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  • 1.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Shatskiy, Andrey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Laine, Tanja M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Arafa, Wael A. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. University Fayoum, Egypt.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Bjorn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Chemical and Photochemical Water Oxidation Mediated by an Efficient Single-Site Ruthenium Catalyst2016In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564X, Vol. 9, no 24, p. 3448-3456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water oxidation is a fundamental step in artificial photosynthesis for solar fuels production. In this study, we report a single-site Ru-based water oxidation catalyst, housing a dicarboxylate-benzimidazole ligand, that mediates both chemical and light-driven oxidation of water efficiently under neutral conditions. The importance of the incorporation of the negatively charged ligand framework is manifested in the low redox potentials of the developed complex, which allows water oxidation to be driven by the mild one-electron oxidant [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine). Furthermore, combined experimental and DFT studies provide insight into the mechanistic details of the catalytic cycle.

  • 2. Abdissa, Negera
    et al.
    Fangfang, Pan
    Gruhonjic, Amra
    Gräfenstein, Jürgen
    Fitzpatrick, Paul A
    Landberg, Göran
    Rissanen, Kari
    Yenesew, Abiy
    Erdelyi, Mate
    Naphthalene Derivatives from the Roots of Pentas parvifolia and Pentas bussei.2016In: Journal of natural products (Print), ISSN 0163-3864, E-ISSN 1520-6025, Vol. 79, no 9, p. 2181-2187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phytochemical investigation of the CH2Cl2/MeOH (1:1) extract of the roots of Pentas parvifolia led to the isolation of three new naphthalenes, parvinaphthols A (1), B (2), and C (3), two known anthraquinones, and five known naphthalene derivatives. Similar investigation of the roots of Pentas bussei afforded a new polycyclic naphthalene, busseihydroquinone E (4), a new 2,2'-binaphthralenyl-1,1'-dione, busseihydroquinone F (5), and five known naphthalenes. All purified metabolites were characterized by NMR and MS data analyses, whereas the absolute configurations of 3 and 4 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The E-geometry of compound 5 was supported by DFT-based chemical shift calculations. Compounds 2-4 showed marginal cytotoxicity against the MDA-MB-231 human triple-negative breast cancer cell line with IC50 values ranging from 62.3 to 129.6 μM.

  • 3.
    Albers, Michael Franz
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Synthesis and investigation of bacterial effector molecules2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During infections, bacterial microorganisms initiate profound interactions with mammalian host cells. Usually defense mechanisms of the host destroy intruding bacteria in rapid manner. However, many bacterial pathogens have evolved in a way to avoid these mechanisms. By use of effector molecules, which can be small organic molecules or proteins with enzymatic activity, the host is manipulated on a molecular level. Effectors mediating post-translational modifications (PTMs) are employed by many pathogens to influence the biological activity of host proteins. In the presented thesis, two related PTMs are investigated in detail: Adenylylation, the covalent transfer of an adenosine monophosphate group from adenosine triphosphate onto proteins, and phosphocholination, the covalent transfer of a phosphocholine moiety onto proteins. Over the past years, enzymes mediating these modifications have been discovered in several pathogens, especially as a mechanism to influence the signaling of eukaryotic cells by adenylylating or phosphocholinating small GTPases. However, the development of reliable methods for the isolation and identification of adenylylated and phosphocholinated proteins remains a vehement challenge in this field of research. This thesis presents general procedures for the synthesis of peptides carrying adenylylated or phosphocholinated tyrosine, threonine and serine residues. From the resulting peptides, mono-selective polyclonal antibodies against adenylylated tyrosine and threonine have been raised. The antibodies were used as tools for proteomic research to isolate unknown substrates of adenylyl transferases from eukaryotic cells. Mass spectrometric fragmentation techniques have been investigated to ease the identification of adenylylated proteins. Furthermore, this work presents a new strategy to identify adenylylated proteins. Additionally, small effector molecules are involved in the regulation of infection mechanisms. In this work, the small molecule LAI-1 (Legionella autoinducer 1) from the pathogen Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of the Legionnaire’s disease, was synthesised together with its amino-derivatives. LAI-1 showed are a clear pharmacological effect on the regulation of the life cycle of L. pneumophila, initiating transmissive traits like motility and virulence. Furthermore, LAI-1 was shown to have an effect on eukaryotic cells as well. Directed motility of the eukaryotic cells was significantly reduced and the cytoskeletal architecture was reorganised, probably by interfering with the small GTPase Cdc42.

  • 4.
    Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Assembling and Unraveling Carbohydrates Structures: Conformational analysis of synthesized branched oligosaccharides2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in the elaboration of vaccines and enzyme inhibitors rely on acquiring more knowledge about protein-carbohydrate binding events. Furthermore, the relationships between biological function and the three-dimensional properties of large glycans can be studied by focusing on the structural components they contained, namely, by scaling down the system under analysis. Chemical methods are useful assets as they allow the isolation and determination of epitopes; these small and recognizable fragments that lead to very specific interactions. In this thesis, biologically relevant saccharides were obtained using recently developed concepts in carbohydrate synthesis and NMR spectroscopy was used to unravel their conformational preferences.

    In paper I, the convergent synthesis of the tetrasaccharide found in the natural product solaradixine is described. Reactivity enhanced disaccharide glycosyl donors were coupled to a disaccharide acceptor in a 2 + 2 fashion. The computer program CASPER was subsequently used to verify the synthesized structure.

    The conformation arming concept employed in paper I was further investigated in paper II. An NMR-based methodology enabled the determination of the ring conformations of a set of donors. Subsequently, glycosylation reactions were performed and yields were correlated to donors ring shapes. Perturbations in the rings shape caused by bulky silyl ether protective groups were sufficient to boost the potency of several donors. As a matter of fact, complex branched oligosaccharides could be obtained in good to excellent yields.

    In paper III, NMR spectroscopy observables were measured to elucidate the ring shape, the mutual orientation of the rings across the glycosidic bond and the positions of the side chains of 5 trisaccharides found in larger structures. With the aid of molecular dynamics simulations, their overall conformational propensities were revealed.

    Finally, the software CASPER prediction skills were improved by adding, inter alia, NMR information of synthesized mono- and disaccharides to its database. Unassigned chemical shifts from polysaccharides served as input to challenge its ability to solve large carbohydrate structures.

  • 5.
    Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of the tetrasaccharide glycoside moiety of Solaradixine and rapid NMR-based structure verification using the program CASPER2016In: Tetrahedron, ISSN 0040-4020, E-ISSN 1464-5416, Vol. 72, no 7, p. 912-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The major glycoalkaloid in the roots of Solanum laciniatum is Solaradixine having the branched tetrasaccharide beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 3)[alpha-L-Rhap-(1 -> 2)]-beta-D-Galp linked to O3 of the steroidal alkaloid Solasodine. We herein describe the synthesis of the methyl glycoside of the tetrasaccharide using a super-armed disaccharide as a donor molecule. A 2-(naphthyl)methyl protecting group was used in the synthesis of the donor since it was tolerant to a wide range of reaction conditions. The 6-O-benzylated-hexa-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyi-protected beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Glcp-SEt donor, which avoided 1,6-anydro formation, was successfully glycosylated at O3 of a galactoside acceptor molecule. However, subsequent glycosylation at O2 by a rhamnosyl donor was unsuccessful and instead a suitably protected alpha-L-Rhap(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Galp-OMe disaccharide was used as the acceptor molecule together with a super-armed beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 2)-beta-D-Glcp-SEt donor in the glycosylation reaction, to give a tetrasaccharide in a yield of 55%, which after deprotection resulted in the target molecule, the structure of which was verified by the NMR chemical shift prediction program CASPER.

  • 6. Aronsson, Per
    et al.
    Munissi, Joan J E
    Gruhonjic, Amra
    Fitzpatrick, Paul A
    Landberg, Göran
    Nyandoro, Stephen S
    Erdelyi, Mate
    Phytoconstituents with Radical Scavenging and Cytotoxic Activities from Diospyros shimbaensis.2016In: Diseases (Basel, Switzerland), ISSN 2079-9721, Vol. 4, no 1, article id E3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of our search for natural products having antioxidant and anticancer properties, the phytochemical investigation of Diospyros shimbaensis (Ebenaceae), a plant belonging to a genus widely used in East African traditional medicine, was carried out. From its stem and root barks the new naphthoquinone 8,8'-oxo-biplumbagin (1) was isolated along with the known tetralones trans-isoshinanolone (2) and cis-isoshinanolone (3), and the naphthoquinones plumbagin (4) and 3,3'-biplumbagin (5). Compounds 2, 4, and 5 showed cytotoxicity (IC50 520-82.1 μM) against MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Moderate to low cytotoxicity was observed for the hexane, dichloromethane, and methanol extracts of the root bark (IC50 16.1, 29.7 and > 100 μg/mL, respectively), and for the methanol extract of the stem bark (IC50 59.6 μg/mL). The radical scavenging activity of the isolated constituents (1-5) was evaluated on the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay. The applicability of the crude extracts and of the isolated constituents for controlling degenerative diseases is discussed.

  • 7. Ashour, Radwa M.
    et al.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Nuclear Materials Authority, Egypt.
    Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed A.
    Helaly, O. S.
    Ali, M. M.
    Preparation and characterization of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized by L-cysteine: Adsorption and desorption behavior for rare earth metal ions2016In: Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering, ISSN 2160-6544, E-ISSN 2213-3437, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 3114-3121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with L-cysteine (Cys-Fe3O4 NPs) was synthesized and fully characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and zeta potential measurements. The synthesized Cys-Fe(3)O(4)NPs has been evaluated as a highly adsorbent for the adsorption of a mixture of four rare earths RE3+ ions (La3+, Nd3+, Gd3+ and Y3+) from digested monazite solutions. The influence of various factors on the adsorption efficiency such as, the contact time, sample pH, temperature, and concentration of the stripping solution were investigated. The results indicate that Cys-Fe3O4 NPs achieve high removal efficiency 96.7, 99.3, 96.5 and 87% for La3+, Nd3+, Gd3+ and Y3+ ions, respectively, at pH = 6 within 15 min, and the adsorbent affinity for metal ions was found to be in order of Nd3+ > La3+ > Gd3+ > Y3+ ions. Using the Langmuir model, a maximum adsorption capacity of La3+, Nd3+, Gd3+ and Y3+ at room temperature was found to be 71.5, 145.5, 64.5 and 13.6 mg g (1), respectively. The Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second order model fitted much better than the other isotherms and kinetic models. The obtained results for the thermodynamic parameters confirmed the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the process. Moreover, the desorption was carried out with 0.1 M nitric acid solutions. In addition, Cys-Fe3O4 NPs can be used as a highly efficient adsorbent for the adsorption of La3+, Nd3+, Gd3+ and Y3+ ions from digested monazite solutions.

  • 8.
    Axelsson, Karolin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Chemical signals in interactions between Hylobius abietis and associated bacteria2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The pine weevil (Hylobius abietis L.) is one of the two topmost economically important insect pests in Swedish conifer forests. The damage increase in areas were the silvicultural practice is to use clear cuttings were the insects gather and breed. During egglaying the female protects her offspring by creating a cave in roots and stumps were she puts her egg and covers it with frass, a mixture of weevil feces and chewed bark. Adult pine weevils have been observed to feed on the other side of the egg laying site and antifeedant substance has been discovered in the feces of the pine weevil. We think it is possible that microorganisms present in the frass contribute with antifeedant/repellent substances. Little is known about the pine weevils associated bacteria community and their symbiotic functions. In this thesis the bacterial community is characterized in gut and frass both from pine weevils in different populations across Europe as well as after a 28 day long diet regime on Scots pine, silver birch or bilberry. Volatile substances produced by isolated bacteria as well as from a consortium of microorganisms were collected with solid phase micro extraction (SPME) and analyzed with GC-MS. The main volatiles were tested against pine weevils using a two-choice test. Wolbachia, Rahnella aquatilis, Serratia and Pseudomonas syringae was commonly associated with the pine weevil. 2-Methoxyphenol, 2-phenylethanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol were found in the headspace from Rahnella aquatilis when grown in substrate containing pine bark. 2-Methoxyphenol and 3-methyl-1-butanol, phenol and methyl salicylate were found in pine feces. Birch and bilberry feces emitted mainly linalool oxides and bilberry emitted also small amounts of 2-phenylethanol.

    A second part of the thesis discusses the role of fungi in forest insect interactions and the production of oxygenated monoterpenes as possible antifeedants. Spruce bark beetles (Ips typhographus L.) aggregate with the help of pheromones and with collected forces they kill weakened adult trees as a result of associated fungi growth and larval development. A fungi associated with the bark beetle, Grosmannia europhoides, was shown to produce de novo 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, the major component of the spruce bark beetle aggregation pheromone. Chemical defense responses against Endoconidiophora polonica and Heterobasidion parviporum were investigated using four clones of Norway spruce with different susceptibility to Heterobasidion sp. Clone specific differences were found in induced mono-, sesqui and diterpenes. A number of oxygenated monoterpenes which are known antifeedants for the pine weevil were produced in the infested areas.

  • 9.
    Axelsson, Karolin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Zendegi-Shiraz, Amene
    Swedjemark, Gunilla
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Zhao, Tao
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Clone specific chemical defense responses in Norway spruce to infestations by two pathogenic fungi2016In: Forest Pathology, ISSN 1437-4781, E-ISSN 1439-0329Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Heterobasidion parviporum (Hp) were investigated using four clones of Norway spruce (Picea abies) with different susceptibility to Heterobasidion sp. Eight year old trees were inoculated with Ep and Hp to minimize the variation due to environment. After three weeks the bark tissue at the upper border of the inoculation hole were extracted with hexane and analyzed by GC-MS. Both treatment and clonal differences were found based on induced mono-, sesqui- and diterpenes. In addition, the Hp produced toxin, fomanoxin, was identified in lowest amount in the most Hp susceptible clone. The clonal trees seem to use different defense strategies towards the two fungi. One of the clones was able to induce strong chemical defense against both fungi, one clone induced chemical defense only against Ep and the most susceptible clone exhibited the least capacity to produce an effective defense against Ep and Hp. Two diterpenes were found to be distinctly different between clones with different susceptibilities, which can be used as chemical indication of Norway spruce resistance against fungi.

  • 10.
    Barange, Deepak Kumar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Johnson, Magnus T.
    Cairns, Andrew G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Olsson, Roger
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Regio- and Stereoselective Alkylation of Pyridine-N-oxides: Synthesis of Substituted Piperidines and Pyridines2016In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 18, no 24, p. 6228-6231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regio- and stereoselective addition of alkyl Grignard reagents to pyridine-N-oxides gave C2-alkylated N-hydroxy-1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridines and trans-2,3-disubstituted N-hydroxy-1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridines in good to excellent yields. These intermediates were aromatized or alternatively reduced in one-pot methodologies for efficient syntheses of alkylpyridines or piperidines, respectively. These reactions have a broad substrate scope and short reaction times.

  • 11.
    Barrozo, Alexandre
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology.
    Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology.
    Brandao, Tiago
    Hengge, Alvan
    Phosphoryl and Sulfuryl Transfer2016In: Reference Module in Chemistry, Molecular Sciences and Chemical EngineeringArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Belfrage, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Abdurakhmanov, Eldar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Åkerblom, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Brandt, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Oshalim, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Gising, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Skogh, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Neyts, Johan
    Danielson, U. Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Biochemistry.
    Sandström, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Discovery of pyrazinone based compounds that potently inhibit the drug resistant enzyme variant R155K of the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease2016In: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0968-0896, E-ISSN 1464-3391, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 2603-2620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we present the design and synthesis of 2(1H)-pyrazinone based HCV NS3 protease inhibitors with variations in the C-terminus. Biochemical evaluation was performed using genotype 1a, both the wildtype and the drug resistant enzyme variant, R155K. Surprisingly, compounds without an acidic sulfonamide retained good inhibition, challenging our previous molecular docking model. Moreover, selected compounds in this series showed nanomolar potency against R155K NS3 protease; which generally confer resistance to all HCV NS3 protease inhibitors approved or in clinical trials. These results further strengthen the potential of this novel substance class, being very different to the approved drugs and clinical candidates, in the development of inhibitors less sensitive to drug resistance.

  • 13.
    Belhomme, Marie-Charlotte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wang, Dong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Formation of C(sp(3))-C(sp(3)) Bonds by Palladium Catalyzed Cross-Coupling of alpha-Diazoketones and Allylboronic Acids2016In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 18, no 10, p. 2503-2506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Palladium catalyzed cross-coupling of allylboronic acids with a-diazoketones was studied. The reaction selectively affords the linear allylic product. The reaction proceeds with formation of a new C(sp(3))-C(sp(3)) bond. The reaction was performed without an external oxidant, likely without the Pd-catalyst undergoing redox reactions.

  • 14.
    Bellini, Rosalba
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Magre, Marc
    Biosca, Maria
    Norrby, Per-Ola
    Pamies, Oscar
    Dieguez, Montserrat
    Moberg, Christina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Conformational Preferences of a Tropos Biphenyl Phosphinooxazoline-a Ligand with Wide Substrate Scope2016In: ACS Catalysis, ISSN 2155-5435, E-ISSN 2155-5435, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 1701-1712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Excellent enantioselectivities are observed in palladium-catalyzed allylic substitutions of a wide range of substrate types and nucleophiles using a bidentate ligand composed of oxazoline and chirally flexible biaryl phosphite elements. This unusually wide substrate scope is shown by experimental and theoretical studies of its eta(3)-allyl and eta(2)-olefin complexes not to be a result of configurational interconversion of the biaryl unit, since the ligand in all reactions adopts an S-a,S configuration on coordination to palladium, but rather the ability of the ligand to adapt the size of the substrate-binding pocket to the reacting substrate. This ability also serves as an explanation to its excellent performance in other types of catalytic processes.

  • 15.
    Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire
    et al.
    CEA Saclay, CNRS, Lab Leon Brillouin, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, France..
    Hassanali, Ali
    Abdus Salaam Int Ctr Theoret Phys, Condensed Matter & Stat Phys, I-34151 Trieste, Italy..
    Havenith, Martina
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Fac Chem & Biochem, Univ Str 150 Bldg NC 7-72, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Henchman, Richard
    Univ Manchester, Manchester Inst Biotechnol, 131 Princess St, Manchester M1 7DN, Lancs, England..
    Pohl, Peter
    Johannes Kepler Univ Linz, Gruberstr 40, A-4020 Linz, Austria..
    Sterpone, Fabio
    Inst Biol Physicochim, Lab Biochim Theor, 13 Rue Pierre & Marie Curie, F-75005 Paris, France..
    van der Spoel, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics.
    Xu, Yao
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Fac Chem & Biochem, Univ Str 150 Bldg NC 7-72, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Garcia, Angel E.
    Los Alamos Natl Lab, Ctr Non Linear Studies, Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA..
    Water Determines the Structure and Dynamics of Proteins2016In: Chemical Reviews, ISSN 0009-2665, E-ISSN 1520-6890, Vol. 116, no 13, p. 7673-7697Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water is an essential participant in the stability, structure, dynamics, and function of proteins and other biomolecules. Thermodynamically, changes in the aqueous environment affect the stability of biomolecules. Structurally, water participates chemically in the catalytic function of proteins and nucleic acids and physically in the collapse of the protein chain during folding through hydrophobic collapse and mediates binding through the hydrogen bond in complex formation. Water is a partner that slaves the dynamics of proteins, and water interaction with proteins affect their dynamics. Here we provide a review of the experimental and computational advances over the past decade in understanding the role of water in the dynamics, structure, and function of proteins. We focus on the combination of X-ray and neutron crystallography, NMR, terahertz spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, thermodynamics, and computer simulations to reveal how water assist proteins in their function. The recent advances in computer simulations and the enhanced sensitivity of experimental tools promise major advances in the understanding of protein dynamics, and water surely will be a protagonist.

  • 16. Bergenstråhle-Wohlert, Malin
    et al.
    Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sjöberg, Nils A.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    On the anomalous temperature dependence of cellulose aqueous solubility2016In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 2375-2387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The solubility of cellulose in water-based media is promoted by low temperature, which may appear counter-intuitive. An explanation to this phenomenon has been proposed that is based on a temperature-dependent orientation of the hydroxymethyl group. In this paper, this hypothesis is investigated using molecular dynamics computer simulations and NMR spectroscopy, and is discussed in conjunction with alternative explanations based on solvent–solute and solvent–solvent hydrogen bond formation respectively. It is shown that neither simulations nor experiments lend support to the proposed mechanism based on the hydroxymethyl orientation, whereas the two alternative explanations give rise to two distinct contributions to the hydration free energy of cellooligomers.

  • 17. Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bergenstråhle-Wohlert, Malin
    Lawoko, Martin
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    Lindström, Mikael
    Wohlert, Jakob
    A molecular dynamics study of the effect of glycosidic linkage type in the hemicellulose backbone on the molecular chain flexibility2016In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 56-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The macromolecular conformation of the constituent polysaccharides in lignocellulosic biomass influences their supramolecular interactions, and therefore their function in plants and their performance in technical products. The flexibility of glycosidic linkages from the backbone of hemicelluloses was studied by evaluating the conformational freedom of the φ and ψ dihedral angles using molecular dynamic simulations, additionally selected molecules were correlated with experimental data by NMR spectroscopy. Three types of β-(1→4) glycosidic linkages involving the monosaccharides (Glcp, Xylp and Manp) present in the backbone of hemicelluloses were defined. Different di- and tetrasaccharides with combinations of such sugar monomers from hemicelluloses were simulated and free energy maps of the φ - ψ space and hydrogen bonding patterns were obtained. The glycosidic linkage between Glc-Glc or Glc-Man (C-type) was the stiffest with mainly one probable conformation; the linkage from Man-Man or Man-Glc (M-type) was similar but with an increased probability for an alternative conformation making it more flexible, and the linkage between two Xyl-units (X-type) was the most flexible with two almost equally populated conformations. Glycosidic linkages of the same type showed essentially the same conformational space in both disaccharides and in the central region of tetrasaccharides. Different probabilities of glycosidic linkage conformations in the backbone of hemicelluloses can be directly estimated from the free energy maps, which to a large degree affect the overall macromolecular conformations of these polymers. The information gained contributes to an increased understanding of hemicelluloses’ function both in the cell wall and in technical products.

  • 18.
    Blom, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Synthetical Organic Chemistry.
    Norrehed, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Synthetical Organic Chemistry.
    Andersson, Claes-Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Synthetical Organic Chemistry.
    Huang, Hao
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Light, Mark E.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ, U.K.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Grennberg, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Physical Organic Chemistry.
    Gogoll, Adolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Synthetical Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis and Properties of Bis-Porphyrin Molecular Tweezers: Effects of Spacer Flexibility on Binding and Supramolecular Chirogenesis2016In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 21, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Ditopic binding of various dinitrogen compounds to three bisporphyrin molecular tweezers with spacers of varying conformational rigidity, incorporating the planar ene-diyne (1), the helical stiff stilbene (2), or the semirigid glycoluril motif fused to  the porphyrins (3) are compared. Binding constants Ka = 10^4 to 10^6 M^-1 reveal subtle  differences between these tweezers, that are discussed in terms of porphyrin dislocation  modes. Exciton coupled circular dichroism (ECCD) of complexes with chiral dinitrogen  guests provides experimental evidence for the conformational properties of the tweezers. The results are further supported and rationalized by conformational analysis.

  • 19.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mechanism of Oxygen Reduction in Cytochrome c Oxidase and the Role of the Active Site Tyrosine2016In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 489-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme in the respiratory chain, reduces molecular oxygen to water and stores the released energy through electrogenic chemistry and proton pumping across the membrane. Apart from the heme-copper binuclear center, there is a conserved tyrosine residue in the active site (BNC). The tyrosine delivers both an electron and a proton during the O-O bond cleavage step, forming a tyrosyl radical. The catalytic cycle then occurs in four reduction steps, each taking up one proton for the chemistry (water formation) and one proton to be pumped. It is here suggested that in three of the reduction steps the chemical proton enters the center of the BNC, leaving the tyrosine unprotonated with radical character. The reproprotonation of the tyrosine occurs first in the final reduction step before binding the next oxygen molecule. It is also suggested that this reduction mechanism and the presence of the tyrosine are essential for the proton pumping. Density functional theory calculations on large cluster models of the active site show that only the intermediates with the proton in the center of the BNC and with an unprotonated tyrosyl radical have a high electron affinity of similar size as the electron donor, which is essential for the ability to take up two protons per electron and thus for the proton pumping. This type of reduction mechanism is also the only one that gives a free energy profile in accordance with experimental observations for the amount of proton pumping in the working enzyme.

  • 20.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Improved free energy profile for reduction of NO in cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR)2016In: Journal of Computational Chemistry, ISSN 0192-8651, E-ISSN 1096-987X, Vol. 37, no 19, p. 1810-1818Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantum chemical calculations play an essential role in the elucidation of reaction mechanisms for redox-active metalloenzymes. For example, the cleavage and the formation of covalent bonds can usually not be described only on the basis of experimental information, but can be followed by the calculations. Conversely, there are properties, like reduction potentials, which cannot be accurately calculated. Therefore, computational and experimental data has to be carefully combined to obtain reliable descriptions of entire catalytic cycles involving electron and proton uptake from donors outside the enzyme. Such a procedure is illustrated here, for the reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide and water in the membrane enzyme, cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR). A surprising experimental observation is that this reaction is nonelectrogenic, which means that no energy is conserved. On the basis of hybrid density functional calculations a free energy profile for the entire catalytic cycle is obtained, which agrees much better with experimental information on the active site reduction potentials than previous ones. Most importantly the energy profile shows that the reduction steps are endergonic and that the entire process is rate-limited by high proton uptake barriers during the reduction steps. This result implies that, if the reaction were electrogenic, it would become too slow when the gradient is present across the membrane. This explains why this enzyme does not conserve any of the free energy released.

  • 21.
    Bornschein, Christoph
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Universität Rostock, Germany.
    Gustafson, Karl P. J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Verho, Oscar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Beller, Matthias
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Evaluation of Fe and Ru Pincer-Type Complexes as Catalysts for the Racemization of Secondary Benzylic Alcohols2016In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 22, no 33, p. 11583-11586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fe and Ru pincer-type catalysts are used for the racemization of benzylic alcohols. Racemization with the Fe catalyst was achieved within 30 minutes under mild reaction conditions, with a catalyst loading as low as 2 mol %. This reaction constitutes the first example of an iron-catalyzed racemization of an alcohol. The efficiency for racemization of the Fe catalyst and its Ru analogue was evaluated for a wide range of sec-benzylic alcohols. The commercially available Ru complex proved to be highly robust and even tolerated the presence of water in the reaction mixture.

  • 22. Boutet, Julien
    et al.
    Blasco, Pilar
    Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, Spain.
    Guerreiro, Catherine
    Thouron, Francoise
    Dartevelle, Sylvie
    Nato, Farida
    Javier Canada, F.
    Arda, Ana
    Phalipon, Armelle
    Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus
    Mulard, Laurence A.
    Detailed Investigation of the Immunodominant Role of O-Antigen Stoichiometric O-Acetylation as Revealed by Chemical Synthesis, Immunochemistry, Solution Conformation and STD-NMR Spectroscopy for Shigella flexneri 3a2016In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 22, no 31, p. 10892-10911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shigella flexneri 3a causes bacillary dysentery. Its O-antigen has the {2)-[alpha-d-Glcp-(1 -> 3)]-alpha-L-Rhap-(1 -> 2)-alpha-L-Rhap-( 1 -> 3)-[Ac -> 2]-alpha-L-Rhap-(1 ->)-[Ac -> 6](approximate to 40%)-beta-D-GlcpNAc-(1 ->} ([(E)AB(Ac)C(Ac)D]) repeating unit, and the non-Oacetylated equivalent defines S. flexneri X. Propyl hepta-, octa-, and decasaccharides sharing the (E') A'BAcCD(E) A sequence, and their non-O-acetylated analogues were synthesized from a fully protected BAcCD(E) A allyl glycoside. The stepwise introduction of orthogonally protected mono-and disaccharide imidate donors was followed by a two-step deprotection process. Monoclonal antibody binding to twenty-six S. flexneri types 3a and X di-to decasaccharides was studied by an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and STD-NMR spectroscopy. Epitope mapping revealed that the 2(C)-acetate dominated the recognition by monoclonal IgG and IgM antibodies and that the BAcCD segment was essential for binding. The glucosyl side chain contributed to a lesser extent, albeit increasingly with the chain length. Moreover, tr-NOESY analysis also showed interaction but did not reveal any meaningful conformational change upon antibody binding.

  • 23. Bui, Hue Thi Buu
    et al.
    Ha, Quy Thi Kim
    Oh, Won Keun
    Vo, Duy Duc
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Chau, Yen Nguyen Tram
    Tu, Cuc Thi Kim
    Pham, Em Canh
    Tran, Phuong Thao
    Tran, Loan Thi
    Mai, Hieu Van
    Microwave assisted synthesis and cytotoxic activity evaluations of new benzimidazole derivatives2016In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, E-ISSN 1359-8562, Vol. 57, no 8, p. 887-891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twelve new 2-quinolizinylbenzimidazole and 2-naphthalylbenzimidazole derivatives with various 5- and 6-positioned substituents (aza, H, CH3, Cl, NO2, NH2, OCH3), have been synthesized in moderate to excellent yields via the condensation of 4-oxo-4H-quinolizinecarbaldehyde or naphthalenecarbaldehyde with substituted o-phenylenediamines, o-nitroaniline, and 2,3-pyridinediamine using sodium metabisulfite or sodium hydrosulfite under microwave irradiation. The new benzimidazole derivatives were screened for their cytotoxic activity against the human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7). The results showed on one hand that 2-(substituted quinolizinyl)-1H-benzimidazoles (12bf) were less active (3–6 fold) than the positive control Tamoxifen (CC50 = 6.52 μM), and on the other hand, among the 2-(substituted naphthalyl)-1H-benzimidazoles series (13af), compounds 6,7,8-trimethoxy-3-(5-chloro-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)naphthalen-1-ol (13c) (CC50 = 7.48 μM) and 6,7,8-trimethoxy-3-(5-methoxy-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)naphthalen-1-ol (13f) (CC50 = 6.43 μM) were found to be as active as Tamoxifen.

  • 24.
    Bunrit, Anon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Dahlstrand, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Srifa, Pemikar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Olsson, Sandra K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Huang, Genping
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Organ Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Tianjin Univ, Sch Sci, Dept Chem, Tianjin 300072, Peoples R China..
    Biswas, Srijit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC. Ctr Biomed Res, Lucknow 226014, Uttar Pradesh, India..
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Organ Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Samec, Joseph S. M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC. Stockholm Univ, Dept Organ Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nucleophilic Substitution of the Hydroxyl Group in Stereogenic Alcohols with Chirality Transfer2016In: Synlett: Accounts and Rapid Communications in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0936-5214, E-ISSN 1437-2096, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 173-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A brief overview of the development of direct substitution of the hydroxyl (OH) group of alcohols in our research group is presented. By applying a BrOnsted acid, an intramolecular substitution of the OH group in stereogenic alcohols with chirality transfer was achieved. Noteworthy, the intramolecular substitution has a wide scope in respect to both the nucleophile and also the nucleofuge. A mechanistic study by both experiments and DFT calculations revealed a unique reaction pathway in which the BrOnsted acid operates in a bifunctional manner to promote an S(N)2-type reaction mechanism.

  • 25.
    Bunrit, Anon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC. Stockholm Univ, Dept Organ Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sawadjoon, Supaporn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Tsupova, Svetlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Sjöberg, Per J. R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Samec, Joseph S. M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC. Stockholm Univ, Dept Organ Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    A General Route to beta-Substituted Pyrroles by Transition-Metal Catalysis2016In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 81, no 4, p. 1450-1460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An atom-efficient route to pyrroles substituted in the beta-position has been achieved in four high yielding steps by a combination of Pd, Ru, and Fe catalysis with only water and ethene as side-products. The reaction is general and gives pyrroles substituted in the beta-position with linear and branched alkyl, benzyl, or aryl groups in overall good yields. The synthetic route includes a Pd-catalyzed monoallylation step of amines with substituted allylic alcohols that proceeds to yield the monoallylated products in moderate to excellent yields. In a second step, unsymmetrical diallylated aromatic amines are generated from the reaction of a second allylic alcohol with high selectivity in moderate to good yields by control of the reaction temperature. Ru-catalyzed ring-closing metathesis performed on the diallylated aromatic amines yields the pyrrolines substituted in the beta-position in excellent yields. By addition of ferric chloride to the reaction mixture, a selective aromatization to yield the corresponding pyrroles substituted in the beta-position was achieved. A reaction mechanism involving a palladium hydride, generated from insertion of palladium to O-H of an allyl alcohol, that is responsible for the C-O bond cleavage to generate the pi-allyl intermediate is proposed.

  • 26.
    Bäcklund, Fredrik G.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pallbo, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Controlling Amyloid Fibril Formation by Partial Stirring2016In: Biopolymers, ISSN 0006-3525, E-ISSN 1097-0282, Vol. 105, no 5, p. 249-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many proteins undergoes self-assembly into fibrillar structures known as amyloid fibrils. During the self-assembly process related structures, known as spherulites, can be formed. Herein we report a facile method where the balance between amyloid fibrils and spherulites can be controlled by stirring of the reaction mixture during the initial stages of the self-assembly process. Moreover, we report how this methodology can be used to prepare non-covalently functionalized amyloid fibrils. By stirring the reaction mixture continuously or for a limited time during the lag phase the fibril length, and hence the propensity to form liquid crystalline phases, can be influenced. This phenomena is utilized by preparing films consisting of aligned protein fibrils incorporating the laser dye Nile red. The resulting films display polarized Nile red fluorescence.

  • 27.
    Cadu, Alban
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Synthetical Organic Chemistry.
    Noble Metal Catalysed Reductions and Rearrangements2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this thesis has been organometallic catalysis applied to compounds containing heteroatoms which are usually poisonous to metal catalysts, by channelling their innate reactivity advantageously. The studies described in this thesis concentrate, in the first part, on iridium catalysed asymmetric hydrogenation (papers I and II) and in the second part, on gold catalysed internal rearrangements (papers III and IV). In each case, two classes of compounds are studied: pyridinium salts or sulphurous compounds. The asymmetric hydrogenation of pyridinium compounds was performed with 2% loading of N,P-ligated Ir catalyst with I2 additive (paper I) to achieve moderate to good enantiomeric excess (up to 98%). In paper II, olefinic sulphones were hydrogenated with an efficient 0.5% catalytic loading. In most cases full conversion was obtained and with good to excellent ees (up to 99%). The products of these reductions are chiral compounds, which could constitute further chemical building blocks. Palladium and gold were used sequentially in paper III, in order to perform a “Click” thiol-yne reaction followed by a semi-Pinacol rearrangement, leading to isolated yields of up to 98%. In paper IV The gold catalysed rearrangement of alkyl-pyridinium diynes was conducted, with a number of substrates providing >90% NMR yield. A highly selective hydrogenation was performed with a heterogeneous palladium catalyst to yield single diastereomer products. This methodology consists of up to three steps, with two catalysts in one pot.

  • 28.
    Carlsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Forens Centre NFC, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of emerging synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The application of different analytical techniques is fundamental in forensic drug analysis. In the wake of the occurrence of large numbers of new psychoactive substances possessing similar chemical structures as already known ones, focus has been placed on applied criteria for their univocal identification. These criteria vary, obviously, depending on the applied technique and analytical approach. However, when two or more substances are proven to have similar analytical properties, these criteria no longer apply, which imply that complementary techniques have to be used in their differentiation.

    This work describes the synthesis of some structural analogues to synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones based on the evolving patterns in the illicit drug market. Six synthetic cannabinoids and six synthetic cathinones were synthesized, that, at the time for this study, were not as yet found in drug seizures. Further, a selection of their spectroscopic data is compared to those of already existing analogues; mainly isomers and homologues. The applied techniques were mass spectrometry (MS), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR, gas phase) spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In total, 59 different compounds were analyzed with the  selected techniques.

    The results from comparison of spectroscopic data showed that isomeric substances may in some cases be difficult to unambiguously identify based only on their GC-MS EI spectra. On the other hand, GC-FTIR demonstrated more distinguishable spectra. The spectra for the homologous compounds showed however, that the GC-FTIR technique was less successful compared to GC-MS. Also a pronounced fragmentation pattern for some of the cathinones was found.

    In conclusion, this thesis highlights the importance of using complementary techniques for the univocal identification of synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones. By increasing the number of analogues investigated, the more may be learnt about the capabilities of different techniques for structural differentiations, and thereby providing important identification criteria leading to trustworthy forensic evidence.

  • 29.
    Chen, Shan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology. Hainan University, China.
    Liu, Fuyan
    Zhang, Kuan
    Huang, Hansheng
    Wang, Huani
    Zhou, Jiaying
    Zhang, Jing
    Gong, Yiwei
    Zhang, Dela
    Chen, Yiping
    Lin, Chang
    Wang, Bo
    An efficient enzymatic aminolysis for kinetic resolution of aromatic alpha-hydroxyl acid in non-aqueous media2016In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, E-ISSN 1359-8562, Vol. 57, no 48, p. 5312-5314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new and highly efficient enzymatic aminolysis approach for kinetic resolution of aromatic a-hydroxy acid in non-aqueous media has been developed. The corresponding alpha-hydroxyl acid ester was employed as the substrate, and commercially available Candida antarctica lipase B is used as the biocatalyst, anhydrous ammonia is the resolving agent. Reactions can be proceeded smoothly in organic solvent at ambient temperatures. High concentration of substrate is allowed due to the application of organic media and the products are obtained in yields of up to 49% with ee values of up to 99%, and with E value of >300, representing an appealing and promising protocol for large-scale preparations.

  • 30.
    Chow, Shiao Y.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Stevens, Marc Y.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Åkerbladh, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bergman, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Odell, Luke R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Mild and Low-Pressure fac-Ir(ppy)3-Mediated Radical Aminocarbonylation of Unactivated Alkyl Iodides through Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis2016In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 22, no 27, p. 9155-9161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel, mild and facile preparation of alkyl amides from unactivated alkyl iodides employing a fac-Ir(ppy)(3)-catalyzed radical aminocarbonylation protocol has been developed. Using a two-chambered system, alkyl iodides, fac-Ir(ppy)(3), amines, reductants, and CO gas (released ex situ from Mo(CO)(6)), were combined and subjected to an initial radical reductive dehalogenation generating alkyl radicals, and a subsequent aminocarbonylation with amines affording a wide range of alkyl amides in moderate to excellent yields.

  • 31. Colak, Burcu
    et al.
    Da Silva, Julio C. S.
    Soares, Thereza A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Departament of Fundamental Chemistry, CCEN, Federal University of Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, Brazil.
    Gautrot, Julien E.
    Impact of the Molecular Environment on Thiol-Ene Coupling For Biofunctionalization and Conjugation2016In: Bioconjugate chemistry, ISSN 1043-1802, E-ISSN 1520-4812, Vol. 27, no 9, p. 2111-2123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thiol-ene radical coupling is increasingly used for the biofunctionalization of biomaterials and the formation of 3D hydrogels enabling cell encapsulation. Indeed, thiol-ene chemistry presents interesting features that are particularly attractive for platforms requiring specific reactions of peptides or proteins, in particular, in situ, during cell culture or encapsulation. Despite such interest, little is known about the factors impacting thiol-ene chemistry in situ, under biologically relevant conditions. Here we explore some of the molecular parameters controlling photoinitiated thiol-ene couplings with a series of alkenes and thiols, including peptides, in buffered conditions. H-1 NMR and HPLC were used to quantify the efficiency of couplings and the impact of the pH of the buffer, as well as the molecular structure and local microenvironment close to alkenes and thiols to be coupled. Some of these observations are supported by molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations. An important finding of our work is that the plc of thiols (and its variation upon changes in molecular structure) have a striking impact on coupling efficiencies. Similarly, positively charged and aromatic amino acids are found to have some impact on thiol-ene couplings. Hence, our study demonstrates that molecular design should be carefully selected in order to achieve high biofunctionalization levels in biomaterials with peptides or promote the efficient formation of peptide-based hydrogels.

  • 32. Danelius, Emma
    et al.
    Pettersson, Mariell
    Bred, Matilda
    Min, Jaeki
    Waddell, M Brett
    Guy, R Kiplin
    Grøtli, Morten
    Erdelyi, Mate
    Flexibility is important for inhibition of the MDM2/p53 protein-protein interaction by cyclic β-hairpins.2016In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 14, no 44, p. 10386-10393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein-protein interactions that have large, flat and featureless binding sites are difficult drug targets. In the development of their modulators conventional drug discovery strategies are often unsuccessful. Gaining a detailed understanding of the binding mode of protein-protein interaction inhibitors is therefore of vast importance for their future pharmaceutical use. The MDM2/p53 protein pair is a highly promising target for cancer treatment. Disruption of the protein complex using p53 α-helix mimetics has been shown to be a successful strategy to control p53 activity. To gain further insight into the binding of inhibitors to MDM2, the flexibility of four cyclic β-hairpins that act as α-helical mimetics and potential MDM2/p53 interaction inhibitors was investigated in relation to their inhibitory activity. MDM2-binding of the mimetics was determined using fluorescence polarization and surface plasmon resonance assays, whereas their conformation and dynamics in solution was described by the combined experimental and computational NAMFIS analysis. Molecular flexibility was shown to be important for the activity of the cyclic β-hairpin based MDM2 inhibitors.

  • 33.
    Das, Biswanath
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lee, Bao-Lin
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Erik A.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Akermark, Torbjorn
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Shatskiy, Andrey
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Demeshko, Serhiy
    University of Gottingen, Germany.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China.
    Laine, Tanja M.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Haukka, Matti
    University of Jyvaskyla, Finland.
    Zeglio, Erica
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Meyer, Franc
    University of Gottingen, Germany.
    Karkas, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Nordlander, Ebbe
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Åkermark, Bjorn
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Water oxidation catalyzed by molecular di- and nonanuclear Fe complexes: importance of a proper ligand framework2016In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 45, no 34, p. 13289-13293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis of two molecular iron complexes, a dinuclear iron(III,III) complex and a nonanuclear iron complex, based on the di-nucleating ligand 2,2-(2-hydroxy-5-methyl-1,3-phenylene)bis(1H-benzo[d]imidazole-4-carboxylic acid) is described. The two iron complexes were found to drive the oxidation of water by the one-electron oxidant [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+).

  • 34. Das, Biswanath
    et al.
    Lee, Bao-Lin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Karlsson, Erik A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Shatskiy, Andrey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Demeshko, Serhiy
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Laine, Tanja M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Haukka, Matti
    Zeglio, Erica
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Meyer, Franc
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nordlander, Ebbe
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Water oxidation catalyzed by molecular di- and nonanuclear Fe complexes: importance of a proper ligand framework2016In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 45, no 34, p. 13289-13293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis of two molecular iron complexes, a dinuclear iron(III,III) complex and a nonanuclear iron complex, based on the di-nucleating ligand 2,2'-(2-hydroxy-5-methyl-1,3-phenylene)bis(1H-benzo[d]imidazole-4-carboxylic acid) is described. The two iron complexes were found to drive the oxidation of water by the one-electron oxidant [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+).

  • 35.
    Daver, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Das, Biswanath
    Nordlander, Ebbe
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Theoretical Study of Phosphodiester Hydrolysis and Transesterification Catalyzed by an Unsymmetric Biomimetic Dizinc Complex2016In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 1872-1882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to investigate the reaction mechanisms of phosphodiester hydrolysis and transesterification catalyzed by a dinuclear zinc complex of the 2-(N-isopropyl-N-((2-pyridyl)methyl)-aminomethyl)-6-(N-(carboxylmethyl)-N-((2-pyridyl)methyl)amino-methyl)-4-methylphenol (IPCPMP) ligand, mimicking the active site of zinc phosphotriesterase. The substrates bis(2,4)-dinitrophenyl phosphate (BDNPP) and 2-hydroxypropyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP) were employed as analogues of DNA and RNA, respectively. A number of different mechanistic proposals were considered, with the active catalyst harboring either one or two hydroxide ions. It is concluded that for both reactions the catalyst has only one hydroxide bound, as this option yields lower overall energy barriers. For BDNPP hydrolysis, it is suggested that the hydroxide acts as the nucleophile in the reaction, attacking the phosphorus center of the substrate. For HPNP transesterification, on the other hand, the hydroxide is proposed to act as a Bronsted base, deprotonating the alcohol moiety of the substrate, which in turn performs the nucleophilic attack. The calculated overall barriers are in good agreement with measured rates. Both reactions are found to proceed by essentially concerted associative mechanisms, and it is demonstrated that two consecutive catalytic cycles need to be considered in order to determine the rate-determining free energy barrier.

  • 36.
    Denisova, Aleksandra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Emanuelsson, Rikard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ottosson, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Expanding the (Cross-)Hyperconjugation of 1,4-Disilacyclohexa-2,5-dienes to Larger Monomers and Oligomers: A Computational Investigation2016In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, no 43, p. 36961-36970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used density functional theory calculations to examine molecules that can be regarded as expanded 1,4-disilacyclohexa-2,5-dienes as well as oligomers based on these or 1,4-disilacyclohexa-2,5-diene with the aim to identify systems with extended (cross-)hyperconjugation. Among the three "expanded 1,4-disilacyclohexa-2,5-dienes" considered cyclobutadisilole is the most interesting as it has a higher thermodynamic stability than the isomeric 1,6-disilacyclodeca-2,3,4,7,8,9-hexaene and significantly lower first electronic excitation energy than 1,6-disilacyclodeca-2,4,7,9-tetraene. Cyclobutadisilole with trimethylsilyl substituents at Si shows particularly low excitations with the first strong transition at 3.46 eV (358 nm), i.e., similar to 1.1 eV lower than in 1,4-disilacyclohexa-2,5-diene. The monomers were connected into oligomers via their Si atoms using bis(dimethylsilanediyl) linkers, and some extended hyperconjugation was revealed. The first allowed UV/Vis excitation in the cyclobutadisilole-based tetramers is calculated at 2.57 eV (482 nm), although the lowering in excitation energies when going from monomer to tetramer is merely similar to 0.5 eV and hyperconjugation has modest impact on geometries. Yet, the tetra(cyclobutadisilole) has a significantly lower first allowed excitation when compared to a previously studied tetra(1,4-disilacyclohexadiene) with first excitation at 3.9 eV (318 nm).

  • 37.
    Devaraj, Karthik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Organic Chemistry.
    Sollert, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Organic Chemistry.
    Gates, P. J.
    Univ Bristol, Sch Chem, Bristol BS8 1TS, Avon, England.
    Pilarski, Lukasz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Organic Chemistry.
    Ru-Catalysed C-H Silylation of Gramines, Tryptamines and their Congeners2016In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 52, no 34, p. 5868-5871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selective Ru-catalysed C2–H silylation of heteroarenes is presented. The transformation works with or without directing group assistance and requires no protecting groups. Gramines and tryptamines may be converted efficiently whilst avoiding deleterious elimination side-reactions. Mechanistic studies reveal an unusual activation of the indole C4–H bond by an electron-rich metal.

  • 38.
    Dinér, Peter
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Yttrium from Ytterby2016In: Nature Chemistry, ISSN 1755-4330, E-ISSN 1755-4349, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 192-192Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Duarte, Fernanda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Univ Oxford, Chem Res Lab, 12 Mansfield Rd, Oxford OX1 3TA, England.;Univ Oxford, Phys & Theoret Chem Lab, S Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3QZ, England..
    Barrozo, Alexandre
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Åqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Williams, Nicholas H.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Chem, Sheffield S3 7HF, S Yorkshire, England..
    Kamerlin, Shina C. Lynn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structure and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    The Competing Mechanisms of Phosphate Monoester Dianion Hydrolysis2016In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 138, no 33, p. 10664-10673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the numerous experimental and theoretical studies on phosphate monoester hydrolysis, significant questions remain concerning the mechanistic details of these biologically critical reactions. In the present work we construct a linear free energy relationship for phosphate monoester hydrolysis to explore the effect of modulating leaving group plc on the competition between solvent- and substrate-assisted pathways for the hydrolysis of these compounds. Through detailed comparative electronic-structure studies of methyl phosphate and a series of substituted aryl phosphate monoesters, we demonstrate that the preferred mechanism is dependent on the nature of the leaving group. For good leaving groups, a strong preference is observed for a more dissociative solvent-assisted pathway. However, the energy difference between the two pathways gradually reduces as the leaving group pK(a) increases and creates mechanistic ambiguity for reactions involving relatively poor alkoxy leaving groups. Our calculations show that the transition-state structures vary smoothly across the range of pK(a)s studied and that the pathways remain discrete mechanistic alternatives. Therefore, while not impossible, a biological catalyst would have to surmount a significantly higher activation barrier to facilitate a substrate-assisted pathway than for the solvent-assisted pathway when phosphate is bonded to good leaving groups. For poor leaving groups, this intrinsic preference disappears.

  • 40.
    Duner, Gunnar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Anderson, Henrik
    Pei, Zhichao
    Ingemarsson, Bjorn
    Aastrup, Teodor
    Ramstrom, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Signal enhancement in ligand-receptor interactions using dynamic polymers at quartz crystal microbalance sensors2016In: The Analyst, ISSN 0003-2654, E-ISSN 1364-5528, Vol. 141, no 13, p. 3993-3996Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The signal enhancement properties of QCM sensors based on dynamic, biotinylated poly(acrylic acid) brushes has been studied in interaction studies with an anti-biotin Fab fragment. The poly (acrylic acid) sensors showed a dramatic increase in signal response with more than ten times higher signal than the carboxyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer surface.

  • 41.
    Engdahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Knutsson, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ekström, Fredrik
    Linusson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Discovery of selective inhibitors targeting acetylcholinesterase 1 from disease-transmitting mosquitoes2016In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 59, no 20, p. 9409-9421Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Vector control of disease-transmitting mosquitoes is increasingly important due to the re-emergence and spread of infections such as malaria and dengue. We have conducted a high throughput screen (HTS) of 17,500 compounds for inhibition of the essential AChE1 enzymes from the mosquitoes Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti. In a differential HTS analysis including the human AChE, several structurally diverse, potent, and selective noncovalent AChE1 inhibitors were discovered. For example, a phenoxyacetamide-based inhibitor was identified with a 100-fold selectivity for the mosquito over the human enzyme. The compound also inhibited a resistance conferring mutant of AChE1. Structure-selectivity relationships could be proposed based on the enzymes' 3D structures; the hits' selectivity profiles appear to be linked to differences in two loops that affect the structure of the entire active site. Noncovalent inhibitors of AChE1, such as the ones presented here, provide valuable starting points toward insecticides and are complementary to existing and new covalent inhibitors.

  • 42. Erdelyi, Mate
    Deyou, Tsegaye
    Gruhonic, Amra
    Hollerand, John
    Duffy, Sandra
    Heydenreich, Matthias
    Fitzpatrick, Paul
    Landberg, Göran
    Koch, Andreas
    Derese, Solomon
    Pelletier, Jerry
    Avery, Vicky
    Yenesew, Abiy
    Pterocarpans and isoflavones from the root bark of Millettia micans and of Millettia dura2016In: Phytochemistry Letters, ISSN 1874-3900, E-ISSN 1876-7486, Vol. 21, p. 216-220-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From the CH2Cl2/CH3OH (1:1) extract of the root bark of Millettia micans, a new pterocarpan, (6aR,11aR)-3-hydroxy-7,8,9-trimethoxypterocarpan (1), named micanspterocarpan, was isolated. Similar investigation of the CH2Cl2/CH3OH (1:1) extract of the root bark of Millettia dura gave a further new pterocarpan, (6aR,11aR)-8,9-methylenedioxy-3-prenyloxypterocarpan (2), named 3-O-prenylmaackiain, along with six known isoflavones (3-8) and a chalcone (9). All purified compounds were identified by NMR and MS, whereas the absolute configurations of the new pterocarpans were established by chriptical data analyses including quantum chemical ECD calculation. Among the isolated constituents, calopogonium isoflavone B (3) and isoerythrin A-4′-(3-methylbut-2-enyl) ether (4) showed marginal activities against the 3D7 and the Dd2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum (70–90% inhibition at 40 μM). Maximaisoflavone B (5) and 7,2′-dimethoxy-4′,5′-methylenedioxyisoflavone (7) were weakly cytotoxic (IC50 153.5 and 174.1 μM, respectively) against the MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line. None of the tested compounds showed in-vitro translation inhibitory activity or toxicity against the HEK-293 human embryonic kidney cell line at 40 μM.

  • 43.
    Fan, Ke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Chen, Hong
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ji, Yongfei
    Huang, Hui
    Claesson, Per Martin
    Daniel, Quentin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Philippe, Bertrand
    Rensmo, Hakan
    Li, Fusheng
    Luo, Yi
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Nickel-vanadium monolayer double hydroxide for efficient electrochemical water oxidation2016In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, article id 11981Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly active and low-cost electrocatalysts for water oxidation are required due to the demands on sustainable solar fuels; however, developing highly efficient catalysts to meet industrial requirements remains a challenge. Herein, we report a monolayer of nickel-vanadium-layered double hydroxide that shows a current density of 27 mA cm(-2) (57 mA cm(-2) after ohmic-drop correction) at an overpotential of 350 mV for water oxidation. Such performance is comparable to those of the best-performing nickel-iron-layered double hydroxides for water oxidation in alkaline media. Mechanistic studies indicate that the nickel-vanadium-layered double hydroxides can provide high intrinsic catalytic activity, mainly due to enhanced conductivity, facile electron transfer and abundant active sites. This work may expand the scope of cost-effective electrocatalysts for water splitting.

  • 44.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    de Boer, J.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Assessment of Results for the 2nd Interlaboratory Study of POPs Laboratories2016In: Organohalogen Compounds, ISSN 1026-4892, Vol. 78, p. 777-780Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Fontana, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Conde-Alvarez, Raquel
    Ståhle, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Holst, Otto
    Iriarte, Maite
    Zhao, Yun
    Arce-Gorvel, Vilma
    Hanniffy, Sean
    Gorvel, Jean-Pierre
    Moriyon, Ignacio
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Structural Studies of Lipopolysaccharide-defective Mutants from Brucella melitensis Identify a Core Oligosaccharide Critical in Virulence2016In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 291, no 14, p. 7727-7741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structures of the lipooligosaccharides from Brucella melitensis mutants affected in the WbkD and ManB(core) proteins have been fully characterized using NMR spectroscopy. The results revealed that disruption of wbkD gives rise to a rough lipopolysaccharide (R-LPS) with a complete core structure (beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 4)-alpha-Kdop-(2 -> 4)[beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 6)-beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 4)[beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 6)]-beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 3)-alpha-D-Manp-(1 -> 5)]-alpha-Kdop-(2 -> 6)-beta-D-GlcpN3N4P-(1 -> 6)-alpha-D-GlcpN3N1P), in addition to components lacking one of the terminal beta-D-GlcpN and/or the beta-D-Glcp residues (48 and 17%, respectively). These structures were identical to those of the R-LPS from B. melitensis EP, a strain simultaneously expressing both smooth and R-LPS, also studied herein. In contrast, disruption of man-B-core gives rise to a deep-rough pentasaccharide core (beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 4)-alpha-Kdop-(2 -> 4)-alpha-Kdop-(2 -> 6)-beta-D-GlcpN3N4P-(1 -> 6)-alpha-D-GlcpN3N1P) as the major component (63%), as well as a minor tetrasaccharide component lacking the terminal beta-D-Glcp residue (37%). These results are in agreement with the predicted functions of the WbkD (glycosyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of the O-antigen) and ManB(core) proteins (phosphomannomutase involved in the biosynthesis of a mannosyl precursor needed for the biosynthesis of the core and O-antigen). We also report that deletion of B. melitensis wadC removes the core oligosaccharide branch not linked to the O-antigen causing an increase in overall negative charge of the remaining LPS inner section. This is in agreement with the mannosyltransferase role predicted for WadC and the lack of GlcpN residues in the defective core oligosaccharide. Despite carrying the O-antigen essential in B. melitensis virulence, the core deficiency in the wadC mutant structure resulted in a more efficient detection by innate immunity and attenuation, proving the role of the beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 6)-beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 4)[beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 6)]-beta-D-GlcpN-(1 -> 3)-alpha-D-Manp-(1 -> 5) structure in virulence.

  • 46.
    Fontana, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zaccheus, Mona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Weintraub, Andrej
    Ansaruzzaman, Mohammad
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Structural studies of a polysaccharide from Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain AN-160002016In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 432, p. 41-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of a polysaccharide from Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain AN-16000 has been investigated. The sugar and absolute configuration analysis revealed D-Glc, D-GalN, D-QuiN and L-FucN as major components. The PS was subjected to dephosphorylation with aqueous 40% HF to obtain an oligosaccharide that was analyzed by H-1 and C-13 NMR spectroscopy. The HR-MS spectrum of the oligosaccharide revealed a pentasaccharide composed of two Glc residues, one QuiNAc and one GalNAc, one FucNAc, as well as a glycerol moiety. The structure of the PS was determined using H-1, C-13, N-15 and P-31 NMR spectroscopy; inter-residue correlations were identified by H-1, C-13-heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation, H-1, H-1-NOESY and H-1, P-31-hetero-TOCSY experiments. The PS backbone has the following teichoic acid-like structure: -> 3)-D-Gro-(1-P-6)-beta-D-Glcp-(1 -> 4)-alpha-L-FucpNAc-(1 -> 3)-beta-D-QuipNAc-(1 -> with a side-chain consisting of alpha-D-Glcp-(1 -> 6)-alpha-D-GalpNAc-(1 -> linked to the O3 position of the FucNAc residue.

  • 47.
    Gao, Qiuju
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in thermochemical conversion of biomass: formation, distribution and fingerprints2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the transition to a sustainable energy supply there is an increasing need to use biomass for replacement of fossil fuel. A key challenge is to utilize biomass conversion technologies in an environmentally sound manner. Important aspects are to minimize potential formation of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as dioxins and dioxin-like compounds.

    This thesis involves studies of formation characteristics of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and naphthalenes (PCNs) in microwave-assisted pyrolysis (MAP) and torrefaction using biomass as feedstock. The research focuses are on their levels, distributions, fingerprints (homologue profiles and isomer patterns) and the underlying formation pathways. The study also included efforts to optimize methods for extracting chlorinated aromatic compounds from thermally treated biomass. The overall objective was to contribute better understanding on the formation of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in low temperature thermal processes.

    The main findings include the following:

    • Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) is applicable for simultaneous extraction of PCDDs, PCDFs, PCNs, polychlorinated phenols and benzenes from thermally treated wood. The choice of solvent for PLE is critical, and the extraction efficiency depends on the degrees of biomass carbonization.
    • In MAP experiments PCDDs, PCDFs and PCNs were predominantly found in pyrolysis oils, while in torrefaction experiments they were mainly retained in solid chars with minor fractions in volatiles. In both cases, highly chlorinated congeners with low volatility tended to retain on particles whereas the less chlorinated congeners tended to volatize into the gas phase.
    • Isomer patterns of PCDDs, PCDFs and PCNs generated in MAP were more selective than those reported in combustion processes. The presence of isomers with low thermodynamic stability suggests that the pathway of POPs formation in MAP may be governed not only by thermodynamic stabilities but also by kinetic factors.
    • Formation of PCDDs, PCDFs and PCNs depends not only on the chlorine contents in biomass but also the presence of metal catalysts and organic/metal-based preservatives.

    Overall, the results provide information on the formation characteristics of PCDDs, PCDFs and PCNs in MAP and torrefaction. The obtained knowledge is useful regarding management and utilization of thermally treated biomass with minimum environmental impact.

  • 48.
    Gao, Qiuju
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Budarin, Vitaliy L.
    Cieplik, Mariusz
    Gronnow, Mark
    Jansson, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    PCDDs, PCDFs and PCNs in products of microwave-assisted pyrolysis of woody biomass: Distribution among solid, liquid and gaseous phases and effects of material composition2016In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 145, p. 193-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microwave-assisted pyrolysis (MAP) of lignocellulosic biomass is a technique that could potentially be used to produce and upgrade renewable energy carriers. However, there is no available information about the formation of dioxins and other organic pollutants in MAP treatment of woody biomass. In this study, MAP experiments were conducted in lab-scale using virgin softwood, bark, and impregnated wood as feedstocks. The non-condensable gas, liquid (fractionated into aqueous and oil phases), and char fractions generated during pyrolysis were collected and analysed for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and naphthalenes (PCNs). The concentrations of PCDDs, PCDFs and PCNs in the pyrolysis products ranged from 0.52 to 43.7 ng kg(-1). All investigated compound groups were most abundant in the oil fraction, accounting for up to 68% (w/w) of the total concentrations. The highest PCDD, PCDF and PCN concentrations were found from the pyrolysis of bark, which has relatively high contents of chlorine and mineral matter, followed by impregnated wood, which contains organic and metal-based preservatives. The homologue profiles of all three compound groups were dominated by the less chlorinated homologues. The homologue abundance decreased as the degree of chlorination increased. This trend was observed for all three feedstocks.

  • 49.
    Gao, Qiuju
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Cieplik, Mariusz K
    Budarin, Vitaliy L
    Gronnow, Mark
    Jansson, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mechanistic evaluation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin, dibenzofuran and naphthalene isomer fingerprints in microwave pyrolysis of biomass2016In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 150, p. 168-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Isomer distribution patterns of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and naphthalenes (PCNs) were investigated in microwave-assisted pyrolysis (MAP) products of woody biomass. The feedstocks included bark and impregnated wood. The results indicated that isomer distributions in MAP are more selective compared to those reported from wood burning and waste incineration. Favored formation of 4-MoCDF and highly selective chlorine substitution at the 2,4-position observed during MAP suggested a preferred formation pathway of PCDFs involving (chloro)phenol precursors followed by subsequent chlorination. The PCDD distribution was dominated by isomers typically formed from chlorophenol condensation at relatively low temperature. The PCN isomer distributions showed a tendency for sequential chlorination from non-substituted naphthalene at successive positions. The presence of isomers such as 1-MoCDD, 4-MoCDF, 1,2,3-TriCN with low thermodynamic stability indicates that kinetic factors may be important in the MAP process.

  • 50.
    Garcia-Iglesias, Miguel
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    de Waal, Bas F. M.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Gorbunov, Andrey V.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Palmans, Anja R. A.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Complex Materials and Devices. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Meijer, E. W.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    A Versatile Method for the Preparation of Ferroelectric Supramolecular Materials via Radical End-Functionalization of Vinylidene Fluoride Oligomers2016In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 138, no 19, p. 6217-6223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A synthetic method for the end-functionalization of vinylidene fluoride oligomers (OVDF) via a radical reaction between terminal olefins and I-OVDF is described. The method shows a wide substrate scope and excellent conversions, and permits the preparation of different disc-shaped cores such as benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamides (BTAs), perylenes bisimide and phthalocyanines (Pc) bearing three to eight ferroelectric oligomers at their periphery. The formation, purity, OVDF conformation, and morphology of the final adducts has been assessed by a combination of techniques, such as NMR, size exclusion chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, polarized optical microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Finally, PBI-OVDF and Pc-OVDF materials show ferroelectric hysteresis behavior together with high remnant polarizations, with values as high as P-r approximate to 37 mC/m(2) for Pc-OVDF. This work demonstrates the potential of preparing a new set of ferroelectric materials simply by attaching OVDF oligomers to different small molecules. The use of carefully chosen small molecules paves the way to new functional materials in which ferroelectricity and electrical conductivity or light-harvesting properties coexist in a single compound.

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