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  • 101.
    Bielawski, Marcin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    High-Yielding One-Pot Synthesis of Diaryliodonium Triflates from Arenes and Iodine or Aryl Iodides2007In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, no 24, p. 2521-2523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unsymmetric and symmetric diaryliodonium triflates are synthesized from both electron-deficient and electron-rich substrates in a fast, high yielding, and operationally simple protocol employing arenes and aryl iodides or iodine.

  • 102.
    Bielawski, Marcin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zhu, Mingzhao
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Efficient and General One-Pot Synthesis of Diaryliodonium Triflates: Optimization, Scope and Limitations2007In: Advanced Synthesis and Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, E-ISSN 1615-4169, Vol. 349, no 17-18, p. 2610-2618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Symmetrical and unsymmetrical diaryliodonium triflates have been synthesized from both electron-deficient and electron-rich arenes and aryl iodides with mCPBA and triflic acid. A thorough investigation of the optimization, scope and limitations has resulted in an improved one-pot protocol that is fast, high-yielding, and operationally simple. The reaction has been extended to the direct synthesis of symmetrical iodonium salts from iodine and arenes, conveniently circumventing the need for aryl iodides.

  • 103. Biosca, Maria
    et al.
    Paptchikhine, Alexander
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pàmies, Oscar
    Andersson, Pher G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Diéguez, Montserrat
    Extending the Substrate Scope of Bicyclic P-Oxazoline/Thiazole Ligands for Ir-Catalyzed Hydrogenation of Unfunctionalized Olefins by Introducing a Biaryl Phosphoroamidite Group2015In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 3455-3464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study identifies a series of Ir-bicyclic phosphoroamidite-oxazoline/thiazole catalytic systems that can hydrogenate a wide range of minimally functionalized olefins (including E-and Z-tri- and disubstituted substrates, vinylsilanes, enol phosphinates, tri- and disubstituted alkenylboronic esters, and alpha,beta-unsaturated enones) in high enantioselectivities (ee values up to 99%) and conversions. The design of the new phosphoroamidite-oxazoline/thiazole ligands derives from a previous successful generation of bicyclic N-phosphane-oxazoline/thiazole ligands, by replacing the N-phosphane group with a pi-acceptor biaryl phosphoroamidite moiety. A small but structurally important family of Ir-phosphoroamidite-oxazoline/thiazole precatalysts has thus been synthesized by changing the nature of the N-donor group (either oxazoline or thiazole) and the configuration at the biaryl phosphoroamidite moiety. The substitution of the N-phosphane by a phosphoroamidite group in the bicyclic N-phosphane-oxazoline/thiazole ligands extended the range of olefins that can be successfully hydrogenated.

  • 104. Biswas, Srijit
    et al.
    Dahlstrand, Christian
    Watile, Rahul A.
    Kalek, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Samec, Joseph S. M.
    Atom-Efficient Gold(I)-Chloride-Catalyzed Synthesis of alpha-Sulfenylated Carbonyl Compounds from Propargylic Alcohols and Aryl Thiols: Substrate Scope and Experimental and Theoretical Mechanistic Investigation2013In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 19, no 52, p. 17939-17950Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gold(I)-chloride-catalyzed synthesis of -sulfenylated carbonyl compounds from propargylic alcohols and aryl thiols showed a wide substrate scope with respect to both propargylic alcohols and aryl thiols. Primary and secondary aromatic propargylic alcohols generated -sulfenylated aldehydes and ketones in 60-97% yield. Secondary aliphatic propargylic alcohols generated -sulfenylated ketones in yields of 47-71%. Different gold sources and ligand effects were studied, and it was shown that gold(I) chloride gave the highest product yields. Experimental and theoretical studies demonstrated that the reaction proceeds in two separate steps. A sulfenylated allylic alcohol, generated by initial regioselective attack of the aryl thiol on the triple bond of the propargylic alcohol, was isolated, evaluated, and found to be an intermediate in the reaction. Deuterium labeling experiments showed that the protons from the propargylic alcohol and aryl thiol were transferred to the 3-position, and that the hydride from the alcohol was transferred to the 2-position of the product. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations showed that the observed regioselectivity of the aryl thiol attack towards the 2-position of propargylic alcohol was determined by a low-energy, five-membered cyclic protodeauration transition state instead of the strained, four-membered cyclic transition state found for attack at the 3-position. Experimental data and DFT calculations supported that the second step of the reaction is initiated by protonation of the double bond of the sulfenylated allylic alcohol with a proton donor coordinated to gold(I) chloride. This in turn allows for a 1,2-hydride shift, generating the final product of the reaction.

  • 105.
    Björklund, Catarina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jansson, Katarina
    Lindberg, Jimmy
    Vrang, Lotta
    Hallberg, Anders
    Rosenquist, Åsa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Discovery of Potent BACE-1 Inhibitors Containing a New Hydroxyethylene (HE) Scaffold: Exploration of P1’ Alkoxy Residues and an Aminoethylene (AE) Central Core2010In: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0968-0896, E-ISSN 1464-3391, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 1711-1723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a preceding study we have described the development of a new hydroxyethylene (HE) core motif displaying P1 aryloxymethyl and P1’ methoxy substituents delivering potent BACE-1 inhibitors. In a continuation of this work we have now explored the SAR of the S1’ pocket by introducing a set of P1’ alkoxy groups and evaluated them as BACE-1 inhibitors. Previously the P1 and P1’ positions of the classical HE template have been relatively little explored due to the complexity of the chemical routes involved in modifications at these positions. However, the chemistries developed for the current HE template renders substituents in both the P1 and P1’ positions readily available for SAR exploration. The BACE-1 inhibitors prepared displayed IC50 values in the range of 4-45 nM, where the most potent compounds featured small P1’ groups. The cathepsin D selectivity which was high for the smallest P1’ sustituents (P1’=ethoxy, fold selectively >600) dropped for larger groups (P1’=benzyloxy, fold selectivity of 1.6). We have also confirmed the importance of both the hydroxyl group and its stereochemistry preference for this HE transition state isostere by preparing both the deoxygenated analogue and by inverting the configuration of the hydroxyl group to the R-configuration, which as expected resulted in large activity drops. Finally substituting the hydroxyl group by an amino group having the same configuration (S), which previously have been described to deliver potent BACE-1 inhibitors with advantageous properties, surprisingly resulted in a large drop in the inhibitory activity.

  • 106.
    Björklund, Catarina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Benkestock, Kurt
    Borkakoti, Neera
    Jansson, Katarina
    Lindberg, Jimmy
    Vrang, Lotta
    Hallberg, Anders
    Rosenquist, Åsa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Design and synthesis of potent and selective BACE-1 inhibitors2010In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 1458-1464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several highly potent BACE-1 protease inhibitors have been developed from an inhibitor series containing a novel hydroxyethylene (HE) core structure displaying aryloxymethyl or benzyloxymethyl P1 side chains and a methoxy P1’ side chain. The target molecules were readily synthesized from chiral carbohydrate starting materials, furnishing the inhibitor compounds in good overall yields. The inhibitors show both high BACE-1 potency and good selectivity against cathepsin D, where the most potent inhibitor furnish a BACE-1 IC50 value of 0.32 nM and displays > 3000 fold selectivity over cathepsin D.

  • 107.
    Blasco, Pilar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Patel, Dhilon S.
    Engström, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Im, Wonpil
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Conformational Dynamics of the Lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli O91 Revealed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Molecular Simulations2017In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 56, no 29, p. 3826-3839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outer leaflet of the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria contains lipopolysaccharides (LPS) as a major component, and the outer membrane provides a physical barrier and protection against hostile environments. The enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli of serogroup O91 has an O-antigen polysaccharide (PS) with five sugar residues in the repeating unit (RU), and the herein studied O-antigen PS contains similar to 10 RUs. H-1-C-13 HSQC-NOESY experiments on a 1-C-13-labeled PS were employed to deduce H-1-H-1 cross-relaxation rates and transglycosidic (3)J(CH) related to the psi torsional angles were obtained by H-1-H-1 NOESY experiments. Dynamical parameters were calculated from the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the PS in solution and compared to those from C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation studies. Importantly, the MD simulations can reproduce the dynamical behavior of internal correlation times along the PS chain. Two-dimensional free energy surfaces of glycosidic torsion angles delineate the conformational space available to the O-antigen. Although similar with respect to populated states in solution, the O-antigen in LPS bilayers has more extended chains as a result of spatial limitations due to close packing. Calcium ions are highly abundant in the phosphate-containing core region mediating LPS LPS association that is crucial for maintaining bilayer integrity, and the negatively charged O-antigen promotes a high concentration of counterbalancing potassium ions. The ensemble of structures present for the PS in solution is captured by the NMR experiments, and the similarities between the O-antigen on its own and as a constituent of the full LPS in a bilayer environment make it possible to realistically describe the LPS conformation and dynamics from the MD simulations.

  • 108.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Can Reduction of NO to N2O in Cytochrome c Dependent Nitric Oxide Reductase Proceed through a Trans-Mechanism?2017In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 120-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of microbial denitrification, NO is reduced to N2O in the membrane bound enzyme nitric oxide reductase, NOR The N N coupling occurs in the diiron binuclear active site, BNC, and different mechanisms for this reaction step have been suggested. Computational studies have supported a so-called cis:b(3)-mechanism, in which the hyponitrite product of the reductive N N bond formation coordinates with one nitrogen to the heme iron and with both oxygens to the non-heme iron in the BNC. In contrast, experimental results have been interpreted to support a so-called trans-mechanism, in which the hyponitrite intermediate coordinates with one nitrogen atom to each of the two iron ions. Hybrid density functional theory is used here to perform an extensive search for possible intermediates of the NO reduction in the cNOR enzyme. It is found that hyponitrite structures coordinating with their negatively charged oxygens to the positively charged iron ions are the most stable ones. The hyponitrite intermediate involved in the suggested trans-mechanism, which only coordinates with the nitrogens to the iron ions, is found to be prohibitively high in energy, leading to a too slow reaction, which should rule out this mechanism. Furthermore, intermediates binding one NO molecule to each iron ion in the BNC, which have been suggested to initiate the trans-mechanism, are found to be too high in energy to be observable, indicating that the experimentally observed electron paramagnetic resonance signals, taken to support such an iron-nitrosyl dimer intermediate, should be reinterpreted.

  • 109.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    How Quantum Chemistry Can Solve Fundamental Problems in Bioenergetics2015In: International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, ISSN 0020-7608, E-ISSN 1097-461X, Vol. 115, no 18, p. 1197-1201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three different enzymes are discussed, cytochrome c oxidase, involved in aerobic respiration, cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase, involved in denitrification (anaerobic respiration), and photosystem II, involved in photosynthesis. For all three systems, free energy profiles for the entire catalytic cycle are obtained from quantum mechanical calculations on large cluster models of the active sites, using hybrid density functional theory with the B3LYP* functional. The free energy pro-files are used to solve different fundamental problems concerning energy conservation, enzymatic reaction mechanisms and structure, and also to explain experimental results that seem to be in conflict with each other. Possible future applications to related problems using similar methodology are suggested.

  • 110.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mechanism of Oxygen Reduction in Cytochrome c Oxidase and the Role of the Active Site Tyrosine2016In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 489-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme in the respiratory chain, reduces molecular oxygen to water and stores the released energy through electrogenic chemistry and proton pumping across the membrane. Apart from the heme-copper binuclear center, there is a conserved tyrosine residue in the active site (BNC). The tyrosine delivers both an electron and a proton during the O-O bond cleavage step, forming a tyrosyl radical. The catalytic cycle then occurs in four reduction steps, each taking up one proton for the chemistry (water formation) and one proton to be pumped. It is here suggested that in three of the reduction steps the chemical proton enters the center of the BNC, leaving the tyrosine unprotonated with radical character. The reproprotonation of the tyrosine occurs first in the final reduction step before binding the next oxygen molecule. It is also suggested that this reduction mechanism and the presence of the tyrosine are essential for the proton pumping. Density functional theory calculations on large cluster models of the active site show that only the intermediates with the proton in the center of the BNC and with an unprotonated tyrosyl radical have a high electron affinity of similar size as the electron donor, which is essential for the ability to take up two protons per electron and thus for the proton pumping. This type of reduction mechanism is also the only one that gives a free energy profile in accordance with experimental observations for the amount of proton pumping in the working enzyme.

  • 111.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    How cytochrome c oxidase can pump four protons per oxygen molecule at high electrochemical gradient2015In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1847, no 3, p. 364-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiments have shown that the A-family cytochrome c oxidases pump four protons per oxygen molecule, also at a high electrochemical gradient. This has been considered a puzzle, since two of the reduction potentials involved, Cu(II) and Fe(III), were estimated from experiments to be too low to afford proton pumping at a high gradient The present quantum mechanical study (using hybrid density functional theory) suggests a solution to this puzzle. First, the calculations show that the charge compensated Cu(II) potential for Cu-B is actually much higher than estimated from experiment, of the same order as the reduction potentials for the tyrosyl radical and the ferryl group, which are also involved in the catalytic cycle. The reason for the discrepancy between theory and experiment is the very large uncertainty in the experimental observations used to estimate the equilibrium potentials, mainly caused by the lack of methods for direct determination of reduced Cu-B. Second, the calculations show that a high energy metastable state, labeled E-H, is involved during catalytic turnover. The E-H state mixes the low reduction potential of Fe(III) in heme a(3) with another, higher potential, here suggested to be that of the tyrosyl radical, resulting in enough exergonicity to allow proton pumping at a high gradient In contrast, the corresponding metastable oxidized state, O-H, is not significantly higher in energy than the resting state, O. Finally, to secure the involvement of the high energy E-H state it is suggested that only one proton is taken up via the K-channel during catalytic turnover.

  • 112.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Improved free energy profile for reduction of NO in cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR)2016In: Journal of Computational Chemistry, ISSN 0192-8651, E-ISSN 1096-987X, Vol. 37, no 19, p. 1810-1818Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantum chemical calculations play an essential role in the elucidation of reaction mechanisms for redox-active metalloenzymes. For example, the cleavage and the formation of covalent bonds can usually not be described only on the basis of experimental information, but can be followed by the calculations. Conversely, there are properties, like reduction potentials, which cannot be accurately calculated. Therefore, computational and experimental data has to be carefully combined to obtain reliable descriptions of entire catalytic cycles involving electron and proton uptake from donors outside the enzyme. Such a procedure is illustrated here, for the reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide and water in the membrane enzyme, cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR). A surprising experimental observation is that this reaction is nonelectrogenic, which means that no energy is conserved. On the basis of hybrid density functional calculations a free energy profile for the entire catalytic cycle is obtained, which agrees much better with experimental information on the active site reduction potentials than previous ones. Most importantly the energy profile shows that the reduction steps are endergonic and that the entire process is rate-limited by high proton uptake barriers during the reduction steps. This result implies that, if the reaction were electrogenic, it would become too slow when the gradient is present across the membrane. This explains why this enzyme does not conserve any of the free energy released.

  • 113.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase: Energetic requirements and the role of two proton channels2014In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1837, no 7, p. 1165-1177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytochrome c oxidase is a superfamily of membrane bound enzymes catalyzing the exergonic reduction of molecular oxygen to water, producing an electrochemical gradient across the membrane. The gradient is formed both by the electrogenic chemistry, taking electrons and protons from opposite sides of the membrane, and by proton pumping across the entire membrane. In the most efficient subfamily, the A-family of oxidases, one proton is pumped in each reduction step, which is surprising considering the fact that two of the reduction steps most likely are only weakly exergonic. Based on a combination of quantum chemical calculations and experimental information, it is here shown that from both a thermodynamic and a kinetic point of view, it should be possible to pump one proton per electron also with such an uneven distribution of the free energy release over the reduction steps, at least up to half the maximum gradient. A previously suggested pumping mechanism is developed further to suggest a reason for the use of two proton transfer channels in the A-family. Since the rate of proton transfer to the binuclear center through the D-channel is redox dependent, it might become too slow for the steps with low exergonicity. Therefore, a second channel, the K-channel, where the rate is redox-independent is needed. A redox-dependent leakage possibility is also suggested, which might be important for efficient energy conservation at a high gradient. A mechanism for the variation in proton pumping stoichiometry over the different subfamilies of cytochrome oxidase is also suggested. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference.

  • 114.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Protonation of the binuclear active site in cytochrome c oxidase decreases the reduction potential of Cu-B2015In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1847, no 10, p. 1173-1180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the remaining mysteries regarding the respiratory enzyme cytochrome c oxidase is how proton pumping can occur in all reduction steps in spite of the low reduction potentials observed in equilibrium titration experiments for two of the active site cofactors, CUB(II) and Fe-a3(III). It has been speculated that, at least the copper cofactor can acquire two different states, one metastable activated state occurring during enzyme turnover, and one relaxed state with lower energy, reached only when the supply of electrons stops. The activated state should have a transiently increased Cu-B(II) reduction potential, allowing proton pumping. The relaxed state should have a lower reduction potential, as measured in the titration experiments. However, the structures of these two states are not known. Quantum mechanical calculations show that the proton coupled reduction potential for Cu-B is inherently high in the active site as it appears after reaction with oxygen, which explains the observed proton pumping. It is suggested here that, when the flow of electrons ceases, a relaxed resting state is formed by the uptake of one extra proton, on top of the charge compensating protons delivered in each reduction step. The extra proton in the active site decreases the proton coupled reduction potential for Cu-B by almost half a volt, leading to agreement with titration experiments. Furthermore, the structure for the resting state with an extra proton is found to have a hydroxo-bridge between Cu-B(II) and Fe-a3(III), yielding a magnetic coupling that can explain the experimentally observed EPR silence.

  • 115.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Why is the reduction of NO in cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR) not electrogenic?2013In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1827, no 7, p. 826-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The membrane-bound enzyme cNOR (cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase) catalyzes the reduction of NO in a non-electrogenic process. This is in contrast to the reduction of O-2 in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), the other member of the heme-copper oxidase family, which stores energy by the generation of a membrane gradient. This difference between the two enzymes has not been understood, but it has been speculated to be of kinetic origin, since per electron the NO reduction is more exergonic than the O-2 reduction, and the energy should thus be enough for an electrogenic process. However, it has not been clear how and why electrogenicity, which mainly affects the thermodynamics, would slow down the very exergonic NO reduction. Quantum chemical calculations are used to construct a free energy profile for the catalytic reduction of NO in the active site of cNOR. The energy profile shows that the reduction of the NO molecules by the enzyme and the formation of N2O are very exergonic steps, making the rereduction of the enzyme endergonic and rate-limiting for the entire catalytic cycle. Therefore the NO reduction cannot be electrogenic, i.e. cannot take electrons and protons from the opposite sides of the membrane, since it would increase the endergonicity of the rereduction when the gradient is present, thereby increasing the rate-limiting barrier, and the reaction would become too slow. It also means that proton pumping coupled to electron transfer is not possible in cNOR In CcO the corresponding rereduction of the enzyme is very exergonic.

  • 116.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ädelroth, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The mechanism for oxygen reduction in cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR) as obtained from a combination of theoretical and experimental results2017In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1858, no 11, p. 884-894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial NO-reductases (NOR) belong to the heme-copper oxidase (HCuO) superfamily, in which most members are O-2-reducing, proton-pumping enzymes. This study is one in a series aiming to elucidate the reaction mechanisms of the HCuOs, including the mechanisms for cellular energy conservation. One approach towards this goal is to compare the mechanisms for the different types of HCuOs, cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) and NOR, reducing the two substrates O-2 and NO. Specifically in this study, we describe the mechanism for oxygen reduction in cytochrome c dependent NOR (cNOR). Hybrid density functional calculations were performed on large cluster models of the cNOR binuclear active site. Our results are used, together with published experimental information, to construct a free energy profile for the entire catalytic cycle. Although the overall reaction is quite exergonic, we show that during the reduction of molecular oxygen in cNOR, two of the reduction steps are endergonic with high barriers for proton uptake, which is in contrast to oxygen reduction in CcO, where all reduction steps are exergonic. This difference between the two enzymes is suggested to be important for their differing capabilities for energy conservation. An additional result from this study is that at least three of the four reduction steps are initiated by proton transfer to the active site, which is in contrast to CcO, where electrons always arrive before the protons to the active site. The roles of the non-heme metal ion and the redox-active tyrosine in the active site are also discussed.

  • 117.
    Bogár, Krisztián
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    High-yielding metalloenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution of fluorinated aryl alcohols2007In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, E-ISSN 1359-8562, Vol. 48, no 31, p. 5471-5474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) of various fluorinated aryl alcohols by a combination of lipase-catalyzed enzymatic resolution with in situ ruthenium-catalyzed alcohol racemization is described. (R)-Selective Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) was employed for transesterification of different fluoroaryl alcohols in DKR reactions delivering the corresponding acetates in high yield (97%) with excellent enantiomeric excess (98%).

  • 118.
    Bogár, Krisztián
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Hoyos Vidal, Pilar
    Alcántara León, Andrés R.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Chemoenzymatic Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of Allylic Alcohols: A Highly Enantioselective Route to Acyloin Acetates2007In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 9, no 17, p. 3401-3404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) of a series of sterically hindered allylic alcohols has been conducted with Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) and ruthenium catalyst 1. The optically pure allylic acetates obtained were subjected to oxidative cleavage to give the corresponding acylated acyloins in high yields without loss of chiral information.

  • 119.
    Bogár, Krisztián
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Krumlinde, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bacsik, Zoltán
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bäckvall, Jan E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Heterogenized Wilkinson's Catalyst for Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds2011In: European Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-193X, E-ISSN 1099-0690, no 23, p. 4409-4414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wilkinson’s catalyst [RhCl(PPh3)3] was heterogenized on common silica by the use of a grafting/anchoring technique. The immobilized catalyst showed high activity and selectivity in transfer hydrogenation reactions of a range of carbonyl compounds in 2-propanol. Reactions carried out in 2-propanol at reflux afforded the corresponding alcohols in high yields in short reaction times. The heterogeneous feature ofthe catalyst allows for easy recovery and efficient reuse in the same reaction up to 5 times without any detectible loss of catalytic activity.

  • 120. Bogár, Krisztián
    et al.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Large-scale ruthenium- and enzyme-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution of (rac)-1-phenylethanol2007In: Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 1860-5397, Vol. 3, p. artikel nr 50-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 121. Bollmark, Martin
    et al.
    Kullberg, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stawinski, Jacek
    Nucleoside H-phosphonates. Part 19: Novel nucleotide analogues H-phosphonoselenoate mono- and diesters2002In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 515-518Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 122. Borgström, Magnus
    et al.
    Johansson, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lomoth, Reiner
    Berglund-Baudin, Helena
    Wallin, Staffan
    Sun, Licheng
    Åkermark, Björn
    Hammarström, Leif
    Electron Donor-Acceptor Dyads and Triads Based on Tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) and Benzoquinone: Synthesis, Characterization, and Photoinduced Electron Transfer Reactions2003In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, Vol. 42, no 17, p. 5173-5184Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 123.
    Bornschein, Christoph
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Universität Rostock, Germany.
    Gustafson, Karl P. J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Verho, Oscar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Beller, Matthias
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Evaluation of Fe and Ru Pincer-Type Complexes as Catalysts for the Racemization of Secondary Benzylic Alcohols2016In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 22, no 33, p. 11583-11586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fe and Ru pincer-type catalysts are used for the racemization of benzylic alcohols. Racemization with the Fe catalyst was achieved within 30 minutes under mild reaction conditions, with a catalyst loading as low as 2 mol %. This reaction constitutes the first example of an iron-catalyzed racemization of an alcohol. The efficiency for racemization of the Fe catalyst and its Ru analogue was evaluated for a wide range of sec-benzylic alcohols. The commercially available Ru complex proved to be highly robust and even tolerated the presence of water in the reaction mixture.

  • 124.
    Borén, Linnéa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Leijondahl, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Dynamic Kinetic Asymmetric Transformation of 1,4-diols and Preparation of Trans-2,5-Disubstituted pyrrolidines2009In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, E-ISSN 1359-8562, Vol. 50, no 26, p. 3237-3240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation (DYKAT) of a series of 1,4-diols is carried out with Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB), Pseudomonas cepacia lipase II (PS-C II), and a ruthenium catalyst. A β-chloro-substituted 1,4-diol is successfully transformed into an optically pure 1,4-diacetate, which is a highly useful synthetic intermediate. The usefulness of the optically pure 1,4-diacetates is demonstrated by the synthesis of enantiopure 2,5-disubstituted pyrrolidines.

  • 125.
    Borén, Linnéa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Xu, Yongmei
    Córdova, Armando
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    (S)-Selective Kinetic Resolution and Chemoenzymatic Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of Secondary Alcohols2006In: Chemistry: a European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 225-232Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 126. Both, P.
    et al.
    Green, A. P.
    Gray, C. J.
    Sardzik, R.
    Voglmeir, J.
    Fontana, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Austeri, M.
    Rejzek, M.
    Richardson, D.
    Field, R. A.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Flitsch, S. L.
    Eyers, C. E.
    Discrimination of epimeric glycans and glycopeptides using IM-MS and its potential for carbohydrate sequencing2014In: Nature Chemistry, ISSN 1755-4330, E-ISSN 1755-4349, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 65-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass spectrometry is the primary analytical technique used to characterize the complex oligosaccharides that decorate cell surfaces. Monosaccharide building blocks are often simple epimers, which when combined produce diastereomeric glycoconjugates indistinguishable by mass spectrometry. Structure elucidation frequently relies on assumptions that biosynthetic pathways are highly conserved. Here, we show that biosynthetic enzymes can display unexpected promiscuity, with human glycosyltransferase pp-a-GanT2 able to utilize both uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine and uridine diphosphate N-acetylgalactosamine, leading to the synthesis of epimeric glycopeptides in vitro. Ion-mobility mass spectrometry ( IM-MS) was used to separate these structures and, significantly, enabled characterization of the attached glycan based on the drift times of the monosaccharide product ions generated following collision-induced dissociation. Finally, ion-mobility mass spectrometry following fragmentation was used to determine the nature of both the reducing and non-reducing glycans of a series of epimeric disaccharides and the branched pentasaccharide Man3 glycan, demonstrating that this technique may prove useful for the sequencing of complex oligosaccharides.

  • 127.
    Bouma, Marinus J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    General One-Pot Synthesis of Alkynyliodonium Salts and Alkynyl Benziodoxolones from Aryl Iodides2012In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 18, no 45, p. 14242-14245Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 128. Bratt, Emma
    et al.
    Verho, Oscar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johansson, Magnus J.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    A General Suzuki Cross-Coupling Reaction of Heteroaromatics Catalyzed by Nanopalladium on Amino-Functionalized Siliceous Mesocellular Foam2014In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 79, no 9, p. 3946-3954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions of heteroaromatics catalyzed by palladium supported in the cavities of amino-functionalized siliceous mesocellular foam are presented. The nanopalladium catalyst effectively couples not only heteroaryl halides with boronic acids but also heteroaryl halides with boronate esters, potassium trifluoroborates, MIDA boronates, and triolborates, producing a wide range of heterobiaryls in good to excellent yields. Furthermore, the heterogeneous palladium nanocatalyst can easily be removed from the reaction mixture by filtration and recycled several times with minimal loss in activity. This catalyst provides an alternative, environmentally friendly, low-leaching process for the preparation of heterobiaryls.

  • 129.
    Brea, Oriana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mó, Otilia
    Yáñez, Manuel
    Merced Montero-Campillo, M.
    Alkorta, Ibon
    Elguero, José
    Are beryllium-containing biphenyl derivatives efficient anion sponges?2018In: Journal of Molecular Modeling, ISSN 1610-2940, E-ISSN 0948-5023, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structures and stabilities of 2,2'-diBeX-1,1'-biphenyl (X = H, F, Cl, CN) derivatives and their affinities for F-, Cl-, and CN- were theoretically investigated using a B3LYP/6-311 + G(3df, 2p)//B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) model. The results obtained show that the 2,2'-diBeX-1,1'-biphenyl derivatives (X = H, F, Cl, CN) exhibit very high F-, Cl-, and CN- affinities, albeit lower than those reported before for their 1,8-diBeX-naphthalene analogs, in spite of the fact that the biphenyl derivatives are more flexible than their naphthalene counterparts. Nevertheless, some of the biphenyl derivatives investigated are predicted to have anion affinities larger than those measured for SbF5, which is considered one of the strongest anion capturers. Therefore, although weaker than their naphthalene analogs, the 2,2'-diBeX-1,1'-biphenyl derivatives can still be considered powerful anion sponges. This study supports the idea that compounds containing -BeX groups in chelating positions behave as anion sponges due to the electron-deficient nature and consequently high intrinsic Lewis acidity of these groups.

  • 130. Breistein, Palle
    et al.
    Johansson, Jonas
    Ibrahem, Ismail
    Lin, Shuangzheng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Deiana, Luca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sun, Junliang
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Cordova, Armando
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    One-Step Catalytic Enantioselective a-Quaternary 5-Hydroxyproline Synthesis: An Asymmetric Entry to Highly Functionalized a-Quaternary Proline Derivatives2012In: Advanced Synthesis and Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, E-ISSN 1615-4169, Vol. 354, no 6, p. 1156-1162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The highly enantioselective cascade reaction between N-protected a-cyanoglycine esters and a,beta-unsaturated aldehydes is disclosed. The reaction represents a one-step entry to polysubstituted 5-hydroxyproline derivatives having a quaternary a-stereocenter generally in high yields with up to >95:5 dr and 99:1 er. It is also a direct catalytic two-step entry to functionalized a-quaternary proline derivatives.

  • 131. Brown, Michael
    et al.
    Delorme, Marion
    Malmedy, Florence
    Malmgren, Joel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wirth, Thomas
    Synthesis of New Chiral Diaryliodonium Salts2015In: Synlett: Accounts and Rapid Communications in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0936-5214, E-ISSN 1437-2096, Vol. 26, no 11, p. 1573-1577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A structurally diverse range of chiral diaryliodonium salts have been synthesised which have potential application in metal-free stereoselective arylation reactions.

  • 132.
    Bruneau, Alexandre
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Gustafson, Karl P. J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Yuan, Ning
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Persson, Ingmar
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Synthesis of Benzofurans and Indoles from Terminal Alkynes and Iodoaromatics Catalyzed by Recyclable Palladium Nanoparticles Immobilized on Siliceous Mesocellular Foam2017In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 23, no 52, p. 12886-12891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we report on the utilization of a heterogeneous catalyst, consisting of Pd nanoparticles supported on a siliceous mesocellular foam (Pd-0-AmP-MCF), for the synthesis of heterocycles. Reaction of o-iodophenols and protected o-iodoanilines with acetylenes in the presence of a Pd nanocatalyst produced 2-substituted benzofurans and indoles, respectively. In general, the catalytic protocol afforded the desired products in good to excellent yields under mild reaction conditions without the addition of ligands. Moreover, the structure of the reported Pd nanocatalyst was further elucidated with extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy, and it was proven that the catalyst could be recycled multiple times without significant loss of activity.

  • 133.
    Buitrago, Elina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lundberg, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Andersson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ryberg, Per
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    High Throughput Screening of a Catalyst Library for the Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Heteroaromatic Ketones: Formal Syntheses of (R)-Fluoxetine and (S)-Duloxetine2012In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 2082-2089Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A total of 21 amino acid based ligands including hydroxy amide, thioamide, and hydroxamic acid functionalities, respectively, were combined with [Ru(p-cymene)Cl2]2 and [RhCp*Cl2]2, and used as catalysts for the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of four different heteroaromatic ketones in 2-propanol. The reactions were performed on a Chemspeed automated high-throughput screening robotic platform. Optimal catalysts were identified for the individual heterocyclic substrate classes. Based on these results, the formal syntheses of the antidepressant drugs (R)-fluoxetine and (S)-duloxetine were conducted by using the found catalysts in the key reaction step, which results in high isolated yields (94?%) and excellent product enantioselectivities (>99?% ee) of the formed 1,3-amino alcohols.

  • 134.
    Buitrago, Elina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tinnis, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Efficient and Selective Hydrosilylation of Carbonyls Catalyzed by Iron Acetate and N-Hydroxyethylimidazolium Salts2012In: Advanced Synthesis and Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, E-ISSN 1615-4169, Vol. 354, no 1, p. 217-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aromatic aldehydes, along with aryl alkyl, heteroaryl alkyl, and dialkyl ketones were efficiently reduced to their corresponding primary and secondary alcohols, respectively, in high yields, using the commercially available and inexpensive polymeric silane, polymethylhydrosiloxane (PMHS), as reducing agent. The reaction is catalyzed by in situ generated iron complexes containing hydroxyethyl-functionalized NHC ligands. Turnover frequencies up to 600 h−1 were obtained

  • 135.
    Buitrago, Elina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zani, Lorenzo
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Selective hydrosilylation of ketones catalyzed by in situ-generated iron NHC complexes2011In: Applied organometallic chemistry, ISSN 0268-2605, E-ISSN 1099-0739, Vol. 25, no 10, p. 748-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aryl alkyl-, heteroaryl alkyl- and dialkyl ketones were readily reduced to their corresponding secondary alcohols in high yields, using the commercially available and inexpensive polymeric silane polymethylhydrosiloxane (PMHS), as reducing agent. The reaction is catalyzed by an in situ-generated iron complex, conveniently generated from iron(II) acetate and the commercially available N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) precursor IPr·HCl.

  • 136. Bunrit, Anon
    et al.
    Dahlstrand, Christian
    Olsson, Sandra K.
    Srifa, Pemikar
    Huang, Genping
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Orthaber, Andreas
    Sjöberg, Per J. R.
    Biswas, Srijit
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Samec, Joseph S. M.
    Brønsted Acid-Catalyzed Intramolecular Nucleophilic Substitution of the Hydroxyl Group in Stereogenic Alcohols with Chirality Transfer2015In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 137, no 14, p. 4646-4649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hydroxyl group of enantioenriched benzyl, propargyl, allyl, and alkyl alcohols has been intramolecularly displaced by uncharged O-, N-, and S-centered nucleophiles to yield enantioenriched tetrahydrofuran, pyrrolidine, and tetrahydrothiophene derivatives with phosphinic acid catalysis. The five-membered heterocyclic products are generated in good to excellent yields, with high degree of chirality transfer, and water as the only side-product. Racemization experiments show that phosphinic acid does not promote S(N)1 reactivity. Density functional theory calculations corroborate a reaction pathway where the phosphinic acid operates as a bifunctional catalyst in the intramolecular substitution reaction. In this mechanism, the acidic proton of the phosphinic acid protonates the hydroxyl group, enhancing the leaving group ability. Simultaneously, the oxo group of phosphinic acid operates as a base abstracting the nucleophilic proton and thus enhancing the nucleophilicity. This reaction will open up new atom efficient techniques that enable alcohols to be used as nucleofuges in substitution reactions in the future.

  • 137. Bunrit, Anon
    et al.
    Dahlstrand, Christian
    Srifa, Pemikar
    Olsson, Sandra K.
    Huang, Genping
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Tianjin University, China.
    Biswas, Srijit
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Samec, Joseph S. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nucleophilic Substitution of the Hydroxyl Group in Stereogenic Alcohols with Chirality Transfer2016In: Synlett: Accounts and Rapid Communications in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0936-5214, E-ISSN 1437-2096, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 173-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A brief overview of the development of direct substitution of the hydroxyl (OH) group of alcohols in our research group is presented. By applying a BrOnsted acid, an intramolecular substitution of the OH group in stereogenic alcohols with chirality transfer was achieved. Noteworthy, the intramolecular substitution has a wide scope in respect to both the nucleophile and also the nucleofuge. A mechanistic study by both experiments and DFT calculations revealed a unique reaction pathway in which the BrOnsted acid operates in a bifunctional manner to promote an S(N)2-type reaction mechanism.

  • 138.
    Bunrit, Anon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sawadjoon, Supaporn
    Tšupova, Svetlana
    Sjöberg, Per J. R.
    Samec, Joseph S. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    A General Route to beta-Substituted Pyrroles by Transition-Metal Catalysis2016In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 81, no 4, p. 1450-1460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An atom-efficient route to pyrroles substituted in the beta-position has been achieved in four high yielding steps by a combination of Pd, Ru, and Fe catalysis with only water and ethene as side-products. The reaction is general and gives pyrroles substituted in the beta-position with linear and branched alkyl, benzyl, or aryl groups in overall good yields. The synthetic route includes a Pd-catalyzed monoallylation step of amines with substituted allylic alcohols that proceeds to yield the monoallylated products in moderate to excellent yields. In a second step, unsymmetrical diallylated aromatic amines are generated from the reaction of a second allylic alcohol with high selectivity in moderate to good yields by control of the reaction temperature. Ru-catalyzed ring-closing metathesis performed on the diallylated aromatic amines yields the pyrrolines substituted in the beta-position in excellent yields. By addition of ferric chloride to the reaction mixture, a selective aromatization to yield the corresponding pyrroles substituted in the beta-position was achieved. A reaction mechanism involving a palladium hydride, generated from insertion of palladium to O-H of an allyl alcohol, that is responsible for the C-O bond cleavage to generate the pi-allyl intermediate is proposed.

  • 139.
    Burkhardt, Anja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry, Department of Structural Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Cumpstey, Ian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    (Z)-1,2:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-α-D-ribo-hexofuranos-3-ulose O-benzyloxime2009In: Acta Crystallographica Section E: Structure Reports Online, ISSN 1600-5368, E-ISSN 1600-5368, Vol. E65, no Part 3, p. o633-o633Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 140. Bustelo, Emilio
    et al.
    Gushchin, Artem L.
    Fernandez-Trujillo, M. Jesus
    Basallote, Manuel G.
    Algarra, Andres G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    On the Critical Effect of the Metal (Mo vs. W) on the [3+2] Cycloaddition Reaction of M3S4 Clusters with Alkynes: Insights from Experiment and Theory2015In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 21, no 42, p. 14823-14833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whereas the cluster [Mo3S4(acac)(3)(py)(3)](+) ([1](+), acac=acetylacetonate, py=pyridine) reacts with a variety of alkynes, the cluster [W3S4(acac)(3)(py)(3)](+) ([2](+)) remains unaffected under the same conditions. The reactions of cluster [1]+ show polyphasic kinetics, and in all cases clusters bearing a bridging dithiolene moiety are formed in the first step through the concerted [3+2] cycloaddition between the C equivalent to C atoms of the alkyne and a Mo(mu-S)(2) moiety of the cluster. A computational study has been conducted to analyze the effect of the metal on these concerted [3+ 2] cycloaddition reactions. The calculations suggest that the reactions of cluster [2](+) with alkynes feature Delta G(+) values only slightly larger than its molybdenum analogue, however, the differences in the reaction free energies between both metal clusters and the same alkyne reach up to approximately 10 kcal mol(-1), therefore indicating that the differences in the reactivity are essentially thermodynamic. The activation strain model (ASM) has been used to get more insights into the critical effect of the metal center in these cycloadditions, and the results reveal that the change in reactivity is entirely explained on the basis of the differences in the interaction energies E-int between the cluster and the alkyne. Further decomposition of the E-int values through the localized molecular orbital-energy decomposition analysis (LMO-EDA) indicates that substitution of the Mo atoms in cluster [1](+) by W induces changes in the electronic structure of the cluster that result in weaker intra-and inter-fragment orbital interactions.

  • 141. Bäck, Marcus
    et al.
    Johansson, Per-Ola
    Wångsell, Fredrik
    Thorstensson, Fredrik
    Kvarnström, Ingemar
    Ayesa, Susana
    Wähling, Horst
    Pelcman, Mikael
    Jansson, Katarina
    Lindström, Stefan
    Wallberg, Hans
    Classon, Björn
    Rydergård, Christina
    Vrang, Lotta
    Hamelink, Elizabeth
    Hallberg, Anders
    Rosenquist, Åsa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Novel potent macrocyclic inhibitors of the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease: use of cyclopentane and cyclopentene P2-motifs2007In: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0968-0896, Vol. 15, no 22, p. 7184-7202Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 142.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Preface2010In: Topics in catalysis, ISSN 1022-5528, E-ISSN 1572-9028, Vol. 53, no 13-14, p. 831-831Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 143. Cadu, Alban
    et al.
    Andersson, Pher G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Council for Scientific & Industrial Research (CSIR) - South Africa .
    Iridium catalysis: application of asymmetric reductive hydrogenation2013In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 42, no 40, p. 14345-14356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Iridium, despite being one of the least abundant transition metals, has found several uses. N,P-ligated iridium catalysts are used to perform many highly selective reactions. These methodologies have been developed extensively over the past 15 years. More recently, the application of iridium N,P catalysts in asymmetric hydrogenation has been a focus of research to find novel applications and to expand on their current synthetic utility. The aim of this perspective is to highlight the advances made by the Andersson group.

  • 144. Cadu, Alban
    et al.
    Upadhyay, Puspesh K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Andersson, Pher G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. University of Kwazulu Natal, South Africa.
    Iridium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Substituted Pyridines2013In: Asian Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 2193-5807, Vol. 2, no 12, p. 1061-1065Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Asymmetric hydrogenation of ortho-substituted pyridines catalyzed by N,P-ligated iridium is demonstrated. To facilitate this reaction, the aromaticity of the pyridines was weakened by forming N-iminopyridium ylides. The reactions give very high conversions, and after a single recrystallization, excellent ee of up to 98% was obtained. This method lends itself to the synthesis of chiral piperidine building blocks.

  • 145. Carballeira, José Daniel
    et al.
    Krumlinde, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bocola, Marco
    Vogel, Andreas
    Reetz, Manfred T.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Directed evolution and axial chirality: optimization of the enantioselectivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipase towards the kinetic resolution of a racemic allene2007In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, Vol. 20, p. 1913-1915Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 146.
    Carson, Fabian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martínez-Castro, Elisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Marcos, Rocio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    González Miera, Greco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martin-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Effect of the functionalisation route on a Zr-MOF with an Ir-NHC complex for catalysis2015In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 51, no 54, p. 10864-10867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new iridium N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) metallolinker has been synthesised and introduced into a metal-organic framework (MOF), for the first time, via two different routes: direct synthesis and postsynthetic exchange (PSE). The two materials were compared in terms of the Ir loading and distribution using X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), the local Ir structure using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and the catalytic activity. The materials showed good activity and recyclability as catalysts for the isomerisation of an allylic alcohol.

  • 147.
    Carson, Fabian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Pascanu, Vlad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bermejo Gómez, Antonio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zhang, Yi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Platero-Prats, Ana E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martin-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Influence of the Base on Pd@MIL-101-NH2(Cr) as Catalyst for the Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling Reaction2015In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 21, no 30, p. 10896-10902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chemical stability of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is a major factor preventing their use in industrial processes. Herein, it is shown that judicious choice of the base for the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction can avoid decomposition of the MOF catalyst Pd@MIL-101-NH2(Cr). Four bases were compared for the reaction: K2CO3, KF, Cs2CO3 and CsF. The carbonates were the most active and achieved excellent yields in shorter reaction times than the fluorides. However, powder XRD and N-2 sorption measurements showed that the MOF catalyst was degraded when carbonates were used but remained crystalline and porous with the fluorides. XANES measurements revealed that the trimeric chromium cluster of Pd@MIL-101-NH2(Cr) is still present in the degraded MOF. In addition, the different countercations of the base significantly affected the catalytic activity of the material. TEM revealed that after several catalytic runs many of the Pd nanoparticles (NPs) had migrated to the external surface of the MOF particles and formed larger aggregates. The Pd NPs were larger after catalysis with caesium bases compared to potassium bases.

  • 148. Casas, J
    et al.
    Engqvist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ibrahem, I
    Kaynak, B
    Córdova, A
    Direct Amino Acid-Catalyzed Asymmetric Synthesis of Polyketide Sugars2005In: Angewandte Chemie International ed., ISSN 1433-7851, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 1343-1345Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 149. Casillo, Angela
    et al.
    Ståhle, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Parrilli, Ermenegilda
    Sannino, Filomena
    Mitchell, Daniel E.
    Pieretti, Giuseppina
    Gibson, Matthew I.
    Marino, Gennaro
    Lanzetta, Rosa
    Parrilli, Michelangelo
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tutino, Maria L.
    Corsaro, Maria M.
    Structural characterization of an all-aminosugar-containing capsular polysaccharide from Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H2017In: Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0003-6072, E-ISSN 1572-9699, Vol. 110, no 11, p. 1377-1387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from Arctic marine sediments, is considered a model to study the adaptation to cold environments. Recently, we demonstrated that C. psychrerythraea 34H produces two different extracellular polysaccharides, a capsular polysaccharide and a medium released polysaccharide, which confer cryoprotection to the bacterium. In this study, we report the structure of an additional capsular polysaccharide produced by Colwellia grown at a different temperature. The structure was determined using chemical methods, and one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The results showed a trisaccharide repeating unit made up of only amino-sugar residues: N-acetyl-galactosamine, 2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-glucose (bacillosamine), and 2-acetamido-2-deoxyglucuronic acid with the following structure: -> 4)-beta-d-GlcpNAcA-(1 -> 3)-beta-d-QuipNAc4NAc-(1 -> 3)-beta-d-GalpNAc-(1 ->. The 3D model, generated in accordance with H-1,H-1-NOE NMR correlations and consisting of ten repeating units, shows a helical structure. In contrast with the other extracellular polysaccharides produced from Colwellia at 4 A degrees C, this molecule displays only a low ice recrystallization inhibition activity.

  • 150. Castro, Vasco
    et al.
    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sandström, Dick
    Maliniak, Arnold
    NMR studies of membranes composed of glycolipids and phospholipids2007In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, Vol. 1768, no -, p. 2432-2437Article in journal (Refereed)
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