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  • 1.
    Agrawal, Santosh
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martínez-Castro, Elisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Marcos, Rocio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Readily Available Ruthenium Complex for Efficient Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of Aromatic alpha-Hydroxy Ketones2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 2256-2259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A ruthenium complex formed from commercially available [Ru(p-cymene)Cl-2](2) and 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane catalyzes the racemization of aromatic alpha-hydroxy ketones very efficiently at room temperature. The racemization is fully compatible with a kinetic resolution catalyzed by a lipase from Pseudomonas stutzeri. This is the first example of dynamic kinetic resolution of alpha-hydroxy ketones at ambient temperature in which the metal and enzyme catalysts work in concert in one pot at room temperature to give quantitative yields of esters of alpha-hydroxy ketones with very high enantioselectivity.

  • 2.
    Alam, Rauful
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Das, Arindam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Huang, Genping
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stereoselective allylboration of imines and indoles under mild conditions. An in situ E/Z isomerization of imines by allylboroxines2014In: Chemical Science, ISSN 2041-6520, E-ISSN 2041-6539, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 2732-2738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct allylboration of various acyclic and cyclic aldimine, ketimine and indole substrates was performed using allylboronic acids. The reaction proceeds with very high anti-stereoselectivity for both E and Z imines. The allylboroxines formed by dehydration of allylboronic acids have a dual effect: promoting E/Z isomerization of aldimines and triggering the allylation by efficient electron withdrawal from the imine substrate.

  • 3.
    Alamsetti, Santosh Kumar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Persson, Andreas K. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palladium-Catalyzed Intramolecular Hydroamination of Propargylic Carbamates and Carbamothioates2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 1434-1437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient and simple methodology was developed for the synthesis of oxazolidinones, oxazolidinthiones, imidazolidinthiones, and imidazolidinones from the corresponding propargylic starting materials using Pd(OAc)(2) and n-Bu4NOAc as catalysts in DCE at room temperature.

  • 4.
    Bartholomeyzik, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mazuela, Javier
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Deng, Youqian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Arylating Carbocyclization of Allenynes: Control of Selectivity and Role of H2O2014In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 53, no 33, p. 8696-8699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly selective protocols for the carbocyclization/arylation of allenynes using arylboronic acids are reported. Arylated vinylallenes are obtained with the use of BF3 center dot Et2O as an additive, whereas addition of water leads to arylated trienes. These conditions provide the respective products with excellent selectivities (generally > 97:3) for a range of boronic acids and different allenynes. It has been revealed that water plays a crucial role for the product distribution.

  • 5.
    Bermejo Gomez, Antonio
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Erbing, Elis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Batuecas, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Vazquez-Romero, Ana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martin-Matute, Belen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Iridium-Catalyzed Isomerization/Bromination of Allylic Alcohols: Synthesis of alpha-Bromocarbonyl Compounds2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 34, p. 10703-10709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    alpha-Brominated ketones and aldehydes, with two adjacent electrophilic carbon atoms, are highly valuable synthetic intermediates in organic synthesis, however, their synthesis from unsymmetrical ketones is very challenging, and current methods suffer from low selectivity. We present a new, reliable, and efficient method for the synthesis of alpha-bromocarbonyl compounds in excellent yields and with excellent selectivities. Starting from allylic alcohols as the carbonyl precursors, the combination of a 1,3-hydrogen shift catalyzed by iridium(III) with an electrophilic bromination gives alpha-bromoketones and aldehydes in good to excellent yields. The selectivity of the process is determined by the structure of the starting allylic alcohol; thus, alpha-bromoketones formally derived from unsymmetrical ketones can be synthesized in a straightforward and selective manner.

  • 6.
    Bermejo Gómez, Antonio
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Holmberg, Pär
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martin-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Transition metal-catalyzed redox isomerization of codeine and morphine in water2014In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 74, p. 39519-39522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A water-soluble rhodium complex formed from commercially available [Rh(COD)(CH3CN)(2)]BF4 and 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (PTA) catalyzes the isomerization of both codeine and morphine into hydrocodone and hydromorphone with very high efficiency. The reaction is performed in water, allowing isolation of the final products by simple filtration, which results in very high isolated yields. The reactions can be easily scaled up to 100 g.

  • 7.
    Bielawski, Marcin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Malmgren, Joel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pardo, Leticia M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wikmark, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    One-Pot Synthesis and Applications of N-Heteroaryl Iodonium Salts2014In: ChemistryOpen, ISSN 2191-1363, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 19-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient one-pot synthesis of N-heteroaryl iodonium triflates from the corresponding N-heteroaryl iodide and arene has been developed. The reaction conditions resemble our previous one-pot syntheses, with suitable modifications to allow N-heteroaryl groups. The reaction time is only 30min, and no anion exchange is required. The obtained iodonium salts were isolated in a protonated form, these salts can either be employed directly in applications or be deprotonated prior to use. The aryl groups were chosen to induce chemoselective transfer of the heteroaryl moiety to various nucleophiles. The reactivity and chemoselectivity of these iodonium salts were demonstrated by selectively introducing a pyridyl moiety onto both oxygen and carbon nucleophiles in good yields.

  • 8. Both, P.
    et al.
    Green, A. P.
    Gray, C. J.
    Sardzik, R.
    Voglmeir, J.
    Fontana, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Austeri, M.
    Rejzek, M.
    Richardson, D.
    Field, R. A.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Flitsch, S. L.
    Eyers, C. E.
    Discrimination of epimeric glycans and glycopeptides using IM-MS and its potential for carbohydrate sequencing2014In: Nature Chemistry, ISSN 1755-4330, E-ISSN 1755-4349, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 65-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass spectrometry is the primary analytical technique used to characterize the complex oligosaccharides that decorate cell surfaces. Monosaccharide building blocks are often simple epimers, which when combined produce diastereomeric glycoconjugates indistinguishable by mass spectrometry. Structure elucidation frequently relies on assumptions that biosynthetic pathways are highly conserved. Here, we show that biosynthetic enzymes can display unexpected promiscuity, with human glycosyltransferase pp-a-GanT2 able to utilize both uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine and uridine diphosphate N-acetylgalactosamine, leading to the synthesis of epimeric glycopeptides in vitro. Ion-mobility mass spectrometry ( IM-MS) was used to separate these structures and, significantly, enabled characterization of the attached glycan based on the drift times of the monosaccharide product ions generated following collision-induced dissociation. Finally, ion-mobility mass spectrometry following fragmentation was used to determine the nature of both the reducing and non-reducing glycans of a series of epimeric disaccharides and the branched pentasaccharide Man3 glycan, demonstrating that this technique may prove useful for the sequencing of complex oligosaccharides.

  • 9. Bratt, Emma
    et al.
    Verho, Oscar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johansson, Magnus J.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    A General Suzuki Cross-Coupling Reaction of Heteroaromatics Catalyzed by Nanopalladium on Amino-Functionalized Siliceous Mesocellular Foam2014In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 79, no 9, p. 3946-3954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions of heteroaromatics catalyzed by palladium supported in the cavities of amino-functionalized siliceous mesocellular foam are presented. The nanopalladium catalyst effectively couples not only heteroaryl halides with boronic acids but also heteroaryl halides with boronate esters, potassium trifluoroborates, MIDA boronates, and triolborates, producing a wide range of heterobiaryls in good to excellent yields. Furthermore, the heterogeneous palladium nanocatalyst can easily be removed from the reaction mixture by filtration and recycled several times with minimal loss in activity. This catalyst provides an alternative, environmentally friendly, low-leaching process for the preparation of heterobiaryls.

  • 10. Chen, Mo
    et al.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Brady, John W.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Ionic Liquid 1-n-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium Chloride and Its Binary Mixtures with Ethanol2014In: Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation, ISSN 1549-9618, E-ISSN 1549-9626, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 4465-4479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) of the imidazolium family have attracted much attention during the past decade for their capability to dissolve biomass. Besides experimental work, numerous compuational studies have been concerned with the physical properties of both neat ILs and their interactions with different solutes, in particular, carbohydrates. Many classical force fields designed specifically for ILs have been found to yield viscosities that are too high for the liquid state, which has been attributed to the fact that the effective charge densities are too high due to the lack of electronic polarizability. One solution to this problem has been uniform scaling of the partial charges by a scale factor in the range 0.6-0.9, depending on model. This procedure has been shown to improve the viscosity of the models, and also to positively affect other properties, such as diffusion constants and ionic conductivity. However, less attention has been paid to how this affects the overall thermodynamics of the system, and the problems it might create when the IL models are combined with other force fields (e.g., for solutes). In the present work, we employ three widely used IL force fields to simulate 1-n-buty1-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride in both the crystal and the liquid state, as well as its binary mixture with ethanol. Two approaches are used: one in which the ionic charge is retained at its full integer value and one in which the partial charges are uniformly reduced to 85%. We investigate and calculate crystal and liquid structures, molar heat capacities, heats of fusion, self-diffusion constants, ionic conductivity, and viscosity for the neat IL, and ethanol activity as a function of ethanol concentration for the binary mixture. We show that properties of the crystal are less affected by charge scaling compared to the liquid. In the liquid state, transport properties of the neat IL are generally improved by scaling, whereas values for the heat of fusion are unaffected, and results for the heat capacity are ambiguous. Neither full nor reduced charges could reproduce experimental ethanol activities for the whole range of compositions.

  • 11.
    Das, Arindam
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Alam, Rauful
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stereocontrol in Synthesis of Homoallylic Amines. Syn Selective Direct Allylation of Hydrazones with Allylboronic Acids2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 14, p. 3808-3811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allylboronic acids directly react with acyl hydrazones, affording homoallylic amine derivatives. The reaction proceeds with very high syn selectivity, which is the opposite of the stereochemistry observed for allylboration of imines. The reaction can be carried out with both aromatic and aliphatic acyl hydrazones. Based on our studies the excellent syn stereochemistry can be explained by chelation control of the acyl hydrazone and the B(OH)(2) moiety.

  • 12.
    Deng, Hong-Ping
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Allylic sp (3) C-H borylation of alkenes via allyl-Pd intermediates: an efficient route to allylboronates2014In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 50, no 65, p. 9207-9210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Palladium catalyzed allylic C-H functionalization was performed using exocyclic alkene substrates. Multi-component synthesis of stereodefined homoallylic alcohols could be performed using a reaction sequence involving allylic C-H borylation and allylation of aldehydes.

  • 13.
    Engelmark Cassimjee, Karim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kadow, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wikmark, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Svedendahl Humble, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Rothstein, M. L.
    Rothstein, D. M.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    A general protein purification and immobilization method on controlled porosity glass: biocatalytic applications2014In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 50, no 65, p. 9134-9137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A general combined purification and immobilization method to facilitate biocatalytic process development is presented. The support material, EziG (TM), is based on controlled porosity glass (CPG) or polymer-coated versions thereof (HybCPG) and binds protein affinity tags. Biocatalytic reactions in aqueous and organic media with seven enzymes of biocatalytic interest are shown.

  • 14.
    Fontana, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kovacs, Helena
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates2014In: Journal of Biomolecular NMR, ISSN 0925-2738, E-ISSN 1573-5001, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 95-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of C-13-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly C-13-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-C-13)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight (C-13-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, similar to 10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The C-13 resonances are traced using C-13-C-13 correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the C-13 resonances, the H-1 chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond H-1-C-13 correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J (CC) splitting of the C-13 resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either C-13 or H-1 detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T-2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the H-1-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the C-13-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with N-15 at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and C-13-detected (H)CACO spectra.

  • 15.
    Fontana, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lundborg, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Weintraub, Andrej
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Rapid structural elucidation of polysaccharides employing predicted functions of glycosyltransferases and NMR data: Application to the O-antigen of Escherichia coli O592014In: Glycobiology, ISSN 0959-6658, E-ISSN 1460-2423, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 450-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A computerized method that uses predicted functions of glycosyltransferases (GTs) in conjunction with unassigned NMR data has been developed for the structural elucidation of bacterial polysaccharides (PSs). In this approach, information about the action of GTs (consisting of possible sugar residues used as donors and/or acceptors, as well as the anomeric configuration and/or substitution position in the respective glycosidic linkages) is extracted from the Escherichia coli O-antigen database and is submitted, together with the unassigned NMR data, to the CASPER program. This time saving methodology, which alleviates the need for chemical analysis, was successfully implemented in the structural elucidation of the O-antigen PS of E. coli O59. The repeating unit of the O-specific chain was determined using the O-deacylated PS and has a branched structure, namely, -> 6)[alpha-d-GalpA3Ac/4Ac-(1 -> 3)]-alpha-d-Manp-(1 -> 3)-alpha-d-Manp-(1 -> 3)-beta-d-Manp-(1 -> 3)-alpha-d-GlcpNAc-(1 ->. The identification of the O-acetylation positions was efficiently performed by comparison of the H-1,C-13 HSQC NMR spectra of the O-deacylated lipopolysaccharide and the lipid-free PS in conjunction with chemical shift predictions made by the CASPER program. The side-chain d-GalpA residue carries one equivalent of O-acetyl groups at the O-3 and O-4 positions distributed in the LPS in a 3:7 ratio, respectively. The presence of O-acetyl groups in the repeating unit of the E. coli O59 PS is consistent with the previously proposed acetyltransferase WclD in the O-antigen gene cluster.

  • 16.
    Ghosh, Raju
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lindstedt, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jalalian, Nazli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Room Temperature, Metal-Free Arylation of Aliphatic Alcohols2014In: ChemistryOpen, ISSN 2191-1363, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 54-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diaryliodonium salts are demonstrated as efficient arylating agents of aliphatic alcohols under metal-free conditions. The reaction proceeds at room temperature within 90min to give alkyl aryl ethers in good to excellent yields. Aryl groups with electron-withdrawing substituents are transferred most efficiently, and unsymmetric iodonium salts give chemoselective arylations. The methodology has been applied to the formal synthesis of butoxycaine.

  • 17.
    Ghosh, Raju
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Metal-Free Synthesis of N-Aryloxyimides and Aryloxyamines2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 1830-1832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    N-Hydroxyphthalimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide have been arylated with diaryliodonium salts to provide N-aryloxyimides in excellent yields in short reaction times. A novel hydrolysis under mild and hydrazine-free conditions yielded aryloxyamines, which are valuable building blocks in the synthesis of oxime ethers and benzofurans.

  • 18.
    Gigant, Nicolas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Access to Cinnamyl Derivatives from Arenes and Allyl Esters by a Biomimetic Aerobic Oxidative Dehydrogenative Coupling2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 1664-1667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient biomimetic aerobic oxidative dehydrogenative alkenylation of arenes with allyl esters is presented. The reaction proceeds under an ambient pressure of oxygen with relatively low catalyst loading of palladium acetate, employing catalytic amounts of electron-transfer mediators (ETMs). This study represents a new environmentally friendly method for the synthesis of cinnamyl derivatives.

  • 19.
    Gigant, Nicolas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Aerobic Direct C-H Arylation of Nonbiased Olefins2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 17, p. 4432-4435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient ligand-promoted biomimetic aerobic oxidative dehydrogenative cross-coupling between arenes and nonbiased olefins is presented. Acridine as a ligand was found to significantly enhance the rate, the yield, and the scope of the reaction under ambient oxygen pressure, providing a variety of alkenylarenes via an environmentally friendly procedure.

  • 20.
    Gigant, Nicolas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Aerobic Double Dehydrogenative Cross Coupling between Cyclic Saturated Ketones and Simple Arenes2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 20, p. 5890-5894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis of 3-aryl-2-cyclohexenones is a topic of current interest as they are not only privileged structures in bioactive molecules, but they are also relevant feedstocks for the synthesis of substituted phenols or anilines, which are ubiquitous structural elements both in drug design and medicinal chemistry. A simple and sustainable one-pot aerobic double dehydrogenative reaction under mild conditions for the introduction of arenes in the -position of cyclic ketones has been developed. Starting from the corresponding saturated ketone, this reaction sequence proceeds under relatively low Pd catalyst loading and involves catalytic amounts of electron-transfer mediators (ETMs) under ambient oxygen pressure.

  • 21.
    Gustafson, Karl P. J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lihammar, Richard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Verho, Oscar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Engström, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Chemoenzymatic Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of Primary Amines Using a Recyclable Palladium Nanoparticle Catalyst Together with Lipases2014In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 79, no 9, p. 3747-3751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A catalyst consisting of palladium nanoparticles supported on amino-functionalized siliceous mesocellular foam (Pd-AmP-MCF) was used in chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) to convert primary amines to amides in high yields and excellent ee's. The efficiency of the nanocatalyst at temperatures below 70 degrees C enables reaction conditions that are more suitable for enzymes. In the present study, this is exemplified by subjecting 1-phenylethylamine (1a) and analogous benzylic amines to DKR reactions using two commercially available lipases, Novozyme-435 (Candida antartica Lipase B) and Amano Lipase PS-C1 (lipase from Burkholderia cepacia) as biocatalysts. The latter enzyme has not previously been used in the DKR of amines because of its low stability at temperatures over 60 degrees C. The viability of the heterogeneous Pd-AmP-MCF was further demonstrated in a recycling study, which shows that the catalyst can be reused up to five times.

  • 22.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Landström, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    SEAL by NMR: Glyco-Based Selenium-Labeled Affinity Ligands Detected by NMR Spectroscopy2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 43, p. 13905-13908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a method for the screening of interactions between proteins and selenium-labeled carbohydrate ligands. SEAL by NMR is demonstrated with selenoglycosides binding to lectins where the selenium nucleus serves as an NMR-active handle and reports on binding through Se-77 NMR spectroscopy. In terms of overall sensitivity, this nucleus is comparable to C-13 NMR, while the NMR spectral width is ten times larger, yielding little overlap in Se-77 NMR spectroscopy, even for similar compounds. The studied ligands are singly selenated bioisosteres of methyl glycosides for which straightforward preparation methods are at hand and libraries can readily be generated. The strength of the approach lies in its simplicity, sensitivity to binding events, the tolerance to additives and the possibility of having several ligands in the assay. This study extends the increasing potential of selenium in structure biology and medicinal chemistry. We anticipate that SEAL by NMR will be a beneficial tool for the development of selenium-based bioactive compounds, such as glycomimetic drug candidates.

  • 23.
    Ilchenko, Nadia O.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tasch, Boris O. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mild Silver-Mediated Geminal Difluorination of Styrenes Using an Air- and Moisture-Stable Fluoroiodane Reagent2014In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 53, no 47, p. 12897-12901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An air-and moisture-stable fluoroiodane in the presence of AgBF4 is suitable for selective geminal difluorination of styrenes under mild reaction conditions. One of the C-F bonds is formed by transfer of electrophilic fluorine from the hypervalent iodine reagent, while the other one arises from the tetrafluoroborate counterion of silver. Deuterium-isotope-labelling experiments and rearrangement of methyl styrene substrates suggest that the reaction proceeds through a phenonium ion intermediate.

  • 24.
    Janson, Pär
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Oxidative Trifluoromethylation and other Functionalization Reactions of Alkenes and Alkynes2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis concerns the use of various potent oxidants in organic synthesis. The main focus is directed at selectively introducing trifluoromethyl groups into compounds containing double or triple bonds. All reactions proceed under mild conditions and can in most cases be performed on the bench-top.

    We have developed three different procedures for transformations of activated alkenes and alkynes as well as quinones. In paper I the selective introduction of a trifluoromethyl group together with an oxygen functionality to double and triple bonds is demonstrated.

    Paper II is focused on the related chemoselective cyanotrifluoromethylation in which a cyano group is added instead of the oxygen functionality.

    Paper III describes a new procedure for C–H trifluoromethylation of quinones. Our studies on the mechanistic aspects of the above reactions are described in Paper IV. In these studies we investigated the ligand and substituent effects in Cu-catalyzed reactions.

    Paper V is focused on a conceptually new palladium-catalyzed allylic C–H acyloxylation of olefins under oxidative conditions. The procedure uses an inexpensive, safe and environmentally benign oxidant, sodium perborate, which is activated with acetic anhydride.

  • 25.
    Jiang, Tuo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palladium(II)-Catalyzed Oxidative Carbocyclization: Stereoselective Formation of C–C and C–B Bonds2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Transition metal catalysis has emerged as one of the most versatile methods for the selective formation of carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bonds. In particular, oxidative carbon–carbon bond forming reactions have been widely studied due to their atom economic feature. This thesis has been focused on the development of new palladium(II)-catalyzed carbocyclization reactions under oxidative conditions.

    The first part of the thesis describes the palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidative carbocyclization-borylation and -arylation of enallenes. In these reactions, the (σ-alkyl)palladium(II) intermediate, which was shown previously to undergo β-hydride elimination, could be trapped in situ by organoboron reagents (B2pin2 and arylboronic acids) to form new carbon–boron and carbon–carbon bonds. Through these two protocols, a range of borylated and arylated carbocycles were obtained as single diastereomers in high yields.

    The second part deals with a palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidative diarylative carbocyclization of enynes. The reaction was proposed to start with a syn-arylpalladation of an alkyne, followed by insertion of the coordinated alkene. Subsequent arylation afforded a series of valuable diarylated tetrahydrofuran and tetrahydropyran products.

    The final part of the thesis advances the previously developed palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidative carbocyclization-borylation of enallenes in an enantioselective manner. C2-symmetric chiral phosphoric acids were used as the novel co-catalyst to trigger the enantioselective formation of intramolecular carbon–carbon bonds. By using this chiral anion strategy, a number of enallenes were converted to the borylated carbocycles with high to excellent enantioselectivity.

  • 26.
    Kadow, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Ernst Moritz Arndt Universitat Greifswald, Germany.
    Balke, Kathleen
    Willetts, Andrew
    Bornscheuer, Uwe T.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Functional assembly of camphor converting two-component Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases with a flavin reductase from E-coli2014In: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, ISSN 0175-7598, E-ISSN 1432-0614, Vol. 98, no 9, p. 3975-3986Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The major limitation in the synthetic application of two-component Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases was addressed by identifying the 28-kDa flavin-reductase Fre from Escherichia coli as a suitable supplier of reduced FMN for these enzymes. Coexpression of Fre with either 2,5- or 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 10007 significantly enhanced the conversion of camphor and norcamphor serving as representative ketones. With purified enzymes, full conversion was achieved, while only slight amounts of product were formed in the absence of this flavin reductase. Fusion of the genes of Fre and DKCMOs into single open reading frame constructs resulted in unstable proteins exhibiting flavin reducing, but poor oxygenating activity, which led to overall decreased conversion of camphor.

  • 27.
    Lihammar, Richard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Enzyme- and Transition Metal-Catalyzed Asymmetric Transformations: Application of Enzymatic (D)KR in Enantioselective Synthesis2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) is a powerful method for obtaining compounds with high optical purity. The process relies on the combination of a kinetic resolution with an in situ racemization. In this thesis, a combination of an immobilized hydrolase and a transition metal-based racemization catalyst was employed in DKR to transform racemic alcohols and amines into enantioenriched esters and amides, respectively.

    In the first part the DKR of 1,2-amino alcohols with different rings sizes and N-protecting groups is described. We showed that the immobilization method used to support the lipase strongly influenced the stereoselectivity of the reaction.

    The second part deals with the DKR of C3-functionalized cyclic allylic alcohols affording the corresponding allylic esters in high yields and high ee’s. The protocol was also extended to include carbohydrate derivatives, leading to inversion of a hydroxyl substituted chiral center on the carbohydrate.

    The third part focuses on an improved method for obtaining benzylic primary amines. By using a novel, recyclable catalyst composed of Pd nanoparticles on amino-functionalized mesocellular foam, DKR could be performed at 50 °C. Moreover, Lipase PS was for the first time employed in the DKR of amines.

    In the fourth part DKR was applied in the total synthesis of Duloxetine, a compound used in the treatment of major depressive disorder. By performing a six-step synthesis, utilizing DKR in the enantiodetermining step, Duloxetine could be isolated in an overall yield of 37% and an ee >96%.

    In the final part we investigated how the enantioselectivty of reactions catalyzed by Candida Antarctica lipase B for δ-substituted alkan-2-ols are influenced by water. The results showed that the enzyme displays much higher enantioselectivity in water than in anhydrous toluene. The effect was rationalized by the creation of a water mediated hydrogen bond in the active site that helps the enzyme form enantiodiscriminating binding modes.

  • 28.
    Lihammar, Richard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Rönnols, Jerk
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Epimerization of Glycal Derivatives by a Cyclopentadienylruthenium Catalyst: Application to Metalloenzymatic DYKAT2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 45, p. 14756-14762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epimerization of a non-anomeric stereogenic center in carbohydrates is an important transformation in the synthesis of natural products. In this study an epimerization procedure of the allylic alcohols of glycals by cyclopentadienylruthenium catalyst 1 is presented. The epimerization of 4,6-O-benzylidene-D-glucal 4 in toluene is rapid, and an equlibrium with its D-allal epimer 5 is established within 5min at room temperature. Exchange rates for allal and glucal formation were determined by 1D H-1 EXSY NMR experiments to be 0.055s(-1) and 0.075s(-1), respectively. For 4-O-benzyl-L-rhamnal 8 the epimerization was less rapid and four days of epimerization was required to achieve equilibration of the epimers at room temperature. The epimerization methodology was subsequently combined with acylating enzymes in a dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation (DYKAT), giving stereoselective acylation to the desired stereoisomers 12, 13, and 15. The net effect of this process is an inversion of a stereogenic center on the glycal, and yields ranging from 71% to 83% of the epimer were obtained.

  • 29.
    Lundberg, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tinnis, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Selander, Nicklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Catalytic amide formation from non-activated carboxylic acids and amines2014In: Chemical Society Reviews, ISSN 0306-0012, E-ISSN 1460-4744, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 2714-2742Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amide functionality is found in a wide variety of biological and synthetic structures such as proteins, polymers, pesticides and pharmaceuticals. Due to the fact that synthetic amides are still mainly produced by the aid of coupling reagents with poor atom-economy, the direct catalytic formation of amides from carboxylic acids and amines has become a field of emerging importance. A general, efficient and selective catalytic method for this transformation would meet well with the increasing demands for green chemistry procedures. This review covers catalytic and synthetically relevant methods for direct condensation of carboxylic acids and amines. A comprehensive overview of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic methods is presented, covering biocatalysts, Lewis acid catalysts based on boron and metals as well an assortment of other types of catalysts.

  • 30.
    Malmgren, Joel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Iodonium Salts: Preparation, Chemoselectivity and Metal-Catalyzed Applications2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis concerns the preparation and use of diaryliodonium salts. In Project I various unsymmetrical diaryliodonium salts were reacted with three different nucleophiles in order to study the chemoselectivity of the reactions of the salts. The main focus of this project was to gain a deeper understanding of the underlying factors that affect the chemoselectivity in transition metal-free arylation reactions. They were found to be very nucleophile-dependent. Some nucleophiles were very sensitive to electronic effects, whereas others were sensitive to steric factors. Ultimately, some arenes are never transferred. A very interesting scrambling reaction was also observed under the reaction conditions, where unsymmetrical diaryliodonium salts form symmetrical salts in situ.

    Project II details the preparation of N-heteroaryliodonium salts via a one-pot procedure. The salts were designed so that the N-heteroaryl moiety was selectively transferred in applications both with and without transition metals. The chemoselectivity was demonstrated by selective transfer of the pyridyl group onto two different nucleophiles.

    The third project in the thesis discusses the synthesis of alkynyl(aryl)iodonium salts and alkynylbenziodoxolones from arylsilanes. This protocol could potentially be a very useful complement to the existing procedures, in which boronic acids are used.

    The last part of the thesis (Project IV) describes a C-2 selective arylation of indoles where diaryliodonium salts were used in combination with hetero-geneous palladium catalysis. This transformation was performed in water at ambient temperature to 50 °C, and tolerated variations of both the indole and the diaryliodonium salt. Importantly, several N-H indoles could be arylated. The MCF-supported Pd-catalyst showed very little leaching and it was demonstrated that the main part of the reaction occurred via heterogeneous catalysis.

  • 31.
    Malmgren, Joel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nagendiran, Anuja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    C-2 Selective Arylation of Indoles with Heterogeneous Nanopalladium and Diaryliodonium Salts2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 42, p. 13531-13535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple and efficient method to prepare synthetically useful 2-arylindoles is presented, using a heterogeneous Pd catalyst and diaryliodonium salts in water under mild conditions. A remarkably low leaching of metal catalyst was observed under the applied conditions. The developed protocol is highly C-2 selective and tolerates structural variations both in the indole and in the diaryliodonium salt. Arylations of both NH indoles and N-protected indoles with ortho-substituted, electron-rich, electron-deficient, or halogenated diaryliodonium salts were achieved to give the desired products in high to excellent isolated yields within 6 to 15 h at room temperature or 40 °C.

  • 32. Mensch, Carl
    et al.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johannessen, Christian
    Studying the Glycan Moiety of RNase B by Means of Raman and Raman Optical Activity2014In: ChemPhysChem, ISSN 1439-4235, E-ISSN 1439-7641, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 2252-2254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Raman and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectroscopy are used to study the solution-phase structure of the glycan moiety of the protein ribonuclease B (RNase B). Spectral data of the intact glycan moiety of RNase B is obtained by subtracting high-quality spectral data of RNase A, the non-glycosylated form of the RNase, from the spectra of the glycoprotein. The remaining difference spectra are compared to spectra generated from Raman and ROA data of the constituent disaccharides of the RNase glycan, achieving convincing spectral overlap. The results show that ROA spectroscopy is able to extract detailed spectral data of the glycan moieties of proteins, provided that the non-glycosylated isoform is available. Furthermore, good comparison between the full glycan spectrum and the regenerated spectra based on the disaccharide data lends great promise to ROA as a tool for the solution-phase structural analysis of this structurally elusive class of biomolecules.

  • 33.
    Nagendiran, Anuja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Verho, Oscar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Haller, Clemence
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Cycloisomerization of Acetylenic Acids to gamma-Alkylidene Lactones using a Palladium(II) Catalyst Supported on Amino-Functionalized Siliceous Mesocellular Foam2014In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 79, no 3, p. 1399-1405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cycloisomerization of various gamma-acetylenic acids to their corresponding gamma-alkylidene lactones by the use of a heterogeneous Pd(II) catalyst supported on amino-functionalized siliceous mesocellular foam is described. Substrates containing terminal as well as internal alkynes were cyclized in high to excellent yields within 2-24 h under mild reaction conditions. The protocol exhibited high regio- and stereoselectivity, favoring the exo-dig product with high Z selectivity. Moreover, the catalyst displayed excellent stability under the employed reaction conditions, as demonstrated by its good recyclability and low leaching.

  • 34. Patel, Dhilon S.
    et al.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mallajosyula, Sairam S.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    MacKerell, Alexander D., Jr.
    Conformational Properties of alpha- or beta-(1 -> 6)-Linked Oligosaccharides: Hamiltonian Replica Exchange MD Simulations and NMR Experiments2014In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 118, no 11, p. 2851-2871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conformational sampling for a set of 10 alpha- or beta-(1 -> 6)-linked oligosaccharides has been studied using explicit solvent Hamiltonian replica exchange (HREX) simulations and NMR spectroscopy techniques. Validation of the force field and simulation methodology is done by comparing calculated transglycosidic J coupling constants and proton-proton distances with the corresponding NMR data. Initial calculations showed poor agreement, for example, with >3 Hz deviation of the calculated (3)J(H5,H6R) values from the experimental data, prompting optimization of the omega torsion angle parameters associated with (1 -> 6)-linkages. The resulting force field is in overall good agreement (i.e., within similar to 0.5 Hz deviation) from experimental (3)J(H5,H6R) values, although some small limitations are evident. Detailed hydrogen bonding analysis indicates that most of the compounds lack direct intramolecular H-bonds between the two monosaccharides; however, minor sampling of the O6 center dot center dot center dot HO2' hydrogen bond is present in three compounds. The results verify the role of the gauche effect between O5 and O6 atoms in gluco- and manno-configured pyranosides causing the omega torsion angle to sample an equilibrium between the gt and gg rotamers. Conversely, galacto-configured pyranosides sample a population distribution in equilibrium between gt and tg rotamers, while the gg rotamer populations are minor. Water radial distribution functions suggest decreased accessibility to the O6 atom in the (1 -> 6)-linkage as compared to the O6' atom in the nonreducing sugar. The role of bridging water molecules between two sugar moieties on the distributions of omega torsion angles in oligosaccharides is also explored.

  • 35.
    Pendrill, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Methyl 4-O-benzyl-alpha-l-rhamno-pyrano-side2014In: Acta Crystallographica Section E: Structure Reports Online, ISSN 1600-5368, E-ISSN 1600-5368, Vol. 70, p. o561-o562Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Pendrill, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sørensen, Ole W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Suppressing one-bond homonuclear 13C,13C scalar couplings in the J-HMBC NMR experiment: application to 13C site-specifically labeled oligosaccharides2014In: Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry, ISSN 0749-1581, E-ISSN 1097-458X, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 82-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Site-specific C-13 isotope labeling is a useful approach that allows for the measurement of homonuclear C-13,C-13 coupling constants. For three site-specifically labeled oligosaccharides, it is demonstrated that using the J-HMBC experiment for measuring heteronuclear long-range coupling constants is problematical for the carbons adjacent to the spin label. By incorporating either a selective inversion pulse or a constant-time element in the pulse sequence, the interference from one-bond C-13,C-13 scalar couplings is suppressed, allowing the coupling constants of interest to be measured without complications. Experimental spectra are compared with spectra of a nonlabeled compound as well as with simulated spectra. The work extends the use of the J-HMBC experiments to site-specifically labeled molecules, thereby increasing the number of coupling constants that can be obtained from a single preparation of a molecule.

  • 37.
    Quan, Xu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Parihar, Vijay Singh
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bera, Milan
    University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
    Andersson, Pher G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
    Iridium Catalysts with Chiral Bicyclic Pyridine-Phosphane Ligands for the Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Olefins2014In: European Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-193X, E-ISSN 1099-0690, Vol. 2014, no 1, p. 140-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New bicyclic pyridine-phosphane ligands were prepared, and their iridium complexes were evaluated in asymmetric hydrogenation of trisubstituted olefins with non-coordinating and weakly coordinating substituents. The iridium catalysts showed high reactivity and enantioselectivity for both types of olefins.

  • 38.
    Rönnols, Jerk
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Manner, Sophie
    Ellervik, Ulf
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Conformational effects due to stereochemistry and C3-substituents in xylopyranoside derivatives as studied by NMR spectroscopy2014In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 12, no 40, p. 8031-8035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glycosaminoglycans contain a beta-D-xylopyranose residue at its reducing end, which links the polysaccharide to the protein in proteoglycans. 2-Naphthyl beta-D-xylopyranosides have shown inhibition of tumor growth and we herein investigate conformation and dynamics of compounds structurally and stereochemically modified at the C3 position as well as the influence of solvent. The 3-deoxygenated compound, the 3-C-methyl-substituted beta-D-xylopyranoside, beta-D-ribopyranoside, the 3-C-methyl-substituted beta-D-ribopyranoside as well as 2-naphthyl beta-D-xylopyranoside were analyzed by NMR spectroscopy. Conformational equilibria were dependent on the solvent of choice, either methanol-d(4) or chloroform-d, with mainly C-4(1) and C-1(4) conformations present but also skew conformations to some extent. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding was concluded to be important for the 3-C-methyl-substituted beta-D-xylopyranosides in the non-polar solvent. Dynamic NMR (DNMR) spectroscopy was carried out for the 3-deoxygenated compound, which at 25 degrees C in methanol-d(4) exists with equally populated states of the C-4(1) and the C-1(4) conformations, but at -100 degrees C only a few percent is present of the latter. Using C-13 NMR detection for DNMR, resonance lines were shown to broaden at -40 degrees C and to sharpen again below -90 degrees C, without the emergence of a second set of NMR resonances, a typical behavior for an unequally populated equilibrium. The enthalpy and entropy activation barriers were calculated and resulted in Delta H-double dagger = 47.3 kJ mol(-1) and Delta S-double dagger = 54 J mol(-1) K-1.

  • 39. Sapu, Chicco Manzuna
    et al.
    Görbe, Tamás
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lihammar, Richard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Deska, Jan
    Migratory Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of Carbocyclic Allylic Alcohols2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 22, p. 5952-5955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel migratory dynamic kinetic resolution based on the interplay between an enzyme acylation catalyst and a heterogeneous Bronsted acid as an isomerization/racemization catalyst gives rise to carbocyclic allylic esters with excellent stereoselectivity from readily available tertiary carbinols. An easy-to-use teabag setup combining resin-bound catalysts, a biphasic isooctanewater solvent system, and a highly lipophilic acyl donor efficiently suppresses side reactions and allows for the preparation of functionalized carbocyclic building blocks in high yields and optical purity.

  • 40. Siegbahn, Anna
    et al.
    Manner, Sophie
    Persson, Andrea
    Tykesson, Emil
    Holmqvist, Karin
    Ochocinska, Agata
    Rönnols, Jerk
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sundin, Anders
    Mani, Katrin
    Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ellervik, Ulf
    Rules for priming and inhibition of glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis; probing the beta 4GalT7 active site2014In: Chemical Science, ISSN 2041-6520, E-ISSN 2041-6539, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 3501-3508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    beta-1,4-Gatactosyltransferase 7 (beta 4GalT7) is an essential enzyme in the biosynthesis of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains of proteoglycans (PGs). Mammalian cells produce PGs, which are involved in biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation. The PGs consist of a core protein, with one or several GAG chains attached. Both the structure of the PGs and the GAG chains, and the expression of the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and degradation, vary between normal cells and tumor cells. The biosynthesis of GAG chains is initiated by xylosylation of a serine residue of the core protein, followed by galactosylation by beta 4GalT7. The biosynthesis can also be initiated by exogenously added beta-D-xylopyranosides with hydrophobic aglycons, which thus can act as acceptor substrates for beta 4GalT7. To determine the structural requirements for beta 4GalT7 activity, we have cloned and expressed the enzyme and designed a focused library of 2-naphthyl beta-D-xylopyranosides with modifications of the xylose moiety. Based on enzymatic studies, that is galactosylation and its inhibition, conformational analysis and molecular modeling using the crystal structure, we propose that the binding pocket of beta 4GalT7 is very narrow, with a precise set of important hydrogen bonds. Xylose appears to be the optimal acceptor substrate for galactosylation by beta 4GalT7. However, we show that modifications of the xylose moiety of the beta-D-xylopyranosides can render inhibitors of galactosylation. Such compounds will be valuable tools for the exploration of GAG and PG biosynthesis and a starting point for development of anti-tumor agents.

  • 41.
    Tinnis, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Verho, Oscar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Gustafson, Karl P. J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Efficient Palladium-Catalyzed Aminocarbonylation of Aryl Iodides Using Palladium Nanoparticles Dispersed on Siliceous Mesocellular Foam2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 20, p. 5885-5889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A highly dispersed nanopalladium catalyst supported on mesocellular foam (MCF), was successfully used in the heterogeneous catalysis of aminocarbonylation reactions. During the preliminary evaluation of this catalyst it was discovered that the supported palladium nanoparticles exhibited a “release and catch” effect, meaning that a minor amount of the heterogeneous palladium became soluble and catalyzed the reaction, after which it re-deposited onto the support.

  • 42. Verendel, J. Johan
    et al.
    Pamies, Oscar
    Dieguez, Montserrat
    Andersson, Pher G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Univ KwaZulu Natal, Sch Chem, Durban, South Africa.
    Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Olefins Using Chiral Crabtree-type Catalysts: Scope and Limitations2014In: Chemical Reviews, ISSN 0009-2665, E-ISSN 1520-6890, Vol. 114, no 4, p. 2130-2169Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Verho, Oscar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Gao, Feifei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wan, Wei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Nagendiran, Anuja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zheng, Haoquan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles applied as a support for Pd and Au nanocatalysts in cycloisomerization reactions2014In: APL materials, ISSN 2166-532X, Vol. 2, no 11, p. 113316-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultra-small mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have been synthesized at room temperature with particle sizes ranging from 28 to 45 nm. These MSNs have been employed as heterogeneous supports for palladium and gold nanocatalysts. The colloidal nature of the MSNs is highly useful for catalytic applications as it allows for better mass transfer properties and a more uniform distribution of the nanocatalysts in solution. The two nanocatalysts were evaluated in the cycloisomerization of alkynoic acids and demonstrated to produce the corresponding alkylidene lactones in good to excellent yields under mild conditions. In addition to their high activity, the catalysts exhibit low degree of metal leaching and straight-forward recycling, which highlight the practical utility of MSNs as supports for nanocatalysts. (C) 2014 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

  • 44.
    Verho, Oscar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Gustafson, Karl P. J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nagendiran, Anuja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mild and Selective Hydrogenation of Nitro Compounds using Palladium Nanoparticles Supported on Amino-Functionalized Mesocellular Foam2014In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 6, no 11, p. 3153-3159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the utilization of a heterogeneous catalyst comprised of Pd nanoparticles supported on aminopropyl-functionalized siliceous mesocellular foam (Pd-0-AmP-MCF) for the selective hydrogenation of aromatic, aliphatic, and heterocyclic nitro compounds to the corresponding amines. In general, the catalytic protocol exclusively affords the desired amine products in excellent yields within short reaction times with the reactions performed at room temperature under ambient pressure of H-2. Moreover, the reported Pd nanocatalyst displayed excellent structural integrity for this transformation as it could be recycled multiple times without any observable loss of activity or leaching of metal. In addition, the Pd nanocatalyst could be easily integrated into a continuous-flow device and used for the hydrogenation of 4-nitroanisole on a 2.5 g scale, where the product p-anisidine was obtained in 95% yield within 2 h with a Pd content of less than 1 ppm.

  • 45.
    Verho, Oscar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nagendiran, Anuja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nanopalladium on Amino-Functionalized Mesocellular Foam as an Efficient and Recyclable Catalyst for the Selective Transfer Hydrogenation of Nitroarenes to Anilines2014In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 205-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we report on the use of nanopalladium on amino-functionalized siliceous mesocellular foam as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for the transfer hydrogenation of nitroarenes to anilines. In all cases, the protocol proved to be highly selective and favored the formation of the desired aniline as the single product in high yields with short reaction times if naturally occurring and renewable -terpinene was employed as the hydrogen donor. Furthermore, the catalyst displayed excellent recyclability over five cycles and negligible leaching of metal into solution, which makes it an eco-friendly and economic catalyst to perform this transformation. The scalability of the protocol was demonstrated with the reduction of 4-nitroanisole on a 2g scale, in which p-anisidine was isolated in 98% yield.

  • 46.
    Volla, Chandra M. R.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Domino Carbocyclization- Carbonylation-Alkynylation of Enallenes2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 16, p. 4174-4177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An oxidative carbocyclization-carbonylation-alkynylation reaction cascade has been developed using catalytic amounts of palladium(II) salts. The domino reaction proceeds efficiently, giving the corresponding ynones in good to excellent yields under operationally simple conditions. A wide range of aromatic and aliphatic terminal alkynes with various functional groups are tolerated under the reaction conditions.

  • 47.
    Volla, Chandra M. R.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mazuela, Javier
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Carbocyclization-Carbonylation of Allenynes and Enallenes2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 25, p. 7608-7612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A highly efficient oxidative carbocyclization-carbonylation reaction cascade of allenynes and enallenes has been developed using a Pd-II salt in low catalytic amounts under ambient temperature and pressure (1 atm of carbon monoxide). The use of DMSO as an additive was found to be important for an efficient reaction. A wide range of alcohols as trapping reagents were used to give the corresponding esters in good yields.

  • 48. Wu, Emilia L.
    et al.
    Fleming, Patrick J.
    Yeom, Min Sun
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Klauda, Jeffery B.
    Fleming, Karen G.
    Im, Wonpil
    E. coil Outer Membrane and Interactions with OmpLA2014In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 106, no 11, p. 2493-2502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is a unique asymmetric lipid bilayer composed of phospholipids (PLs) in the inner leaflet and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) in the outer leaflet. Its function as a selective barrier is crucial for the survival of bacteria in many distinct environments, and it also renders Gram-negative bacteria more resistant to antibiotics than their Gram-positive counterparts. Here, we report the structural properties of a model of the Escherichia coli outer membrane and its interaction with outer membrane phospholipase A (OmpLA) utilizing molecular dynamics simulations. Our results reveal that given the lipid composition used here, the hydrophobic thickness of the outer membrane is similar to 3 angstrom thinner than the corresponding PL bilayer, mainly because of the thinner LPS leaflet. Further thinning in the vicinity of OmpLA is observed due to hydrophobic matching. The particular shape of the OmpLA barrel induces various interactions between LPS and PL leaflets, resulting in asymmetric thinning around the protein. The interaction between OmpLA extracellular loops and LPS (headgroups and core oligosaccharides) stabilizes the loop conformation with reduced dynamics, which leads to secondary structure variation and loop displacement compared to that in a DLPC bilayer. In addition, we demonstrate that the LPS/PL ratios in asymmetric bilayers can be reliably estimated by the per-lipid surface area of each lipid type, and there is no statistical difference in the overall membrane structure for the outer membranes with one more or less LPS in the outer leaflet, although individual lipid properties vary slightly.

  • 49.
    Yang, Bin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lihammar, Richard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Investigation of the Impact of Water on the Enantioselectivity Displayed by CALB in the Kinetic Resolution of δ-Functionalized Alkan-2-ol Derivatives2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 42, p. 13517-13521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is shown that the low enantioselectivity of Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB)-catalyzed transesterification of a δ-functionalized alkan-2-ol to its acetate does not correlate at all with the high enantioselectivity of the CALB-catalyzed hydrolysis of the corresponding acetate in water. This lack of correlation is unusual and for unfunctionalized alkan-2-ol derivatives there is a very good correlation between the enantioselectivity of transesterification of the alcohol and hydrolysis of the corresponding acetate (E>200 in both cases). The results confirm previous predictions from molecular modeling. The water effect was mimicked by CALB variant Ala281Ser, which showed an enhanced enantioselectivity in transesterification of δ-functionalized alkan-2-ols compared to wild-type CALB.

  • 50.
    Zhao, Tony S. N.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Yang, Yuzhu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lessing, Timo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Borylation of Propargylic Substrates by Bimetallic Catalysis. Synthesis of Allenyl, Propargylic, and Butadienyl Bpin Derivatives2014In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 136, no 21, p. 7563-7566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bimetallic Pd/Cu and Pd/Ag catalytic systems were used for borylation of propargylic alcohol derivatives. The substrate scope includes even terminal alkynes. The reactions proceed stererospecifically with formal S(N)2' pathways to give allenyl boronates. Opening of propargyl epoxides leads to 1,2-diborylated butadienes probably via en allenylboronate intermediate.

1 - 50 of 50
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