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  • 1.
    Dinér, Peter
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Yttrium from Ytterby2016In: Nature Chemistry, ISSN 1755-4330, E-ISSN 1755-4349, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 192-192Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, 930 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, United States.
    Matsuura, Bryan S.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, 930 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, United States.
    Stephenson, Corey R. J.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, 930 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, United States.
    Enchained by Visible Light–Mediated Photoredox Catalysis2015In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 349, no 6254, p. 1285-1286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Free radicals are exploited in biology, often through highly controlled enzymatic reactions, to drive many reactions that would be difficult via nonradical routes that transfer two electrons (1). In synthetic chemistry, visible-light photoredox catalysis has emerged as an economical and environmentally benign route for promoting free radical transformations in the lab (24). Although the initial light-sensitization steps are well established (5), insufficient attention has been dedicated to essential mechanistic features of the closed catalytic cycle (6). Several reports have hypothesized that these photocatalyzed reactions are terminated through a closed catalytic cycle, which delivers the final product and regenerates the ground state of the photosensitizer (PS). However, Cismesia and Yoon (6) highlight that some of the mechanistic proposals may be incomplete and may involve radical chains.

  • 3.
    Moberg, Christina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Editorial: Chemistry in SwedenA Midsummer Night's Dream?2013In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 1844-1845Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4. Moberg, Christina
    et al.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Concepts in asymmetric catalysis2012In: Israel Journal of Chemistry, ISSN 0021-2148, Vol. 52, no 7 SI, p. 571-571Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ni, Shengjun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Abd El Aleem Ali Ali El Remaily, Mahmoud
    Franzén, Johan
    Carbocation Catalyzed Bromination of Alkyl Arenes, a Chemoselective sp3 vs. sp2 C−H Functionalization2018In: Advanced Synthesis and Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, E-ISSN 1615-4169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The versatility of the trityl cation (TrBF4) as a highly efficient Lewis acid organocatalyst isdemonstrated in a light induced benzylic brominaion of alkyl-arenes under mild conditions. The reaction wasconducted at ambient temperature under common hood light (55 W fluorescent light) with catalyst loadingsdown to 2.0 mol% using N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) as the brominating agent. The protocol is applicable toan extensive number of substrates to give benzyl bromides in good to excellent yields. In contrast to mostpreviously reported strategies, this protocol does not require any radical initiator or extensive heating. Forelectron-rich alkyl-arenes, the trityl ion catalyzed bromination could be easily switched between benzylic sp3CH functionalization and arene sp2 CH functionalization by simply alternating the solvent. Thischemoselective switch allows for high substrate control and easy preparation of benzyl bromides andbromoarenes, respectively. The chemoselective switch was also applied in a one-pot reaction of 1-methylnaphthalene for direct introduction of both sp3 CBr and sp2 CBr functionality.

  • 6.
    Chow, Shiao Y. (Contributor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Stevens, Marc Y. (Contributor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Åkerbladh, Linda (Contributor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bergman, Sara (Contributor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Odell, Luke R. (Contributor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Mild and Low-Pressure fac-Ir(ppy)3-Mediated Radical Aminocarbonylation of Unactivated Alkyl Iodides through Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis2016In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 22, no 27, p. 9037-9037Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Invited for the cover of this issue is the group of L. R. Odell at Uppsala University (Sweden). The image depicts iridium at the center of a vortex of electrons that are transferred to and from the surrounding reaction components in aradical aminocarbonylation method. Read the full text of the article at 10.1002/chem.201601694.

  • 7.
    Chow, Shiao Y. (Contributor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Stevens, Marc Y. (Contributor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Åkerbladh, Linda (Contributor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bergman, Sara (Contributor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Odell, Luke R. (Contributor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Mild and Low-Pressure fac-Ir(ppy)3-Mediated Radical Aminocarbonylation of Unactivated Alkyl Iodides through Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis2016In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 22, no 27, p. 9033-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Iridium stands at the center of a vortex of electrons that are transferred to and from the surrounding reaction components in this radical aminocarbonylation method. The combination of visible-light irradiation and low-pressure ex situ carbon monoxide generation makes this an attractive and operationally simple approach for preparing β-hydride-containing alkyl amides. Additional cover art acknowledgements: Bobo Skillinghaug and Johan Sjöstedt. More information can be found in the Full Paper by L. R. Odell et al. on page 9155 ff.

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