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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Transition metal-catalyzed epoxidation of alkenes2010In: Modern Oxidation Methods / [ed] Jan-Erling Bäckvall, Weinheim: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA , 2010, 2, p. 37-84Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Hanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Organic Chemistry.
    Carlsson, Anna-Carin C.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nekoueishahraki, Bijan
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brath, Ulrika
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Erdélyi, Máté
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Chapter Two - Solvent Effects on Nitrogen Chemical Shifts2015In: Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy, Academic Press , 2015, Vol. 86, p. 73-210Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to significant developments in cryogenic probe technology and the easy access to inverse detection pulse programmes (HSQC, HMBC), the sensitivity of nitrogen NMR has lately vastly improved. As a consequence, nitrogen NMR has turned into a useful and commonly available tool for solution studies of molecular structure and properties for small organic compounds likewise biopolymers. The high sensitivity of the nitrogen lone pair to changes in the molecular environment, alterations in intra- and intermolecular interactions, and in molecular conformation along with its wide, up to 1200ppm chemical shift dispersion make nitrogen NMR to an exceptionally sensitive reporter tool. The nitrogen chemical shift has been applied in various fields of chemistry, including for instance the studies of transition metal complexes, chemical reactions such as N-alkylation and N-oxidation, tautomerization, protonation–deprotonation equilibria, hydrogen and halogen bonding, and elucidation of molecular conformation and configuration. The 15N NMR data observed in the investigation of these molecular properties and processes is influenced by the medium it is acquired in. This influence may be due to direct coordination of solvent molecules to transition metal complexes, alteration of tautomerization equilibria, and solvent polarity induced electron density changes of conjugated systems, for example. Thus, the solvent may significantly alter the observed nitrogen NMR shifts. This review aims to provide an overview of solvent effects of practical importance, and discusses selected experimental reports from various subfields of chemistry.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Pher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry. Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry I.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Synthesis of Heterocyclic Natural Products via Regio- and Stereocontrolled Palladium-Catalyzed Reactions1996In: Advances in Heterocyclic Natural Product Synthesis, JAI Press Inc, Greenwich , 1996, p. 179-215Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry.
    Kihlberg, T.
    Långström, B.
    11C: Labelling chemistry and labelled compounds2003In: Handbook Chem03_0302, 2003, no 332, p. 119-165Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5. Arukuusk, Piret
    et al.
    Pärnaste, Ly
    Hällbrink, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Langel, Ülo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry. Tartu University, Estonia.
    PepFects and NickFects for the Intracellular Delivery of Nucleic Acids2015In: Cell-Penetrating Peptides: Methods and Protocols / [ed] Ülo Langel, New York: Springer, 2015, Vol. 1324, p. 303-315Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nucleic acids can be utilized in gene therapy to restore, alter, or silence gene functions. In order to reveal the biological activity nucleic acids have to reach their intracellular targets by passing through the plasma membrane, which is impermeable for these large and negatively charged molecules. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) condense nucleic acids into nanoparticles using non-covalent complexation strategy and mediate their delivery into the cell, whereas the physicochemical parameters of the nanoparticles determine the interactions with the membranes, uptake mechanism, and subsequent intracellular fate. The nanoparticles are mostly internalized by endocytosis that leads to the entrapment of them in endosomal vesicles. Therefore design of new CPPs that are applicable for non-covalent complex formation strategy and harness endosomolytic properties is highly vital. Here we demonstrate that PepFects and NickFects are efficient vectors for the intracellular delivery of various nucleic acids.This chapter describes how to form CPP/pDNA nanoparticles, evaluate stable nanoparticles formation, and assess gene delivery efficacy.

  • 6.
    Baltzer, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry II.
    Klinman, J.P.
    Hynes, J.T.
    Limbach, H-H.
    Acid base catalysis in designed polypeptides2006In: Handbook of Hydrogen Transfer, Wiley , 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bergqvist, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Zaliauskiene, Audrone
    Field study considerations in the use of passive sampling devices in water monitoring2007In: Passive Sampling Techniques in Environmental Monitoring / [ed] R. Greenwood, G. Mills and B. Vrana, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2007, p. 311-328Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are passive monitors that are being increasingly used by monitoring agencies and wastewater dischargers to measure the contents of lipophilic organic chemicals that may adversely affect water quality. This chapter addresses the most frequently asked questions regarding the use of SPMDs for water monitoring and other questions related to the field application of SPMDs. It provides a sound understanding of the applicability and limitations of SPMDs for obtaining reliable monitoring data. The chapter discusses under field study considerations: pre-exposure considerations; SPMD storage considerations; and precautions/procedures during deployment and retrieval of SPMDs. In environmental monitoring projects using SPMDs, quality control (QC) procedures for sampling and analysis are applied to ensure that the data are of high quality. Appropriate QC samples are prepared to quantify possible sampler contamination during transport, deployment, retrieval, storage, processing, enrichment, fractionation operations and analyte recovery. In general, two groups of quality assurance measures are implemented: replicate QC and sampling device control.

  • 8.
    Björklund Jansson, Marianne
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Nilvebrant, N. -O
    Wood Extractives2009In: Wood Chemistry and Wood Biotechnology, Walter de Gruyter, 2009, p. 147-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bouma, M. J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    7.07 α-Oxygenation of Carbonyl Compounds2014In: Comprehensive Organic Synthesis II (Second Edition) / [ed] Paul Knochel and Gary A. Molander, Amsterdam: Oxford: Elsevier , 2014, 2nd, p. 213-241Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The chapter describes synthetically useful strategies for α-oxygenation of carbonyl compounds, with special emphasis on recent methods for catalytic and asymmetric reactions. The oxidation of enolates, enols, enol ethers, and α,β-unsaturated compounds is discussed in detail. Classical oxidation reagents like metal oxides, molecular oxygen, peroxides, and peracids are covered, with asymmetric dihydroxylation of enol ethers giving the highest enantioselectivities together with organocatalytic methods using peroxides. Oxaziridines, nitrosoarenes, and hypervalent iodine compounds are more recently developed α-oxygenation alternatives that allow metal-free oxidations under mild conditions. The combination of nitrosoarenes with organocatalysis is currently the best method for enantioselective α-oxygenations. The area of asymmetric α-oxygenations with hypervalent iodine compounds is currently under development, and high enantioselectivities have only been achieved in intramolecular reactions and epoxidations.

  • 10. Bradley, Jean-Claude
    et al.
    Guha, Rajarshi
    Lang, Andrew
    Lindenbaum, Pierre
    Neylon, Cameron
    Williams, Antony
    Willighagen, Egon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Beautifying Data in the Real World2009In: Beautiful Data: The Stories Behind Elegant Data Solutions / [ed] Toby Segaran & Jeff Hammerbacher, Sebastol, USA: O'Reilly , 2009, 1, p. 259-278Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Selective oxidation of amines and sulfides2010In: Modern Oxidation Methods / [ed] Jan-Erling Bäckvall, Weinheim: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA , 2010, 2, p. 277-313Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Córdova, Armando
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Asymmetric bifunctional catalysis using heterobimetallic and multimetallic systems in enantioselective conjugate additions2010In: Catalytic Asymmetric Conjugate Reactions / [ed] Armando Córdova, Weinheim: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA , 2010, 1, p. 169-190Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Córdova, Armando
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    R., Rios
    Aziridine Formation: in C-N Bond Formation2012In: Comprehensive Chirality / [ed] Yamamoto, H.; Carreira, E. Eds, Oxford: Elsevier, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14. Forsum, Oskar
    et al.
    Näsholm, Torgny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Transformation of Plants with D-Amino Acid Resistance Selectable Markers2009In: D-Amino Acids: Practical Methods and Protocols, Volume 4: Enzymes Involved in the Metabolism of D-Amino Acids / [ed] Ryuichi Konno, Hans Brückner, Antimo D'Aniello, George H. Fisher, Noriko Fujii and Hiroshi Homma, Hauppauge: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2009, p. 73-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Gising, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Larhed, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Molecular Imaging.
    Odell, Luke R
    University of Newcastle, Australia.
    Microwave-assisted synthesis of anti-tuberculosis, HIV and hepatitis C agents2014In: Microwaves in Drug Discovery and Development: Recent Advances, Future Medicine , 2014, p. 34-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microwave heating technology is ideally suited to small-scale discovery chemistry applications, as it allows for full reaction control, rapid (super)heating, short reaction times, high safety and rapid feedback. These unique properties offer unparalleled opportunities for medicinal chemists to speed up the lead optimization process in early drug discovery. To illustrate these advantages, we herein describe a number of recent applications of dedicated microwave instrumentation in the synthesis of small molecules targeting three of the most prevalent infectious diseases: tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C.

  • 16.
    Hedenström, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Characterization of Hydrogenated Fullerenes by NMR Spectroscopy2010In: Fulleranes: The Hydrogenated Fullerenes / [ed] Franco Cataldo, Susana Iglesias-Groth, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2010, Vol. 2, p. 171-202Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    NMR spectroscopy is so far the only analytical technique that has been used to get a detailed structural characterization of hydrogenated fullerenes. A substantial amount of information derived from different NMR experiments can thus be found in the literature for a number of fullerenes hydrogenated to various degrees. These studies have benefitted from the fact that chemical shifts of H-1 and C-13 and in some cases also He-3 can be used to obtain structural information of these compounds. Such results, together with discussions about different NMR experiments and general considerations regarding sample preparations, are summarized in this chapter. The unique information, both structural and physicochemical, that can be derived from different NMR experiments ensures that this technique will continue to be of central importance in characterization of hydrogenated fullerenes.

  • 17.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Oxidation of carbonyl compounds2010In: Modern Oxidation Methods / [ed] Jan-Erling Bäckvall, Weinheim: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA , 2010, 2, p. 353-369Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Klunk, W.E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry.
    Engler,
    H. Nordberg, A.
    Bacskai, B.
    Wang, Y.
    Price, J.
    Bergström, M.
    Hyman, B.
    Långström, B.
    Mathis, C.A.
    Imaging the Pathology of Alzheimer's Disease: Amyloid-Imaging with PET2003In: Neuroimaging Clinics, 2003, no 435Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Li, Songjun
    et al.
    School of Materials Science & Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China.
    Zhu, Maiyong
    School of Materials Science & Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China.
    Whitcombe, Michael J.
    Department of Chemestry, Unversity of Leicester, UK.
    Piletsky, Sergey A.
    Department of Chemestry, Unversity of Leicester, UK.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Enzyme-Like Catalysis: principle, design and applications2015In: Molecularly imprinted polymers for enzyme-like catalysis : principle, design and applications / [ed] Sogjun Li, Cao Shunsheng, Sergey Piletsky, Anthony Turner, Elsevier, 2015, p. 1-17Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selective catalysis remains a significant challenge owing to the lack of a generic protocol suitable for the preparation of selective catalytic materials. A promising approach is to translate the principle of enzyme catalysis for the design of new catalytic materials. Known as a “key-to-lock” technology, molecular imprinting provides a promising perspective by helping create in a straightforward manner binding sites that possess enzyme-like catalytic ability with but higher stability. In this chapter, we focus on discussing some key issues involved in active molecularly imprinted polymers from catalytic applications. The similarity and difference between preparing conventional molecularly imprinted polymers and catalytic imprinted polymers are highlighted. Other aspects relating to the principle, design, and future outlook of catalytic molecularly imprinted polymers are also discussed.

  • 20.
    Matsson, Olle
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry II.
    Isotope Effects for Exotic Nuclei2006In: Isotope Effects in Chemistry and Biology, CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, NW , 2006, p. 417-431Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Miller, Philip W.
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Kato, Koichi
    Department of Molecular Imaging, National Centre of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan.
    Långstrom, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Physical Organic Chemistry.
    Carbon-11, Nitrogen-13, and Oxygen-15 Chemistry: An Introduction to Chemistry with Short-Lived Radioisotopes2015In: The Chemistry of Molecular Imaging / [ed] Nicholas Long and Wing-Tak Wong, Wiley-Blackwell, 2015, p. 79-103Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter first introduces the field of carbon-11, nitrogen-13, and oxygen-15 chemistry, and then provides an up-to-date account of their chemistry. The carbon-11 isotope is most widely produced by the proton bombardment of nitrogen-14 in a gas phase cyclotron target. 11CO2 is the most widely produced in target C-11 primary precursor. Methylation reactions are commonly used for the production of many of the key 11C-tracers. Palladium-mediated C-11 carbonylation reactions are most widely exploited and used to effectively label imides, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amides, and acrylamides. N-13 labelled amines are of interest for improving positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging and representing their metabolism. Oxygen-15 is generally produced in target via the bombardment of nitrogen gas with deuterons. The majority of O-15 chemistry is therefore based on the production of small molecules either directly within the cyclotron target or via one chemical transformation using high temperature gas phase methods.

  • 22.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Golker, Kerstin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Henschel, Henning
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Karlsson, Björn C. G.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Olsson, Gustaf D.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Rosengren, Annika M.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Shoravi, Siamak
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Wiklander, Jesper G.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Rational molecularly imprinted polymer design: theoretical and computational strategies2013In: Molecular Imprinting: Principles and Applications of Micro- and Nanostructured Polymers / [ed] Ye, L, London: Pan Stanford Publishing, 2013, p. 71-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC. Linnaeus Univ, Bioorgan & Biophys Chem Lab, Ctr Biomat Chem, Dept Chem & Biomed, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Chavan, Swapnil
    Linnaeus Univ, Bioorgan & Biophys Chem Lab, Ctr Biomat Chem, Dept Chem & Biomed, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Golker, Kerstin
    Linnaeus Univ, Bioorgan & Biophys Chem Lab, Ctr Biomat Chem, Dept Chem & Biomed, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Björn C. G.
    Linnaeus Univ, Bioorgan & Biophys Chem Lab, Ctr Biomat Chem, Dept Chem & Biomed, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Olsson, Gustaf D.
    Linnaeus Univ, Bioorgan & Biophys Chem Lab, Ctr Biomat Chem, Dept Chem & Biomed, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Rosengren, Annika M.
    Linnaeus Univ, Bioorgan & Biophys Chem Lab, Ctr Biomat Chem, Dept Chem & Biomed, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian
    Linnaeus Univ, Bioorgan & Biophys Chem Lab, Ctr Biomat Chem, Dept Chem & Biomed, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Wiklander, Jesper G.
    Linnaeus Univ, Bioorgan & Biophys Chem Lab, Ctr Biomat Chem, Dept Chem & Biomed, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Theoretical and Computational Strategies for the Study of the Molecular Imprinting Process and Polymer Performance2015In: Molecularly Imprinted Polymers In Biotechnology, Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2015, p. 25-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of in silico strategies for the study of the molecular imprinting process and the properties of molecularly imprinted materials has been driven by a growing awareness of the inherent complexity of these systems and even by an increased awareness of the potential of these materials for use in a range of application areas. Here we highlight the development of theoretical and computational strategies that are contributing to an improved understanding of the mechanisms underlying molecularly imprinted material synthesis and performance, and even their rational design.

  • 24.
    Nicholls, Ian Alan
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Piletsky, Sergey A.
    Chen, Biening
    Chianella, Iva
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Thermodynamic considerations and the use of molecular modeling as a tool for predicting MIP performance2005In: Molecularly imprinted materials: science and technology / [ed] Mingdi Yan and Olof Ramström, New York: Marcel Dekker, 2005, 1, p. 363-393Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25. Odell, L. R.
    et al.
    Sävmarker, J.
    Lindh, J.
    Nilsson, P.
    Larhed, M.
    7.18 Addition Reactions with Formation of Carbon–Carbon Bonds: (v) The Oxidative Heck Reaction2014In: Comprehensive Organic Synthesis II (Second Edition), Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2014, p. 492-537Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The Heck reaction, generally defined as the substitution of a vinylic hydrogen with an aryl, vinyl, or benzyl group, is widely regarded as one of the premier synthetic tools for the construction of new C–C bonds. The oxidative Heck reaction, which commences with the generation of the key arylpalladium species under palladium(II) catalysis, has emerged as a powerful alternative to the palladium(0)-catalyzed Mizoroki−Heck reaction over the past decade. This chapter gives an overview of the various olefin and aryl/vinyl substrate classes that have been utilized in this reaction. The material is organized according to the reaction type (inter- or intramolecular), the electronic nature of the olefin (electron-poor, electron-rich, or neutral), and the olefin coupling partner. Special emphasis is given to some of the more recent advances in this area and, where applicable, a critical review of the most synthetically useful methods is presented.

  • 26.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Arylation with Diaryliodonium Salts2016In: Hypervalent Iodine Chemistry / [ed] Thomas Wirth, Springer, 2016, p. 135-166Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on recent developments in metal-free and metal-catalyzed arylations with diaryliodonium salts (diaryl-λ3-iodanes). Synthetic routes to diaryliodonium salts are briefly described, and chemoselectivity trends with unsymmetric iodonium salts are discussed.

  • 27.
    Olofsson, Berit
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Somfai, Peter
    Organisk kemi, KTH.
    Vinylepoxides in Organic Synthesis2006In: Aziridines and Epoxides in Organic Synthesis, Wiley-VCH: Weinheim , 2006, p. 315-347Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vinylepoxides have become important intermediates in organic synthesis. The main reason for this is the development of selective methods for their subsequent transformations. As vinylepoxides are a special type of allylic electrophiles, it is necessary to control both the regioselectivity and the diastereoselectivity in their reactions with nucleophiles. The practical usefulness of vinylepoxides in synthesis will, however, always be dictated by their availability. Several methods for the asymmetric preparation of vinyloxiranes have been developed and it can be expected that the use of these compounds in organic synthesis will increase. This chapter starts with a discussion of the available techniques for preparing vinylepoxides, with emphasis on asymmetric methods. In the second part various transformations of vinylepoxides are summarized.

  • 28.
    Ottosson, H
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry.
    Guliashvili, T
    El-Sayed, I.
    Thermolytic Formation and Trapping of Silenes Strongly Influenced by Reversed Polarization2003In: Organosilicon Chemostry V - From Molecules to Materials, Wiley-VCH , 2003, p. 78-81Chapter in book (Other scientific)
  • 29.
    Persson, Anders J.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    Applying ethical criteria for privacy2005In: The ethics of workplace privacy, Bryssel: P.I.E.- Peter Lang S.A. , 2005, p. 137-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Pilarski, Lukasz T.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Diphenyliodonium hexafluorophosphate2011In: Encyclopedia of Reagents for Organic Synthesis, John Wiley & Sons, 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Rotticci, Didier
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Ottosson, Jenny
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Norin, Torbjörn
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Hult, Karl
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Candida Antarctica lipase B: A tool for the preparation of optically active alcohols2001In: Methods in Biotechnology 15: Enzymes in Nonaqueous Solvents, Humana Press, 2001, Vol. 15, p. 261-276Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Russo, Francesco
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Odell, Luke R
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Kristofer
    Nilsson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Larhed, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Microwave-Heated Transition Metal-Catalyzed Coupling Reactions2012In: Microwaves in Organic Synthesis / [ed] de la Hoz, A, Loupy, A, Weinheim: Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2012, 3, p. 607-672Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33. Samec, Joseph S. M.
    et al.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    1-Hydroxytetraphenylcyclopentadienyl-(tetraphenyl-2,4-cyclopentadien-1-one)-μ-hydrotetracarbonyldiruthenium(II)2009In: Encyclopedia of Reagents for Organic Synthesis, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. , 2009, 2, p. 5557-5564Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Sane, Prafullachandra Vishnu
    et al.
    Jain Irrigation Systems Limited, Jalgaon, India.
    Ivanov, Alexander G.
    Department of Biology and The Biotron, Experimental Climate Change Research Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
    Öquist, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Huener, Norman P. A.
    Department of Biology and The Biotron, Experimental Climate Change Research Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
    Thermoluminescence2012In: Photosynthesis: Plastid Biology, Energy Conversion and Carbon Assimilation / [ed] Julian J. Eaton-Rye,Baishnab C. Tripathy, Thomas D. Sharkey, Springer Netherlands, 2012, p. 445-474Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermo luminescence (TL) of photosynthetic membranes was discovered by William Arnold and Helen Sherwood in 1957. In the last half century, several studies have elucidated the mechanism of TL emission, which showed that the recombination of different charge pairs generated and trapped during pre-illumination are responsible for the observed light emission. Since most of the TL bands originate within Photosystem II (PS II), the technique of TL has become a useful complementary tool to chlorophyll a fluorescence to probe subtle changes in PS II photochemistry. The technique is simple and non-invasive; it has been successfully used to study leaf, cells, thylakoids and even reaction center preparations. The TL technique provides quick information about the redox potential changes of the bound primary quinone (Q(A)) and the secondary quinone (Q(B)) acceptors of PS II; TL has been extensively used to study the effects of photoinhibition, mutations, stresses and myriad responses of the photosynthetic apparatus during acclimation and adaptation. This chapter reviews crucial evidence for the identification of charge pairs responsible for the generation of different TL bands; the relationship of these bands to the components of delayed light emission; responses to excitation pressure arising out of environmental factors; methodology, and instrumentation. A model based on the detailed analysis of the redox shifts of the PS II electron acceptors Q(A) and Q(B), explaining the possibility of non-radiative dissipation of excess light energy within the reaction center of PS II (reaction center quenching) and its physiological significance in photoprotection of the photosynthetic membranes has been suggested. Developments in the analysis of biophysical parameters and the non-adherence of photosynthetic TL to the analysis by the 1945 theory of J.T. Randall and M.H.F. Wilkins have been briefly reviewed.

  • 35.
    Selander, Nicklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    [2,6-Bis[(phenylseleno-κSe)methyl]phenyl-κC]chloropalladium2009In: Encyclopedia of Reagents for Organic Synthesis, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Selander, Nicklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Efficient synthesis of α-amino acids via organoboronate reagents2009In: Asymmetric Synthesis and Application of α-Amino Acids / [ed] Vadim A. Soloshonok and Kunisuke Izawa, Washington, DC, USA: American Chemical Society , 2009, p. 190-202Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Sivaev, I.B
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry.
    Sjöberg, S
    Bregadze, V.I.
    The Synthesis of Functional Derivatives of the [1-CB9H10]- Anion for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy2003In: Boron Chemistry at the Beginning of the 21st Century. Y.N Bubnov, (ed), Editoral URSS, Scientific Literature and Textbooks , 2003, p. 333-337Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Somfai, Peter
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Non-Enzymatic Kinetic Resolution of Secondary Alcohols2008In: Organic Synthesis Set, Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2008, p. 175-181Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Ståhle, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    NMR Chemical Shift Predictions and Structural Elucidation of Oligo- and Polysaccharides by the Computer Program CASPER2017In: NMR in Glycoscience and Glycotechnology / [ed] Koichi Kato, Thomas Peters, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2017, p. 335-352Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glycans are often linked to proteins or lipids in the form of glycoconjugates but these highly complex molecules also have biological functions as oligosaccharides per se. The limited dispersion in NMR spectra of carbohydrates makes their analysis and interpretation very cumbersome. The computer program CASPER, which is a web-based tool, facilitates prediction 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of oligo- or polysaccharide structures defined by the user, makes it possible to carry out an NMR-based sugar analysis including determination of absolute configuration and to perform structure elucidation of unknown glycans using unassigned NMR spectra as input to the program. The output from the program contains, inter alia, tentatively assigned NMR resonances, proposed sugar components, structural suggestions ranked according to the similarity between their predicted chemical shifts and the experimental data as well as 3D structures in pdb-format generated seamlessly by the CarbBuilder program as a part of the CASPER-GUI.

  • 40.
    Talyzin, Alexandr
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Fulleranes by direct reaction with hydrogen gas at elevated conditions2010In: Fulleranes: the hydrogenated fullerenes / [ed] Franco Cataldo, Susana Iglesias-Groth, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2010, p. 85-103Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reaction of solid fullerenes with hydrogen gas occurs with or without catalysts at elevated conditions. Composition of hydrofullerene mixture obtained in this reaction depends strongly on temperature (350–450°C), hydrogen pressure (typically 10–120 bar) and duration of treatment. Saturation of hydrogenation occurs after tens of hours, depending on temperature of reaction. In case of extra strong hydrogenation prolonged reaction leads to formation of fulleranes with composition C60Hx approaching number of hydrogen atoms X = 60. These fulleranes are highly unstable and decompose first with formation of fragmented hydrofullerenes with progressively smaller number of carbon atoms C59, C58, C57 etc., followed by collapse of cage structure. Since the collapse occurs at the conditions of high temperature and high hydrogen pressure, all breaking C–C bonds are saturated immediately with hydrogen and new C–H bonds are formed. Therefore, large fragments of fullerane molecules are able to survive and large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH’s) formed as a result of cage structure collapse.

  • 41.
    Tolmachev, V.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry.
    Bruskin, A.
    Orlova, A.
    Winberg, K.J.
    Sivaevv, I.B.
    Nestor, M., Lundqvist, H.
    Sjöberg, S.
    Radiohalogenated Polyhedral Borate Anaions for use in Targeted Oncological Radionuclide Therapy, Some Recent Developments2003In: Boron Chemistry at the Beginning of the 21st Century. Y.N Bubnov, Editoral URSS, Scientific Literature and Textbooks,, Moscow , 2003, p. 338-3342Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Trejos, Alejandro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Odell, Luke R
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Alkenes with Metal-Directing Groups as Reaction Components2013In: Science of Synthesis: Cross-Coupling and Heck-Type Reactions, Volume 3, Metal-Catalyzed Heck-Type Reactions and C-C Cross Coupling via C–H Activation / [ed] Mats Larhed, Stuttgart: Georg Thieme Verlag KG, 2013, p. 345-390Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Zhang, Wei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Franzen, Johan.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Asymmetric catalytic synthesis of corynanthe and ipecac alkaloids2012In: Targets in Heterocyclic Systems: Chemistry and Properties / [ed] Orazio A. Attanasi; Domenico Spinelli, Societa Chimica Italiana , 2012, p. 31-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corynanthe and ipecac alkaloids constitute a large group of natural occurring alkaloids that demonstrate a vast variety of bioactivity and have a long history of usage as herbal drugs. Both the corynanthe and ipecac alkaloids share a common structural unit with a quinolizidine ring fused with a benzo- or indolo-group and three stereocentres wherein one is a ring-junction stereocentre. From synthetic point of view, these natural products represent an intriguing challenge and over the years several strategies toward the asymmetric total synthesis of corynanthe and ipecac alkaloids have been devised and the majority of these are target specific natural-pool based strategies. However, during the last few years, several efficient and diverse strategies based on asymmetric catalysis and one-pot cascade protocols as the key-steps have emerged. In this mini-review the attention is to give an overview of these strategies.

  • 44.
    Zhao, Gui-Ling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Catalytic asymmetric Baylis–Hillman reactions and surroundings2010In: Catalytic Asymmetric Conjugate Reactions / [ed] Armando Córdova, Weinheim: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA , 2010, 1, p. 393-438Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Zhao, Gui-Ling
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Córdova, Armando
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    ECAs of organolithium reagents, Grignard reagents, and examples of Cu-catalyzed ECAs2010In: Catalytic Asymmetric Conjugate Reactions / [ed] Armando Córdova, Weinheim: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA , 2010, 1, p. 145-167Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46. Zhao, Gui-Ling
    et al.
    Córdova, Armando
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    ECAs of Organolithium reagents, Grignard reagents and Examples of Cu-Catalyzed ECAs2010In: Catalytic Asymmetric Conjugate Reactions, Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
1 - 46 of 46
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