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  • 201.
    Bunrit, Anon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Watile, Rahul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lagerspets, Emi
    Lanekoff, Ingela
    Biswas, Srijit
    Repo, Timo
    Samec, Joseph
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Iron (III)-Catalyzed Intramolecular Stereospecific Substitution of the OH Group in Stereogenic Secondary and Tertiary AlcoholsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We herein report a Fe(OTf)3-catalyzed stereospecific substitution of the hydroxyl (OH) group in secondary and tertiary alcohols by N-, and O-centered nucleophiles to generate synthetically precious enantioenriched pyrrolidines, tetrahydrofuran, 1,2,3,4-tetra-hydroquinolines, and chromanes. The substitution of the OH group in benzylic, allylic, and aliphatic alcohols proceed with high yields and high degree of enantiospecificity to give saturated five- and six-membered heterocyclic products and water as the only by-product. Mechanistic studies revealed that the intramolecular substitution reaction proceeds through an SN2 reaction with secondary alcohols and an SN1 reaction, comprising a tight ion pair, with tertiary alcohols giving products with inversion of configuration at the stereogenic carbon in both cases. The iron interacts with both nucleofile and nucloefuge, where the latter leads to a controlled carbon−oxygen (C–O) bond cleavage. The procedure opens up new atom efficient technique for catalytic stereospecific reactions that allow easily accessible stereogenic secondary and tertiary alcohols to be considered as substrates in substitution reactions. 

  • 202.
    Burkhardt, Anja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry, Department of Structural Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Cumpstey, Ian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    (Z)-1,2:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-α-D-ribo-hexofuranos-3-ulose O-benzyloxime2009In: Acta Crystallographica Section E: Structure Reports Online, ISSN 1600-5368, E-ISSN 1600-5368, Vol. E65, no Part 3, p. o633-o633Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 203. Bustelo, Emilio
    et al.
    Gushchin, Artem L.
    Fernandez-Trujillo, M. Jesus
    Basallote, Manuel G.
    Algarra, Andres G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    On the Critical Effect of the Metal (Mo vs. W) on the [3+2] Cycloaddition Reaction of M3S4 Clusters with Alkynes: Insights from Experiment and Theory2015In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 21, no 42, p. 14823-14833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whereas the cluster [Mo3S4(acac)(3)(py)(3)](+) ([1](+), acac=acetylacetonate, py=pyridine) reacts with a variety of alkynes, the cluster [W3S4(acac)(3)(py)(3)](+) ([2](+)) remains unaffected under the same conditions. The reactions of cluster [1]+ show polyphasic kinetics, and in all cases clusters bearing a bridging dithiolene moiety are formed in the first step through the concerted [3+2] cycloaddition between the C equivalent to C atoms of the alkyne and a Mo(mu-S)(2) moiety of the cluster. A computational study has been conducted to analyze the effect of the metal on these concerted [3+ 2] cycloaddition reactions. The calculations suggest that the reactions of cluster [2](+) with alkynes feature Delta G(+) values only slightly larger than its molybdenum analogue, however, the differences in the reaction free energies between both metal clusters and the same alkyne reach up to approximately 10 kcal mol(-1), therefore indicating that the differences in the reactivity are essentially thermodynamic. The activation strain model (ASM) has been used to get more insights into the critical effect of the metal center in these cycloadditions, and the results reveal that the change in reactivity is entirely explained on the basis of the differences in the interaction energies E-int between the cluster and the alkyne. Further decomposition of the E-int values through the localized molecular orbital-energy decomposition analysis (LMO-EDA) indicates that substitution of the Mo atoms in cluster [1](+) by W induces changes in the electronic structure of the cluster that result in weaker intra-and inter-fragment orbital interactions.

  • 204. Bäck, Marcus
    et al.
    Johansson, Per-Ola
    Wångsell, Fredrik
    Thorstensson, Fredrik
    Kvarnström, Ingemar
    Ayesa, Susana
    Wähling, Horst
    Pelcman, Mikael
    Jansson, Katarina
    Lindström, Stefan
    Wallberg, Hans
    Classon, Björn
    Rydergård, Christina
    Vrang, Lotta
    Hamelink, Elizabeth
    Hallberg, Anders
    Rosenquist, Åsa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Novel potent macrocyclic inhibitors of the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease: use of cyclopentane and cyclopentene P2-motifs2007In: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0968-0896, Vol. 15, no 22, p. 7184-7202Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 205.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. -.
    Asymmetric Catalysis via Dynamic Kinetic Resolution2007In: Asymmetric Synthesis - The Essentials, Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim , 2007, p. 171-175Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    -

  • 206.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Catalytic asymmetric synthesis via combined metal and enzyme catalysis2009In: 3rd Hellenic Symposium on Organic Synthesis, October 15-17, 2009, Athens, Greece: Abstracts of papers, Athens, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 207.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Modern Oxidation Methods2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palladium- and ruthenium-catalyzed redox reactions in selective organic synthesis2009In: Abstract of LOST II Symposium in honour of Prof. Alain Krief, March 18-20, 2009, Namur, Belgium, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 209.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pd- and Ru-catalyzed redox reactions in catalysis. Application to the combination with enzyme catalysis2009In: Abstract of 42nd Jahrestreffen Deutscher Katalytiker, March 11-13, 2009, Weimar, Germany, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 210.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Preface2010In: Topics in catalysis, ISSN 1022-5528, E-ISSN 1572-9028, Vol. 53, no 13-14, p. 831-831Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 211.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Recent advances in the combination of metal and enzyme catalysis2009In: Abstract of the 10th Netherlands Catalysis and Chemistry Conference (NCCC-X), March 2-4, 2009, Noordwijkerhout, the Netherlands, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 212.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Selective oxidation of amines and sulfides2010In: Modern Oxidation Methods / [ed] Jan-Erling Bäckvall, Weinheim: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA , 2010, 2, p. 277-313Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 213. Cadu, Alban
    et al.
    Andersson, Pher G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Council for Scientific & Industrial Research (CSIR) - South Africa .
    Iridium catalysis: application of asymmetric reductive hydrogenation2013In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 42, no 40, p. 14345-14356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Iridium, despite being one of the least abundant transition metals, has found several uses. N,P-ligated iridium catalysts are used to perform many highly selective reactions. These methodologies have been developed extensively over the past 15 years. More recently, the application of iridium N,P catalysts in asymmetric hydrogenation has been a focus of research to find novel applications and to expand on their current synthetic utility. The aim of this perspective is to highlight the advances made by the Andersson group.

  • 214. Cadu, Alban
    et al.
    Upadhyay, Puspesh K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Andersson, Pher G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. University of Kwazulu Natal, South Africa.
    Iridium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Substituted Pyridines2013In: Asian Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 2193-5807, Vol. 2, no 12, p. 1061-1065Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Asymmetric hydrogenation of ortho-substituted pyridines catalyzed by N,P-ligated iridium is demonstrated. To facilitate this reaction, the aromaticity of the pyridines was weakened by forming N-iminopyridium ylides. The reactions give very high conversions, and after a single recrystallization, excellent ee of up to 98% was obtained. This method lends itself to the synthesis of chiral piperidine building blocks.

  • 215. Carballeira, José Daniel
    et al.
    Krumlinde, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bocola, Marco
    Vogel, Andreas
    Reetz, Manfred T.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Directed evolution and axial chirality: optimization of the enantioselectivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipase towards the kinetic resolution of a racemic allene2007In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, Vol. 20, p. 1913-1915Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 216.
    Carson, Fabian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Agrawal, Santosh
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Mikaela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Moraga, Francisca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ruthenium Complexation in an Aluminium Metal-Organic Framework and its Application in Alcohol Oxidation Catalysis2012In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 18, no 48, p. 15337-15344Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A ruthenium trichloride complex has been loaded into an aluminium metalorganic framework (MOF), MOF-253, by post-synthetic modification to give MOF-253-Ru. MOF-253 contains open bipyridine sites that are available to bind with the ruthenium complex. MOF-253-Ru was characterised by elemental analysis, N2 sorption and X-ray powder diffraction. This is the first time that a Ru complex has been coordinated to a MOF through post-synthetic modification and used as a heterogeneous catalyst. MOF-253-Ru catalysed the oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols, including allylic alcohols, with PhI(OAc)2 as the oxidant under very mild reaction conditions (ambient temperature to 40 degrees C). High conversions (up to >99%) were achieved in short reaction times (13 h) by using low catalyst loadings (0.5 mol% Ru). In addition, high selectivities (>90%) for aldehydes were obtained at room temperature. MOF-253-Ru can be recycled up to six times with only a moderate decrease in substrate conversion.

  • 217.
    Carson, Fabian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martínez-Castro, Elisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Marcos, Rocio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    González Miera, Greco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martin-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Effect of the functionalisation route on a Zr-MOF with an Ir-NHC complex for catalysis2015In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 51, no 54, p. 10864-10867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new iridium N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) metallolinker has been synthesised and introduced into a metal-organic framework (MOF), for the first time, via two different routes: direct synthesis and postsynthetic exchange (PSE). The two materials were compared in terms of the Ir loading and distribution using X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), the local Ir structure using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and the catalytic activity. The materials showed good activity and recyclability as catalysts for the isomerisation of an allylic alcohol.

  • 218.
    Carson, Fabian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martínez-Castro, Elisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Marcos, Rocío
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    González Miera, Greco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Introduction of an N-heterocyclic Carbene Iridium Complex into a Zirconium Metal–Organic Framework for CatalysisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 219.
    Carson, Fabian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Pascanu, Vlad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bermejo Gómez, Antonio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zhang, Yi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Platero-Prats, Ana E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martin-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Influence of the Base on Pd@MIL-101-NH2(Cr) as Catalyst for the Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling Reaction2015In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 21, no 30, p. 10896-10902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chemical stability of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is a major factor preventing their use in industrial processes. Herein, it is shown that judicious choice of the base for the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction can avoid decomposition of the MOF catalyst Pd@MIL-101-NH2(Cr). Four bases were compared for the reaction: K2CO3, KF, Cs2CO3 and CsF. The carbonates were the most active and achieved excellent yields in shorter reaction times than the fluorides. However, powder XRD and N-2 sorption measurements showed that the MOF catalyst was degraded when carbonates were used but remained crystalline and porous with the fluorides. XANES measurements revealed that the trimeric chromium cluster of Pd@MIL-101-NH2(Cr) is still present in the degraded MOF. In addition, the different countercations of the base significantly affected the catalytic activity of the material. TEM revealed that after several catalytic runs many of the Pd nanoparticles (NPs) had migrated to the external surface of the MOF particles and formed larger aggregates. The Pd NPs were larger after catalysis with caesium bases compared to potassium bases.

  • 220. Casas, J
    et al.
    Engqvist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ibrahem, I
    Kaynak, B
    Córdova, A
    Direct Amino Acid-Catalyzed Asymmetric Synthesis of Polyketide Sugars2005In: Angewandte Chemie International ed., ISSN 1433-7851, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 1343-1345Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 221. Casillo, Angela
    et al.
    Ståhle, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Parrilli, Ermenegilda
    Sannino, Filomena
    Mitchell, Daniel E.
    Pieretti, Giuseppina
    Gibson, Matthew I.
    Marino, Gennaro
    Lanzetta, Rosa
    Parrilli, Michelangelo
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tutino, Maria L.
    Corsaro, Maria M.
    Structural characterization of an all-aminosugar-containing capsular polysaccharide from Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H2017In: Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0003-6072, E-ISSN 1572-9699, Vol. 110, no 11, p. 1377-1387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from Arctic marine sediments, is considered a model to study the adaptation to cold environments. Recently, we demonstrated that C. psychrerythraea 34H produces two different extracellular polysaccharides, a capsular polysaccharide and a medium released polysaccharide, which confer cryoprotection to the bacterium. In this study, we report the structure of an additional capsular polysaccharide produced by Colwellia grown at a different temperature. The structure was determined using chemical methods, and one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The results showed a trisaccharide repeating unit made up of only amino-sugar residues: N-acetyl-galactosamine, 2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-glucose (bacillosamine), and 2-acetamido-2-deoxyglucuronic acid with the following structure: -> 4)-beta-d-GlcpNAcA-(1 -> 3)-beta-d-QuipNAc4NAc-(1 -> 3)-beta-d-GalpNAc-(1 ->. The 3D model, generated in accordance with H-1,H-1-NOE NMR correlations and consisting of ten repeating units, shows a helical structure. In contrast with the other extracellular polysaccharides produced from Colwellia at 4 A degrees C, this molecule displays only a low ice recrystallization inhibition activity.

  • 222. Castro, Vasco
    et al.
    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sandström, Dick
    Maliniak, Arnold
    NMR studies of membranes composed of glycolipids and phospholipids2007In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, Vol. 1768, no -, p. 2432-2437Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 223. Chassagne, Pierre
    et al.
    Fontana, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Guerreiro, Catherine
    Gauthier, Charles
    Phalipon, Armelle
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mulard, Laurence A.
    Structural Studies of the O-Acetyl-Containing O-Antigen from a Shigella flexneri Serotype 6 Strain and Synthesis of Oligosaccharide Fragments Thereof2013In: European Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-193X, E-ISSN 1099-0690, no 19, p. 4085-4106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extensive analysis by NMR spectroscopy of the delipidated lipopolysaccharide of Shigella flexneri serotype 6 strain MDC 2924-71 confirmed the most recently reported structure of the O-antigen repeating unit as {4)--D-GalpA-(13)--D-GalpNAc-(12)--L-Rhap3Ac/4Ac-(12)--L-Rhap-(1}, and revealed the non-stoichiometric acetylation at O-3C/4C. Input from the CASPER program helped to ascertain the fine distribution of the three possible patterns of O-acetylation. The non-O-acetylated repeating unit (ABCD) corresponded to about 2/3 of the population, while 1/4 was acetylated at O-3C (3AcCDAB), and 1/10 at O-4C (4AcCDAB). Di- to tetrasaccharides with a GalpA residue (A) at their reducing end were synthesized as their propyl glycosides following a multistep linear strategy relying on late-stage acetylation at O-3C. Thus, the 3C-O-acetylated and non-O-acetylated targets were synthesized from common protected intermediates. Rhamnosylation was most efficiently achieved by using imidate donors, including at O-4 of a benzyl galacturonate acceptor. In contrast, a thiophenyl 2-deoxy-2-trichloroacetamido-D-galactopyranoside precursor was preferred for chain elongation involving residue B. Final Pd/C-mediated deprotection ensured O-acetyl stability. All of the target molecules represent parts of the O-antigen of S. flexneri 6, a prevalent serotype. Non-O-acetylated oligosaccharides are also fragments of the Escherichia coli O147 O-antigen.

  • 224.
    Chen, Hong
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Deng, Youqian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Yu, Zhengbao
    Zhao, Huishuang
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Yao, Qingxia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sun, Junliang
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    3D Open-Framework Vanadoborate as a Highly Effective Heterogeneous Pre-catalyst for the Oxidation of Alkylbenzenes2013In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 25, no 24, p. 5031-5036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three three-dimensional (3D) open-framework vanadoborates, denoted as SUT-6-Zn, SUT-6-Mn, and SUT-6-Ni, were synthesized using diethylenetriamine as a template. SUT-6-Zn, SUT-6-Mn, and SUT-6-Ni are isostructural and built from (VO)(12)O-6 B18O36(OH)(6) clusters bridged by ZnO5, MnO6, and NiO6 polyhedra, respectively, to form the 3D frameworks. SUT-6 is the first vanadoborate with a 3D framework. The framework follows a semiregular hxg net topology with a 2-fold interpenetrated diamond-like channel system. The amount of template used in the synthesis played an important role in the dimensionality of the resulting vanadoborate structures. A small amount of diethylenetriamine led to the formation of this first 3D vanadoborate framework, while an increased amount of diethylenetriamine resulted in vanadoborates with zero-dimensional (0D) and one-dimensional (1D) structures. SUT-6-Zn was proved to be an efficient heterogeneous precatalyst for the oxidation of alkylbenzenes.

  • 225. Chen, Mo
    et al.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Brady, John W.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Ionic Liquid 1-n-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium Chloride and Its Binary Mixtures with Ethanol2014In: Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation, ISSN 1549-9618, E-ISSN 1549-9626, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 4465-4479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) of the imidazolium family have attracted much attention during the past decade for their capability to dissolve biomass. Besides experimental work, numerous compuational studies have been concerned with the physical properties of both neat ILs and their interactions with different solutes, in particular, carbohydrates. Many classical force fields designed specifically for ILs have been found to yield viscosities that are too high for the liquid state, which has been attributed to the fact that the effective charge densities are too high due to the lack of electronic polarizability. One solution to this problem has been uniform scaling of the partial charges by a scale factor in the range 0.6-0.9, depending on model. This procedure has been shown to improve the viscosity of the models, and also to positively affect other properties, such as diffusion constants and ionic conductivity. However, less attention has been paid to how this affects the overall thermodynamics of the system, and the problems it might create when the IL models are combined with other force fields (e.g., for solutes). In the present work, we employ three widely used IL force fields to simulate 1-n-buty1-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride in both the crystal and the liquid state, as well as its binary mixture with ethanol. Two approaches are used: one in which the ionic charge is retained at its full integer value and one in which the partial charges are uniformly reduced to 85%. We investigate and calculate crystal and liquid structures, molar heat capacities, heats of fusion, self-diffusion constants, ionic conductivity, and viscosity for the neat IL, and ethanol activity as a function of ethanol concentration for the binary mixture. We show that properties of the crystal are less affected by charge scaling compared to the liquid. In the liquid state, transport properties of the neat IL are generally improved by scaling, whereas values for the heat of fusion are unaffected, and results for the heat capacity are ambiguous. Neither full nor reduced charges could reproduce experimental ethanol activities for the whole range of compositions.

  • 226. Chen, Shi-Lu
    et al.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    An investigation of possible competing mechanisms for Ni-containing methyl-coenzyme M reductase2014In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 16, no 27, p. 14029-14035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ni-containing methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) is capable of catalyzing methane formation from methyl-coenzyme M (CH3-SCoM) and coenzyme B (CoB-SH), and also its reverse reaction (methane oxidation). Based on extensive experimental and theoretical investigations, it has turned out that a mechanism including an organometallic methyl-Ni(III)F-430 intermediate is inaccessible, while another mechanism involving a methyl radical and a Ni(II)-SCoM species currently appears to be the most acceptable one for MCR. In the present paper, using hybrid density functional theory and an active-site model based on the X-ray crystal structure, two other mechanisms were studied and finally also ruled out. One of them, involving proton binding on the CH3-SCoM substrate, which should facilitate methyl-Ni(III)F-430 formation, is demonstrated to be quite unfavorable since the substrate has a much smaller proton affinity than the F-430 cofactor. Another one (oxidative addition mechanism) is also shown to be unfavorable for the MCR reaction, due to the large endothermicity for the formation of the ternary intermediate with side-on C-S (for CH3-SCoM) or C-H (for methane) coordination to Ni.

  • 227. Chen, Shi-Lu
    et al.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Phosphate Monoester Hydrolysis by Trinuclear Alkaline Phosphatase; DFT Study of Transition States and Reaction Mechanism2014In: ChemPhysChem, ISSN 1439-4235, E-ISSN 1439-7641, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 2321-2330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is a trinuclear metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of a broad range of phosphate monoesters to form inorganic phosphate and alcohol (or phenol). In this paper, by using density functional theory with a model based on a crystal structure, the AP-catalyzed hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters is investigated by calculating two substrates, that is, methyl and p-nitrophenyl phosphates, which represent alkyl and aryl phosphates, respectively. The calculations confirm that the AP reaction employs a ping-pong mechanism involving two chemical displacement steps, that is, the displacement of the substrate leaving group by a Ser102 alkoxide and the hydrolysis of the phosphoseryl intermediate by a Zn2-bound hydroxide. Both displacement steps proceed via a concerted associative pathway no matter which substrate is used. Other mechanistic aspects are also studied. Comparison of our calculations with linear free energy relationships experiments shows good agreement.

  • 228. Chojnacka, Kinga
    et al.
    Santoro, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Awartani, Radi
    Richards, Nigel G. J.
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Aponick, Aaron
    Synthetic studies on the solanacol ABC ring system by cation-initiated cascade cyclization: implications for strigolactone biosynthesis2011In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 9, no 15, p. 5350-5353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a new method for constructing the ABC ringsystem of strigolactones, in a single step from a simple linearprecursor by acid-catalyzed double cyclization. The reactionproceeds with a high degree of stereochemical control, whichcan be qualitatively rationalized usingDFT calculations. Ourconcise synthetic approach offers a new model for thinkingabout the (as yet) unknown chemistry that is employed in thebiosynthetic pathways leading to this class of plant hormones.

  • 229. Chow, Winnie W. Y.
    et al.
    Herwik, Stanislav
    Kisban, Sebastian
    Ruther, Patrick
    Neves, Herc
    Oscarsson, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Gothelid, Emmanuelle
    Influence of bio-coatings on the recording performance of neural electrodes2014In: Biomedizinische Technik (Berlin. Zeitschrift), ISSN 1862-278X, E-ISSN 0013-5585, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 315-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neural probes are complex devices consisting of metallic (often Pt based) electrodes, spread over an insolating/dielectric backbone. Their functionality is often limited in time because of the formation of scaring tissues around the implantation tracks. Functionalization of the probes surface can be used to limit the glial scar reaction. This is however challenging, as this treatment has to be equally efficient on all probe surfaces (metallic as well as dielectric) and should not influence the electrodes performances. This paper presents a novel technique to functionalize recording neural probes with hyaluronic acid (HyA), a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM). HyA and the probe surface are both modified to make the reaction feasible: HyA is chemically functionalized with SS-pyridine groups while the probe surfaces are silanized. The thiol groups thus introduced on the probe surface can then react with the HyA SS-pyridine group, resulting in a covalent bonding of the latter on the former. The electrodes are protected by introducing a pretreatment step, namely an additional hyaluronic acid layer on the platinum electrode, prior to the silanization process, which was found to be effective in reducing electrode impedance under optimized conditions.

  • 230. Chow, Winnie W. Y.
    et al.
    Herwik, Stanislav
    Ruther, Patrick
    Gothelid, Emmanuelle
    Oscarsson, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bio-polymer coatings on neural probe surfaces: Influence of the initial sample composition2012In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 258, no 20, p. 7864-7871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results of the study of hyaluronic acid (HyA) coating on two structural materials, silicon oxide (dielectric) surface and platinum (Pt) surface used for fabrication of probes developed for neurological investigations in the framework of the EU-project NeuroProbes. The silicon-based neural probes consist of multiple Pt electrodes on the probe shafts for neural recording applications. HyA coatings were proposed to apply on the probe surfaces to enhance the biocompatibility [1]. This study aims at understanding the influence of the initial composition of the probe surface on the structure and morphology of HyA coating. HyA was chemically functionalized by SS-pyridin using (N-Succinimidyl 3-[2-pyridyldithio]-propionate) (SPDP) and was immobilized on the surfaces via a covalent bond. The dielectric and Pt surfaces were derivatized by use of (3-mercaptopropyl) methyldimethoxysilane (MPMDMS). The silanol groups in MPMDMS bind to the dielectric surface, leaving the thiol groups at the uppermost surface and the thiol groups then bind covalently to the functionalized HyA. On the Pt surface, it is the thiol group which binds on the Pt surface. The coated surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A well-defined HyA layer was observed on both dielectric and Pt surfaces. The coating of two molecular weights (340 kDa and 1.3 MDa) of HyA was examined. The influence of the silanized layer on the HyA coating was also investigated.

  • 231. Chowdhury, Sugata
    et al.
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Russo, Nino
    Sicilia, Emilia
    Mechanistic investigation of the hydrogenation of O2 by a transfer hydrogenation catalyst2010In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 132, no 12, p. 4178-4190Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 232. Closson, Adam
    et al.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Ionic liquid-immobilized catalytic system for biomimetic dihydroxylation of olefins2004In: Chemical Communication, ISSN 0366-5607, no 13, p. 1494-1495Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 233.
    Colas, Kilian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Montero, Raúl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mendoza, Abraham
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Intermolecular Pummerer Coupling with Carbon Nucleophiles in Non-Electrophilic Media2017In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 56, no 50, p. 16042-16046Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new Pummerer-type C-C coupling protocol is introduced based on turbo-organomagnesium amides, which unlike traditional Pummerer reactions, does not require strong electrophilic activators, engages a broad range of C(sp(3))-, C(sp(2))-, and C(sp)-nucleophiles, and seamlessly integrates with C-H and C-X magnesiation. Given the central character of sulfur compounds in organic chemistry, this protocol allows access to unrelated carbonyls, olefins, organometallics, halides, and boronic esters through a single strategy.

  • 234. Coll, Mercedes
    et al.
    Ahlford, Katrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pamies, Oscar
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Dieguez, Montserrat
    Modular Furanoside Pseudodipeptides and Thioamides, Readily Available Ligand Libraries for Metal-Catalyzed Transfer Hydrogenation Reactions: Scope and Limitations2012In: Advanced Synthesis and Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, E-ISSN 1615-4169, Vol. 354, no 2-3, p. 415-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two new highly modular carbohydrate-based, pseudodipeptide and thioamide ligand libraries have been synthesized for the rhodium- and ruthenium-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) of prochiral ketones. These series of ligands can be prepared efficiently from easily accessible D-xylose and D-glucose. The ligand libraries contain two main ligand structures (pseudodipeptide and thioamide) that have been designed by making systematic modifications to one of the most successful ligand families developed for the ATH. As well as studying the effect of these two ligand structures on the catalytic performance, we also evaluated the effect of modifying several of the ligand parameters. We found that the effectiveness of the ligands at transferring the chiral information in the product can be tuned by correctly choosing the ligand components (ligand structure and ligand parameters). Excellent enantioselectivities (ees up to 99%) were therefore obtained in both enantiomers of the alcohol products using a wide range of substrates.

  • 235. Coll, Mercedes
    et al.
    Pamies, Oscar
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Dieguez, Montserrat
    Second-Generation Amino Acid Furanoside Based Ligands from D-Glucose for the Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Ketones2013In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 5, no 12, p. 3821-3828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel series of modular amino acid thioamide ligands functionalized with carbohydrates were introduced and employed in the rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) of aryl alkyl ketones, including the less-studied heteroaromatic ketones. The ligands are based on amino acid hydroxyamides (pseudodipeptides), which are the most successful ligands previously used in asymmetric hydrogen transfer reactions. High enantioselectivities [up to 99% enantiomeric excess (ee)] were achieved in the ATH of a wide range of aryl alkyl ketones by using catalysts generated insitu from [RhCl2Cp*](2) (Cp*=C5Me5) and thioamide ligands comprising a 3-benzyl glucofuranoside backbone and a bulky isopropyl group in the -amino acid moiety. Interestingly, both enantiomers of the alcohol products can readily be obtained with high enantioselectivity by simply changing the absolute configuration of the -amino acid. The good performance can be extended to a very challenging class of industrially interesting heteroaromatic ketones (up to 99%ee).

  • 236. Coll, Mercedes
    et al.
    Pàmies, Oscar
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Diéguez, Montserrat
    Carbohydrate-based pseudo-dipeptides: new ligands for the highly enantioselective Ru-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation reaction2011In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 47, no 44, p. 12188-12190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ruthenium-complexes of novel carbohydrate based pseudo-dipeptide ligands effectively and selectively catalyze the reduction of a broad range of aryl–alkyl ketones under ATH conditions. Excellent enantioselectivities (>99% ee) are obtained using aminosugars as the sole source of chirality.

  • 237.
    Cordova, Armando
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lin, Shuangzheng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tseggai, Abrehet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Concise catalytic asymmetric total synthesis of biologically active tropane alkaloids2012In: Advanced Synthesis and Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, E-ISSN 1615-4169, Vol. 354, no 7, p. 1363-1372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A general strategy for the total asymmetric synthesis of valuable tropane alkaloids by catalytic stereoselective transformations is disclosed. The power of this approach is exemplified by the concise catalytic enantioselective total syntheses of (+)-methylecgonine, (-)-cocaine and (+)-cocaine as well as the first catalytic asymmetric total syntheses of a cocaine C-1 derivative and (+)-ferruginine starting from 5-oxo-protected-a,beta-unsaturated enals using only two and three column chromatographic purification steps, respectively.

  • 238. Cosner, Casey C.
    et al.
    Iska, Vijaya Bhaskara Reddy
    Chatterjee, Anamitra
    Markiewicz, John T.
    Corden, Steven J.
    Löfstedt, Joakim
    Ankner, Tobias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Richer, Joshua
    Hulett, Tyler
    Schauer, Douglas J.
    Wiest, Olaf
    Helquist, Paul
    Evolution of Concise and Flexible Synthetic Strategies for Trichostatic Acid and the Potent Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Trichostatin A2013In: European Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-193X, E-ISSN 1099-0690, no 1, p. 162-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (R)-(+)-Trichostatic acid and (R)-(+)-trichostatin A (TSA) are natural products that have attracted considerable attention in the field of epigenetic therapies. TSA in particular is a naturally occurring hydroxamic acid having potent activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) and having significant potential for treatment of a myriad of genetically based diseases. Development of TSA and other trichostatic acid derivatives into useful small-molecule therapies has been hindered by the low natural abundance and high cost associated with these compounds. We report herein our collective efforts towards the development of concise and scalable routes for the synthesis of trichostatic acid and TSA in both racemic and enantioenriched forms. Three independent synthetic pathways were developed with varying degrees of efficiency and convergency. In the first synthesis, the key step was a vinylogous Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons condensation. A Marshall propargylation reaction was used as the key step in the second synthesis, and Pd-catalyzed a-alkenylation of a ketone zinc enolate by using various functionalized alkenyl or dienyl halides was developed for the third synthesis. The second pathway proved to be readily amenable to an enantioselective modification, and both the second and third pathways were straightforwardly adapted for the facile preparation of new analogues of trichostatic acid and TSA.

  • 239.
    Cotton, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Chiral metallocene ligands for transition metal-catalysed reactions2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 240. Cotton, Hanna K.
    et al.
    Norinder, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Screening of Ligands in the Asymmetric Metallocenethiolatocopper(I)-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution with Grignard Reagents2006In: Tetrahedron, ISSN 0040-4020, E-ISSN 1464-5416, Vol. 62, no 24, p. 5632-5640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Screening of metallocenethiolate ligands for copper(I)-catalyzed substitution of allylic acetates with Grignard reagents has been carried out. The previously used ligand, lithium (R,Sp)-2-(1-dimethylaminoethyl)ferrocenylthiolate (4a), possessing both central and planar chirality, was the starting point for the screening. It was found that the diastereomeric ligand lithium (R,Rp)-2-(1-dimethylaminoethyl)ferrocenylthiolate (4b) exhibiting reversed planar chirality gave increased enantioselectivity in the allylic substitution, at least when cinnamyl acetate was used as a substrate. The ruthenocene-based ligand lithium (R,Sp)-2-(1-dimethylaminoethyl)ruthenocenylthiolate (4c) gave an enhanced reaction rate, but lower chiral induction. The use of disulfide bis[(R,Sp)-2-(1-dimethylaminoethyl)ferrocenyl]disulfide (7a) as a ligand precursor worked well but resulted in lower enantioselectivity.

  • 241.
    Covarrubias, Adrian Suarez
    et al.
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Högbom, Martin
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bergfors, Terese
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Carroll, Paul
    Institute for Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London.
    Mannerstedt, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Parish, Tanya
    Institute for Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London.
    Jones, T Alwyn
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Mowbray, Sherry L
    Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Biomedical Center, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Structural, biochemical, and in vivo investigations of the threonine synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.2008In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 381, no 3, p. 622-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Threonine biosynthesis is a general feature of prokaryotes, eukaryotic microorganisms, and higher plants. Since mammals lack the appropriate synthetic machinery, instead obtaining the amino acid through their diet, the pathway is a potential focus for the development of novel antibiotics, antifungal agents, and herbicides. Threonine synthase (TS), a pyridoxal-5-phosphate-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the final step in the pathway, in which L-homoserine phosphate and water are converted into threonine and inorganic phosphate. In the present publication, we report structural and functional studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis TS, the product of the rv1295 (thrC) gene. The structure gives new insights into the catalytic mechanism of TSs in general, specifically by suggesting the direct involvement of the phosphate moiety of the cofactor, rather than the inorganic phosphate product, in transferring a proton from C4' to C(gamma) in the formation of the alphabeta-unsaturated aldimine. It further provides a basis for understanding why this enzyme has a higher pH optimum than has been reported elsewhere for TSs and gives rise to the prediction that the equivalent enzyme from Thermus thermophilus will exhibit similar behavior. A deletion of the relevant gene generated a strain of M. tuberculosis that requires threonine for growth; such auxotrophic strains are frequently attenuated in vivo, indicating that TS is a potential drug target in this organism.

  • 242. Cribiù, Riccardo
    et al.
    Borbas, K. Eszter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Cumpstey, Ian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    On the synthesis of vinyl and phenyl C-furanosides by stereospecific debenzylative cycloetherification2009In: Tetrahedron, ISSN 0040-4020, E-ISSN 1464-5416, Vol. 65, no 10, p. 2022-2031Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 243.
    Cribiù, Riccardo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Cumpstey, Ian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stereospecific debenzylative cycloetherification of carbohydrate-derived allylic alcohols, ethers and esters to form vinyl C-furanosides2008In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, no 10, p. 1246-1248Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 244. Crovetto, Luis
    et al.
    Paredes, Jose M.
    Rios, Ramon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Talavera, Eva M.
    Avarez-Pez, Jose M.
    Photophysics of a xanthenic derivative dye useful as an ""On/Off"" fluorescence probe2007In: Journal of Physical Chemistry A, ISSN 1089-5639, E-ISSN 1520-5215, Vol. 111, no 51, p. 13311-13320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The photophysical behavior of a new fluorescein derivative has been explored by using absorption and steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The influence of ionic strength, as well as total buffer concentration, on both the absorbance and fluorescence has been investigated. The apparent acidity constant of the dye determined by absorbance is almost independent of the added buffer and salt concentrations. A semiempirical model is proposed to rationalize the variations in the apparent pK(a) values. The excited-state proton-exchange reaction around the physiological pH becomes reversible upon addition of phosphate buffer, inducing a pH-dependent change of the steady-state fluorescence and decay times. Fluorescence decay traces, collected as a function of total buffer concentration and pH, were analyzed by global compartmental analysis, yielding the following values of the rate constants describing excited-state dynamics: k(01) = 1.29 x 10(10) s(-1), k(02) = 4.21 x 10(8) s(-1), k(21)approximate to 3 x 10(6) M-1 s(-1), k(12)(B) = 6.40 x 10(8) M-1 s(-1), and k(21)(B) = 2.61 x 10(7) M-1 s(- 1). The decay rate constant values of k(01), k(21), and k(21)(B), along with the low molar absorption coefficient of the neutral form, mean that coupled decays are practically monoexponential at buffer concentrations higher than 0.02 M and any pH. Thus, the pH and buffer concentration can modulate the main lifetime of the dye.

  • 245.
    Csjernyik, Gábor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Studies of Biomimtic Oxidations and Racemizations2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with studies of ruthenium-catalyzed hydrogen transfer reactions for oxidations and racemization.

    Through optimisation of the substrate-selective redox catalyst, the electron and proton transfer mediator (a benzoquinone derivative), and the oxygen-activating metal macrocycle a highly efficient biomimetic oxidation of secondary alcohols was obtained. Several alcohols were subjected to the new oxidation protocol and the corresponding ketones were isolated in high yield.

    The deactivation of the oxygen-activating metal macrocycle retarded the aerobic oxidation of primary alcohols. Encapsulation of the metal macrocycle into zeolite, described in chapter 3, proved to be an efficient method to solve this problem and comparable conversion of alcohols was achieved. The immobilization of the oxygen-activating porphyrin to a surface can be an alternative approach to solve the deactivation problem. Therefore as the first step towards studies of immobilized porphyrins on a metal surface (of gold or silver), S-thioacetyl derivatized porphyrins were synthesized; two alternative syntheses are described in chapter 4.

    A new and effecient ruthenium-catalyzed racemization protocol was established by proper ligand tuning. The racemization of the enantiomerically pure alcohols was increased significantly; this work is reported in chapter 5.

  • 246.
    Csjernyik, Gábor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bogár, Krisztián
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    New Efficient Ruthenium Catalysts for Racemization of Alcohols at Room Temperature2004In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, E-ISSN 1359-8562, Vol. 45, no 36, p. 6799-6802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    5-Pentaphenylcyclopentadienyl)RuCl(CO)2 was found to catalyze efficiently the racemization of chiral alcohols such as (S)-1-phenylethanol, (S)-1-phenylpropan-2-ol, (S)-4-phenylbutan-2-ol and (S)-4-methoxy-1-phenylethanol at room temperature in the presence of a base. The catalytic activity of three other Ru(II) complexes was also investigated. The effects of halide and solvent were studied as well.

  • 247.
    Csjernyik, Gábor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Notheisz, Ferenc
    Zsigmond, Ágnes
    Ruthenium-Catalyzed Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols on Zeolite-Encapsulated Cobalt Salophen Catalyst2002In: Topics in catalysis, ISSN 1022-5528, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 119-124Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 248.
    Csjernyik, Gábor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Éll, Alida H
    Fadini, Luca
    Pugin, Benoit
    Efficient Ruthenium-Catalyzed Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols Using a Biomimetic Coupled Catalytic System2002In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, Vol. 67, no 5, p. 1657-1662Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 249.
    Cumpstey, Ian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Intramolecular aglycon delivery2008In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 343, no 10-11, p. 1553-1573Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 250.
    Cumpstey, Ian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Neodisaccharide diglycosyl compounds: Ethers, thioethers and selenoethers. A survey of their synthesis and biological activity2011In: Comptes rendus. Chimie, ISSN 1631-0748, E-ISSN 1878-1543, Vol. 14, no 2-3, p. 274-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article gives an account of the area of nonglycosidically linked neodisaccharide compounds consisting of two monosaccharides linked by formal condensation without using the anomeric centre, i.e. by ether bonds, and also their thioether and selenoether counterparts. Synthetic methods and biological relevance are covered.

2345678 201 - 250 of 1552
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