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  • 1.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Arafa, Wael A. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Laine, Tanja M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Shatskiy, Andrey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Substituent Effects in Molecular Ruthenium Water Oxidation Catalysts Based on Amide Ligands2017In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 9, no 9, p. 1583-1587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The production of clean and sustainable energy is considered as one of the most urgent issues for our society. Mastering the oxidation of water to dioxygen is essential for the production of solar fuels. A study of the influence of the substituents on the catalytic activity of a series of mononuclear Ru complexes (2a-e) based on a tetradentate ligand framework is presented. At neutral pH, using [Ru(bpy)(3)](PF6)(3) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) as the terminal oxidant, a good correlation between the turnover frequency (TOF) and the Hammett sigma(meta) parameters was obtained. Additionally, a general pathway for the deactivation of Ru-based catalysts 2a-e during the catalytic oxidation of water through poisoning by carbon monoxide was demonstrated. These results highlight the importance of ligand design for fine-tuning the catalytic activity of water oxidation catalysts.

  • 2.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Shatskiy, Andrey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Laine, Tanja M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Arafa, Wael A. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. University Fayoum, Egypt.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Bjorn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Chemical and Photochemical Water Oxidation Mediated by an Efficient Single-Site Ruthenium Catalyst2016In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564X, Vol. 9, no 24, p. 3448-3456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water oxidation is a fundamental step in artificial photosynthesis for solar fuels production. In this study, we report a single-site Ru-based water oxidation catalyst, housing a dicarboxylate-benzimidazole ligand, that mediates both chemical and light-driven oxidation of water efficiently under neutral conditions. The importance of the incorporation of the negatively charged ligand framework is manifested in the low redox potentials of the developed complex, which allows water oxidation to be driven by the mild one-electron oxidant [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine). Furthermore, combined experimental and DFT studies provide insight into the mechanistic details of the catalytic cycle.

  • 3. Afewerki, Samson
    et al.
    Breistein, Palle
    Deiana, Luca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Dziedzic, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ibrahem, Ismail
    Córdova, Armando
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Catalytic enantioselective β -alkylation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes by combination of transition-metal- and aminocatalysis: Total synthesis of bisabolane sesquiterpenes2011In: Chemistry: a European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, Vol. 17, no 32, p. 8784-8788Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Afewerki, Samson
    et al.
    Ibrahem, Ismail
    Rydfjord, Jonas
    Breistein, Palle
    Córdova, Armando
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Direct Regiospecific and Highly Enantioselective Intermolecular α-Allylic Alkylation of Aldehydes by a Combination of Transition-Metal and Chiral Amine Catalysts2012In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 18, no 10, p. 2972-2977Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first direct intermolecular regiospecific and highly enantioselective a-allylic alkylation of linear aldehydes by a combination of achiral bench-stable Pd0 complexes and simple chiral amines as co-catalysts is disclosed. The co-catalytic asymmetric chemoselective and regiospecific a-allylic alkylation reaction is linked in tandem with in situ reduction to give the corresponding 2-alkyl alcohols with high enantiomeric ratios (up to 98:2 e.r.; e.r.=enantiomeric ratio). It is also an expeditious entry to valuable 2-alkyl substituted hemiacetals, 2-alkyl-butane-1,4-diols, and amines. The concise co-catalytic asymmetric total syntheses of biologically active natural products (e.g., Arundic acid) are disclosed.

  • 5. Agasti, Soumitra
    et al.
    Maity, Soham
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Maiti, Debabrata
    Palladium-Catalyzed Synthesis of 2,3-Disubstituted Benzofurans: An Approach Towards the Synthesis of Deuterium Labeled Compounds2015In: Advanced Synthesis and Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, E-ISSN 1615-4169, Vol. 357, no 10, p. 2331-2338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Palladium-catalyzed oxidative annulations between phenols and alkenylcarboxylic acids produced a library of benzofuran compounds. Depending on the nature of the substitution of the phenol precursor, either 2,3-dialkylbenzofurans or 2-alkyl-3-methylene-2,3-dihydrobenzofurans can be synthesized with excellent regioselectivity. Reactions between conjugated 5-phenylpenta-2,4-dienoic acids and phenol gave 3-alkylidenedihydrobenzofuran alkaloid motifs while biologically active 7-arylbenzofuran derivatives were prepared by starting from 2-phenylphenols. More interestingly, selective incorporation of deuterium from D2O has been discovered, which offers an attractive one-step method to access deuterated compounds.

  • 6.
    Aggarwal, Varinder K.
    et al.
    Bristol University.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
    Enantioselective α-arylation of cyclohexanones with diaryl iodonium salts: Application to the synthesis of (-)-epibatidine.2005In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 44, no 34, p. 5516-5519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The direct asym. α-arylation of prochiral ketones has been effected using chiral lithium amide bases and diaryl iodonium salts. The methodol. has been employed in a short total synthesis of the alkaloid (-)-epibatidine. [on SciFinder(R)]

  • 7.
    Agrawal, Santosh
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martinez-Castro, Elisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Marcos, Rocio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Readily Available Ruthenium Complex for Efficient Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of Aromatic alpha-Hydroxy Ketones2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 2256-2259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A ruthenium complex formed from commercially available [Ru(p-cymene)Cl-2](2) and 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane catalyzes the racemization of aromatic alpha-hydroxy ketones very efficiently at room temperature. The racemization is fully compatible with a kinetic resolution catalyzed by a lipase from Pseudomonas stutzeri. This is the first example of dynamic kinetic resolution of alpha-hydroxy ketones at ambient temperature in which the metal and enzyme catalysts work in concert in one pot at room temperature to give quantitative yields of esters of alpha-hydroxy ketones with very high enantioselectivity.

  • 8.
    Ahlford, Katrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Amino acid-derived amides and hydroxamic acids as ligands for asymmetric transfer hydrogenation in aqueous media2011In: Catalysis communications, ISSN 1566-7367, E-ISSN 1873-3905, Vol. 12, no 12, p. 1118-1121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amides and hydroxamic acids derived from α-amino acids were evaluated as ligands in combination with rhodium and iridium half-sandwich complexes in asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) of ketones. The reactions were performed in aqueous media using lithium formate as hydride source. The catalyst systems turned out to be highly efficient and ees up to 90% were obtained.

  • 9.
    Ahlford, Katrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ekström, Jesper
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zaitsev, Alexey B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ryberg, Per
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Ketones Catalyzed by Amino Acid Derived Rhodium Complexes: On the Origin of Enantioselectivity and Enantioswitchability2009In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 15, no 42, p. 11197-11209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amino acid based thioamides, hydroxamic acids, and hydrazides have been evaluated as ligands in the rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones in 2-propanol. Catalysts containing thioamide ligands derived from L-valine were found to selectively generate the product with an R configuration (95 % ee), whereas the corresponding L-valine-based hydroxamic acids or hydrazides facilitated the formation of the (S)-alcohols (97 and 91 % ee, respectively). The catalytic reduction was examined by performing a structure–activity correlation investigation with differently functionalized or substituted ligands and the results obtained indicate that the major difference between the thioamide and hydroxamic acid based catalysts is the coordination mode of the ligands. Kinetic experiments were performed and the rate constants for the reduction reactions were determined by using rhodium–arene catalysts derived from amino acid thioamide and hydroxamic acid ligands. The data obtained show that the thioamide-based catalyst systems demonstrate a pseudo-first-order dependence on the substrate, whereas pseudo-zero-order dependence was observed for the hydroxamic acid containing catalysts. Furthermore, the kinetic experiments revealed that the rate-limiting steps of the two catalytic systems differ. From the data obtained in the structure–activity correlation investigation and along with the kinetic investigation it was concluded that the enantioswitchable nature of the catalysts studied originates from different ligand coordination, which affects the rate-limiting step of the catalytic reduction reaction.

  • 10.
    Ahlford, Katrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ekström, Jesper
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zaitsev, Alexey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ryberg, Per
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones catalyzed by amino acid derived rhodium complexes: on the origin of enantioselectivity and enantioswitchability: Corrigendum to vol 15(2009) 42, pp. 11197-2010In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 16, no 35, p. 10610-10610Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ahlford, Katrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lind, Jesper
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mäler, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of alkyl and aryl ketones in aqueous media2008In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 832-835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel lipophilic rhodium catalyst was evaluated in the enantioselective transfer hydrogenation of ketones in water using sodium formate as the hydride donor, and in the presence of sodium docecylsulfonate. Alkyl alkyl ketones were reduced in good yields and in moderate to good enantioselectivities, and the reduction of aryl alkyl ketones proceeded with excellent enantioselectivity (up to 97% ee).

  • 12.
    Ahlford, Katrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Livendahl, Madeleine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Fine-tuning catalytic activity and selectivity-[Rh(amino acid thioamide)] complexes for efficient ketone reduction2009In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, E-ISSN 1359-8562, Vol. 50, no 46, p. 6321-6324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amino acid-derived thioamides are prepared and evaluated as ligands in the rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones in 2-propanol. It is found that increasing the steric bulk at the C-terminus of the ligand had a positive impact on both activity and selectivity in the reduction reaction. In order to find the optimum catalyst, a study is performed on a series of thioamide ligands having substituents of varying size.

  • 13.
    Ahlford, Katrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zaitsev, Alexey B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ekström, Jesper
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    A Simple and Efficient Catalyst System for the Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Ketones2007In: Synlett: Accounts and Rapid Communications in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0936-5214, E-ISSN 1437-2096, no 16, p. 2541-2544Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Ahlsten, Nanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Agrawal, Santosh
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martin-Matute, Belen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    A facile synthesis of α-fluoro ketones catalyzed by [Cp*IrCl2](2)2011In: Synthesis (Stuttgart), ISSN 0039-7881, E-ISSN 1437-210X, no 16, p. 2600-2608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allylic alcohols are isomerized into enolates (enols) by [Cp*IrCl2]2. The enolates react with Selectfluor present in the reaction media. This method produces α-fluoro ketones as single constitutional isomers in high yields.

  • 15.
    Ahlsten, Nanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Allylic alcohols as synthetic enolate equivalents: Isomerisation and tandem reactions catalysed by transition metal complexes2012In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1660-1670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allylic alcohols can be isomerised into carbonyl compounds by transition metal complexes. In the last few years, catalyst design and development have resulted in highly efficient isomerisations under mild reaction conditions, including enantioselective versions. In addition, the isomerisation of allylic alcohols has been combined with C-C bond forming reactions when electrophiles such as aldehydes or imines were present in the reaction mixture. Also, C-F bonds can be formed when electrophilic fluorinating reagents are used. Thus, allylic alcohols can be treated as latent enol(ate)s. In this article, we highlight the latest developments concerning the isomerisation of allylic alcohols into carbonyl compounds, focusing in particular on tandem isomerisation/C-C or C-heteroatom bond formation processes. Significant attention is given to the mechanistic aspects of the reactions.

  • 16.
    Ahlsten, Nanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lundberg, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martin-Matute, Belen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Rhodium-catalysed isomerisation of allylic alcohols in water at ambient temperature2010In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 12, no 9, p. 1628-1633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An environmentally benign method for the transformation of allylic alcohols into carbonyl compounds is described. Using [Rh(COD(CH3CN)(2)]BF4 (2) in combination with 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (PTA, 1) as the catalytic system in water results in a very fast redox isomerisation of a variety of secondary allylic alcohols at ambient temperature. Also, some primary allylic alcohols can be isomerised into the corresponding aldehydes. The active complex, which in some cases can be used in catalyst loadings as low as 0.5 mol%, is formed in situ from commercially available reagents. Based on deuterium labelling studies, a tentative mechanism involving metal-enone intermediates is presented.

  • 17.
    Ahlsten, Nanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martin-Matute, Belen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ir-catalysed formation of C-F bonds. From allylic alcohols to α-fluoroketones2011In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 47, no 29, p. 8331-8333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel iridium-catalysed tandem isomerisation/C-F bond formation from allylic alcohols and Selectfluor® to prepare α-fluorinated ketones as single constitutional isomers is reported.

  • 18.
    Ahlsten, Nanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Rhodium-catalysed coupling of allylic, homoallylic, and bishomoallylic alcohols with aldehydes and N-tosylimines: insights into the mechanism2009In: Advanced Synthesis and Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, E-ISSN 1615-4169, Vol. 351, no 16, p. 2657-2666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The isomerisation of alkenols followed by reaction with aldehydes or N-tosylimines catalysed by rhodium complexes has been studied. The catalytically active rhodium complex is formed in situ from commercially available (cyclooctadiene)rhodium(l) chloride dimer [Rh(COD)Cl](2). The tandem process affords aldol and Mannich-type products in excellent yields. The key to the success of the coupling reaction is the activation of the catalysts by reaction with postassium tert-butoxide (t-BuOK), which promotes a catalytic cycle via alkoxides rather than rhodium hydrides. This mechanism minimises the formation of unwanted by-products. The mechanism has been studied by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and deuterium labelling experiments.

  • 19. Ahmad, Anees
    et al.
    Scarassati, Paulo
    Jalalian, Nazli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Silva, Luiz F., Jr.
    Oxidative rearrangement of alkenes using in situ generated hypervalent iodine(III)2013In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, E-ISSN 1359-8562, Vol. 54, no 43, p. 5818-5820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel protocol for the oxidative rearrangement of alkenes using in situ generated hypervalent iodine(III) was developed. This approach uses inexpensive, readily available, and stable chemicals (PhI, mCPBA, and TsOH) giving rearrangement products in yields comparable to those obtained using the more expensive commercially available [hydroxy(tosyloxy)iodo]benzene [HTIB or Koser's reagent]. Additionally, an alternative protocol for the synthesis of 1-methyl-2-tetralone through the one-step epoxidation/rearrangement of 4-methyl-1,2-dihydronaphthalene using mCPBA and TsOH was developed.

  • 20. Ai, Yue-Jie
    et al.
    Liao, Rong-zhen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Chen, Shu-feng
    Luo, Yi
    Fang, Wei-Hai
    Theoretical Studies on Photoisomerizations of (6-4) and Dewar Photolesions in DNA2010In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 114, no 44, p. 14096-14102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The (6-4) photoproduct ((6-4) PP) is one of the main lesions in UV-induced DNA damage. The (6-4) PP and its valence isomer Dewar photoproduct (Dewar PP) can have a great threat of mutation and cancer but gained much less attention to date. In this study, with density functional theory (DFT) and the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) methods, the photoisomerization processes between the (6-4) PP and the Dewar PP in the gas phase, the aqueous solution, and the photolyase have been carefully examined. Noticeably, the solvent effect is treated with the CASPT2//CASSCF/Amber (QM/MM) method. Our calculations show that the conical intersection (Cl) points play a crucial role in the photoisomerization reaction between the (6-4) PP and the Dewar PP in the gas and the aqueous solution. The ultrafast internal conversion between the S-2 ((1)pi pi*) and the So states via a distorted intersection point is found to be responsible for the formation of the Dewar PP lesion at 313 nm, as observed experimentally. For the reversed isomeric process, two channels involving the "dark" excited states have been identified. In addition to the above passages, in the photolyase, a new electron-injection isomerization process as an efficient way for the photorepair of the Dewar PP is revealed.

  • 21.
    Alam, Rauful
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Das, Arindam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Huang, Genping
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stereoselective allylboration of imines and indoles under mild conditions. An in situ E/Z isomerization of imines by allylboroxines2014In: Chemical Science, ISSN 2041-6520, E-ISSN 2041-6539, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 2732-2738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct allylboration of various acyclic and cyclic aldimine, ketimine and indole substrates was performed using allylboronic acids. The reaction proceeds with very high anti-stereoselectivity for both E and Z imines. The allylboroxines formed by dehydration of allylboronic acids have a dual effect: promoting E/Z isomerization of aldimines and triggering the allylation by efficient electron withdrawal from the imine substrate.

  • 22.
    Alam, Rauful
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mihai, Raducan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Szabo, Kalman J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Selective Formation of Adjacent Stereocenters by Allylboration of Ketones under Mild Neutral Conditions2013In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 15, no 10, p. 2546-2549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allylboronic acids readily react with a broad variety of ketones, affording homoallylic alcohols with adjacent quaternary and tertiary stereocenters. The reaction proceeds with very high anti stereoselectivity even if the substituents of the keto group have a similar size. a-Keto acids react with syn stereoselectivity probably due to the formation of acyl boronate intermediates. The allylation reactions proceed without added acids/bases under mild conditions. Because of this, many functionalities are tolerated even with in situ generated allylboronic acids.

  • 23.
    Alam, Rauful
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pilarski, Lukasz T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pershagen, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabo, Kalman J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stereoselective intermolecular allylic C-H trifluoroacetoxylation of functionalized alkenes2012In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 134, no 21, p. 8778-8781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pd-catalyzed allylic C-H trifluoroacetoxylation of substituted alkenes was performed using PhI(OCOCF3)(2) as the oxidant and acyloxy source. Trifluoroacetoxylation of monosubstituted cyclopentenes and cyclohexenes proceeds with excellent regio- and diastereoselectivity. Studies with one of the possible (eta(3)-allyl)Pd(II) intermediates suggest that the reaction proceeds via stereoselective formation of Pd(IV) intermediates and subsequent stereo- and regioselective reductive elimination of the product.

  • 24.
    Alam, Rauful
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Vollgraff, Tobias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of Adjacent Quaternary Stereocenters by Catalytic Asymmetric Allylboration2015In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 137, no 35, p. 11262-11265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allylboration of ketones with gamma-disubstituted allylboronic acids is performed in the presence of chiral BINOL derivatives. The reaction is suitable for single-step creation of adjacent quaternary stereocenters with high selectivity. We show that, with an appropriate choice of the chiral catalyst and the stereoisomeric prenyl substrate, full control of the stereo- and enantioselectivity is possible in the reaction.

  • 25.
    Alamsetti, Santosh Kumar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Persson, Andreas K. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palladium-Catalyzed Intramolecular Hydroamination of Propargylic Carbamates and Carbamothioates2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 1434-1437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient and simple methodology was developed for the synthesis of oxazolidinones, oxazolidinthiones, imidazolidinthiones, and imidazolidinones from the corresponding propargylic starting materials using Pd(OAc)(2) and n-Bu4NOAc as catalysts in DCE at room temperature.

  • 26.
    Alamsetti, Santosh Kumar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Persson, Andreas K. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jiang, Tuo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Scalable Synthesis of Oxazolones from Propargylic Alcohols through Multistep Palladium(II) Catalysis: beta-Selective Oxidative Heck Coupling of Cyclic Sulfonyl Enamides and Aryl Boroxines2013In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 52, no 51, p. 13745-13750Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Algarra, Andres G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Computational Insights into the Isomerism of Hexacoordinate Metal-Sarcophagine Complexes: The Relationship between Structure and Stability2015In: European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-1948, E-ISSN 1099-1948, no 3, p. 503-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hexacoordinate complexes that the macrobicyclic ligands {(NH3)(2)sar)(2+) and {NMe3)(2)sar}(2+) (sar = 3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo[6.6.6]icosane) form with transition metals such as Co-III, Co-II and Cu-II can adopt several isomeric structures. In this article, we have firstly employed DFT methods lo compute the relative stability of their Delta-ob(3), Delta-ob(2)lel, Delta-lel(2)ob and Delta-lel(3) isomers, as well as the activation barriers for their interconversion. In agreement with the experimental data, the results show that, in general, the different isomers of the Co-III and Co-II complexes present similar free energies, whereas the Cu-II complexes show a strong tendency towards the lel(3) form. In addition, the interplay between the structure and stability of these species has been studied by combining shape maps with a distortion/interaction energy analysis. In contrast to the geometries close to the ideal octahedron that all the studied Co complexes present, the le)3 structures of [Cu{(NH3)(2)sar}](4+) and [Cu{(NMe3)(2)sar](4+) are better described. as trigonal prisms. In such structures the ligand adopts a conformation significantly more stable than in the other isomers, and this drives the formation of lel(3)-[Cu{(NH3)(2)sar}](4+) and lel(3)-[Cu{(NNe3)(2)sar}](4+). Overall, the results show a clear relationship between the stability of a given isomer and its degree of distortion with respect to the ideal octahedron (or trigonal prism), with the latter being ultimately dependent on the transition metal and its radius.

  • 28.
    Ali, Tara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Weintraub, Andrej
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Structural determination of the O-antigenic polysaccharide from Escherichia coli O1662007In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 342, no 2, p. 274-278Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Anderson, Mattias
    et al.
    Afewerki, Samson
    Berglund, Per
    Córdova, Armando
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Total Synthesis of Capsaicin Analogues from Lignin-Derived Compounds by Combined Heterogeneous Metal, Organocatalytic and Enzymatic Cascades in One Pot2014In: Advanced Synthesis and Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, E-ISSN 1615-4169, Vol. 356, no 9, p. 2113-2118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The total synthesis of capsaicin analogues was performed in one pot, starting from compounds that can be derived from lignin. Heterogeneous palladium nanoparticles were used to oxidise alcohols to aldehydes, which were further converted to amines by an enzyme cascade system, including an amine transaminase. It was shown that the palladium catalyst and the enzyme cascade system could be successfully combined in the same pot for conversion of alcohols to amines without any purification of intermediates. The intermediate vanillyl-amine, prepared with the enzyme cascade system, could be further converted to capsaicin analogues without any purification using either fatty acids and a lipase, or Schotten-Baumann conditions, in the same pot. An aldol compound (a simple lignin model) could also be used as starting material for the synthesis of capsaicin analogues. Using l-alanine as organocatalyst, vanillin could be obtained by a retro-aldol reaction. This could be combined with the enzyme cascade system to convert the aldol compound to vanillylamine in a one-step one-pot reaction.

  • 30. Andersson, Samir
    et al.
    Zou, Dapeng
    Zhang, Rong
    Sun, Shiguo
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sun, Licheng
    Selective positioning of CB[8] on two linked viologens and electrochemically driven movement of the host molecule2009In: European Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-193X, E-ISSN 1099-0690, no 8, p. 1163-1172Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Structure-Reactivity Relationships of Conformationally Armed Disaccharide Donors and Their Use in the Synthesis of a Hexasaccharide Related to the Capsular Polysaccharide from Streptococcus pneumoniae Type 372017In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 82, no 15, p. 8123-8140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To advance the field of glycobiology, efficient synthesis methods of oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates are a requisite. In glycosylation reactions using superarmed donors, both selectivity and reactivity issues must be considered, and we herein investigate these aspects for differently protected beta-linked 2-O-glycosylated glucosyl donors carrying bulky tert-butyldimethylsilyl groups to different extents. The acceptors in reactions being secondary alcohols presents a challenging situation with respect to steric crowding. Conformational pyranose ring equilibria of the superarmed disaccharide donors with axial-rich substituents contained skew and boat conformations, and three-state models were generally assumed. With NIS/TfOH as the promotor, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylpyridine as the base, and a dichloromethane/toluene solvent mixture, ethyl 1-thio-beta-d-glucosyl disaccharide donors having 6-O-benzyl group(s) besides tert-butyldimethylsilyl groups were efficiently coupled at -40 degrees C to the hydroxyl group at position 3 of glucopyranosyl acceptors to form beta-(1 -> 2),beta-(1 -> 3)-linked trisaccharides, isolated in excellent 95% yield. The more axial-rich donors in skew and boat conformations are thus preorganized closer to the assumed transition state in these glycosylation reactions. The developed methodology was subsequently applied in the synthesis of a multibranched hexasaccharide related to the capsular polysaccharide from Streptococcus pneumoniae type 37, which consists of a beta-(1 -> 3)-linked backbone and a beta-(1 -> 2)-linked side chain of D-glucosyl residues in disaccharide repeating units.

  • 32.
    Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sjöberg, Nils A.
    Vasiljeva, Polina
    Lindman, Jonas
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bergenstråhle-Wohlert, Malin
    Wohlert, Jakob
    Temperature Dependence of Hydroxymethyl Group Rotamer Populations in Cellooligomers2015In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 119, no 30, p. 9559-9570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical force fields for computer simulations of carbohydrates are often implicitly assumed to be valid also at temperatures different from room temperature for which they were optimited: Herein, the temperature dependence of the hydroxymethyl group rotamer populations in short oligogaccharides is invegtigated using Molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy. Two oligosaccharides, methyl beta-cellobioside and beta-cellotetraose were simulated using three different carbohydrate force fields (CHARMM C35, GLYCAM06, and GROMOS 56A(carbo)) in combination with different water models (SPC, SPC/E, and TIP3P) using replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. For comparison, hydroxymethyl group rotamer populations were investigated for methyl beta-cellobioside and cellopentaose based- on measured NMR (3)J(H5,H6) coupling constants, in the latter case by using a chemical shift selective NMR-filter. Molecular dynamics simulations in combination with NMR spectroscopy show that the temperature dependence of the hydroxymethyl rotamer population in these short cellooligomers, in the range 263-344 K, generally becomes exaggerated in simulations when compared to experimental data, but also that it is dependent on simulation conditions, and most notably properties of the water model.

  • 33.
    Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of the tetrasaccharide glycoside moiety of Solaradixine and rapid NMR-based structure verification using the program CASPER2016In: Tetrahedron, ISSN 0040-4020, E-ISSN 1464-5416, Vol. 72, no 7, p. 912-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The major glycoalkaloid in the roots of Solanum laciniatum is Solaradixine having the branched tetrasaccharide beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 3)[alpha-L-Rhap-(1 -> 2)]-beta-D-Galp linked to O3 of the steroidal alkaloid Solasodine. We herein describe the synthesis of the methyl glycoside of the tetrasaccharide using a super-armed disaccharide as a donor molecule. A 2-(naphthyl)methyl protecting group was used in the synthesis of the donor since it was tolerant to a wide range of reaction conditions. The 6-O-benzylated-hexa-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyi-protected beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Glcp-SEt donor, which avoided 1,6-anydro formation, was successfully glycosylated at O3 of a galactoside acceptor molecule. However, subsequent glycosylation at O2 by a rhamnosyl donor was unsuccessful and instead a suitably protected alpha-L-Rhap(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Galp-OMe disaccharide was used as the acceptor molecule together with a super-armed beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Glcp-SEt donor in the glycosylation reaction, to give a tetrasaccharide in a yield of 55%, which after deprotection resulted in the target molecule, the structure of which was verified by the NMR chemical shift prediction program CASPER.

  • 34.
    Arafa, Wael A. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lee, Bao-Lin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Berends, Hans-Martin
    Messinger, Johannes
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Dinuclear manganese complexes for water oxidation: evaluation of electronic effects and catalytic activity2014In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 16, no 24, p. 11950-11964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent years significant progress has been made towards the realization of a sustainable and carbon-neutral energy economy. One promising approach is photochemical splitting of H2O into O-2 and solar fuels, such as H-2. However, the bottleneck in such artificial photosynthetic schemes is the H2O oxidation half reaction where more efficient catalysts are required that lower the kinetic barrier for this process. In particular catalysts based on earth-abundant metals are highly attractive compared to catalysts comprised of noble metals. We have now synthesized a library of dinuclear Mn-2 (II,III) catalysts for H2O oxidation and studied how the incorporation of different substituents affected the electronics and catalytic efficiency. It was found that the incorporation of a distal carboxyl group into the ligand scaffold resulted in a catalyst with increased catalytic activity, most likely because of the fact that the distal group is able to promote proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) from the high-valent Mn species, thus facilitating O-O bond formation.

  • 35. Arafa, Wael A. A.
    et al.
    Mohamed, Ashraf M.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    ULTRASOUND-MEDIATED THREE-COMPONENT REACTION ON-WATER PROTOCOL FOR THE SYNTHESIS OF NOVEL MONO- AND BIS-1,3-THIAZIN-4-ONE DERIVATIVES2017In: Heterocycles, ISSN 0385-5414, E-ISSN 1881-0942, Vol. 94, no 8, p. 1439-1455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Green synthetic and catalyst-free strategy towards the synthesis of novel mono- and bis-1,3-thiazin-4-one scaffolds through a one pot, reaction of carbon disulfide, monoacetylenic esters and amines under ultrasonication has been reported. The merits of this protocol comprise no need for tedious workup steps and afforded the desired products in excellent yields make this synthetic protocol more efficient and worthy of further attentiveness. Moreover, the method exhibited excellent score in a number of green metrics.

  • 36. Ashour, Radwa M.
    et al.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Nuclear Materials Authority, Egypt.
    Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed A.
    Helaly, O. S.
    Ali, M. M.
    Preparation and characterization of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized by L-cysteine: Adsorption and desorption behavior for rare earth metal ions2016In: Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering, ISSN 2160-6544, E-ISSN 2213-3437, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 3114-3121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with L-cysteine (Cys-Fe3O4 NPs) was synthesized and fully characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and zeta potential measurements. The synthesized Cys-Fe(3)O(4)NPs has been evaluated as a highly adsorbent for the adsorption of a mixture of four rare earths RE3+ ions (La3+, Nd3+, Gd3+ and Y3+) from digested monazite solutions. The influence of various factors on the adsorption efficiency such as, the contact time, sample pH, temperature, and concentration of the stripping solution were investigated. The results indicate that Cys-Fe3O4 NPs achieve high removal efficiency 96.7, 99.3, 96.5 and 87% for La3+, Nd3+, Gd3+ and Y3+ ions, respectively, at pH = 6 within 15 min, and the adsorbent affinity for metal ions was found to be in order of Nd3+ > La3+ > Gd3+ > Y3+ ions. Using the Langmuir model, a maximum adsorption capacity of La3+, Nd3+, Gd3+ and Y3+ at room temperature was found to be 71.5, 145.5, 64.5 and 13.6 mg g (1), respectively. The Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second order model fitted much better than the other isotherms and kinetic models. The obtained results for the thermodynamic parameters confirmed the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the process. Moreover, the desorption was carried out with 0.1 M nitric acid solutions. In addition, Cys-Fe3O4 NPs can be used as a highly efficient adsorbent for the adsorption of La3+, Nd3+, Gd3+ and Y3+ ions from digested monazite solutions.

  • 37.
    Aydin, Juhanes
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Larsson, Johanna M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Selander, Nicklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pincer complex-catalyzed redox coupling of alkenes with iodonium salts via presumed palladium(IV) intermediates2009In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 11, no 13, p. 2852-2854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Palladium pincer complexes directly catalyze the redox coupling reactions of functionalized alkenes and iodonium salts. The catalytic process, which is suitable for mild catalytic functionalization of allylic acetates and electron-rich alkenes, probably occurs through Pd(IV) intermediates. Due to the strong metal−ligand interactions, the oxidation of phosphine and amine ligands of the pincer complexes can be avoided in the presented reactions.

  • 38.
    Ayesa, Susana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Classon, Björn
    A One-Pot, Solid-Phase Synthesis of Secondary Amines from Reactive Alkyl Halides and an Alkyl Azide2008In: Synlett: Accounts and Rapid Communications in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0936-5214, E-ISSN 1437-2096, no 1, p. 77-79Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39. Barbion, Julien
    et al.
    Sorin, Geoffroy
    Selkti, Mohamed
    Kellenberger, Esther
    Baati, Rachid
    Santoro, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pancrazi, Ange
    Lannou, Marie-Isabelle
    Ardisson, Janick
    Stereoselective functionalization of pyrrolidinone moiety towards the synthesis of salinosporamide A2012In: Tetrahedron, ISSN 0040-4020, E-ISSN 1464-5416, Vol. 68, no 32, p. 6504-6512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important feature of the synthesis of salinosporamide A. a potent proteasome inhibitor, is the establishment of the quaternary stereocenter at C3. A new route has been developed based on the methylation of a functionalized pyrrolidinone. Direct methylation reaction led to the unwanted diastereomer: however, by means of a Corey-Chaykovsky reaction followed by LiAlH4 epoxide opening, the desired alcohol was obtained. The pyrrolidinone was elaborated through a key allylation reaction between a tertiary allyltitanium reagent and an aldehyde bearing a spiroketal moiety in alpha-position.

  • 40.
    Bartholomeyzik, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mazuela, Javier
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Deng, Youqian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Arylating Carbocyclization of Allenynes: Control of Selectivity and Role of H2O2014In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 53, no 33, p. 8696-8699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly selective protocols for the carbocyclization/arylation of allenynes using arylboronic acids are reported. Arylated vinylallenes are obtained with the use of BF3 center dot Et2O as an additive, whereas addition of water leads to arylated trienes. These conditions provide the respective products with excellent selectivities (generally > 97:3) for a range of boronic acids and different allenynes. It has been revealed that water plays a crucial role for the product distribution.

  • 41.
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    González Miera, Greco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Marcos, Rocio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Norrby, Per-Ola
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mechanistic Studies on the Alkylation of Amines with Alcohols Catalyzed by a Bifunctional Iridium Complex2015In: ACS Catalysis, ISSN 2155-5435, E-ISSN 2155-5435, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 3704-3716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanism of the N-alkylation of amines with alcohols catalyzed by an iridium complex containing an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand with a tethered alcohol/alkoxide functionality was investigated by a combination of experimental and computational methods. The catalyst resting state is an iridium hydride species containing the amine substrate as a ligand, and decoordination of the amine, followed by coordination of the imine intermediate to the iridium center, constitute the rate-determining step (rds) of the catalytic process. The alcohol/alkoxide that is tethered to the NHC participates in every step of the catalytic cycle by accepting or releasing protons and forming hydrogen bonds with the reacting species. Thus, the iridium complex with the alcohol/alkoxide tethered to the N-heterocyclic carbene ligand acts as a bifunctional catalyst.

  • 42.
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jezowska, Martina M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Laymand, Kevin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mobus, Juri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of β-Hydroxy and β-Amino Ketones from Allylic Alcohols Catalyzed by Ru(η5-C5Ph5)(CO)2Cl2012In: European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-1948, E-ISSN 1099-1948, no 9, p. 1517-1530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient method for the synthesis of beta-hydroxy and beta-amino ketones from allylic alcohols catalyzed by Ru(5-C5Ph5)(CO)2Cl is described. The influence of the stereoelectronic properties of the catalyst on the reaction outcome has been studied. Optimization of the reaction conditions supressed the formation of undesired side products such as saturated ketones, benzyl alcohols, and a,beta-unsaturated ketones. Several aromatic and aliphatic allylic alcohols have been reacted with a large variety of aldehydes or imines to produce beta-hydroxy ketones or beta-amino ketones, respectively, in yields up to 99%. Based on experimental data, a mechanism via ruthenium alkoxides and ruthenium aldoxides is proposed. In addition, a C-bound ruthenium enolate has been characterized.

  • 43.
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Livendahl, Madeleine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of b-Hydroxy Ketones from Allylic Alcohols via Catalytic Formation of Ruthenium Enolates2008In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 14, no 34, p. 10547-10550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most efficient Ru-catalyzed isomerization–aldol reaction from allylic alcohols has been achieved by using [η5-(Ph5Cp)Ru(CO)2Cl] as the catalyst. The bulky pentaphenylcyclopentadienyl ligand on the ruthenium atom prevents protonation at the oxygen of the Ru–enolate intermediate and completely suppresses the formation of unwanted ketone byproducts (see scheme). The domino transformation is as good as it can be: aldols are obtained in quantitative yields at ambient temperature.

  • 44.
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Building molecular complexity via tandem Ru-catalyzed isomerization/C-H activation2009In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 1749-1752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A tandem isomerization/C-H activation of allylic alcohols was performed using a catalytic amount of RUCl(2)(PPh(3))(3). A variety of ortho alkylated ketones have been obtained in excellent yields. This tandem process relies on an in situ generation of a carbonyl functional group that directs the ortho C-H bond activation.

  • 45. Battistel, Marcos D.
    et al.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Freedberg, Daron I.
    Direct Evidence for Hydrogen Bonding in Glycans: A Combined NMR and Molecular Dynamics Study2013In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 117, no 17, p. 4860-4869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduce the abundant hydroxyl groups of glycans as NMR handle's and structural probes to expand the repertoire of tools for structure function studies on glycans in solution. To this end, we present the facile detection and assignment of hydroxyl groups in a Wide range of sample concentrations (0.5-1700 mM) and temperatures, ranging from -5 to 25 degrees C.,We then exploit this information to directly detect hydrogen bonds, well-known for their importance in molecular structural determination through NMR. Via HSQC-TOCSY, we were able to determine the directionality; of these hydrogen bonds in sucrose Furthermore, by means Of molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with NMR, we establish that one Out of the three detected hydrogen bonds arises from intermolecular interactions. This finding may shed light on glycan glycan interactions and glycan recognition by proteins.

  • 46. Bergenstråhle-Wohlert, Malin
    et al.
    Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sjöberg, Nils A.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    On the anomalous temperature dependence of cellulose aqueous solubility2016In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 2375-2387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The solubility of cellulose in water-based media is promoted by low temperature, which may appear counter-intuitive. An explanation to this phenomenon has been proposed that is based on a temperature-dependent orientation of the hydroxymethyl group. In this paper, this hypothesis is investigated using molecular dynamics computer simulations and NMR spectroscopy, and is discussed in conjunction with alternative explanations based on solvent–solute and solvent–solvent hydrogen bond formation respectively. It is shown that neither simulations nor experiments lend support to the proposed mechanism based on the hydroxymethyl orientation, whereas the two alternative explanations give rise to two distinct contributions to the hydration free energy of cellooligomers.

  • 47. Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bergenstråhle-Wohlert, Malin
    Lawoko, Martin
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    Lindström, Mikael
    Wohlert, Jakob
    A molecular dynamics study of the effect of glycosidic linkage type in the hemicellulose backbone on the molecular chain flexibility2016In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 56-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The macromolecular conformation of the constituent polysaccharides in lignocellulosic biomass influences their supramolecular interactions, and therefore their function in plants and their performance in technical products. The flexibility of glycosidic linkages from the backbone of hemicelluloses was studied by evaluating the conformational freedom of the φ and ψ dihedral angles using molecular dynamic simulations, additionally selected molecules were correlated with experimental data by NMR spectroscopy. Three types of β-(1→4) glycosidic linkages involving the monosaccharides (Glcp, Xylp and Manp) present in the backbone of hemicelluloses were defined. Different di- and tetrasaccharides with combinations of such sugar monomers from hemicelluloses were simulated and free energy maps of the φ - ψ space and hydrogen bonding patterns were obtained. The glycosidic linkage between Glc-Glc or Glc-Man (C-type) was the stiffest with mainly one probable conformation; the linkage from Man-Man or Man-Glc (M-type) was similar but with an increased probability for an alternative conformation making it more flexible, and the linkage between two Xyl-units (X-type) was the most flexible with two almost equally populated conformations. Glycosidic linkages of the same type showed essentially the same conformational space in both disaccharides and in the central region of tetrasaccharides. Different probabilities of glycosidic linkage conformations in the backbone of hemicelluloses can be directly estimated from the free energy maps, which to a large degree affect the overall macromolecular conformations of these polymers. The information gained contributes to an increased understanding of hemicelluloses’ function both in the cell wall and in technical products.

  • 48.
    Bermejo Gómez, Antonio
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Holmberg, Pär
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martin-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Transition metal-catalyzed redox isomerization of codeine and morphine in water2014In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 74, p. 39519-39522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A water-soluble rhodium complex formed from commercially available [Rh(COD)(CH3CN)(2)]BF4 and 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (PTA) catalyzes the isomerization of both codeine and morphine into hydrocodone and hydromorphone with very high efficiency. The reaction is performed in water, allowing isolation of the final products by simple filtration, which results in very high isolated yields. The reactions can be easily scaled up to 100 g.

  • 49.
    Bielawski, Marcin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Aili, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Regiospecific One-Pot Synthesis of Diaryliodonium Tetrafluoroborates from Arylboronic Acids and Aryl Iodides2008In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 73, no 12, p. 4602-4607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diaryliodonium salts have recently received considerable attention as mild arylation reagents in organic synthesis. This paper describes a regiospecific, sequential one-pot synthesis of symmetrical and unsymmetrical diaryliodonium tetrafluoroborates, which are the most popular salts in metal-catalyzed arylations. The protocol is fast and high-yielding and has a large substrate scope. Furthermore, the corresponding diaryliodonium triflates can conveniently be obtained via an in situ anion exchange.

  • 50.
    Bielawski, Marcin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Efficient one-pot synthesis of bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)iodonium triflate2009In: Organic Syntheses, ISSN 0078-6209, Vol. 86, p. 308-314Article in journal (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 600
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