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  • 1.
    Adrian Meredith, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Design and Synthesis of Inhibitors Targeting the Aspartic Proteases HIV-1 PR and BACE-12009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis describes the synthesis of molecules designed for inhibition of two aspartic proteases, viral HIV-1 PR and human BACE-1. It also reports on the structure activity relationships of the targeted enzyme inhibitors.

    It is estimated that currently 33 million people are infected with HIV, the causative agent of AIDS. The virus targets T-lymphocytes and macrophages of the human immune system. The HIV-1 PR plays an important role in the viral replication, and by inhibiting the enzyme the disease progression can be slowed down or even halted.

    Herein is reported the design and synthesis of a series of HIV-1 PR inhibitors with novel P2 substituents of which several inhibit the enzyme in the nanomolar range. The aim of the second work was to further develop the inhibitors by the introduction of fluorine. Several attempts were performed to fluorinate different P2-substituents.

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is neurodegenerative, progressive and fatal disorder of the brain. It is associated with accumulation of plaques and tangles that cause impairment and functional decline of brain tissue which result in loss of memory and cognition. The plaques are mainly constituted of amyloid-β peptides that are generated in two steps from the amyloid precursor protein (APP). The cleavage sequence is initiated by the aspartic protease BACE-1, which makes the enzyme a key target in the effort of finding a therapy that aim to slow down the progression of AD.

    Herein are enclosed the development of two series of potent BACE-1 inhibitors. In the first work a synthetic strategy was developed to truncate a previously reported hydroxyethylene core structure in order to generate more drug-like inhibitors. This generated a series of truncated inhibitors where two amide bonds have been replaced with an ether - or alternatively a secondary amine linkage. A number of these inhibitors show potency against BACE-1. In the second part of the work the aim was investigate the effect of alterations in the P1 position. Five scaffolds with new P1 substituents were designed, synthesized and coupled with two different P2-P3 substituents. This resulted in a series of potent inhibitors that inhibit BACE-1 in the nanomolar range.

  • 2.
    Aydin, Juhanes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Novel Pincer Complex-Catalyzed Transformations: Including Asymmetric Catalysis2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is focused on the development of new pincer complex-catalyzed transformations. Optimization of the catalytic properties (fine-tuning) was directed to increase the catalytic activity as well as the chemo-, stereo- and enantioselectivity of the complexes. This was achieved by varying the heteroatoms in the terdentate pincer ligand, by changing the electronic properties of the coordinated aryl moiety and by implementing chiral functionalities in the pincer complexes.

    In the cross-coupling reaction of vinyl epoxides and aziridines with organoboronic acids the chemoselectivity of the reaction could be increased by employment of pincer complexes instead of commonly used Pd(0) catalysts. Furthermore, the introduction of a methoxy substituent in the aromatic subunit of the complex considerably increased the activity of the pincer complex catalyst.

    Fine-tuning of the enantioselectivity in electrophilic allylation reactions was achieved by using a wide variety of new BINOL- and biphenanthrol-based pincer complexes. The highest enantioselectivity (85% ee) was obtained by applying biphenanthrol-based pincer complexes.

    Stereoselective pincer complex-catalyzed condensation of sulfonylimines with isocyanoacetate could be achieved under mild reaction conditions. By application of chiral PCP catalysts, 2-imidazolines could be obtained with up to 86% ee.

    A new pincer complex-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization based reaction between organonitriles and sulfonylimines affords homoallylic amines and beta-aminonitriles in high yields. The asymmetric version of this process affords beta-aminonitriles with up to 71% ee.

    In the last chapter, a pincer complex-catalyzed redox coupling reaction is described. In this highly regio- and stereoselective process the integrity of the pincer catalysts is fully retained. This catalytic reaction proceeds with a high level of functional group tolerance, as allylic acetate and aryl halide functionalities are retained.

  • 3.
    Bielawski, Marcin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Efficient one-pot synthesis of bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)iodonium triflate2009In: Organic Syntheses, ISSN 0078-6209, Vol. 86, p. 308-314Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Frigell, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Cumpstey, Ian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of carbadisaccharide mimics of galactofuranosides2009In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, E-ISSN 1359-8562, Vol. 50, no 36, p. 5142-5144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Jalalian, Nazli
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Asymmetric α-arylation of carbonyl compounds with chiral diaryliodonium salts2009In: Abstracts of Papers, 238th ACS National Meeting, Washington, DC, United States, August 16-20, 2009, Washington, D.C.: American Chemical Society , 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Merritt, Eleanor A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Malmgren, Joel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Klinke, Felix J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of diaryliodonium triflates using environmentally benign oxidizing agents2009In: Synlett: Accounts and Rapid Communications in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0936-5214, E-ISSN 1437-2096, no 14, p. 2277-2280Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Fast, efficient and high-yielding routes to diaryliodonium salts2009In: European Symposium on Organic Chemistry (ESOC 16), Prague, Czech Republic, 2009, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Fast, efficient and high-yielding routes to diaryliodonium salts2009In: 44th EUCHEM Conference on Stereochemistry, Bürgenstock, Switzerland, May, 2009, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Fast, efficient and high-yielding routes to diaryliodonium salts2009In: XVIII EuCheMS Conference on Organometallic Chemistry, Gothenburg, Sweden, 2009, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Fast, efficient and high-yielding routes to diaryliodonium salts2009In: EUCHEMS Young Investigator Workshop, Liblice, Czech Republic, 2009, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Olsson, Vilhelm
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Development of New Synthetic Routes to Organoboronates by Catalytic Allylic Substitution and C-H bond Functionalization2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis describes the development of new catalytic methods for the synthesis and application of organometallic reagents, mainly focusing on allylboronic acid derivatives. Thus, palladium pincer-complex catalysis has been applied for extending the scope of palladiumcatalyzed borylation reactions in the synthesis of regio- and stereodefined functionalized allylboronic acid derivatives. These novel allylboronic acids were also employed as substrates in palladium catalyzed regioselective coupling reactions with iodobenzenes. We have also developed a new one-pot sequence based on preparation of allyl- and vinylboronates

    via catalytic carbon-hydrogen bond activation/borylation reactions. The synthetic scope of the reaction as well as mechanistic studies on the borylation process are presented. Finally, the synthesis of new chiral palladium pincer-complexes is described. These species were employed as catalysts in asymmetric electrophilic allyation of imines.

  • 12.
    Tran, Lien-Hoa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Biomimetic Reactions: Water Oxidation and Aerobic Oxidation2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals mainly with two oxidation reactions: water oxidation and aerobic oxidation, both of which have been applied in a biomimetic fashion. In the former reaction molecular oxygen is generated whereas in the latter it was used as terminal oxidant in oxidation reactions.

    The first part of this thesis describes the synthesis of different ruthenium and manganese complexes that could potentially act as catalysts for water oxidation. This part includes a discussion of the stability and reactivity of a new manganese(III) amide-type complex, that has been used as a catalyst for both epoxidation of stilbene and alcohol oxidation.

    The second part of this thesis discusses the synthesis of two new hybrid catalysts consisting of hydroquinone linked cobalt(II) salophen and cobalt(II) salmdpt, which have been used as oxygen-activating catalysts in aerobic oxidation reactions. The former catalyst was applied to the Pd-catalyzed reactions such as 1,4-diacetoxylation of cyclohexadiene whereas the latter was applied to the Ru-catalyzed oxidation of secondary alcohols to ketones. Moreover, these two hybrid catalysts could be used in the Pd-catalyzed carbocyclization of enallenes. In all cases molecular oxygen was used as the stoichiometric oxidant.

     

  • 13.
    Åberg, Jenny B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mechanistic Studies on Ruthenium-Catalyzed Hydrogen Transfer Reactions2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanistic studies on three different ruthenium-based catalysts have been performed. The catalysts have in common that they have been employed in hydrogen transfer reactions involving alcohols and ketones, amines and imines or both.

    Bäckvall’s catalyst, η5-(Ph5C5)Ru(CO)2Cl, finds its application as racemization catalyst in dynamic kinetic resolution, where racemic alcohols are converted to enantiopure acetates in high yields. The mechanism of the racemization has been investigated and both alkoxide and alkoxyacyl intermediates have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy and in situ FT-IR measurements. The presence of acyl intermediates supports a mechanism via CO assistance. Substantial support for coordination of the substrate during the racemization cycle is provided, including exchange studies with both external and internal potential ketone traps. We also detected an unexpected alkoxycarbonyl complex from 5-hydroxy-1-hexene, which has the double bond coordinated to ruthenium.

    Shvo’s catalyst, [Ru2(CO)4(μ-H)(C4Ph4COHOCC4Ph4)] is a powerful catalyst for transfer hydrogenation as well as for dynamic kinetic resolution. The mechanism of this catalyst is still under debate, even though a great number of studies have been published during the past decade. In the present work, the mechanism of the reaction with imines has been investigated. Exchange studies with both an external and an internal amine as potential traps have been performed and the results can be explained by a stepwise inner-sphere mechanism. However, if there is e.g. a solvent cage effect, the results can also be explained by an outer-sphere mechanism. We have found that there is no cage effect in the reduction of a ketone containing a potential internal amine trap. If the mechanism is outer-sphere, an explanation as to why the solvent cage effect is much stronger in the case of imines than ketones is needed.

    Noyori’s catalyst, [p-(Me2CH)C6H4Me]RuH(NH2CHPhCHPhNSO2C6H4-p-CH3), has successfully been used to produce chiral alcohols and amines via transfer hydrogenation. The present study shows that the mechanism for the reduction of imines is different from that of ketones and aldehydes. Acidic activation of the imine was found necessary and an ionic mechanism was proposed.

1 - 13 of 13
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