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  • 1.
    Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sjöberg, Nils A.
    Vasiljeva, Polina
    Lindman, Jonas
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bergenstråhle-Wohlert, Malin
    Wohlert, Jakob
    Temperature Dependence of Hydroxymethyl Group Rotamer Populations in Cellooligomers2015In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 119, no 30, p. 9559-9570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical force fields for computer simulations of carbohydrates are often implicitly assumed to be valid also at temperatures different from room temperature for which they were optimited: Herein, the temperature dependence of the hydroxymethyl group rotamer populations in short oligogaccharides is invegtigated using Molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy. Two oligosaccharides, methyl beta-cellobioside and beta-cellotetraose were simulated using three different carbohydrate force fields (CHARMM C35, GLYCAM06, and GROMOS 56A(carbo)) in combination with different water models (SPC, SPC/E, and TIP3P) using replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. For comparison, hydroxymethyl group rotamer populations were investigated for methyl beta-cellobioside and cellopentaose based- on measured NMR (3)J(H5,H6) coupling constants, in the latter case by using a chemical shift selective NMR-filter. Molecular dynamics simulations in combination with NMR spectroscopy show that the temperature dependence of the hydroxymethyl rotamer population in these short cellooligomers, in the range 263-344 K, generally becomes exaggerated in simulations when compared to experimental data, but also that it is dependent on simulation conditions, and most notably properties of the water model.

  • 2.
    Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of the tetrasaccharide glycoside moiety of Solaradixine and rapid NMR-based structure verification using the program CASPER2016In: Tetrahedron, ISSN 0040-4020, E-ISSN 1464-5416, Vol. 72, no 7, p. 912-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The major glycoalkaloid in the roots of Solanum laciniatum is Solaradixine having the branched tetrasaccharide beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 3)[alpha-L-Rhap-(1 -> 2)]-beta-D-Galp linked to O3 of the steroidal alkaloid Solasodine. We herein describe the synthesis of the methyl glycoside of the tetrasaccharide using a super-armed disaccharide as a donor molecule. A 2-(naphthyl)methyl protecting group was used in the synthesis of the donor since it was tolerant to a wide range of reaction conditions. The 6-O-benzylated-hexa-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyi-protected beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Glcp-SEt donor, which avoided 1,6-anydro formation, was successfully glycosylated at O3 of a galactoside acceptor molecule. However, subsequent glycosylation at O2 by a rhamnosyl donor was unsuccessful and instead a suitably protected alpha-L-Rhap(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Galp-OMe disaccharide was used as the acceptor molecule together with a super-armed beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Glcp-SEt donor in the glycosylation reaction, to give a tetrasaccharide in a yield of 55%, which after deprotection resulted in the target molecule, the structure of which was verified by the NMR chemical shift prediction program CASPER.

  • 3. Battistel, Marcos D.
    et al.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Freedberg, Daron I.
    Direct Evidence for Hydrogen Bonding in Glycans: A Combined NMR and Molecular Dynamics Study2013In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 117, no 17, p. 4860-4869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduce the abundant hydroxyl groups of glycans as NMR handle's and structural probes to expand the repertoire of tools for structure function studies on glycans in solution. To this end, we present the facile detection and assignment of hydroxyl groups in a Wide range of sample concentrations (0.5-1700 mM) and temperatures, ranging from -5 to 25 degrees C.,We then exploit this information to directly detect hydrogen bonds, well-known for their importance in molecular structural determination through NMR. Via HSQC-TOCSY, we were able to determine the directionality; of these hydrogen bonds in sucrose Furthermore, by means Of molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with NMR, we establish that one Out of the three detected hydrogen bonds arises from intermolecular interactions. This finding may shed light on glycan glycan interactions and glycan recognition by proteins.

  • 4.
    Fontana, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Weintraub, Andrej
    Karolinska Institute.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Facile Structural Elucidation of Glycans Using NMR Spectroscopy Data and the Program CASPER: Application to the O-Antigen Polysaccharide of Escherichia coli O1552013In: ChemPlusChem, ISSN 2192-6506, Vol. 78, no 11, p. 1327-1329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The program CASPER was successfully employed to rapidly elucidate a new O-antigen polysaccharide structure (obtained from a strain of Escherichia coli serogroup O155), using solelyunassigned NMR spectroscopy data as input information. Thus, what is considered the most tedious and time-consuming part of the structural elucidation process has been reduced from several hours (or even days) of manual interpretation to about four minutes of automated analysis.

  • 5.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Landström, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    SEAL by NMR: Glyco-Based Selenium-Labeled Affinity Ligands Detected by NMR Spectroscopy2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 43, p. 13905-13908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a method for the screening of interactions between proteins and selenium-labeled carbohydrate ligands. SEAL by NMR is demonstrated with selenoglycosides binding to lectins where the selenium nucleus serves as an NMR-active handle and reports on binding through Se-77 NMR spectroscopy. In terms of overall sensitivity, this nucleus is comparable to C-13 NMR, while the NMR spectral width is ten times larger, yielding little overlap in Se-77 NMR spectroscopy, even for similar compounds. The studied ligands are singly selenated bioisosteres of methyl glycosides for which straightforward preparation methods are at hand and libraries can readily be generated. The strength of the approach lies in its simplicity, sensitivity to binding events, the tolerance to additives and the possibility of having several ligands in the assay. This study extends the increasing potential of selenium in structure biology and medicinal chemistry. We anticipate that SEAL by NMR will be a beneficial tool for the development of selenium-based bioactive compounds, such as glycomimetic drug candidates.

  • 6. Harper, James K.
    et al.
    Tishler, Derek
    Richardson, David
    Lokvam, John
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Solid-State NMR Characterization of the Molecular Conformation in Disordered Methyl alpha-L-Rhamnofuranoside2013In: Journal of Physical Chemistry A, ISSN 1089-5639, E-ISSN 1520-5215, Vol. 117, no 26, p. 5534-5541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A combination of solid-state C-13 NMR tensor data and DFT computational methods is utilized to predict the conformation in disordered methyl alpha-L-rhamnofuranoside. This previously uncharacterized solid is found to be crystalline and consists of at least six distinct conformations that exchange on the kHz time scale. A total of 66 model structures were evaluated, and six were identified as being consistent with experimental C-13 NMR data. All feasible structures have very similar carbon and oxygen positions and differ most significantly in OH hydrogen orientations. A concerted rearrangement of OH hydrogens is proposed to account for the observed dynamic disorder. This rearrangement is accompanied by smaller changes in ring conformation and is slow enough to be observed on the NMR time scale due to severe steric crowding among ring substituents. The relatively minor differences in non-hydrogen atom positions in the final structures suggest that characterization of a complete crystal structure by X-ray powder diffraction may be feasible.

  • 7. He, Xibing
    et al.
    Hatcher, Elizabeth
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    MacKerell, Alexander D., Jr.
    Bifurcated Hydrogen Bonding and Asymmetric Fluctuations in a Carbohydrate Crystal Studied via X-ray Crystallography and Computational Analysis2013In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 117, no 25, p. 7546-7553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of the O-methyl glycoside of the naturally occurring 6-O-[(R)-1-carboxyethyl]-alpha-D-galactopyranose, C10H18O8, has been determined by X-ray crystallography at 100 K, supplementing the previously determined structure obtained at 293 K (Acta Crystallogr. 1996, C52, 2285-2287). Molecular dynamics simulations of this glycoside were Performed in the crystal environment with different numbers of units cells included in the primary simulation system at both 100 and 293 K. The Calculated unit cell Parameters and the intramolecular geometries (bonds, angles, and dihedrals) agree well with experimental results. Atomic fluctuations, including B-factors and anisotropies, are in good agreement with respect to the relative values on an atom-by-atom basis. In addition, the fluctuations increase with increasing simulation system size, with the simulated values converging to values lower than those observed experimentally indicating that the simulation model is not accounting for all possible contributions to the experimentally observed B-factors, which may be related to either the simulation time scale or size. In the simulation's, the hydroxyl group of O7 is found to from bifurcated hydrogen bonds with O6 and O8 of an adjacent molecule, with the interactions dominated by the interaction HO7-O6 interaction. Quantum mechanical calculations support this observation.

  • 8.
    Lihammar, Richard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Rönnols, Jerk
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Epimerization of Glycal Derivatives by a Cyclopentadienylruthenium Catalyst: Application to Metalloenzymatic DYKAT2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 45, p. 14756-14762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epimerization of a non-anomeric stereogenic center in carbohydrates is an important transformation in the synthesis of natural products. In this study an epimerization procedure of the allylic alcohols of glycals by cyclopentadienylruthenium catalyst 1 is presented. The epimerization of 4,6-O-benzylidene-D-glucal 4 in toluene is rapid, and an equlibrium with its D-allal epimer 5 is established within 5min at room temperature. Exchange rates for allal and glucal formation were determined by 1D H-1 EXSY NMR experiments to be 0.055s(-1) and 0.075s(-1), respectively. For 4-O-benzyl-L-rhamnal 8 the epimerization was less rapid and four days of epimerization was required to achieve equilibration of the epimers at room temperature. The epimerization methodology was subsequently combined with acylating enzymes in a dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation (DYKAT), giving stereoselective acylation to the desired stereoisomers 12, 13, and 15. The net effect of this process is an inversion of a stereogenic center on the glycal, and yields ranging from 71% to 83% of the epimer were obtained.

  • 9. Mally, Manuela
    et al.
    Fontana, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    LeibundGut-Landmann, Salome
    Laacisse, Lamia
    Fan, Yao-Yun
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Aebi, Markus
    Glycoengineering of host mimicking type-2 LacNAc polymersand Lewis X antigens on bacterial cell surfaces2013In: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 112-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial carbohydrate structures play a central role in mediating a variety of host-pathogen interactions. Glycans can either elicit protective immune response or lead to escape of immune surveillance by mimicking host structures. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component on the surface of Gram-negative bacteria, is composed of a lipid A-core and the O-antigen polysaccharide. Pathogens like Neisseria meningitidis expose a lipooligosaccharide (LOS), which outermost glycans mimick mammalian epitopes to avoid immune recognition. Lewis X (Gal beta 1-4(Fuc alpha 1-3)GlcNAc) antigens of Helicobacter pylori or of the helminth Schistosoma mansoni modulate the immune response by interacting with receptors on human dendritic cells. In a glycoengineering approach we generate human carbohydrate structures on the surface of recombinant Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium that lack O-antigen. A ubiquitous building block in mammalian N-linked protein glycans is Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc, referred to as a type-2 N-acetyllactosamine, LacNAc, sequence. Strains displaying polymeric LacNAc were generated by introducing a combination of glycosyltransferases that act on modified lipid A-cores, resulting in efficient expression of the carbohydrate epitope on bacterial cell surfaces. The poly-LacNAc scaffold was used as an acceptor for fucosylation leading to polymers of Lewis X antigens. We analysed the distribution of the carbohydrate epitopes by FACS, microscopy and ELISA and confirmed engineered LOS containing LacNAc and Lewis X repeats by MALDI-TOF and NMR analysis. Glycoengineered LOS induced pro-inflammatory response in murine dendritic cells. These bacterial strains can thus serve as tools to analyse the role of defined carbohydrate structures in different biological processes.

  • 10. Mensch, Carl
    et al.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johannessen, Christian
    Studying the Glycan Moiety of RNase B by Means of Raman and Raman Optical Activity2014In: ChemPhysChem, ISSN 1439-4235, E-ISSN 1439-7641, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 2252-2254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Raman and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectroscopy are used to study the solution-phase structure of the glycan moiety of the protein ribonuclease B (RNase B). Spectral data of the intact glycan moiety of RNase B is obtained by subtracting high-quality spectral data of RNase A, the non-glycosylated form of the RNase, from the spectra of the glycoprotein. The remaining difference spectra are compared to spectra generated from Raman and ROA data of the constituent disaccharides of the RNase glycan, achieving convincing spectral overlap. The results show that ROA spectroscopy is able to extract detailed spectral data of the glycan moieties of proteins, provided that the non-glycosylated isoform is available. Furthermore, good comparison between the full glycan spectrum and the regenerated spectra based on the disaccharide data lends great promise to ROA as a tool for the solution-phase structural analysis of this structurally elusive class of biomolecules.

  • 11.
    Pendrill, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Methyl 4-O-benzyl-alpha-l-rhamno-pyrano-side2014In: Acta Crystallographica Section E: Structure Reports Online, ISSN 1600-5368, E-ISSN 1600-5368, Vol. 70, p. o561-o562Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Pendrill, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Säwén, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Conformation and Dynamics at a Flexible Glycosidic Linkage Revealed by NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations: Analysis of β-ʟ-Fucp-(1→6)-α-ᴅ-Glcp-OMe in Water Solution2013In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 117, no 47, p. 14709-14722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intrinsic flexibility of carbohydrates facilitates different 3D structures in response to altered environments. At glycosidic (1 -> 46)-linkages, three torsion angles are variable, and herein the conformation and dynamics of beta-1.-Fucp-(1 -> 6)-alpha-D-Glcp-OMe are investigated using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The disaccharide shows evidence of conformational averaging for the psi and co torsion angles, best explained by a four-state conformational distribution. Notably, there is a significant population of conformations having psi = 85 degrees (clinal) in addition to those having psi = 180 degrees (anfiperiplanar). Moderate differences in C-13 R-1 relaxation rates are found to be best explained by axially symmetric tumbling in combination with minor differences in librational motion for the two residues, whereas the isomerization motions are occurring too slowly to significantly to the observed relaxation rates. The MD simulation was found to give a reasonably good agreement with experiment, especially with respect to diffusive properties, among which the rotational anisotropy, D parallel to/D parallel to, is found to be 2.35. The force field employed showed too narrow omega torsion angles in the gauche trans and gauche gauche states as well as overestimating the population of the gauche trans conformer. This information can subsequently be used in directing parameter developments and emphasizes the need for refinement of force fields for (1 -> 6)-linked carbohydrates.

  • 13.
    Pendrill, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sørensen, Ole W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Suppressing one-bond homonuclear 13C,13C scalar couplings in the J-HMBC NMR experiment: application to 13C site-specifically labeled oligosaccharides2014In: Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry, ISSN 0749-1581, E-ISSN 1097-458X, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 82-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Site-specific C-13 isotope labeling is a useful approach that allows for the measurement of homonuclear C-13,C-13 coupling constants. For three site-specifically labeled oligosaccharides, it is demonstrated that using the J-HMBC experiment for measuring heteronuclear long-range coupling constants is problematical for the carbons adjacent to the spin label. By incorporating either a selective inversion pulse or a constant-time element in the pulse sequence, the interference from one-bond C-13,C-13 scalar couplings is suppressed, allowing the coupling constants of interest to be measured without complications. Experimental spectra are compared with spectra of a nonlabeled compound as well as with simulated spectra. The work extends the use of the J-HMBC experiments to site-specifically labeled molecules, thereby increasing the number of coupling constants that can be obtained from a single preparation of a molecule.

  • 14.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    A perspective on the primary and three-dimensional structures of carbohydrates2013In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 378, p. 123-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbohydrates, in more biologically oriented areas referred to as glycans, constitute one of the four groups of biomolecules. The glycans, often present as glycoproteins or glycolipids, form highly complex structures. In mammals ten monosaccharides are utilized in building glycoconjugates in the form of oligo-(up to about a dozen monomers) and polysaccharides. Subsequent modifications and additions create a large number of different compounds. In bacteria, more than a hundred monosaccharides have been reported to be constituents of lipopolysaccharides, capsular polysaccharides, and exopolysaccharides. Thus, the number of polysaccharide structures possible to create is huge. NMR spectroscopy plays an essential part in elucidating the primary structure, that is, monosaccharide identity and ring size, anomeric configuration, linkage position, and sequence, of the sugar residues. The structural studies may also employ computational approaches for NMR chemical shift predictions (CASPER program). Once the components and sequence of sugar residues have been unraveled, the three-dimensional arrangement of the sugar residues relative to each other (conformation), their flexibility (transitions between and populations of conformational states), together with the dynamics (timescales) should be addressed. To shed light on these aspects we have utilized a combination of experimental liquid state NMR techniques together with molecular dynamics simulations. For the latter a molecular mechanics force field such as our CHARMM-based PARM22/SU01 has been used. The experimental NMR parameters acquired are typically H-1, H-1 cross-relaxation rates (related to NOEs), (3)JCH and (3)JCC trans-glycosidic coupling constants and H-1, C-13-and H-1, H-1-residual dipolar couplings. At a glycosidic linkage two torsion angles phi and psi are defined and for 6-substituted residues also the omega torsion angle is required. Major conformers can be identified for which highly populated states are present. Thus, in many cases a well-defined albeit not rigid structure can be identified. However, on longer timescales, oligosaccharides must be considered as highly flexible molecules since also anti-conformations have been shown to exist with H-C-O-C torsion angles of similar to 180 degrees, compared to syn-conformations in which the protons at the carbon atoms forming the glycosidic linkage are in close proximity. The accessible conformational space governs possible interactions with proteins and both minor changes and significant alterations occur for the oligosaccharides in these interaction processes. Transferred NOE NMR experiments give information on the conformation of the glycan ligand when bound to the proteins whereas saturation transfer difference NMR experiments report on the carbohydrate part in contact with the protein. It is anticipated that the subtle differences in conformational preferences for glycan structures facilitate a means to regulate biochemical processes in different environments. Further developments in the analysis of glycan structure and in particular its role in interactions with other molecules, will lead to clarifications of the importance of structure in biochemical regulation processes essential to health and disease.

  • 15.
    Šoltésová, Mária
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Charles University in Prague.
    Kowalewski, Jozef
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Dynamics of exocyclic groups in the Escherichia coli O91 O-antigen polysaccharide in solution studied by carbon-13 NMR relaxation2013In: Journal of Biomolecular NMR, ISSN 0925-2738, E-ISSN 1573-5001, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 37-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon-13 relaxation data are reported for exocyclic groups of hexopyranosyl sugar residues in the repeating unit within the Escherichia coli O91 O-antigen polysaccharide in a dilute D2O solution. The measurements of T 1, T 2 and heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser enhancements were carried out at 310 K at two magnetic fields (16.4 T, 21.1 T). The data were analyzed using the standard and extended Lipari–Szabo models, as well as a conformational jump model. The extended version of the Lipari–Szabo and the two-site jump models were most successful for the hydroxymethyl groups of Gal and GlcNAc sugar residues. Different dynamics was found for the hydroxymethyl groups associated with different configurations (d-gluco, d-galacto) of the sugar residues, the latter being faster than the former.

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