such as parameter uncertainties and computational costs need to be balanced with the ecosystem-specific demand for a consistent, spatial-temporal dynamic implementation of predation mortality on the zooplankton compartment.

  • 14.
    Drury O'Neill, Elizabeth
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Small-Scale Fisheries Governance: Broadening Perspectives on Markets, Relationships and Benefits in Seafood Trade2016Licentiatavhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate adresses the relative ambiguity surounding benefit flows from small-scale fisheries seafood trade with a specific focus on how they may be impacted by market and social stuctures. Small-scale fishery governenace has previously taken a narrowly approach to sustainability. Focused on managing fishing activities, economic-led market interventions and overlooking the embededness of the fishers within a broader social structure. Also failing to address fisheries as interlinked social-ecological systems where feedbacks between the two can impact future sustainability. The larger PhD project takes a step towards combining these two out-of-focus areas by taking a systems perspective, through a Value Chain approach, to fisheries governance, associated market influences and the consequent benefit flows from marine ecosystem services. This licentiate begins by unpacking dynamics within the social realm that may impact benefit flows and ultimately resource extraction decisions, potentially contributing to feedbacks from the marine ecosystem. Research uses mixed-methods and is case-orientated with sites across two tropical marine small-scale fisheries in Zanzibar and the Philippines. Results present two market environments with distinct structures, conduct, reciprocity systems and notably, gender roles. However both systems experience economic transactions underlain by broader social relations and binds. These various features manifest themselves in different, yet often unexpected, ways through income equalities, distributions and reciprocal networks of fishers and trading actors. Once a broadened and diversified view of the SSF trading environment is appropriated, it is clear that benefit flows are impacted by various contextual features (e.g. gender, transaction forms and buyer types). Governance-related research or interventions should incorporate undervalued local attributes such as cultural characteristics, social relationships and market participation as they play a role in who benefits from seafood trade. Thus If governance is to be improved for sustainably increasing food and livelihood security it is necessary to unpack these benefit flow mechanisms and, in particular, the local social dynamics that mediate fishers’ everyday interplay with the marine ecosystem. Future steps include the aim to identify potential social-ecological feedbacks between the disentangled market environments and the local marine ecosystems as a result of interactions in SSF trade. 

  • 15.
    Eero, Margit
    et al.
    National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Hjelm, Joakim
    Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Behrens, Jane
    National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Buchmann, Kurt
    Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cardinale, Massimiliano
    Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Casini, Michele
    Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Holmgren, Noél
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Horbowy, Jan
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Hüssy, Karin
    National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Kirkegaard, Eskil
    International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kornilovs, Georgs
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment “BIOR”, Riga, Latvia.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Köster, Friedrich W.
    National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Plikshs, Maris
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment “BIOR”, Riga, Latvia.
    Radtke, Krzysztof
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Raid, Tiit
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Schmidt, Jörn
    Department of Economics, Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Tomczak, Maciej T.
    Stockholm University, Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vinther, Morten
    National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Zimmermann, Christopher
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Eastern Baltic cod in distress: biological changes and challenges for stock assessment2015Inngår i: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 72, nr 8, 2180-2186 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The eastern Baltic (EB) cod (Gadus morhua) stock was depleted and overexploited for decades until the mid-2000s, when fishing mortality rapidlydeclined and biomass started to increase, as shown by stock assessments. These positive developments were partly assigned to effective managementmeasures, and the EB cod was considered one of the most successful stock recoveries in recent times. In contrast to this optimistic view, theanalytical stock assessment failed in 2014, leaving the present stock status unclear. Deteriorated quality of some basic input data for stock assessmentin combination with changes in environmental and ecological conditions has led to an unusual situation for cod in the Baltic Sea, which posesnew challenges for stock assessment and management advice.Anumber of adverse developments such as low nutritional condition and disappearanceof larger individuals indicate that the stock is in distress. In this study, we (i) summarize the knowledge of recent changes in cod biology andecosystem conditions, (ii) describe the subsequent challenges for stock assessment, and (iii) highlight the key questions where answers are urgentlyneeded to understand the present stock status and provide scientifically solid support for cod management in the Baltic Sea.

  • 16.
    Ekström, Sara M.
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Sandahl, Margareta
    Lund University.
    Nilsson, Per Anders
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper. Lund University.
    Kleja, Dan B.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Kritzberg, Emma S.
    Lund University.
    Reactivity of dissolved organic matter in response to acid deposition2016Inngår i: Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 1015-1621, E-ISSN 1420-9055, Vol. 78, nr 3, 463-475 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Fluvial export of organic matter from the terrestrial catchment to the aquatic system is a large and increasing carbon flux. The successful reduction in sulfuric acid deposition since the 1980s has been shown to enhance the mobility of organic matter in the soil, with more terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) reaching aquatic systems. Changes in soil acidity also affect the quality of the DOM. In this study we explore the consequences this may have on the reactivity and turnover of the terrestrially derived DOM as it reaches the aquatic system. DOM of different quality (estimated by absorbance, fluorescence and size exclusion chromatography) was produced through extraction of boreal forest O-horizon soils from podzol at two sulfuric acid concentrations corresponding to natural throughfall in spruce forest in Southern Sweden around 1980 and today. Extraction was done using two different methods, i.e. field leaching and laboratory extraction. The DOM extracts were used to assess if differences in acidity generate DOM of different reactivity. Three reactivity experiments were performed: photodegradation by UV exposure, biodegradation by bacteria, and biodegradation after UV exposure. Reactivity was assessed by measuring loss of dissolved organic carbon and absorbance, change in fluorescence and molecular weight, and bacterial production. DOM extracted at lower sulfuric acid concentration was more susceptible to photooxidation, and less susceptible to bacterial degradation, than DOM extracted at a higher sulfuric acid concentration. Thus the relative importance of these two turnover processes may be altered with changes in acid deposition.

  • 17.
    Ericsson, Anna
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för livsvetenskaper.
    Water Availability and Distribution in Africa: Effects of the IFAD irrigation scheme in Kiru Valley, Tanzania2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    The case study was made in the area of Kiru Valley, Tanzania, in order to study the conflicts over the water in the river Dodumera, and also to understand how the villages Mawemairo, Matufa and Mapea have been affected by the construction of the IFAD irrigation scheme. The aim was to connect the conflicts in the area with a general view of how water can create such conflicts. The method used in the case study was semi-structured interviews. The results from the interviews made with farmers and officials in Kiru Valley was analysed through general theories about water conflicts and theories about governing common-pool resources, such as Ostrom’s eight principles and the theory the Tragedy of the Commons. The analysis was also made through the IFAD poverty reduction strategy programme (PRSP). The conclusion made on the basis of this analysis was that the IFAD project, in Kiru Valley, was in correlation with the PRSP and an attempt to reduce poverty in the two villages Mawemairo and Matufa. The project has been very successful and has contributed to an increase of livelihood and development in the villages. However, the scheme has also affected other villages, such as Mapea. The scheme has contributed to a decrease of water availability in the Dodumera River for Mapea. Nowadays they only rely on rain-fed irrigation. The conflicts have been affected by the scheme, not so much in the quantity of the conflicts but more in the target of the conflicts. Before the construction of the scheme the conflicts was directed at the big-scale farmers, now they are directed at the scheme. On the other hand, the scheme has helped reducing the conflicts between the farmers in Mawemairo and Matufa. There are solutions to conflicts and water scarcity, such as more efficient irrigation techniques and Ostrom’s principles on governing the common-pool resources.

  • 18.
    Eriksson, Hampus
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. University of Sydney, Australia.
    Byrne, Maria
    The sea cucumber fishery in Australia's Great Barrier Reef Marine Park follows global patterns of serial exploitation2015Inngår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 16, nr 2, 329-341 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Tropical sea cucumber fisheries follow a predictable pattern of serial depletion. Overfishing is exacerbated in developing countries where management systems lack capacity to control large numbers of fishers influenced by poverty. In contrast, the tropical sea cucumber fishery in Australia's World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP) is operating in a developed high-income country with relatively few licensed fishers to manage. The development of this fishery is reviewed here in a meta-analysis of catches from 1991 to 2011. The fishery expanded to replace high-value teatfish species (Holothuria whitmaei and H.fuscogilva), fished heavily in initial stages of the fishery, with newly commercialized medium-value species such as burying blackfish (Actinopyga spinea) and curryfish (Stichopus herrmanni). These two species now constitute 80% of total catch. The annual average catch of burying blackfish was 208tonnes years 2004-11 and curryfish catches increased rapidly at an average annual pace of 200% from 2007-11. This serial harvest pattern occurred in the absence of baseline studies and without independent resource assessments, information required to inform relevant harvest predictions and to determine fishery impacts. This situation does not support ecologically relevant and adaptive decision-making in management and the unfolding catch patterns in the GBRMP follow those in low-income developing countries. The missing knowledge and lack of data serve as arguments to support precautionary reductions in harvests and extending fallow periods in fishing zones.

  • 19. Eriksson, Lars-Ove
    et al.
    Alanärä, Anders
    Andersson, Staffan
    Myter och sanningar om svensk fiskodling2003Inngår i: Torskar torsken? Forskare och fiskare om fisk och fiske / [ed] Birgitta Johansson, Stockholm: Formas , 2003, 103-111 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 20.
    Evans, Sverker
    The Swedish Agency for Marine and Water Management, Göteborg, Sweden.
    10. Shipping and Oil Production2012Inngår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 86-93 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 21.
    Faulks, L. K.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Östman, O.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Inst Coastal Res, Dept Aquat Resources, Skolvagen 6, S-74242 Oregrund, Sweden..
    Adaptive major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and neutral genetic variation in two native Baltic Sea fishes (perch Perca fluviatilis and zander Sander lucioperca) with comparisons to an introduced and disease susceptible population in Australia (P-fluviatilis): assessing the risk of disease epidemics2016Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 88, nr 4, 1564-1583 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assessed the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and neutral genetic variation and structure in two percid species, perch Perca fluviatilis and zander Sander lucioperca, in a unique brackish ecosystem, the Baltic Sea. In addition, to assess the importance of MHC diversity to disease susceptibility in these populations, comparisons were made to an introduced, disease susceptible, P. fluviatilis population in Australia. Eighty-three MHC class II B exon 2 variants were amplified: 71 variants from 92 P. fluviatilis samples, and 12 variants from 82 S. lucioperca samples. Microsatellite and MHC data revealed strong spatial genetic structure in S. lucioperca, but not P. fluviatilis, across the Baltic Sea. Both microsatellite and MHC data showed higher levels of genetic diversity in P. fluviatilis from the Baltic Sea compared to Australia, which may have facilitated the spread of an endemic virus, EHNV in the Australian population. The relatively high levels of genetic variation in the Baltic Sea populations, together with spatial genetic structure, however, suggest that there currently seems to be little risk of disease epidemics in this system. To ensure this remains the case in the face of ongoing environmental changes, fisheries and habitat disturbance, the conservation of local-scale genetic variation is recommended.

  • 22.
    Fitzsimons, John D.
    et al.
    Great Lakes Laboratory for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Burlington, Canada.
    Wolgamood, Martha
    Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Mattawan, MI, USA.
    Madenjian, Charles P.
    United States Geological Survey, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    Bunnell, David B.
    United States Geological Survey, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    20. Thiamine Deficiency in Aquatic Food Chains: The Cumulative Result of Ecosystem Disruption by Clupeids?2012Inngår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 167-180 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 23.
    Folkesson, Malin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturgeografi och kvartärgeologi (INK).
    Towards a Sustainable Fisheries Management: How to address uncertainty in order to achieve a sustainable development of regional fisheries management2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 poäng / 45 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Fisheries management is not only about managing the resource fish, but also includes managing the social system. Aquatic ecosystems and the social system are both complex and change continuously. It is important to address what types of uncertainty the combination of both systems, complex socio-ecological systems leads to, their consequences and how these should be dealt with. Successful or unsuccessful management outcomes are difficult to address whether or not they are due to management efforts or natural changes. In addition, uncertainties often lead to a short-term management, since lack of knowledge makes it difficult to act in a long-term perspective. This thesis conceptualizes how to address different types of uncertainty prevalent in fisheries management, with focus on natural process uncertainty, measurement and estimation uncertainty, decision and implementation uncertainty, and institutional and regime uncertainty.  This was done by analyzing how three theoretical approaches, namely co-management, adaptive management and adaptive co-management address these uncertainties. In order to highlight how different types of uncertainty have been dealt with in practice, a case study on the fishery management in Lake Vättern has been made.

    A comparison between the literature study and this thesis’ case study shows that hypothesis-testing, cooperation, communication and transparency are corresponding factors on how to deal with uncertainties in fisheries management and that institutional and regime uncertainty is inadequately addressed in Sweden.

  • 24.
    Gallardo Fernández, Gloria L.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Uppsala centrum för hållbar utveckling, CSD Uppsala.
    From Seascapes of Extinction to Seascapes of Confidence: Territorial Use Rights in Fisheries in Chile: El Quisco and Puerto Oscuro2008Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In Chile, the indiscriminate harvest for export of the edible shellfish, Concholepas concholepas or false abalone, propelled by a neo-liberal market economy during the 1970s, almost led to the extinction of the species, thereby threatening the dependant small-scale artisan fishers’ survival as well as the ecosystem. To reverse this, fishers’ organizations in Chile have adopted the state created regulatory measure, Management and Exploitation Areas for Benthic Resources (MEABR; locally known as Management Areas -- MAs). Replacing the former unsuccessful fishing regulatory measurements, the MEABR regime empowers the fishers with exclusive territorial use rights (TURF) to manage the species, often under commons institutions, thus creating new seascapes of confidence. However, as is often the case with new solutions, emergent problems are posed that threaten to undermine the reform. With the new regulated extraction measure and geographical expansion of this novel labour and production alternative, fishers experience a transition from ‘nomadic’ to sedentary fishing leading to a transformation of their lifestyle and skills. If MAs become permanent, fishing in rural areas may lead to tensions as the fishers settle on coastal lands without entitlement, or are hindered from developing their own fisheries infrastructure. The legal system does not seem to fully foresee the consequences of the reform, and prevailing power relations and private property rights work to disadvantage the fishers. Using a participatory approach for the first research location of El Quisco (Valparaíso Region), and interviews with key informants for the second research location of Puerto Oscuro (Coquimbo Region), fishers’ views of the Chilean TURF were evaluated. How fishers perceive this experience should be central for the success or failure of the MAs as a viable alternative to the earlier conditions of open access. While the assessment of El Quisco deals more with the performance of the MA, Puerto Oscuro is used to portray the seascapes of conflict that have emerged as ownership of the coastal land is contested. The study shows that while the reform has brought better incomes from the benthic resources, the overall economic importance of the MAs for the fishers is reduced relative to the incomes coming from fishing activities realized outside the MAs. Experiences in both cases have been otherwise positive in terms of the recuperation of the species, ecological concerns and strengthening fishers’ so-called soft assets. Nevertheless, many problems remain, among them the problem of access to the sea border and those related to ambiguous land rights to support coastal settlement and fishing infrastructure development.

  • 25.
    Gallardo Fernández, Gloria L.
    Uppsala universitet.
    From Seascapes of Extinction to Seascapes of Confidence: Territorial Use Rights in Fisheries in Chile: El Quisco and Puerto Oscuro2008Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In Chile, the indiscriminate harvest for export of the edible shellfish, Concholepas concholepas or false abalone, propelled by a neo-liberal market economy during the 1970s, almost led to the extinction of the species, thereby threatening the dependant small-scale artisan fishers’ survival as well as the ecosystem. To reverse this, fishers’ organizations in Chile have adopted the state created regulatory measure, Management and Exploitation Areas for Benthic Resources (MEABR; locally known as Management Areas -- MAs). Replacing the former unsuccessful fishing regulatory measurements, the MEABR regime empowers the fishers with exclusive territorial use rights (TURF) to manage the species, often under commons institutions, thus creating new seascapes of confidence. However, as is often the case with new solutions, emergent problems are posed that threaten to undermine the reform. With the new regulated extraction measure and geographical expansion of this novel labour and production alternative, fishers experience a transition from ‘nomadic’ to sedentary fishing leading to a transformation of their lifestyle and skills. If MAs become permanent, fishing in rural areas may lead to tensions as the fishers settle on coastal lands without entitlement, or are hindered from developing their own fisheries infrastructure. The legal system does not seem to fully foresee the consequences of the reform, and prevailing power relations and private property rights work to disadvantage the fishers. Using a participatory approach for the first research location of El Quisco (Valparaíso Region), and interviews with key informants for the second research location of Puerto Oscuro (Coquimbo Region), fishers’ views of the Chilean TURF were evaluated. How fishers perceive this experience should be central for the success or failure of the MAs as a viable alternative to the earlier conditions of open access. While the assessment of El Quisco deals more with the performance of the MA, Puerto Oscuro is used to portray the seascapes of conflict that have emerged as ownership of the coastal land is contested. The study shows that while the reform has brought better incomes from the benthic resources, the overall economic importance of the MAs for the fishers is reduced relative to the incomes coming from fishing activities realized outside the MAs. Experiences in both cases have been otherwise positive in terms of the recuperation of the species, ecological concerns and strengthening fishers’ so-called soft assets. Nevertheless, many problems remain, among them the problem of access to the sea border and those related to ambiguous land rights to support coastal settlement and fishing infrastructure development.

  • 26.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Restaurang- och hotellhögskolan - Grythytte akademi.
    Stålhammar, BörjeÖrebro universitet, Musikhögskolan.
    Kultur och identitet: doktorandkurs i spetsen "Sinnena och konsten"2004Collection/Antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 27. Gårdmark, Anna
    et al.
    Casini, Michele
    Huss, Magnus
    van Leeuwen, Anieke
    Hjelm, Joakim
    Persson, Lennart
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    de Roos, André M.
    Regime shifts in exploited marine food webs: detecting mechanisms underlying alternative stable states using size-structured community dynamics theory2015Inngår i: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 370, nr 1659, 20130262- s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Many marine ecosystems have undergone 'regime shifts', i.e. abrupt reorganizations across trophic levels. Establishing whether these constitute shifts between alternative stable states is of key importance for the prospects of ecosystem recovery and for management. We show how mechanisms underlying alternative stable states caused by predator-prey interactions can be revealed in field data, using analyses guided by theory on size-structured community dynamics. This is done by combining data on individual performance (such as growth and fecundity) with information on population size and prey availability. We use Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and their prey in the Baltic Sea as an example to discuss and distinguish two types of mechanisms, 'cultivation-depensation' and 'overcompensation', that can cause alternative stable states preventing the recovery of overexploited piscivorous fish populations. Importantly, the type of mechanism can be inferred already from changes in the predators' body growth in different life stages. Our approach can thus be readily applied to monitored stocks of piscivorous fish species, for which this information often can be assembled. Using this tool can help resolve the causes of catastrophic collapses in marine predatory-prey systems and guide fisheries managers on how to successfully restore collapsed piscivorous fish stocks.

  • 28.
    Hansen, Joakim
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Botaniska institutionen. Växtekologi.
    Robertson-Andersson, Deborah
    Troell, Max
    Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Control of the herbivorous gastropod Fissurella mutabilis (Sow.) in a land-based integrated abalone-seaweed culture2006Inngår i: Aquaculture, Vol. 255, nr 1-4, 384-388 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 29.
    Hedberg, Nils
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Sea cages, seaweeds and seascapes: Causes and consequences of spatial links between aquaculture and ecosystems2017Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Aquaculture is of growing importance in the global seafood production. The environmental impact of aquaculture will largely depend on the type of environment in which the aquaculture system is placed. Sometimes, due to the abiotic or biotic conditions of the seascape, certain aquaculture systems tend to be placed within or near specific ecosystems, a phenomenon that in this thesis is referred to as aquaculture system - ecosystem links. The exposed ecosystems can be more or less sensitive to the system specific impacts. Some links are known to be widespread and especially hazardous for the subjected ecosystem such as the one between the shrimp aquaculture and the mangrove forest ecosystem. The aim of this thesis was to identify and investigate causes and consequences of other spatial links between aquaculture and ecosystems in the tropical seascape.

    Two different aquaculture system - ecosystem links were identified by using high resolution satellite maps and coastal habitat maps; the link between sea cage aquaculture and coral reefs, and the one between seaweed farms and seagrass beds. This was followed by interviews with the sea cage- and seaweed farmers to find the drivers behind the farm site selection. Many seaweed farmers actively choose to establish their farms on sea grass beds but sea cage farmers did not consider coral reefs when choosing location for their farms. The investigated environmental consequences of the spatial link between sea cage aquaculture and coral reefs were considerable both on the local coral reef structure, and coral associated bacterial community. Furthermore, coral reef associated fish are used as seedlings and feed on the farms, which likely alter the coral food web and lower the ecosystem resilience. Unregulated use of last resort antibiotics in both fish- and lobster farms were also found to be a wide spread practice within the sea cage aquaculture system, suggesting a high risk for development of antibiotic resistant bacteria. The effects of seaweed farms on seagrass beds were not studied in this thesis but have earlier been shown to be rather substantial within the borders of the farm but less so outside the farm.

    Further, a nomenclature is presented to facilitate the discussion about production system - ecosystem links, which may also be used to be able to incorporate the landscape level within eco-certifying schemes or environmental risk assessments. Finally - increased awareness of the mechanisms that link specific aquaculture to specific habitats, would improve management practices and increase sustainability of an important and still growing food producing sector - the marine aquaculture.

  • 30.
    Hedberg, Nils
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Stenson, Isabell
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Nitz Pettersson, Mika
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Warshan, Denis
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Nguyen-Kim, Hanh
    Tedengren, Michael
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Kautsky, Nils
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Antibiotic use on Vietnamese fish and lobster sea cage farms and implications for the coral reef environment and human healthManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 31.
    Hedberg, Nils
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    von Schreeb, Kristina
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Charisiadou, Stefania
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för biokemi och biofysik.
    Jiddawi, Narriman
    Tedengren, Micael
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Mtwana Nordlund, Lina
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Habitat preference for seaweed farming – a case study from Zanzibar, TanzaniaManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 32.
    Hellström, Anders
    et al.
    National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Chukalova, Natalia
    AtlantNiro, Kaliningrad, Russia.
    Rodjuk, Galina
    AtlantNiro, Kaliningrad, Russia.
    Ekman, Elisabet
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Norrgren, Leif
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    8. Aquaculture and Fish Health2012Inngår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 63-72 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 33.
    Henricksson, Oskar
    et al.
    Södertörn University College.
    Mwandya, Augustine
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Gullström, Martin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Population genetics structure of juvenile Mugil cephalus around Zanzibar and Bagamoyo (Tanzania) reveals multiple genetic demesManuskript (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing demand for wild caught juvenile fish to supply the market for aquaculture. However, little is known about the genetic effects of juvenile collection from wild populations. There are a number of imminent threats to both aquaculture systems and wild populations. Juvenile collection from a single population can for example reduce population’s evolutionary potential as well as the disease resistance within an aquaculture pond. In this study, we investigated the local genetic structure of juvenile Mugil cephalus collected from six sites around Bagamoyo (Tanzanian mainland) and Zanzibar Island, East Africa. Fish were caught in low tide using a seine net. All fish collected were juveniles with a total length ranging between 7 and 14 cm (mean length of about 10 cm). Samples were analyzed using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP), and the Bayesian assignment test implemented in the STRUCTURE 2.2 software was applied to detect if sites were composed of several genetic demes. Our results indicate that all sites contain several different genetic demes suggesting that juvenile collection from a single site may neither harm the genetic diversity of wild M. cephalus nor reduce its disease resistance within an aquaculture system. By collecting juvenile fish from a single site one will in effect harvest juveniles from several genetic lineages.

  • 34.
    Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hjelm, J.
    Can fisheries management be quantified?2014Inngår i: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 48, 18-20 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Policy efforts to reduce fisheries impact have often created micro-management. Detailed regulations are restricting the fishing industry, and are also acknowledged to limit the progress towards sustainable management. Industry representatives, political bodies and scientists have therefore argued for more simplicity and transparency. Here, fisheries management is quantified in terms of trends in regulations for different Swedish fisheries in the Baltic Sea during the period 1995–2009. The results suggest that many fisheries are suffering from increased micro-management, but interestingly some fisheries showing a different trend.

  • 35.
    Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hjelm, J.
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Does fisheries management incentivize non-compliance? Estimated misreporting in the Swedish Baltic Sea pelagic fishery based on commercial fishing effort2014Inngår i: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 71, nr 7, 1846-1853 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Fisheries management agencies and fishing industry representatives depend on reliable estimates of fish biomass and mortality for the determin- ation of sustainable catch levels. Lack of data or misreporting may be reasons for unreliable stock assessment, which, in turn, may result in advice that does not reflect the availability of fisheries resources. It has been suggested that the mixed pelagic trawl fisheries in the Baltic represent a case of biased estimates of fish biomass and mortality resulting from misreporting. Here, we estimate the degree of misreporting in the Swedish pelagic fishery (1996 – 2009) and propose an approach for reconstructing historical catches based on commercial effort data. The analysis suggests that total catches have been underestimated during part of our study period and that systematic misreporting of species composition has taken place over the whole study period. The analysis also suggests that there is overcapacity in the fishery and that such economic incentive could explain the general patterns of misreporting. Applying our method for fisheries with suspected misreporting could significantly improve assessment accuracy, reduce uncertainty and thereby allow for a better link between catches and resource levels. 

  • 36.
    Hernroth, Bodil
    et al.
    Royal Swedish Acad Sci, Sven Loven Ctr Marine Sci, Kristineberg 566, SE-45178 Fiskebackskil, Sweden;Kristianstad Univ, Dept Nat Sci, SE-29188 Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Baden, Susanne
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Kristineberg 566, SE-45178 Fiskebackskil, Sweden.
    Tassidis, Helena
    Kristianstad Univ, Dept Nat Sci, SE-29188 Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Hörnaeus, Katarina
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - BMC, Analytisk kemi.
    Guillemant, Julie
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - BMC, Analytisk kemi.
    Bergström Lind, Sara
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - BMC, Analytisk kemi.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - BMC, Analytisk kemi.
    Impact of ocean acidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) 2016Inngår i: Fish and Shellfish Immunology, ISSN 1050-4648, E-ISSN 1095-9947, Vol. 55, 452-459 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we aimed to investigate potential effects of ocean acidification on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity in the gills of Mytilus edulis, as gills are directly facing seawater and the changing pH (predicted to be reduced from ~8.1 to ~7.7 by 2100). The AMP activity of gill and haemocyte extracts was compared at pH 6.0, 7.7 and 8.1, with a radial diffusion assay against Escherichia coli. The activity of the gill extracts was not affected by pH, while it was significantly reduced with increasing pH in the haemocyte extracts. Gill extracts were also tested against different species of Vibrio (V. parahaemolyticus V. tubiashii, V. splendidus and V. alginoyticus) at pH 7.7 and 8.1. The metabolic activity of the bacteria decreased by ~65-90%, depending on species of bacteria, but was, as in the radial diffusion assay, not affected by pH. The results indicated that AMPs from gills are efficient in a broad pH-range. However, when mussels were pre-exposed for pH 7.7 for four month the gill extracts presented significantly lower inhibit of bacterial growth. A full in-depth proteome investigation of gill extracts, using LC-Orbitrap MS/MS technique, showed that among previously described AMPs from haemocytes of Mytilus, myticin A was found up-regulated in response to lipopolysaccharide, 3 h post injection. Sporadic occurrence of other immune related peptides/proteins also pointed to a rapid response (0.5- 3 h p.i.). Altogether, our results indicate that the gills of blue mussels constitute an important first line defence adapted to act at the pH of seawater. The antimicrobial activity of the gills is however modulated when mussels are under the pressure of ocean acidification, which may give future advantages for invading pathogens.

  • 37.
    Hinrichsen, Hans-Harald
    et al.
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Ctr Ocean Res Kiel, Dusternbrooker Weg 20, D-24105 Kiel, Germany..
    Petereit, Christoph
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Ctr Ocean Res Kiel, Dusternbrooker Weg 20, D-24105 Kiel, Germany..
    Nissling, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Limnologi.
    Wallin, Isa
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik.
    Ustups, Didzis
    Inst Food Safety Anim Hlth & Environm BIOR, Daugavgrivas Str 8, LV-1048 Riga, Latvia..
    Florin, Ann-Britt
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Resources, Inst Coastal Res, Skolgatan 6, S-74242 Oregrund, Sweden..
    Survival and dispersal variability of pelagic eggs and yolk-sac larvae of central and eastern baltic flounder (Platichthys flesus): application of biophysical models2017Inngår i: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 74, nr 1, 41-55 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A hydrodynamic model coupled with a Lagrangian particle tracking technique was utilized to simulate spatially and temporally resolved long-term environmentally related (i) size of habitat suitable for reproduction, (ii) egg/yolk-sac larval survival, (iii) separation of causes of mortality, and (iv) connectivity between spawning areas of Baltic flounder with pelagiceggs. Information on reproduction habitat requirements and mortality sources were obtained from field or laboratory studies. In our modelling study we only quantified physical processes generating heterogeneity in spatial distribution of eggs and yolk-sac larvae, as e.g. predation is not accounted for. The spatial extent of eggs and larvae represented as modelled particles is primarily determined by oxygen and salinity conditions. The reproduction habitat most suitable was determined for the Gdansk Deep, followed by the Bornholm Basin. Relatively low habitat suitability was obtained for the Arkona Basin and the Gotland Basin. The model runs also showed yolk-sac larval survival to be to a large extent affected by sedimentation. Eggs initially released in the Arkona Basin and Bornholm Basin are strongly affected by sedimentation compared with those released in the Gdansk Deep and Gotland Basin. Highest relative survival of eggs occurred in the Gdansk Deep and in the Bornholm Basin. Relatively low survival rates in the Gotland Basin were attributable to oxygen-dependent mortality. Oxygen content had almost no impact on survival in the Arkona Basin. For all spawning areas mortality caused by lethally low temperatures was only evident after severe winters. Buoyancy of eggs and yolk-sac larvae in relation to topographic features appear as a barrier for the transport of eggs and yolk-sac larvae and potentially limits the connectivity of early life stages between the different spawning areas.

  • 38.
    Holmgren, Noél M. A.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Norrström, Niclas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Aps, Robert
    University of Tartu, Estonian Marine Institute, Tallin, Estonia.
    Kuikka, Sakari
    Fisheries and Environmental Management Group, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    MSY-orientated management of Baltic Sea herring (Clupea harengus) during different ecosystem regimes2012Inngår i: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 69, nr 2, 257-266 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Baltic Sea ecosystem has undergone dramatic changes, so-called ecosystem regime shifts, during the past four decades. Baltic Sea herring (Clupea harengus) spawning-stock biomass has declined to a third, and weight-at-age has halved as a result of food shortages and competition with sprat (Sprattus sprattus). The management objective for the herring stock is currently in transition from precautionary to maximum sustainable yield (MSY). The main basin Baltic Sea herring was modelled under the current ecosystem regime and the effect of a recovery of the cod (Gadus morhua) stock and the availability of planktonic food to levels found in the early 1980s analysed. A target of F-MSY = 0.16 for herring, which should decline to F-MSY = 0.10 with recovery of the cod stock, is proposed. An increase in the availability of planktonic food is estimated to more than double the yield at F-MSY = 0.27, overriding the negative effects of cod predation should there be a simultaneous increase in both cod and availability of planktonic food. The estimated net increase in yield is 40% at F-MSY = 0.20. Functions are presented to calculate FMSY and to estimate the expected yield depending on the abundance of cod and food availability. Retrospective application of the functions is indicative of overfishing of herring in the 1990s and early 2000s, and a net loss in yield, with a landing value of some E440 million.

  • 39.
    Howell, Daniel
    et al.
    Institute of Marine Research, Nordnes, Norway.
    Mackinson, Steve
    CEFAS, United Kingdom.
    Kempf, Alexander
    Thuenen Institute of Sea Fisheries, Hamburg, Germany.
    Rindorf, Anna
    DTU-Aqua, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Belgrano, Andrea
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden / Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment (SIME), Göteborg, Sweden.
    Thorpe, Robert
    Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS), United Kingdom.
    Vinther, Morten
    DTU-Aqua, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Bartolino, Valerio
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Pope, John
    NRC (Europe) Ltd.
    Rodriguez, Alfonso Perez
    Institute of Marine Research, Nordnes, Norway.
    Garcia, Clement
    Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS), United Kingdom.
    Lehuta, Sigrid
    French Institut of Research for the Exploitation of the Sea (Ifremer), Nantes, France .
    Kaplan, Isaac
    NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, USA.
    Gaichas, Sarah
    NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, USA.
    Kiersten, Curti
    NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, USA.
    Lucey, Sean
    Dept. of Commerce/NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, USA.
    Gamble, Robert
    NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, USA.
    Cole, Harriet
    Marine Lab, Marine Scotland Science, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.
    Lindstrom, Ulf
    Instittute of Marine Research, Tromsø, Norway.
    Holmgren, Noel
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Villanueva, Ching
    French Institut of Research for the Exploitation of the Sea (Ifremer), Plouzané, France.
    Poos, Jan Jaap
    IMARES, IJmuiden, The Netherlands.
    Report of the Working Group on Multispecies Assessment Methods (WGSAM), 9–13 November 2015, Woods Hole, USA2016Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Three meetings were held between 2013 and 2015 (Stockholm, London and Woods Hole), with progress being made on all the Terms of Reference. WGSAM has been making significant contributions required to enable ICES to develop its capability to give advice on the ecosystem impacts of fishing and climate change. This is a priority area identified in the ICES strategic plan and is consistent with scientific needs to support implementation of the Common Fisheries Policy and Marine Strategy Framework Directive. This final report summarises the key progress made against each ToR. A particularly important area established during this period has been the discussions that have led to guidelines on quality assurance of ecosystem models in-tended for advice giving. WGSAM prepared a specific briefing on this issue and con-tinues to work on issues related to model review processes, model validation and developing methods for generating advice from multi-model ensembles. These are all important areas of work in the evolution toward giving integrated, ecosystem-based advice to ICES clients. We recommend that ICES supports continuation of WGSAM new ToRs and considers more specifically how to support WGSAM in developing advice relevant products.

  • 40.
    Hultén, Hilda
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för svenska, retorik och journalistik.
    Sportfiske är stort vid Stockholms ström2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [sv]

    För den som vill fiska i Strömmen är det bara att ta sitt fiskespö och gå dit, fisket har varit fritt för allmänheten sedan 1436. Men sportfisket är inte okontroversiellt, all lax och öring i Strömmen är inplanterad och hotar de naturliga fiskbestånden i länet. Och man bör akta sig - fiske kan vara beroendeframkallande.

  • 41.
    Jude, David J.
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    18. Fisheries, Aquaculture and Exotic Species of the Laurentian Great Lakes2012Inngår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 149-162 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 42.
    Karpushevskaia, Anastasiia
    et al.
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Nielsen, Anders
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Mikhaylov, Andrey
    Atlantic Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography (AtlantNIRO), Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Florin, Ann-Britt
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Albert, Anu
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Berg, Casper Willestofte
    DTU Aqua National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Ustups, Didzis
    Institute of Food Safety Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Svecovs, Fausts
    Institute of Food Safety Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Bastardie, François
    DTU Aqua, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Kornilovs, Georgs
    Institute of Food Safety Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Strods, Guntars
    Institute of Food Safety Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Strehlow, Harry Vincent
    Thünen Institute, Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Degel, Henrik
    DTU Aqua, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Section for Monitoring and Data, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Karpushevskiy, Igor
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Sics, Ivo
    Institute of Food Safety Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Horbowy, Jan
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Raitaniemi, Jari
    Natural Resources Institute Finland, Turku, Finland.
    Boje, Jesper
    DTU Aqua, Arctic Section, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Hjelm, Joakim
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Pönni, Jukka
    Natural Resources Institute Finland, Natural resources and bioproduction, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hommik, Kristiina
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Öhman, Kristin
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Radtke, Krzysztof
    National Marine Fisheries, Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Eero, Margit
    DTU Aqua, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Plikshs, Maris
    Institute of Food Safety Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Riga, Latvia.
    Pedersen, Martin Wæver
    DTU Aqua, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Bergenius, Mikaela
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Noél
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Kaljuste, Olavi
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Afanasyev, Pavel
    Atlantic Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography (AtlantNIRO), Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Jounela, Pekka
    Natural Resources Institute Finland, Statistical methods, Turku Finland.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute, Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Statkus, Romas
    Fisheries Service under the Ministry of Agriculture, Division of Fisheries Research and Science, Klaipeda, Lithuania.
    Carlshamre, Sofia
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Jonusas, Stanislovas
    European Commission Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Brussels, Belgium.
    Neuenfeldt, Stefan
    DTU Aqua, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Section for Fisheries Advice Population Ecology and Genetics, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Stoetera, Sven
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Smolinski, Szymon
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Raid, Tiit
    Estonian Marine Institute University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Arula, Timo
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Dept. of Ecodynamics, Lootsiza, Estonia.
    Gröhsler, Tomas
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Zolubas, Tomas
    Fisheries Service under the Ministry of Agriculture, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Amosova, Viktoriia
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Grygiel, Wlodzimierz
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Pekcan-Hekim, Zeynep
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Mirny, Zuzanna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Report of the Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group (WGBFAS), 12-19 April 2016, ICES HQ, Copenhagen, Denmark2016Rapport (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 43.
    Kullander, Sven
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för zoologi.
    The need for fish taxonomy in biodiversity and fishery assessment and management2014Inngår i: Fish identification tools for biodiversity and fisheries assessments: Review and guidance for decision-makers / [ed] Johanne Fischer, Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), 2014, 52-53 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 44.
    Levengood, Jeffrey M.
    et al.
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    Martineau, Daniel
    University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada.
    11. Geological, Hydrological and Anthropogenic Features2012Inngår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 97-100 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 45.
    Lundin, Mikael
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för elektronik, matematik och naturvetenskap. Dept. of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU).
    Size selection of fish in the trap fisheries of the Baltic and Bothnian Seas2014Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    A sustainable fishery in the Baltic Sea requires fishing gear that fishes selectively and at the same time excludes raiding seals. A successful type of trap recently developed in response to the seal problem is the pontoon fish chamber, which significantly decreases damage to gear and catch losses caused by grey seals. However, a common problem with traps is the bycatch of juvenile and non-marketable fish which constitutes a threat to the sustainability of the fishery and a time-consuming problem for the fishers. This thesis deal with bycatch reduction of young herring, whitefish and perch in pontoon traps. Rigid grids and square mesh panels were installed in traps during commercial fishing operations and continuously monitored with underwater cameras. The selection efficiencies were calculated for different species and selection panel designs. The importance of abiotic and biotic factors for the selection efficiency, the diurnal activity levels of species, and the positions of escape through a selection panel were analysed. This thesis also addresses the survival changes of herring after being released from a trap and the potential size-structuring effects on the herring stock after a size-selective fishery. The results showed that several tonnes of young fish were able to escape through selection panels from the traps during a season. 70-80% of young herring and whitefish escaped through an encircling selection panel while 90-100% of young perch and roach escaped through a rigid grid. Both biotic and abiotic factors were influencing the selection efficiency of herring. The factors which had most effect were the quantity of fish in the trap, the season of the year, the time of day, and the presence of seals. The diurnal activities were significantly different between species. Herring and roach preferred to escape during night while perch escaped mostly during dusk and dawn. The passing through a rigid grid did not affect the short term mortality of young herring and the risk that extensive use of traps will induce selection for phenotypic changes in mature herring, leading to an evolutionary change on the Bothnian Sea herring population is low. The overall conclusion of this thesis is that bycatch can be reduced by equipping traps with selection panels. The appropriate design of the selection panel depends mainly on the behaviour and physiology of the fish. The survival changes of released fish seem high and the risk that extensive use of size-selective traps will induce evolutionary changes on the herring stock is low.

  • 46.
    Lundin, Mikael
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för elektronik, matematik och naturvetenskap. Institutionen för vilt, fisk och miljö, Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Size-selection of herring (Clupea harengus membras) in a sustainable fishery2012Licentiatavhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 47.
    Macarus, David P
    United States Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL, USA.
    13. Contaminants in Great Lakes Environs2012Inngår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 104-115 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 48.
    Mandari, Zamda
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle.
    Perception and realities of biofuels investment in rural livelihood: the case of Kisarawe district,Tanzania2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 poäng / 45 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Increase demand for biofuel in the world as the means to mitigate global climate change, energy option and reduced fule import expenses have attracted many companies to acquire land in developing countries like Tanzania. To invest on biofuel in Africa is believed to be a means for generating incomes from expert, to employ rural people, enhance infrastructure development.However, in Africa biofuels policy is still weak.

    This study mainly focuses on people`s expectation during and after the investment.Issue of compensation procedure and promises seems to be a big problem; something brought tension of being cheated among local communities. Futhermore, community involvement and integration of jatropha with smallholder´s agriculture is also low.

  • 49.
    Martineau, Daniel
    University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada.
    19. Fisheries of the St Lawrence River, Estuary and Gulf2012Inngår i: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 163-166 s.Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 50.
    Martínez Barrio, Álvaro
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi, Molekylär evolution. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Lamichhaney, Sangeet
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fan, Guangyi
    State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Macau, China; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzen, China; 5 College of Physics, Qingdao University, Qingdao, China .
    Rafati, Nima
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pettersson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhang, He
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzen, China; College of Physics, Qingdao University, Qingdao, China.
    Dainat, Jacques
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ekman, Diana
    Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University.
    Höppner, Marc P.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jern, Patric
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Martin, Marcel
    Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University.
    Nystedt, Björn
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi, Molekylär evolution. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Liu, Xin
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzen, China.
    Chen, Wenbin
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Liang, Xinming
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Shi, Chengcheng
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Fu, Yuanyuan
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Ma, Kailong
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Zhan, Xiao
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Feng, Chungang
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gustafson, Ulla
    Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Rubin, Carl-Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sällman Almén, Markus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Blass, Martina
    Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Coastal Research, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research.
    Folkvord, Arild
    Department of Biology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Hjort Center of Marine Ecosystem Dynamics, Bergen, Norway; Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway .
    Laikre, Linda
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Ryman, Nils
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen Lee
    State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Macao.
    Xu, Xun
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, Texas A&M University, Texas, United States.
    The genetic basis for ecological adaptation of the Atlantic herring revealed by genome sequencing2016Inngår i: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 5, e12081Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecological adaptation is of major relevance to speciation and sustainable population management, but the underlying genetic factors are typically hard to study in natural populations due to genetic differentiation caused by natural selection being confounded with genetic drift in subdivided populations. Here, we use whole genome population sequencing of Atlantic and Baltic herring to reveal the underlying genetic architecture at an unprecedented detailed resolution for both adaptation to a new niche environment and timing of reproduction. We identify almost 500 independent loci associated with a recent niche expansion from marine (Atlantic Ocean) to brackish waters (Baltic Sea), and more than 100 independent loci showing genetic differentiation between spring- and autumn-spawning populations irrespective of geographic origin. Our results show that both coding and non-coding changes contribute to adaptation. Haplotype blocks, often spanning multiple genes and maintained by selection, are associated with genetic differentiation.

12 1 - 50 of 83
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