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  • 1.
    Agrawal, Santosh
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lenormand, Maud
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martin-Matute, Belen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Selective Alkylation of (Hetero)Aromatic Amines with Alcohols Catalyzed by a Ruthenium Pincer Complex2012In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 1456-1459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A readily available pincer ruthenium(II) complex catalyzes the selective monoalkylation of (hetero)aromatic amines with a wide range of primary alcohols (including pyridine-, furan-, and thiophene-substituted alcohols) with high efficiency when used in low catalyst loadings (1 mol %). Tertiary amine formation via polyalkylation does not occur, making this ruthenium system an excellent catalyst for the synthesis of sec-amines.

  • 2.
    Agrawal, Santosh
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martinez-Castro, Elisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Marcos, Rocio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Readily Available Ruthenium Complex for Efficient Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of Aromatic alpha-Hydroxy Ketones2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 2256-2259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A ruthenium complex formed from commercially available [Ru(p-cymene)Cl-2](2) and 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane catalyzes the racemization of aromatic alpha-hydroxy ketones very efficiently at room temperature. The racemization is fully compatible with a kinetic resolution catalyzed by a lipase from Pseudomonas stutzeri. This is the first example of dynamic kinetic resolution of alpha-hydroxy ketones at ambient temperature in which the metal and enzyme catalysts work in concert in one pot at room temperature to give quantitative yields of esters of alpha-hydroxy ketones with very high enantioselectivity.

  • 3.
    Ahlsten, Nanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Allylic alcohols as synthetic enolate equivalents: Isomerisation and tandem reactions catalysed by transition metal complexes2012In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1660-1670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allylic alcohols can be isomerised into carbonyl compounds by transition metal complexes. In the last few years, catalyst design and development have resulted in highly efficient isomerisations under mild reaction conditions, including enantioselective versions. In addition, the isomerisation of allylic alcohols has been combined with C-C bond forming reactions when electrophiles such as aldehydes or imines were present in the reaction mixture. Also, C-F bonds can be formed when electrophilic fluorinating reagents are used. Thus, allylic alcohols can be treated as latent enol(ate)s. In this article, we highlight the latest developments concerning the isomerisation of allylic alcohols into carbonyl compounds, focusing in particular on tandem isomerisation/C-C or C-heteroatom bond formation processes. Significant attention is given to the mechanistic aspects of the reactions.

  • 4.
    Ahlsten, Nanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bermejo Gomez, Antonio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martin-Matute, Belen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Iridium-Catalyzed 1,3-Hydrogen Shift/Chlorination of Allylic Alcohols2013In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 52, no 24, p. 6273-6276Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Ahmad, Anees
    et al.
    Scarassati, Paulo
    Jalalian, Nazli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Silva, Luiz F., Jr.
    Oxidative rearrangement of alkenes using in situ generated hypervalent iodine(III)2013In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, E-ISSN 1359-8562, Vol. 54, no 43, p. 5818-5820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel protocol for the oxidative rearrangement of alkenes using in situ generated hypervalent iodine(III) was developed. This approach uses inexpensive, readily available, and stable chemicals (PhI, mCPBA, and TsOH) giving rearrangement products in yields comparable to those obtained using the more expensive commercially available [hydroxy(tosyloxy)iodo]benzene [HTIB or Koser's reagent]. Additionally, an alternative protocol for the synthesis of 1-methyl-2-tetralone through the one-step epoxidation/rearrangement of 4-methyl-1,2-dihydronaphthalene using mCPBA and TsOH was developed.

  • 6.
    Alam, Rauful
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Das, Arindam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Huang, Genping
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stereoselective allylboration of imines and indoles under mild conditions. An in situ E/Z isomerization of imines by allylboroxines2014In: Chemical Science, ISSN 2041-6520, E-ISSN 2041-6539, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 2732-2738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct allylboration of various acyclic and cyclic aldimine, ketimine and indole substrates was performed using allylboronic acids. The reaction proceeds with very high anti-stereoselectivity for both E and Z imines. The allylboroxines formed by dehydration of allylboronic acids have a dual effect: promoting E/Z isomerization of aldimines and triggering the allylation by efficient electron withdrawal from the imine substrate.

  • 7.
    Alamsetti, Santosh Kumar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Persson, Andreas K. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palladium-Catalyzed Intramolecular Hydroamination of Propargylic Carbamates and Carbamothioates2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 1434-1437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient and simple methodology was developed for the synthesis of oxazolidinones, oxazolidinthiones, imidazolidinthiones, and imidazolidinones from the corresponding propargylic starting materials using Pd(OAc)(2) and n-Bu4NOAc as catalysts in DCE at room temperature.

  • 8.
    Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sjöberg, Nils A.
    Vasiljeva, Polina
    Lindman, Jonas
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bergenstråhle-Wohlert, Malin
    Wohlert, Jakob
    Temperature Dependence of Hydroxymethyl Group Rotamer Populations in Cellooligomers2015In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 119, no 30, p. 9559-9570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical force fields for computer simulations of carbohydrates are often implicitly assumed to be valid also at temperatures different from room temperature for which they were optimited: Herein, the temperature dependence of the hydroxymethyl group rotamer populations in short oligogaccharides is invegtigated using Molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy. Two oligosaccharides, methyl beta-cellobioside and beta-cellotetraose were simulated using three different carbohydrate force fields (CHARMM C35, GLYCAM06, and GROMOS 56A(carbo)) in combination with different water models (SPC, SPC/E, and TIP3P) using replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. For comparison, hydroxymethyl group rotamer populations were investigated for methyl beta-cellobioside and cellopentaose based- on measured NMR (3)J(H5,H6) coupling constants, in the latter case by using a chemical shift selective NMR-filter. Molecular dynamics simulations in combination with NMR spectroscopy show that the temperature dependence of the hydroxymethyl rotamer population in these short cellooligomers, in the range 263-344 K, generally becomes exaggerated in simulations when compared to experimental data, but also that it is dependent on simulation conditions, and most notably properties of the water model.

  • 9.
    Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of the tetrasaccharide glycoside moiety of Solaradixine and rapid NMR-based structure verification using the program CASPER2016In: Tetrahedron, ISSN 0040-4020, E-ISSN 1464-5416, Vol. 72, no 7, p. 912-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The major glycoalkaloid in the roots of Solanum laciniatum is Solaradixine having the branched tetrasaccharide beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 3)[alpha-L-Rhap-(1 -> 2)]-beta-D-Galp linked to O3 of the steroidal alkaloid Solasodine. We herein describe the synthesis of the methyl glycoside of the tetrasaccharide using a super-armed disaccharide as a donor molecule. A 2-(naphthyl)methyl protecting group was used in the synthesis of the donor since it was tolerant to a wide range of reaction conditions. The 6-O-benzylated-hexa-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyi-protected beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Glcp-SEt donor, which avoided 1,6-anydro formation, was successfully glycosylated at O3 of a galactoside acceptor molecule. However, subsequent glycosylation at O2 by a rhamnosyl donor was unsuccessful and instead a suitably protected alpha-L-Rhap(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Galp-OMe disaccharide was used as the acceptor molecule together with a super-armed beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Glcp-SEt donor in the glycosylation reaction, to give a tetrasaccharide in a yield of 55%, which after deprotection resulted in the target molecule, the structure of which was verified by the NMR chemical shift prediction program CASPER.

  • 10.
    Bacsik, Zoltan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Ahlsten, Nanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ziadi, Asraa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zhao, Guoying
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Garcia-Bennett, Alfonso E.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Martin-Matute, Belen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Mechanisms and Kinetics for Sorption of CO(2) on Bicontinuous Mesoporous Silica Modified with n-Propylamine2011In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 27, no 17, p. 11118-11128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied equilibrium adsorption and uptake kinetics and identified molecular species that formed during sorption of carbon dioxide on amine-modified silica. Bicontinuous silicas (AMS-6 and MCM-48) were postsynthetically modified with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane or (3-aminopropyl)methyldiethoxysilane, and amine-modified AMS-6 adsorbed more CO(2) than did amine-modified MCM-48. By in situ FTIR spectroscopy, we showed that the amine groups reacted with CO(2) and formed ammonium carbamate ion pairs as well as carbamic acids under both dry and moist conditions. The carbamic acid was stabilized by hydrogen bonds, and ammonium carbamate ion pairs formed preferably on sorbents with high densities of amine groups. Under dry conditions, silylpropylcarbamate formed, slowly, by condensing carbamic acid and silanol groups. The ratio of ammonium carbamate ion pairs to silylpropylcarbamate was higher for samples with high amine contents than samples with low amine contents. Bicarbonates or carbonates did not form under dry or moist conditions. The uptake of CO(2) was enhanced in the presence of water, which was rationalized by the observed release of additional amine groups under these conditions and related formation of ammonium carbamate ion pairs. Distinct evidence for a fourth and irreversibly formed moiety was observed under sorption of CO(2) under dry conditions. Significant amounts of physisorbed, linear CO(2) were detected at relatively high partial pressures of CO(2), such that they could adsorb only after the reactive amine groups were consumed.

  • 11.
    Bartholomeyzik, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mazuela, Javier
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Deng, Youqian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Arylating Carbocyclization of Allenynes: Control of Selectivity and Role of H2O2014In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 53, no 33, p. 8696-8699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly selective protocols for the carbocyclization/arylation of allenynes using arylboronic acids are reported. Arylated vinylallenes are obtained with the use of BF3 center dot Et2O as an additive, whereas addition of water leads to arylated trienes. These conditions provide the respective products with excellent selectivities (generally > 97:3) for a range of boronic acids and different allenynes. It has been revealed that water plays a crucial role for the product distribution.

  • 12.
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ahlsten, Nanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martin-Matute, Belen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Enantioselective Synthesis of Alcohols and Amines by Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation, Transfer Hydrogenation, and Related Processes2013In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 19, no 23, p. 7274-7302Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preparation of chiral alcohols and amines by using iridium catalysis is reviewed. The methods presented include the reduction of ketones or imines by using hydrogen (hydrogenations), isopropanol, formic acid, or formate (transfer hydrogenations). Also dynamic and oxidative kinetic resolutions leading to chiral alcohols and amines are included. Selected literature reports from early contributions to December 2012 are discussed.

  • 13.
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    González Miera, Greco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Marcos, Rocio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Norrby, Per-Ola
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mechanistic Studies on the Alkylation of Amines with Alcohols Catalyzed by a Bifunctional Iridium Complex2015In: ACS Catalysis, ISSN 2155-5435, E-ISSN 2155-5435, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 3704-3716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanism of the N-alkylation of amines with alcohols catalyzed by an iridium complex containing an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand with a tethered alcohol/alkoxide functionality was investigated by a combination of experimental and computational methods. The catalyst resting state is an iridium hydride species containing the amine substrate as a ligand, and decoordination of the amine, followed by coordination of the imine intermediate to the iridium center, constitute the rate-determining step (rds) of the catalytic process. The alcohol/alkoxide that is tethered to the NHC participates in every step of the catalytic cycle by accepting or releasing protons and forming hydrogen bonds with the reacting species. Thus, the iridium complex with the alcohol/alkoxide tethered to the N-heterocyclic carbene ligand acts as a bifunctional catalyst.

  • 14.
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jezowska, Martina M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Laymand, Kevin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mobus, Juri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of β-Hydroxy and β-Amino Ketones from Allylic Alcohols Catalyzed by Ru(η5-C5Ph5)(CO)2Cl2012In: European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-1948, E-ISSN 1099-1948, no 9, p. 1517-1530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient method for the synthesis of beta-hydroxy and beta-amino ketones from allylic alcohols catalyzed by Ru(5-C5Ph5)(CO)2Cl is described. The influence of the stereoelectronic properties of the catalyst on the reaction outcome has been studied. Optimization of the reaction conditions supressed the formation of undesired side products such as saturated ketones, benzyl alcohols, and a,beta-unsaturated ketones. Several aromatic and aliphatic allylic alcohols have been reacted with a large variety of aldehydes or imines to produce beta-hydroxy ketones or beta-amino ketones, respectively, in yields up to 99%. Based on experimental data, a mechanism via ruthenium alkoxides and ruthenium aldoxides is proposed. In addition, a C-bound ruthenium enolate has been characterized.

  • 15.
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Marcos, Rocio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sahoo, Suman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Inge, A. Ken
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    A Highly Active Bifunctional Iridium Complex with an Alcohol/Alkoxide-Tethered N-Heterocyclic Carbene for Alkylation of Amines with Alcohols2012In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 18, no 45, p. 14510-14519Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of new iridium(III) complexes containing bidentate N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHC) functionalized with an alcohol or ether group (NHC?OR, R=H, Me) were prepared. The complexes catalyzed the alkylation of anilines with alcohols as latent electrophiles. In particular, biscationic IrIII complexes of the type [Cp*(NHC-OH)Ir(MeCN)]2+2[BF4-] afforded higher-order amine products with very high efficiency; up to >99?% yield using a 1:1 ratio of reactants and 12.5 mol?% of Ir, in short reaction times (216 h) and under base-free conditions. Quantitative yields were also obtained at 50?degrees C, although longer reaction times (4860 h) were needed. A large variety of aromatic amines have been alkylated with primary and secondary alcohols. The reactivity of structurally related iridium(III) complexes was also compared to obtain insights into the mechanism and into the structure of possible catalytic intermediates. The IrIII complexes were stable towards oxygen and moisture, and were characterized by NMR, HRMS, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and elemental analyses.

  • 16. Battistel, Marcos D.
    et al.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Freedberg, Daron I.
    Direct Evidence for Hydrogen Bonding in Glycans: A Combined NMR and Molecular Dynamics Study2013In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 117, no 17, p. 4860-4869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduce the abundant hydroxyl groups of glycans as NMR handle's and structural probes to expand the repertoire of tools for structure function studies on glycans in solution. To this end, we present the facile detection and assignment of hydroxyl groups in a Wide range of sample concentrations (0.5-1700 mM) and temperatures, ranging from -5 to 25 degrees C.,We then exploit this information to directly detect hydrogen bonds, well-known for their importance in molecular structural determination through NMR. Via HSQC-TOCSY, we were able to determine the directionality; of these hydrogen bonds in sucrose Furthermore, by means Of molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with NMR, we establish that one Out of the three detected hydrogen bonds arises from intermolecular interactions. This finding may shed light on glycan glycan interactions and glycan recognition by proteins.

  • 17.
    Bermejo Gomez, Antonio
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Erbing, Elis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Batuecas, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Vazquez-Romero, Ana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martin-Matute, Belen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Iridium-Catalyzed Isomerization/Bromination of Allylic Alcohols: Synthesis of alpha-Bromocarbonyl Compounds2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 34, p. 10703-10709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    alpha-Brominated ketones and aldehydes, with two adjacent electrophilic carbon atoms, are highly valuable synthetic intermediates in organic synthesis, however, their synthesis from unsymmetrical ketones is very challenging, and current methods suffer from low selectivity. We present a new, reliable, and efficient method for the synthesis of alpha-bromocarbonyl compounds in excellent yields and with excellent selectivities. Starting from allylic alcohols as the carbonyl precursors, the combination of a 1,3-hydrogen shift catalyzed by iridium(III) with an electrophilic bromination gives alpha-bromoketones and aldehydes in good to excellent yields. The selectivity of the process is determined by the structure of the starting allylic alcohol; thus, alpha-bromoketones formally derived from unsymmetrical ketones can be synthesized in a straightforward and selective manner.

  • 18.
    Bermejo Gómez, Antonio
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Holmberg, Pär
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martin-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Transition metal-catalyzed redox isomerization of codeine and morphine in water2014In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 74, p. 39519-39522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A water-soluble rhodium complex formed from commercially available [Rh(COD)(CH3CN)(2)]BF4 and 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (PTA) catalyzes the isomerization of both codeine and morphine into hydrocodone and hydromorphone with very high efficiency. The reaction is performed in water, allowing isolation of the final products by simple filtration, which results in very high isolated yields. The reactions can be easily scaled up to 100 g.

  • 19.
    Bielawski, Marcin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Malmgren, Joel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pardo, Leticia M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wikmark, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    One-Pot Synthesis and Applications of N-Heteroaryl Iodonium Salts2014In: ChemistryOpen, ISSN 2191-1363, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 19-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient one-pot synthesis of N-heteroaryl iodonium triflates from the corresponding N-heteroaryl iodide and arene has been developed. The reaction conditions resemble our previous one-pot syntheses, with suitable modifications to allow N-heteroaryl groups. The reaction time is only 30min, and no anion exchange is required. The obtained iodonium salts were isolated in a protonated form, these salts can either be employed directly in applications or be deprotonated prior to use. The aryl groups were chosen to induce chemoselective transfer of the heteroaryl moiety to various nucleophiles. The reactivity and chemoselectivity of these iodonium salts were demonstrated by selectively introducing a pyridyl moiety onto both oxygen and carbon nucleophiles in good yields.

  • 20.
    Bielawski, Marcin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Efficient one-pot synthesis of bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)iodonium triflate2009In: Organic Syntheses, ISSN 0078-6209, Vol. 86, p. 308-314Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Bielawski, Marcin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    High-Yielding One-Pot Synthesis of Diaryliodonium Triflates from Arenes and Iodine or Aryl Iodides2007In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, no 24, p. 2521-2523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unsymmetric and symmetric diaryliodonium triflates are synthesized from both electron-deficient and electron-rich substrates in a fast, high yielding, and operationally simple protocol employing arenes and aryl iodides or iodine.

  • 22. Bratt, Emma
    et al.
    Verho, Oscar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johansson, Magnus J.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    A General Suzuki Cross-Coupling Reaction of Heteroaromatics Catalyzed by Nanopalladium on Amino-Functionalized Siliceous Mesocellular Foam2014In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 79, no 9, p. 3946-3954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions of heteroaromatics catalyzed by palladium supported in the cavities of amino-functionalized siliceous mesocellular foam are presented. The nanopalladium catalyst effectively couples not only heteroaryl halides with boronic acids but also heteroaryl halides with boronate esters, potassium trifluoroborates, MIDA boronates, and triolborates, producing a wide range of heterobiaryls in good to excellent yields. Furthermore, the heterogeneous palladium nanocatalyst can easily be removed from the reaction mixture by filtration and recycled several times with minimal loss in activity. This catalyst provides an alternative, environmentally friendly, low-leaching process for the preparation of heterobiaryls.

  • 23. Brown, Michael
    et al.
    Delorme, Marion
    Malmedy, Florence
    Malmgren, Joel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wirth, Thomas
    Synthesis of New Chiral Diaryliodonium Salts2015In: Synlett: Accounts and Rapid Communications in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0936-5214, E-ISSN 1437-2096, Vol. 26, no 11, p. 1573-1577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A structurally diverse range of chiral diaryliodonium salts have been synthesised which have potential application in metal-free stereoselective arylation reactions.

  • 24. Cadu, Alban
    et al.
    Andersson, Pher G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Council for Scientific & Industrial Research (CSIR) - South Africa .
    Iridium catalysis: application of asymmetric reductive hydrogenation2013In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 42, no 40, p. 14345-14356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Iridium, despite being one of the least abundant transition metals, has found several uses. N,P-ligated iridium catalysts are used to perform many highly selective reactions. These methodologies have been developed extensively over the past 15 years. More recently, the application of iridium N,P catalysts in asymmetric hydrogenation has been a focus of research to find novel applications and to expand on their current synthetic utility. The aim of this perspective is to highlight the advances made by the Andersson group.

  • 25. Cadu, Alban
    et al.
    Upadhyay, Puspesh K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Andersson, Pher G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. University of Kwazulu Natal, South Africa.
    Iridium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Substituted Pyridines2013In: Asian Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 2193-5807, Vol. 2, no 12, p. 1061-1065Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Asymmetric hydrogenation of ortho-substituted pyridines catalyzed by N,P-ligated iridium is demonstrated. To facilitate this reaction, the aromaticity of the pyridines was weakened by forming N-iminopyridium ylides. The reactions give very high conversions, and after a single recrystallization, excellent ee of up to 98% was obtained. This method lends itself to the synthesis of chiral piperidine building blocks.

  • 26.
    Carson, Fabian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martínez-Castro, Elisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Marcos, Rocio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    González Miera, Greco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martin-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Effect of the functionalisation route on a Zr-MOF with an Ir-NHC complex for catalysis2015In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 51, no 54, p. 10864-10867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new iridium N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) metallolinker has been synthesised and introduced into a metal-organic framework (MOF), for the first time, via two different routes: direct synthesis and postsynthetic exchange (PSE). The two materials were compared in terms of the Ir loading and distribution using X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), the local Ir structure using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and the catalytic activity. The materials showed good activity and recyclability as catalysts for the isomerisation of an allylic alcohol.

  • 27.
    Das, Arindam
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Alam, Rauful
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stereocontrol in Synthesis of Homoallylic Amines. Syn Selective Direct Allylation of Hydrazones with Allylboronic Acids2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 14, p. 3808-3811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allylboronic acids directly react with acyl hydrazones, affording homoallylic amine derivatives. The reaction proceeds with very high syn selectivity, which is the opposite of the stereochemistry observed for allylboration of imines. The reaction can be carried out with both aromatic and aliphatic acyl hydrazones. Based on our studies the excellent syn stereochemistry can be explained by chelation control of the acyl hydrazone and the B(OH)(2) moiety.

  • 28.
    Deng, Hong-Ping
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Allylic sp (3) C-H borylation of alkenes via allyl-Pd intermediates: an efficient route to allylboronates2014In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 50, no 65, p. 9207-9210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Palladium catalyzed allylic C-H functionalization was performed using exocyclic alkene substrates. Multi-component synthesis of stereodefined homoallylic alcohols could be performed using a reaction sequence involving allylic C-H borylation and allylation of aldehydes.

  • 29.
    Dey, Chandan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lindstedt, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Wallenberg Research Centre at Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Metal-Free C-Arylation of Nitro Compounds with Diaryliodonium Salts2015In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 17, no 18, p. 4554-4557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient, mild, and metal-free arylation of nitro-alkanes with diaryliodonium salts has been developed, giving easy access to tertiary nitro compounds. The reaction proceeds in high yields without the need for excess reagents and can be extended to alpha-arylation of nitroesters. Nitroalkanes were selectively C-arylated in the presence of other easily arylated functional groups, such as phenols and aliphatic alcohols.

  • 30.
    Engelmark Cassimjee, Karim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kadow, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wikmark, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Svedendahl Humble, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Rothstein, M. L.
    Rothstein, D. M.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    A general protein purification and immobilization method on controlled porosity glass: biocatalytic applications2014In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 50, no 65, p. 9134-9137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A general combined purification and immobilization method to facilitate biocatalytic process development is presented. The support material, EziG (TM), is based on controlled porosity glass (CPG) or polymer-coated versions thereof (HybCPG) and binds protein affinity tags. Biocatalytic reactions in aqueous and organic media with seven enzymes of biocatalytic interest are shown.

  • 31.
    Eriksson, Kristofer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johansson, Lars Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Göthelid, Emmanuelle
    Department of Physics and Astroniomy Uppsala University.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Department of Chemistry, Uppsala Univeristy.
    Oscarsson, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Manufacturing of Anisotropic Particles by Site Specific Oxidation of Thiols2012In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, ISSN 0959-9428, E-ISSN 1364-5501, Vol. 22, no 16, p. 7681-7683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel method for the manufacturing of functional anisotropic particles based on an inexpensive and straightforward electrochemical approach is presented. The method enables large-scale manufacturing of anisotropic particles as well as fabrication of multifunctional beads which may be used in the design of barcodes for multiplex diagnostics.

  • 32.
    Eriksson, Kristofer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Palmgren, Pal
    Nyholm, Leif
    Oscarsson, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Electrochemical Synthesis of Gold and Protein Gradients on Particle Surfaces2012In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 28, no 28, p. 10318-10323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A straightforward, versatile approach to the production of protein gradients on planar and spherical particle surfaces is described. The method is based on the spatially controlled oxidation of thiolated surfaces by Au(III) ions generated via the electrochemical oxidation of a gold electrode in a phosphate-buffered saline solution (10 mM PBS, pH 7.2, 150 mM NaCl). Because the gold electrode is in direct contact with the thiolated surfaces, the released Au(III) ions, which are present as Au(III) chloride complexes, give rise to the formation of a surface gradient of Au(I)-thiolate complexes depending on the local redox potential given by the local Au(III) concentration. As is shown on the basis of the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and fluorescently labeled proteins, the Au(I)-thiolate complexes can subsequently be functionalized with thiolated proteins, yielding surface density protein gradients on micrometer-sized nonconducting polymer beads as well as linear Au(I)-thiolate gradients on planar silicon surfaces.

  • 33.
    Fontana, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Weintraub, Andrej
    Karolinska Institute.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Facile Structural Elucidation of Glycans Using NMR Spectroscopy Data and the Program CASPER: Application to the O-Antigen Polysaccharide of Escherichia coli O1552013In: ChemPlusChem, ISSN 2192-6506, Vol. 78, no 11, p. 1327-1329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The program CASPER was successfully employed to rapidly elucidate a new O-antigen polysaccharide structure (obtained from a strain of Escherichia coli serogroup O155), using solelyunassigned NMR spectroscopy data as input information. Thus, what is considered the most tedious and time-consuming part of the structural elucidation process has been reduced from several hours (or even days) of manual interpretation to about four minutes of automated analysis.

  • 34.
    Frigell, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Cumpstey, Ian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    First synthesis of 4a-carba-beta-D-galactofuranose2007In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, E-ISSN 1359-8562, Vol. 48, no 52, p. 9073-9076Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Frigell, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Cumpstey, Ian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of carbadisaccharide mimics of galactofuranosides2009In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, E-ISSN 1359-8562, Vol. 50, no 36, p. 5142-5144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Ghosh, Raju
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lindstedt, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jalalian, Nazli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Room Temperature, Metal-Free Arylation of Aliphatic Alcohols2014In: ChemistryOpen, ISSN 2191-1363, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 54-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diaryliodonium salts are demonstrated as efficient arylating agents of aliphatic alcohols under metal-free conditions. The reaction proceeds at room temperature within 90min to give alkyl aryl ethers in good to excellent yields. Aryl groups with electron-withdrawing substituents are transferred most efficiently, and unsymmetric iodonium salts give chemoselective arylations. The methodology has been applied to the formal synthesis of butoxycaine.

  • 37.
    Ghosh, Raju
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Metal-Free Synthesis of N-Aryloxyimides and Aryloxyamines2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 1830-1832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    N-Hydroxyphthalimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide have been arylated with diaryliodonium salts to provide N-aryloxyimides in excellent yields in short reaction times. A novel hydrolysis under mild and hydrazine-free conditions yielded aryloxyamines, which are valuable building blocks in the synthesis of oxime ethers and benzofurans.

  • 38.
    Gigant, Nicolas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Access to Cinnamyl Derivatives from Arenes and Allyl Esters by a Biomimetic Aerobic Oxidative Dehydrogenative Coupling2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 1664-1667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient biomimetic aerobic oxidative dehydrogenative alkenylation of arenes with allyl esters is presented. The reaction proceeds under an ambient pressure of oxygen with relatively low catalyst loading of palladium acetate, employing catalytic amounts of electron-transfer mediators (ETMs). This study represents a new environmentally friendly method for the synthesis of cinnamyl derivatives.

  • 39.
    Gigant, Nicolas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Aerobic Direct C-H Arylation of Nonbiased Olefins2014In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 16, no 17, p. 4432-4435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient ligand-promoted biomimetic aerobic oxidative dehydrogenative cross-coupling between arenes and nonbiased olefins is presented. Acridine as a ligand was found to significantly enhance the rate, the yield, and the scope of the reaction under ambient oxygen pressure, providing a variety of alkenylarenes via an environmentally friendly procedure.

  • 40.
    Gigant, Nicolas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Aerobic Double Dehydrogenative Cross Coupling between Cyclic Saturated Ketones and Simple Arenes2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 20, p. 5890-5894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis of 3-aryl-2-cyclohexenones is a topic of current interest as they are not only privileged structures in bioactive molecules, but they are also relevant feedstocks for the synthesis of substituted phenols or anilines, which are ubiquitous structural elements both in drug design and medicinal chemistry. A simple and sustainable one-pot aerobic double dehydrogenative reaction under mild conditions for the introduction of arenes in the -position of cyclic ketones has been developed. Starting from the corresponding saturated ketone, this reaction sequence proceeds under relatively low Pd catalyst loading and involves catalytic amounts of electron-transfer mediators (ETMs) under ambient oxygen pressure.

  • 41.
    González Miera, Greco
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bermejo Gómez, Antonio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Chupas, Peter J.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Chapman, Karena W.
    Platero-Prats, Ana E.
    Topological Transformation of a Metal–Organic Framework Triggered by Ligand Exchange2017In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 56, no 8, p. 4576-4583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we describe the topological transformation of the pores of a new framework in the bio-MOF-100 family (dia-c) into the known isomer (lcs) by doubling the pore volume, which occurs during postsynthesis modifications. During this transformation, reassembling of the metal–organic framework (MOF) building blocks into a completely different framework occurs, involving breaking/forming of metal–ligand bonds. MOF crystallinity and local structure are retained, as determined by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and pair distribution function (PDF) analyses, respectively. We exploited the inherent dynamism of bio-MOF-100 by coupling chemical decorations of the framework using solvent-assisted ligand exchange to the topological change. Following this method and starting from the pristine dense dia-c phase, open lcs-bio-MOF-100 was prepared and functionalized in situ with an iridium complex (IrL). Alternatively, the dia-c MOF could be modified with wide-ranging amounts of IrL up to ca. 50 mol %, as determined by solution 1H NMR spectroscopy, by tuning the concentration of the solutions used and with no evidence for isomer transformation. The single-site nature of the iridium complexes within the MOFs was assessed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and PDF analyses. Ligand exchanges occurred quantitatively at room temperature, with no need of excess of the iridium metallolinker.

  • 42.
    González Miera, Greco
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martínez-Castro, Elisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Acceptorless Alcohol Dehydrogenation: OH vs NH Effect in Bifunctional NHC–Ir(III) Complexes2017In: Organometallics, ISSN 0276-7333, E-ISSN 1520-6041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bifunctional complexes bearing N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands functionalized with hydroxy or amine groups were synthesized to measure the beneficial effect of different modes of metal–ligand cooperation in the acceptorless dehydrogenation of alcohols. In comparison to complexes with an amine moiety, hydroxy-functionalized iridium catalysts showed superior activity. In contrast to alcohols, 1,4-diols underwent cyclization to give the corresponding tetrahydrofurans without involving dehydrogenation processes. Mechanistic investigations to rationalize the “OH effect” in these types of complexes have been undertaken.

  • 43.
    Gustafson, Karl P. J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lihammar, Richard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Verho, Oscar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Engström, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Chemoenzymatic Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of Primary Amines Using a Recyclable Palladium Nanoparticle Catalyst Together with Lipases2014In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 79, no 9, p. 3747-3751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A catalyst consisting of palladium nanoparticles supported on amino-functionalized siliceous mesocellular foam (Pd-AmP-MCF) was used in chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) to convert primary amines to amides in high yields and excellent ee's. The efficiency of the nanocatalyst at temperatures below 70 degrees C enables reaction conditions that are more suitable for enzymes. In the present study, this is exemplified by subjecting 1-phenylethylamine (1a) and analogous benzylic amines to DKR reactions using two commercially available lipases, Novozyme-435 (Candida antartica Lipase B) and Amano Lipase PS-C1 (lipase from Burkholderia cepacia) as biocatalysts. The latter enzyme has not previously been used in the DKR of amines because of its low stability at temperatures over 60 degrees C. The viability of the heterogeneous Pd-AmP-MCF was further demonstrated in a recycling study, which shows that the catalyst can be reused up to five times.

  • 44.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Landström, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    SEAL by NMR: Glyco-Based Selenium-Labeled Affinity Ligands Detected by NMR Spectroscopy2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 43, p. 13905-13908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a method for the screening of interactions between proteins and selenium-labeled carbohydrate ligands. SEAL by NMR is demonstrated with selenoglycosides binding to lectins where the selenium nucleus serves as an NMR-active handle and reports on binding through Se-77 NMR spectroscopy. In terms of overall sensitivity, this nucleus is comparable to C-13 NMR, while the NMR spectral width is ten times larger, yielding little overlap in Se-77 NMR spectroscopy, even for similar compounds. The studied ligands are singly selenated bioisosteres of methyl glycosides for which straightforward preparation methods are at hand and libraries can readily be generated. The strength of the approach lies in its simplicity, sensitivity to binding events, the tolerance to additives and the possibility of having several ligands in the assay. This study extends the increasing potential of selenium in structure biology and medicinal chemistry. We anticipate that SEAL by NMR will be a beneficial tool for the development of selenium-based bioactive compounds, such as glycomimetic drug candidates.

  • 45. Harper, James K.
    et al.
    Tishler, Derek
    Richardson, David
    Lokvam, John
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Solid-State NMR Characterization of the Molecular Conformation in Disordered Methyl alpha-L-Rhamnofuranoside2013In: Journal of Physical Chemistry A, ISSN 1089-5639, E-ISSN 1520-5215, Vol. 117, no 26, p. 5534-5541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A combination of solid-state C-13 NMR tensor data and DFT computational methods is utilized to predict the conformation in disordered methyl alpha-L-rhamnofuranoside. This previously uncharacterized solid is found to be crystalline and consists of at least six distinct conformations that exchange on the kHz time scale. A total of 66 model structures were evaluated, and six were identified as being consistent with experimental C-13 NMR data. All feasible structures have very similar carbon and oxygen positions and differ most significantly in OH hydrogen orientations. A concerted rearrangement of OH hydrogens is proposed to account for the observed dynamic disorder. This rearrangement is accompanied by smaller changes in ring conformation and is slow enough to be observed on the NMR time scale due to severe steric crowding among ring substituents. The relatively minor differences in non-hydrogen atom positions in the final structures suggest that characterization of a complete crystal structure by X-ray powder diffraction may be feasible.

  • 46. He, Xibing
    et al.
    Hatcher, Elizabeth
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    MacKerell, Alexander D., Jr.
    Bifurcated Hydrogen Bonding and Asymmetric Fluctuations in a Carbohydrate Crystal Studied via X-ray Crystallography and Computational Analysis2013In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 117, no 25, p. 7546-7553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of the O-methyl glycoside of the naturally occurring 6-O-[(R)-1-carboxyethyl]-alpha-D-galactopyranose, C10H18O8, has been determined by X-ray crystallography at 100 K, supplementing the previously determined structure obtained at 293 K (Acta Crystallogr. 1996, C52, 2285-2287). Molecular dynamics simulations of this glycoside were Performed in the crystal environment with different numbers of units cells included in the primary simulation system at both 100 and 293 K. The Calculated unit cell Parameters and the intramolecular geometries (bonds, angles, and dihedrals) agree well with experimental results. Atomic fluctuations, including B-factors and anisotropies, are in good agreement with respect to the relative values on an atom-by-atom basis. In addition, the fluctuations increase with increasing simulation system size, with the simulated values converging to values lower than those observed experimentally indicating that the simulation model is not accounting for all possible contributions to the experimentally observed B-factors, which may be related to either the simulation time scale or size. In the simulation's, the hydroxyl group of O7 is found to from bifurcated hydrogen bonds with O6 and O8 of an adjacent molecule, with the interactions dominated by the interaction HO7-O6 interaction. Quantum mechanical calculations support this observation.

  • 47.
    Ilchenko, Nadia O.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tasch, Boris O. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mild Silver-Mediated Geminal Difluorination of Styrenes Using an Air- and Moisture-Stable Fluoroiodane Reagent2014In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 53, no 47, p. 12897-12901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An air-and moisture-stable fluoroiodane in the presence of AgBF4 is suitable for selective geminal difluorination of styrenes under mild reaction conditions. One of the C-F bonds is formed by transfer of electrophilic fluorine from the hypervalent iodine reagent, while the other one arises from the tetrafluoroborate counterion of silver. Deuterium-isotope-labelling experiments and rearrangement of methyl styrene substrates suggest that the reaction proceeds through a phenonium ion intermediate.

  • 48.
    Jalalian, Nazli
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Design and asymmetric synthesis of chiral diaryliodonium salts2010In: Tetrahedron, ISSN 0040-4020, E-ISSN 1464-5416, Vol. 66, no 31, p. 5793-5800Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The application of chiral hypervalent iodine reagents in asymmetric synthesis is highly desirable, as the reagents are metal-free, environmentally benign and employed under mild conditions. Three chiral diaryliodonium salts have been designed to provide chemoselectivity and asymmetric induction in asymmetric alpha-phenylation of carbonyl compounds. The synthetic routes to the selected targets are detailed herein, together with a structural investigation into the diastereoselectivity of the alkylation process.

  • 49.
    Jalalian, Nazli
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of Koser’s Reagent and Derivatives2013In: Organic Syntheses, ISSN 0078-6209, Vol. 90, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Kadow, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Ernst Moritz Arndt Universitat Greifswald, Germany.
    Balke, Kathleen
    Willetts, Andrew
    Bornscheuer, Uwe T.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Functional assembly of camphor converting two-component Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases with a flavin reductase from E-coli2014In: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, ISSN 0175-7598, E-ISSN 1432-0614, Vol. 98, no 9, p. 3975-3986Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The major limitation in the synthetic application of two-component Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases was addressed by identifying the 28-kDa flavin-reductase Fre from Escherichia coli as a suitable supplier of reduced FMN for these enzymes. Coexpression of Fre with either 2,5- or 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 10007 significantly enhanced the conversion of camphor and norcamphor serving as representative ketones. With purified enzymes, full conversion was achieved, while only slight amounts of product were formed in the absence of this flavin reductase. Fusion of the genes of Fre and DKCMOs into single open reading frame constructs resulted in unstable proteins exhibiting flavin reducing, but poor oxygenating activity, which led to overall decreased conversion of camphor.

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