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  • 1.
    Adrian Meredith, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Björklund, Catarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jansson, Katarina
    Hallberg, Anders
    Institutionen för läkemedelskemi, Uppsala universitet.
    Rosenquist, Åsa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    P2’-truncated BACE-1 inhibitors with a novel hydroxethylene-like core2010In: European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0223-5234, E-ISSN 1768-3254, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 542-554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly potent BACE-1 protease inhibitors derived from a novel hydroxyethylene-like core structure were recently developed by our group using X-ray crystal structure data and molecular modelling. In a continuation of this work guided by molecular modelling we have explored a truncated core motif where the P2’ amide group is replaced by an ether linkage resulting in a set of alkoxy, aryloxy and alkylaryl groups, with the overall aim to reduce molecular weight and the number of amide bonds to increase permeability and bestow the inhibitors with drug-like features. The most potent of these inhibitors displayed a BACE-1 IC50 value of 140 nM. The synthesis of these BACE-1 inhibitors utilizes readily available starting materials, furnishing the target compounds in good overall yields.

  • 2.
    Adrian Meredith, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wallberg, Hans
    Vrang, Lotta
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Centre for Synthesis and Chemical Biology, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland.
    Parkes, Kevin
    Hallberg, Anders
    Institutionen för läkemedelskemi, Uppsala universitet.
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Design and Synthesis of Novel P2 Substituents in Diol-based HIV Protease Inhibitors2010In: European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0223-5234, E-ISSN 1768-3254, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 160-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis and SAR of HIV-1 protease inhibitors containing novel P2 structural elements are presented. The inhibitors were designed having hydrogen bond accepting P2 substituents to probe potential favorable interactions to Asp-29/Asp-30 of the HIV-1 protease backbone utilizing inhibitor 3 as a model template. Several inhibitors were synthesized from an L-Val-methylamide P2 motif by appending hydrogen bonding moieties from either the isopropyl side chain or from the methylamide portion. The most promising inhibitors 4a and 4e displayed Ki values of 1.0 nM and 0.7 nM respectively and EC50 values in the MT4 cell-based assay of 0.17 µM and 0.33 µM respectively, a slight loss in potency compared to lead inhibitor 3. These inhibitors were also tested against an HIV protease inhibitor resistant strain carrying the M46I, V82F, and I84V mutations. Inhibitors 4a and 4e displayed a 3 and 4 fold change respectively compared with HIV wild type, whereas lead inhibitor 3 showed a higher 9 fold change. This study further demonstrate the chemical tractability of the approach where various P2 substituents can be introduced in just one chemical step from lactone x enabling facile modifications of the overall properties in this inhibitor class.

  • 3.
    Aydin, Juhanes
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Senthil, Kumar K
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sayah, Mahmoud J
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wallner, Olov A
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J
    Synthesis and catalytic application of chiral 1,1'-Bi-2-naphthol- and biphenanthrol-based pincer complexes: selective allylation of sulfonimines with allyl stannane and allyl trifluoroborate.2007In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, Vol. 72, no 13, p. 4689-4697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New easily accessible 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol- (BINOL-) and biphenanthrol-based chiral pincer complex catalysts were prepared for selective (up to 85% enantiomeric excess) allylation of sulfonimines. The chiral pincer complexes were prepared by a flexible modular approach allowing an efficient tuning of the selectivity of the catalysts. By employment of the different enantiomeric forms of the catalysts, both enantiomers of the homoallylic amines could be selectively obtained. Both allyl stannanes and allyl trifluoroborates can be employed as allyl sources in the reactions. The biphenanthrol-based complexes gave higher selectivity than the substituted BINOL-based analogues, probably because of the well-shaped chiral pocket generated by employment of the biphenanthrol complexes. The enantioselective allylation of sulfonimines presented in this study has important implications for the mechanism given for the pincer complex-catalyzed allylation reactions, confirming that this process takes place without involvement of palladium(0) species.

  • 4.
    Aydin, Juhanes
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palladium-pincer complex catalyzed C-C coupling of allyl nitriles with tosyl imines via regioselective allylic C-H bond functionalization2008In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, Vol. 10, no 13, p. 2881-2884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mechanistically new palladium-pincer complex catalyzed allylation of sulfonimines is presented. This reaction involves C-H bond functionalization of allyl nitriles under mild conditions. The reaction proceeds with a high regioselectivity, without allyl rearrangement of the product. Modeling studies indicate that the carbon-carbon bond formation process proceeds via (η1-allyl)palladium pincer complex intermediates.

  • 5.
    Ayesa, Susana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lindquist, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Agback, Tatiana
    Benkestock, Kurt
    Classon, Björn
    Henderson, Ian
    Hewitt, Ellen
    Jansson, Katarina
    Kallin, Anders
    Sheppard, Dave
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Solid-phase parallel synthesis and SAR of 4-amidofuran-3-one inhibitors of cathepsin S: Effect of sulfonamides P3 substituents on potency and selectivity.2009In: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0968-0896, E-ISSN 1464-3391, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 1307-1324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly potent and selective 4-amidofuran-3-one inhibitors of cathepsin S are described. The synthesis and structure–activity relationship of a series of inhibitors with a sulfonamide moiety in the P3 position is presented. Several members of the series show sub-nanomolar inhibition of the target enzyme as well as an excellent selectivity profile and good cellular potency. Molecular modeling of the most interesting inhibitors describes interactions in the extended S3 pocket and explains the observed selectivity towards cathepsin K.

  • 6.
    Bielawski, Marcin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Efficient one-pot synthesis of bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)iodonium triflate2009In: Organic Syntheses, ISSN 0078-6209, Vol. 86, p. 308-314Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Björklund, Catarina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jansson, Katarina
    Lindberg, Jimmy
    Vrang, Lotta
    Hallberg, Anders
    Rosenquist, Åsa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Discovery of Potent BACE-1 Inhibitors Containing a New Hydroxyethylene (HE) Scaffold: Exploration of P1’ Alkoxy Residues and an Aminoethylene (AE) Central Core2010In: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0968-0896, E-ISSN 1464-3391, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 1711-1723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a preceding study we have described the development of a new hydroxyethylene (HE) core motif displaying P1 aryloxymethyl and P1’ methoxy substituents delivering potent BACE-1 inhibitors. In a continuation of this work we have now explored the SAR of the S1’ pocket by introducing a set of P1’ alkoxy groups and evaluated them as BACE-1 inhibitors. Previously the P1 and P1’ positions of the classical HE template have been relatively little explored due to the complexity of the chemical routes involved in modifications at these positions. However, the chemistries developed for the current HE template renders substituents in both the P1 and P1’ positions readily available for SAR exploration. The BACE-1 inhibitors prepared displayed IC50 values in the range of 4-45 nM, where the most potent compounds featured small P1’ groups. The cathepsin D selectivity which was high for the smallest P1’ sustituents (P1’=ethoxy, fold selectively >600) dropped for larger groups (P1’=benzyloxy, fold selectivity of 1.6). We have also confirmed the importance of both the hydroxyl group and its stereochemistry preference for this HE transition state isostere by preparing both the deoxygenated analogue and by inverting the configuration of the hydroxyl group to the R-configuration, which as expected resulted in large activity drops. Finally substituting the hydroxyl group by an amino group having the same configuration (S), which previously have been described to deliver potent BACE-1 inhibitors with advantageous properties, surprisingly resulted in a large drop in the inhibitory activity.

  • 8.
    Björklund, Catarina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Benkestock, Kurt
    Borkakoti, Neera
    Jansson, Katarina
    Lindberg, Jimmy
    Vrang, Lotta
    Hallberg, Anders
    Rosenquist, Åsa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Design and synthesis of potent and selective BACE-1 inhibitors2010In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 1458-1464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several highly potent BACE-1 protease inhibitors have been developed from an inhibitor series containing a novel hydroxyethylene (HE) core structure displaying aryloxymethyl or benzyloxymethyl P1 side chains and a methoxy P1’ side chain. The target molecules were readily synthesized from chiral carbohydrate starting materials, furnishing the inhibitor compounds in good overall yields. The inhibitors show both high BACE-1 potency and good selectivity against cathepsin D, where the most potent inhibitor furnish a BACE-1 IC50 value of 0.32 nM and displays > 3000 fold selectivity over cathepsin D.

  • 9. Cribiù, Riccardo
    et al.
    Borbas, K. Eszter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Cumpstey, Ian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    On the synthesis of vinyl and phenyl C-furanosides by stereospecific debenzylative cycloetherification2009In: Tetrahedron, ISSN 0040-4020, E-ISSN 1464-5416, Vol. 65, no 10, p. 2022-2031Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Córdova, Armando
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ibrahem, Ismail
    Casas, Jesús
    Sundén, Henrik
    Engqvist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Reyes, Efraim
    Amino Acid-Catalyzed Neogenesis of Carbohydrates: A Plausible Ancient Transformation2005In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 11, no 16, p. 4772-4784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hexose sugars play a fundamental role in vital biochemical processes and their biosynthesis is achieved through enzyme-catalyzed pathways. Herein we disclose the ability of amino acids to catalyze the asymmetric neogenesis of carbohydrates by sequential cross-aldol reactions. The amino acids mediate the asymmetric de novo synthesis of natural L- and D-hexoses and their analogues with excellent stereoselectivity in organic solvents. In some cases, the four new stereocenters are assembled with almost absolute stereocontrol. The unique feature of these results is that, when an amino acid is employed as the catalyst, a single reaction sequence can convert a protected glycol aldehyde into a hexose in one step. For example, proline and its derivatives catalyze the asymmetric neogenesis of allose with >99 % ee in one chemical manipulation. Furthermore, all amino acids tested catalyzed the asymmetric formation of natural sugars under prebiotic conditions, with alanine being the smallest catalyst. The inherent simplicity of this catalytic process suggests that a catalytic prebiotic “gluconeogenesis” may occur, in which amino acids transfer their stereochemical information to sugars. In addition, the amino acid catalyzed stereoselective sequential cross-aldol reactions were performed as a two-step procedure with different aldehydes as acceptors and nucleophiles. The employment of two different amino acids as catalysts for the iterative direct aldol reactions enabled the asymmetric synthesis of deoxysugars with >99 % ee. In addition, the direct amino acid catalyzed C2+C2+C2 methodology is a new entry for the short, highly enantioselective de novo synthesis of carbohydrate derivatives, isotope-labeled sugars, and polyketide natural products. The one-pot asymmetric de novo syntheses of deoxy and polyketide carbohydrates involved a novel dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation (DYKAT) mediated by an amino acid.

  • 11.
    Dziedzic, Pawel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Weibiao, Zou
    Hafrén, Jonas
    Córdova, Armando
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    The small peptide-catalyzed direct asymmetric aldol reaction in water2006In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 4, p. 38-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. George, Riham F.
    et al.
    Ismail, Nasser S. M.
    Stawinski, Jacek
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Girgis, Adel S.
    Design, synthesis and QSAR studies of dispiroindole derivatives as new antiproliferative agents2013In: European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0223-5234, E-ISSN 1768-3254, Vol. 68, p. 339-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A variety of 4'-ary1-3-(arylmethylidene)-1 ''-[(cyclic-amino)methylene]-1'-methyl-dispiro[cyclohexane-1,3'-pyrrolidine-2',3 ''-[3H]indole]-2,2 ''(1H)-diones 4a-u were prepared via reaction of 2E,6E-bis(arylidene)-1-cyclohexanones 1a-i with azomethine ylides, generated in situ via a decarboxylative condensation of isatins 2a-c and sarcosine (3). Single crystal X-ray study of 4a, revealed structural and stereochemical features of these derivatives. While most of the synthesized compounds exhibit mild antitumor properties when tested against various human tumor cell lines (HEPG2 liver, HELA cervical and PD prostate cancers), three of them, 4d and 4p (active against HEPG2), and compound 4g (active against HELA), demonstrated higher activities, that were close or even higher than that of the reference standard Doxorubicin. QSAR studies revealed good predictive and statistically significant 3 descriptor models (r(2) = 0.903-0.812, r(adjusted)(2) = 0.855-0.672, r(prediction)(2) = 0.773-0.605).

  • 13. Hammarström, Lars G. J.
    et al.
    Harmel, Robert K.
    Granath, Mikael
    Ringom, Rune
    Gravenfors, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Färnegårdh, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Svensson, Per H.
    Wennman, David
    Lundin, Göran
    Roddis, Ylva
    Kitambi, Satish S.
    Bernlind, Alexandra
    Lehmann, Fredrik
    Ernfors, Patrik
    The Oncolytic Efficacy and in Vivo Pharmacokinetics of [2-(4-Chlorophenyl)quinolin-4-yl](piperidine-2-yl)methanol (Vacquinol-1) Are Governed by Distinct Stereochemical Features2016In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 59, no 18, p. 8577-8592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma remains an incurable brain cancer. Drugs developed in the past 20 years have not improved the prognosis for patients, necessitating the development of new treatments. We have previously reported the therapeutic potential of the quinoline methanol Vacquinol-1 (1) that targets glioblastoma cells and induces cell death by catastrophic vacuolization. Compound 1 is a mixture of four stereoisomers due to the two adjacent stereogenic centers in the molecule, complicating further development in the preclinical setting. This work describes the isolation and characterization of the individual isomers of 1 and shows that these display stereospecific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic features. In addition, we present a stereoselective synthesis of the active isomers, providing a basis for further development of this compound series into a novel experimental therapeutic for glioblastoma.

  • 14.
    Jonsson, K. Hanna M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Weintraub, Andrej
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Structural determination of the O-antigenic polysaccharide from Escherichia coli O742009In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 344, no 12, p. 1592-1595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of the O-antigen polysaccharide (PS) from Escherichia coli O74 has been determined. Component analysis, together with 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy as well as 1H,15N-HSQC experiments were employed to elucidate the structure. Inter-residue correlations were determined by 1H,1H-NOESY and 1H,13C-heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation experiments. The PS is composed of tetrasaccharide repeating units with the following structure:

    Full-size image (5K)

    Cross-peaks of low intensity from an α-linked N-acetylglucosamine residue were present in the NMR spectra, and spectral analysis indicates that they originate from the penultimate residue in the polysaccharide. Consequently, the biological repeating unit has a 3-substituted N-acetyl-d-glucosamine residue at its reducing end. The 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shifts of the α- and β-anomeric forms of d-Fucp3NAc are also reported. The repeating unit of the E. coli O74 O-antigen is identical to that of the capsular polysaccharide from E. coli K45.

  • 15.
    Lavén, Gaston
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stawinski, Jacek
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palladium(0)-catalyzed benzylation of H-phosphonate diesters: An efficient entry to benzylphosphonates2009In: Synlett: Accounts and Rapid Communications in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0936-5214, E-ISSN 1437-2096, no 2, p. 225-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new, efficient method for the synthesis of benzylphosphonate diesters via a palladium(0)-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction between benzyl halides and H-phosphonate diesters, using Pd(OAc)2 as a palladium source and Xantphos as a supporting ligand, has been developed.

  • 16.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Yu, Jian-Guo
    Liu, Ruo-Zhuang
    Theoretical study of the RNA hydrolysis mechanism of the dinuclear zinc enzyme RNase Z2009In: European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-1948, E-ISSN 1099-1948, Vol. 2009, no 20, p. 2967-2972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RNase Z is a dinuclear zinc enzyme that catalyzes the removal of the tRNA 3'-end trailer. Density functional theory is used to investigate the phosphodiester hydrolysis mechanism of this enzyme with a model of the active site constructed on the basis of the crystal structure. The calculations imply that the reaction proceeds through two steps. The first step is a nucleophihc attack by a bridging hydroxide coupled with protonation of the leaving group by a Glu-His diad. Subsequently, a water molecule activated by the same Glu-His diad makes a reverse attack, regenerating the bridging hydroxide. The second step is calculated to be the rate-limiting step with a barrier of 18 kcal/mol, in good agreement with experimental kinetic studies. Both zinc ions participate in substrate binding and orientation, facilitating nucleophilic attack. In addition, they act as electrophilic catalysts to stabilize the pentacoordinate trigonal-bipyramidal transition states.

  • 17. Mbunde, Mourice Victor Nyangabo
    et al.
    Innocent, Ester
    Mabiki, Faith
    Andersson, Pher G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ethnobotanical survey and toxicity evaluation of medicinal plants used for fungal remedy in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania2017In: Journal of Intercultural Ethnopharmacology, ISSN 2146-8397, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 84-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aim: Some of the antifungal drugs used in the current treatments regime are responding to antimicrobial resistance. In rural areas of Southern Tanzania, indigenous people use antifungal drugs alone or together with medicinal plants to curb the effects of antibiotic resistance. This study documented ethnobotanical information of medicinal plants used for managing fungal infections in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania and further assess their safety. Materials and Methods: Ethnobotanical survey was conducted in Makete and Mufindi districts between July 2014 and December 2015 using semi-structured questionnaires followed by two focus group discussions to verify respondents' information. Cytotoxicity study was conducted on extracts of collected plants using brine shrimp lethality test and analyzed by MS Excel 2013 program. Results: During this survey about 46 plant species belonging to 28 families of angiosperms were reported to be traditionally useful in managing fungal and other health conditions. Among these, Terminalia sericea, Aloe nutii, Aloe lateritia, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, Zanthoxylum deremense, and Kigelia africana were frequently mentioned to be used for managing fungal infections. The preparation of these herbals was mostly by boiling plant parts especially the leaves and roots. Cytotoxicity study revealed that most of the plants tested were nontoxic with LC50 > 100 which implies that most compounds from these plants are safe for therapeutic use. The dichloromethane extract of Croton macrostachyus recorded the highest with LC50 value 12.94 mu g/ml. The ethnobotanical survey correlated well with documented literature from elsewhere about the bioactivity of most plants. Conclusions: The ethnobotanical survey has revealed that traditional healers are rich of knowledge to build on for therapeutic studies. Most of the plants are safe for use; and thus can be considered for further studies on drug discovery.

  • 18.
    Merritt, Eleanor A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Malmgren, Joel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Klinke, Felix J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of diaryliodonium triflates using environmentally benign oxidizing agents2009In: Synlett: Accounts and Rapid Communications in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0936-5214, E-ISSN 1437-2096, no 14, p. 2277-2280Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Olsson, Vilhelm
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sebelius, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Selander, Nicklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Direct Boronation of Allyl Alcohols with Diboronic Acid Using Palladium Pincer-Complex Catalysis. A Remarkably Facile Allylic Displacement of the Hydroxy Group under Mild Reaction Conditions2006In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 128, no 14, p. 4588-4589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allyl alcohols were converted to allyl boronic acids and subsequently to trifluoro(allyl)borates with tetrahydroxy diboron using palladium pincer-complex catalysis. These reactions are regio- and stereoselective proceeding with high isolated yields. Competitive boronation experiments indicate that under the applied reaction conditions the allylic displacement of a hydroxy group is faster than the displacement of an acetate leaving group. It is assumed that the hydroxy group of the allyl alcohol is converted to a diboronic acid ester functionality, which can easily be substituted.

  • 20.
    Privalov, Timofei
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Boschloo, Gerrit
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    Svensson, Per H.
    Kloo, Lars
    A study of the interactions between I-/I3- redox , mediators amd organometallic sensitizing dyes in solar cells2009In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 113, no 2, p. 783-790Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Samec, Joseph S M
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mony, Laetitia
    Bäckvall, Jan-E
    Efficient Ruthenium-Catalyzed Transfer Hydrogenation of Functionalized Imines by Isopropanol under Controlled Microwave Heating2005In: Canadian journal of chemistry (Print), ISSN 0008-4042, E-ISSN 1480-3291, Vol. 83, no 6, p. 909-916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transfer hydrogenation of various functionalized imines by isopropanol catalyzed by [Ru(CO)(2)(Ph4C4CO)](2) (3) has been studied. The use of either an oil bath or controlled microwave heating in toluene led to an efficient procedure with high turnover frequencies and the product amines were obtained in high yields. An advantage with catalyst 3 over the conventional [Ru-2(CO)(4)(mu-H)(Ph4C4COHOCC4Ph4)] (1) is the absence of an initiation period, which results in a faster reaction with 3 as compared to 1.

  • 22. Sjödin, Martin
    et al.
    Styring, Stenbjörn
    Wolpher, Henriette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Xu, Yunhua
    Sun, Licheng
    Hammarström, Leif
    Switching the redox mechanism: Models for proton coupled electron transfer from tyrosine and tryptophan2005In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 127, no 11, p. 3855-3863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The coupling of electron and proton transfer is an important controlling factor in radical proteins, such as photosystem II, ribinucleotide reductase, cytochrome oxidases, and DNA photolyase. This was investigated in model complexes in which a tyrosine or tryptophan residue was oxidized by a laser-flash generated trisbipyridine-Ru-III moiety in an intramolecular, proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction. The PCET was found to proceed in a competition between a stepwise reaction, in which electron transfer is followed by deprotonation of the amino acid radical (ETPT), and a concerted reaction, in which both the electron and proton are transferred in a single reaction step (CEP). Moreover, we found that we could analyze the kinetic data for PCET by Marcus' theory for electron transfer. By altering the solution pH, the strength of the Ru-III oxidant, or the identity of the amino acid, we could induce a switch between the two mechanisms and obtain quantitative data for the parameters that control which one will dominate. The characteristic pH-dependence of the CEP rate (M. Sjodin et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2000, 122, 3932) reflects the pH-dependence of the driving force caused by proton release to the bulk. For the pH-independent ETPT on the other hand, the driving force of the rate-determining ET step is pH-independent and smaller. On the other hand, temperature-dependent data showed that the reorganization energy was higher for CEP, while the pre-exponential factors showed no significant difference between the mechanisms. Thus, the opposing effect of the differences in driving force and reorganization energy determines which of the mechanisms will dominate. Our results show that a concerted mechanism is in general quite likely and provides a low-barrier reaction pathway for weakly exoergonic reactions. In addition, the kinetic isotope effect was much higher for CEP (k(H)/k(D) > 10) than for ETPT (k(H)/k(D) = 2), consistent with significant changes along the proton reaction coordinate in the rate-determining step of CEP.

  • 23. Wangsell, Fredrik
    et al.
    Nordeman, Patrik
    Savmarker, Jonas
    Emanuelsson, Rikard
    Jansson, Katarina
    Lindberg, Jimmy
    Rosenquist, Asa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Larhed, Mats
    Investigation of alpha-phenylnorstatine and alpha-benzylnorstatine as transition state isostere motifs in the search for new BACE-1 inhibitors2011In: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0968-0896, E-ISSN 1464-3391, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 145-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inhibition of the BACE-1 protease enzyme has over the recent decade developed into a promising drug strategy for Alzheimer therapy. In this report, more than 20 new BACE-1 protease inhibitors based on alpha-phenylnorstatine, alpha-benzylnorstatine, iso-serine, and beta-alanine moieties have been prepared. The inhibitors were synthesized by applying Fmoc solid phase methodology and evaluated for their inhibitory properties. The most potent inhibitor, tert-alcohol containing (R)-12 (IC(50) = 0.19 mu M) was co-crystallized in the active site of the BACE-1 protease, furnishing a novel binding mode in which the N-terminal amine makes a hydrogen bond to one of the catalytic aspartic acids.

  • 24. Zerbetto, Mirco
    et al.
    Polimeno, Antonino
    Kotsyubynskyy, Dmytro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Ghalebani, Leila
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Kowalewski, Jozef
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Meirovitch, Eva
    Olsson, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    An integrated approach to NMR spin relaxation in flexible biomolecules: Application to β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)-α-D-mannopyranosyl-OMe2009In: Journal of Chemical Physics, ISSN 0021-9606, E-ISSN 1089-7690, Vol. 131, no 23, p. p234501-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The description of the reorientational dynamics of flexible molecules is a challenging task, in particular when the rates of internal and global motions are comparable. The commonly used simple mode-decoupling models are based on the assumption of statistical independence between these motions. This assumption is not valid when the time scale separation between their rates is small, a situation that was found to arise in oligosaccharides in the context of certain internal motions. To make possible the interpretation of NMR spin relaxation data from such molecules, we developed a comprehensive approach generally applicable to flexible rotators with one internal degree of freedom. This approach integrates a stochastic description of coupled global tumbling and internal torsional motion, quantum chemical calculations of the local potential and the local geometry at the site of the restricted torsion, and hydrodynamics-based calculations of the diffusive properties. The method is applied to the disaccharide -D-Glcp-(16)--D-[6-13C]-Manp-OMe dissolved in a DMSO-d6/D2O cryosolvent. The experimental NMR relaxation parameters, associated with the 13CH2 probe residing at the glycosidic linkage, include 13C T1 and T2 and 13C-{1H} nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) as well as longitudinal and transverse dipole-dipole cross-correlated relaxation rates, acquired in the temperature range of 253–293 K. These data are predicted successfully by the new theory with only the H–C–H angle allowed to vary. Previous attempts to fit these data using mode-decoupling models failed.

  • 25. Zovko, Ana
    et al.
    Novak, Metka
    Haag, Petra
    Kovalerchick, Dimitry
    Holmlund, Teresa
    Färnegårdh, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Ilan, Micha
    Carmeli, Shmuel
    Lewensohn, Rolf
    Viktorsson, Kristina
    Compounds from the marine sponge Cribrochalina vasculum offer a way to target IGF-1R mediated signaling in tumor cells2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 31, p. 50258-50276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work two acetylene alcohols, compound 1 and compound 2, which were isolated and identified from the sponge Cribrochalina vasculum, and which showed antitumor effects were further studied with respect to targets and action mechanisms. Gene expression analyses suggested insulin like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) signaling to be instrumental in controlling anti-tumor efficacy of these compounds in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Indeed compounds 1 and 2 inhibited phosphorylation of IGF-1R beta as well as reduced its target signaling molecules IRS-1 and PDK1 allowing inhibition of pro-survival signaling. In silico docking indicated that compound 1 binds to the kinase domain of IGF-1R at the same binding site as the well known tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1024. Indeed, cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA) confirmed that C. vasculum compound 1 binds to IGF-1R but not to the membrane localized tyrosine kinase receptor EGFR. Importantly, we demonstrate that compound 1 causes IGF-1R beta but not Insulin Receptor degradation specifically in tumor cells with no effects seen in normal diploid fibroblasts. Thus, these compounds hold potential as novel therapeutic agents targeting IGF-1R signaling for anti-tumor treatment.

  • 26. Zovko, Ana
    et al.
    Viktorsson, Kristina
    Haag, Petra
    Kovalerchick, Dimitry
    Farnegardh, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Alimonti, Andrea
    Ilan, Micha
    Carmeli, Shmuel
    Lewensohn, Rolf
    Marine Sponge Cribrochalina vasculum Compounds Activate Intrinsic Apoptotic Signaling and Inhibit Growth Factor Signaling Cascades in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma2014In: Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, ISSN 1535-7163, E-ISSN 1538-8514, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 2941-2954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine-derived compounds have been explored and considered as possible antitumor agents. In this study, we analyzed extracts of the sponge Cribrochalina vasculum for their ability to inhibit tumor cell proliferation. Screening identified two acetylenic compounds of similar structure that showed strong tumor-specific toxicity in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells and small-cell lung carcinoma cells, and less prominent toxicity in ovarian carcinoma, while having no effect on normal cells. These acetylenic compounds were found to cause a time-dependent increase in activation of apoptotic signaling involving cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3, and PARP, as well as apoptotic cell morphology in NSCLC cells, but not in normal fibroblasts. Further analysis demonstrated that these compounds caused conformational change in Bak and Bax, and resulted in loss of mitochondrial potential and cytochrome c release in NSCLC cells. Moreover, a decreased phosphorylation of the growth factor signaling kinases Akt, mTOR, and ERK was evident and an increased phosphorylation of JNK was observed. Thus, these acetylenic compounds hold potential as novel therapeutic agents that should be further explored for NSCLC and other tumor malignancies.

1 - 26 of 26
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