Change search
Refine search result
2345678 201 - 250 of 1006
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 201.
    Dalin, Frida
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordling Eriksson, Gabriel
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist, Per
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hallgren, Åsa
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlberg, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekwall, Olov
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Rönnelid, Johan
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olcén, Per
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Winqvist, Ola
    Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Catrina, Sergiu-Bogdan
    Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kriström, Berit
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Laudius, Maria
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Halldin Stenlid, Maria
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gebre-Medhin, Gennet
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Björnsdottir, Sigridur
    Karolinska In Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Janson, Annika
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Åkerman, Anna-Karin
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Åman, Jan
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Duchen, Karel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bergthorsdottir, Ragnhildur
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johannsson, Gudmundur
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindskog, Emma
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Landin-Olsson, Mona
    Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden..
    Elfving, Maria
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden..
    Waldenström, Erik
    Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Hulting, Anna-Lena
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kämpe, Olle
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bensing, Sophie
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Clinical and immunological characteristics of Autoimmune Addison's disease: a nationwide Swedish multicenter study.2017In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 102, no 2, 379-389 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: Studies on clinical and immunological features of Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) are needed to understand the disease burden and increased mortality.

    OBJECTIVE: To provide upgraded data on autoimmune comorbidities, replacement therapy, autoantibody profiles and cardiovascular risk factors.

    DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Cross sectional, population-based study. 660 AAD patients were included utilizing the Swedish Addison Registry (SAR) 2008-2014. When analyzing cardiovascular risk factors, 3,594 individuals from the population-based survey in Northern Sweden, MONICA (MONItoring of Trends and Determinants of CArdiovascular Disease), served as controls.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Prevalence of autoimmune comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors. Autoantibodies against 13 autoantigens were determined.

    RESULTS: Sixty percent of the SAR cohort consisted of females. Mean age at diagnosis was significantly higher for females than for males (36.8 vs. 31.1 years). The proportion of 21-hydroxylase autoantibody positive patients was 83% and 62% of patients had one or more associated autoimmune diseases, more frequently coexisting in females (p<0.0001). AAD patients had lower BMI (p<0.0001) and prevalence of hypertension (p=0.027) compared with controls. Conventional hydrocortisone tablets were used by 89% of patients; with the mean dose 28.1±8.5 mg/day. The mean hydrocortisone equivalent dose normalized to body surface was 14.8±4.4 mg/m(2)/day. Higher hydrocortisone equivalent dose was associated with higher incidence of hypertension (p=0.046).

    CONCLUSIONS: Careful monitoring of AAD patients is warranted to detect associated autoimmune diseases. Contemporary Swedish AAD patients do not have increased prevalence of overweight, hypertension, T2DM or hyperlipidemia. However, high glucocorticoid replacement doses may be a risk factor for hypertension.

  • 202.
    Dam-Larsen, Sanne
    et al.
    Koege Hospital, Denmark.
    Darkahi, Bahman
    Enkoping Hospital, Sweden.
    Glad, Arne
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark.
    Gleditsch, Dagfinn
    Drammen Hospital, Norway.
    Gustavsson, Lena
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Halttunen, Jorma
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Johansson, Karl-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Pischel, Andreas
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Reiertsen, Ola
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    Tornqvist, Bjorn
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Zebski, Hubert
    Department Gastroenterol, Germany.
    Best practice in placement of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with jejunal extension tube for continuous infusion of levodopa carbidopa intestinal gel in the treatment of selected patients with Parkinsons disease in the Nordic region2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 50, no 12, 1500-1507 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Continuous infusion of levodopa carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) is associated with a significant improvement in the symptoms and quality of life of selected patients with advanced Parkinsons disease. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with jejunal extension (PEG/J) was first described in 1998 and has become the most common and standard technique for fixing the tubing in place for LCIG infusion. Material and methods. A workshop was held in Stockholm, Sweden, to discuss the PEG/J placement for the delivery of LCIG in Parkinsons disease patients with the primary goal of providing guidance on best practice for the Nordic countries. Results. Suggested procedures for preparation of patients for PEG/J placement, aftercare, troubleshooting and redo-procedures for use in the Nordic region are described and discussed. Conclusions. LCIG treatment administered through PEG/J-tubes gives a significant increase in quality of life for selected patients with advanced Parkinsons disease. Although minor complications are common, serious complications are infrequent, and the tube insertion procedures have a good safety record. Further development of delivery systems and evaluation of approaches designed to reduce the demand for redo endoscopy are required.

  • 203.
    de Leede, E. M.
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Sibinga Mulder, B. G.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Bastiaannet, E.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Poston, G. J.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Aintree, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Sahora, K.
    Department of Surgery and Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Medical University of Vienna/ABCSG Pancreatic Cancer Registry, Austria.
    Van Eycken, E.
    Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels, Belgium.
    Valerianova, Z.
    Bulgarian National Cancer Registry/National Oncological Hospital, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Mortensen, M. B.
    Department of Surgery, Odense University Hospital/Danish Pancreas Cancer Group, Denmark.
    Dralle, H.
    Department of Surgery, University of Halle-Wittenberg/Pancreatic Cancer Register, Halle, Germany.
    Primic-Zakelj, M.
    Epidemiology and Cancer Registry/Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Borras, J. M.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ryzhov, A.
    National Cancer Registry of Ukraine/National Institute of Cancer, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Lemmens, V. E.
    Department of Research, Netherlands Cancer Registry/Comprehensive Cancer Centre The Netherlands (IKNL), Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Mieog, J. S. D.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Boelens, P. G.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    van de Velde, C. J. H.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Bonsing, B. A.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Common variables in European pancreatic cancer registries: The introduction of the EURECCA pancreatic cancer project2016In: European Journal of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 0748-7983, E-ISSN 1532-2157, Vol. 42, no 9, 1414-1419 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Quality assurance of cancer care is of utmost importance to detect and avoid under and over treatment. Most cancer data are collected by different procedures in different countries, and are poorly comparable at an international level. EURECCA, acronym for European Registration of Cancer Care, is a platform aiming to harmonize cancer data collection and improve cancer care by feedback. After the prior launch of the projects on colorectal, breast and upper GI cancer, EURECCAs newest project is collecting data on pancreatic cancer in several European countries. Methods: National cancer registries, as well as specific pancreatic cancer audits/registries, were invited to participate in EURECCA Pancreas. Participating countries were requested to share an overview of their collected data items. Of the received datasets, a shared items list was made which creates insight in similarities between different national registries and will enable data comparison on a larger scale. Additionally, first data was requested from the participating countries. Results: Over 24 countries have been approached and 11 confirmed participation: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Denmark, Germany, The Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine and United Kingdom. The number of collected data items varied between 16 and 285. This led to a shared items list of 25 variables divided into five categories: patient characteristics, preoperative diagnostics, treatment, staging and survival. Eight countries shared their first data. Conclusions: A list of 25 shared items on pancreatic cancer coming from eleven participating registries was created, providing a basis for future prospective data collection in pancreatic cancer treatment internationally.

  • 204.
    deKeyser, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Agnafors, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Multi-informant reports of mental health in Swedish-born children of immigrants and children born to non-immigrants - the SESBiC-study2014In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 14, 95- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The European literature on mental health of the children of immigrants is limited. Therefore this study aims to investigate gender-specific mental health reported by teachers, parents and the children themselves in 12-year old children of immigrants and non-immigrants and also to study the level of agreement between the different informants.

    METHODS:

    This cross-sectional study is a part of the longitudinal South East Sweden Birth Cohort-study (the SESBiC-study) on children's health. All children born in town in the south of Sweden 1995-1996 were invited to take part. The mothers of 1723 children (88%) consented. In this part 87 Swedish-born 12-year old children of immigrants and 687 12-year old children of non-immigrants were investigated regarding gender-specific differences in mental health as reported by teachers (Teacher-report form), parents (Child behavior checklist), and children (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire) and the agreement reached between the informants.

    RESULTS:

    Parental immigrant status was not associated with mental health in any of the groups, but living arrangements and parental educational level were mainly found to have an effect on the health status of boys (TRF-Internalizing β = .77 95% CI = .02-1.52; TRF-Externalizing.β = 2.31 95% CI = .63-3.99; TRF-Total β = 6.22 95% CI = 2.27-10.18) The agreement between different informants was generally low, except for externalizing problems among boys (Boys of immigrant parents: Parent and teacher correlation ρ = .422 and Child teacher correlation ρ = .524, p-value < .05, respectively). The correlation between teachers and parents were lower in the index group compared to the reference group. In the index group, the correlations between teacher's and children's assessments were fairly high for boys but not for girls (ρ Total = .400, ρ Internalizing = .240 and ρ Externalizing = .524, p-value < .05 for Total and Externalizing).

    CONCLUSION:

    This study confirms previous findings that the mental health of children of immigrants is similar to that of children of non-immigrants. We found that family factors have a greater impact on the reported mental health than immigrant status does. This might be of clinical importance for healthcare workers to recognize when investigating and treating children from other cultures.

  • 205.
    Delisle, Christine
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandin, Sven
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Forsum, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henriksson, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Trolle-Lagerros, Ylva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Larsson, Christel
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Maddison, Ralph
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Ortega, Francisco B.
    University of Granada, Spain.
    Ruiz, Jonatan R.
    University of Granada, Spain.
    Silfvernagel, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    A web- and mobile phone-based intervention to prevent obesity in 4-year-olds (MINISTOP): a population-based randomized controlled trial2015In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, no 95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Childhood obesity is an increasing health problem globally. Overweight and obesity may be established as early as 2-5 years of age, highlighting the need for evidence-based effective prevention and treatment programs early in life. In adults, mobile phone based interventions for weight management (mHealth) have demonstrated positive effects on body mass, however, their use in child populations has yet to be examined. The aim of this paper is to report the study design and methodology of the MINSTOP (Mobile-based Intervention Intended to Stop Obesity in Preschoolers) trial. Methods/Design: A two-arm, parallel design randomized controlled trial in 300 healthy Swedish 4-year-olds is conducted. After baseline measures, parents are allocated to either an intervention-or control group. The 6-month mHealth intervention consists of a web-based application (the MINSTOP app) to help parents promote healthy eating and physical activity in children. MINISTOP is based on the Social Cognitive Theory and involves the delivery of a comprehensive, personalized program of information and text messages based on existing guidelines for a healthy diet and active lifestyle in pre-school children. Parents also register physical activity and intakes of candy, soft drinks, vegetables as well as fruits of their child and receive feedback through the application. Primary outcomes include body fatness and energy intake, while secondary outcomes are time spent in sedentary, moderate, and vigorous physical activity, physical fitness and intakes of fruits and vegetables, snacks, soft drinks and candy. Food and energy intake (Tool for Energy balance in Children, TECH), body fatness (pediatric option for BodPod), physical activity (Actigraph wGT3x-BT) and physical fitness (the PREFIT battery of five fitness tests) are measured at baseline, after the intervention (six months after baseline) and at follow-up (12 months after baseline). Discussion: This novel study will evaluate the effectiveness of a mHealth program for mitigating gain in body fatness among 4-year-old children. If the intervention proves effective it has great potential to be implemented in child-health care to counteract childhood overweight and obesity.

  • 206.
    Delisle Nystrom, Christine
    et al.
    Novum, Sweden.
    Forsum, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henriksson, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Trolle-Lagerros, Ylva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Larsson, Christel
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Maddison, Ralph
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Novum, Sweden.
    A Mobile Phone Based Method to Assess Energy and Food Intake in Young Children: A Validation Study against the Doubly Labelled Water Method and 24 h Dietary Recalls2016In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 8, no 1, 50- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile phones are becoming important instruments for assessing diet and energy intake. We developed the Tool for Energy Balance in Children (TECH), which uses a mobile phone to assess energy and food intake in pre-school children. The aims of this study were: (a) to compare energy intake (EI) using TECH with total energy expenditure (TEE) measured via doubly labelled water (DLW); and (b) to compare intakes of fruits, vegetables, fruit juice, sweetened beverages, candy, ice cream, and bakery products using TECH with intakes acquired by 24 h dietary recalls. Participants were 39 healthy, Swedish children (5.5 +/- 0.5 years) within the ongoing Mobile-based Intervention Intended to Stop Obesity in Preschoolers (MINISTOP) obesity prevention trial. Energy and food intakes were assessed during four days using TECH and 24 h telephone dietary recalls. Mean EI (TECH) was not statistically different from TEE (DLW) (5820 +/- 820 kJ/24 h and 6040 +/- 680kJ/24 h, respectively). No significant differences in the average food intakes using TECH and 24 h dietary recalls were found. All food intakes were correlated between TECH and the 24 h dietary recalls (r = 0.665-0.896, p &lt; 0.001). In conclusion, TECH accurately estimated the average intakes of energy and selected foods and thus has the potential to be a useful tool for dietary studies in pre-school children, for example obesity prevention trials.

  • 207.
    Delisle Nystrom, Christine
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Pontus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. PROmoting FITness and Health Phys Actv Research Grp PROFIT, Spain.
    Alexandrou, Christina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    The Tanita SC-240 to Assess Body Composition in Pre-School Children: An Evaluation against the Three Component Model2016In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 8, no 6, 371- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quick, easy-to-use, and valid body composition measurement options for young children are needed. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of the bioelectrical impedance (BIA) device, Tanita SC-240, to measure fat mass (FM), fat free mass (FFM) and body fatness (BF%) in 40 healthy, Swedish 5.5 years old children against the three component model (3C model). Average BF%, FM, and FFM for BIA were: 19.4% +/- 3.9%, 4.1 +/- 1.9 kg, and 16.4 +/- 2.4 kg and were all significantly different (p amp;lt; 0.001) from corresponding values for the 3C model (25.1% +/- 5.5%, 5.3 +/- 2.5 kg, and 15.2 +/- 2.0 kg). Bland and Altman plots had wide limits of agreement for all body composition variables. Significant correlations ranging from 0.81 to 0.96 (p amp;lt; 0.001) were found for BF%, FM, and FFM between BIA and the 3C model. When dividing the children into tertiles for BF%, 60% of children were classified correctly by means of BIA. In conclusion, the Tanita SC-240 underestimated BF% in comparison to the 3C model and had wide limits of agreement. Further work is needed in order to find accurate and easy-to-use methods for assessing body composition in pre-school children.

  • 208.
    DHaese, J. G.
    et al.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Neumann, J.
    University of Munich, Germany.
    Weniger, M.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Pratschke, S.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ardiles, V.
    Italian Hospital Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Chapman, W.
    Washington University, MO 63110 USA.
    Hernandez-Alejandro, R.
    University of Western Ontario, Canada.
    Soubrane, O.
    Beaujon Hospital, France.
    Robles-Campos, R.
    Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Spain.
    Stojanovic, M.
    University of Clin Centre, Serbia.
    Dalla Valle, R.
    Parma University Hospital, Italy.
    Chan, A. C. Y.
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Coenen, M.
    University of Munich, Germany.
    Guba, M.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Werner, J.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Schadde, E.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Angele, M. K.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Should ALPPS be Used for Liver Resection in Intermediate-Stage HCC?2016In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 1068-9265, E-ISSN 1534-4681, Vol. 23, no 4, 1335-1343 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extended liver resections in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are problematic due to hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Associating liver partition with portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) has been promoted as a novel method to induce hypertrophy for patients with extensive colorectal liver metastases, but outcomes in HCC have not been well investigated. All patients registered in the international ALPPS Registry (http://www.alpps.org) from 2010 to 2015 were studied. Hypertrophy of the future liver remnant, perioperative morbidity and mortality, age, overall survival, and other parameters were compared between patients with HCC and patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). The study compared 35 patients with HCC and 225 patients with CRLM. The majority of patients undergoing ALPPS for HCC fall into the intermediate-stage category of the Barcelona clinic algorithm. In this study, hypertrophy was rapid and extensive for the HCC patients, albeit lower than for the CRLM patients (47 vs. 76 %; p &lt; 0.002). Hypertrophy showed a linear negative correlation with the degrees of fibrosis. The 90-day mortality for ALPPS used to treat HCC was almost fivefold higher than for CRLM (31 vs. 7 %; p &lt; 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that patients older than 61 years had a significantly reduced overall survival (p &lt; 0.004). The ALPPS approach induces a considerable hypertrophic response in HCC patients and allows resection of intermediate-stage HCC, albeit at the cost of a 31 % perioperative mortality rate. The use of ALPPS for HCC remains prohibitive for most patients and should be performed only for a highly selected patient population younger than 60 years with low-grade fibrosis.

  • 209.
    Di Saverio, Salomone
    et al.
    AUSL, Italy.
    Birindelli, Arianna
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Kelly, Micheal D.
    Canberra Hospital, Australia.
    Catena, Fausto
    Maggiore Hospital Parma, Italy.
    Weber, Dieter G.
    Trauma and Gen Surgeon Royal Perth Hospital, Australia; University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Sartelli, Massimo
    Macerata Hospital, Italy.
    Sugrue, Michael
    Letterkenny Hospital, Ireland.
    De Moya, Mark
    Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Augusto Gomes, Carlos
    University of Gen Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Bhangu, Aneel
    University Hospital Birmingham NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Agresta, Ferdinando
    Civil Hospital, Italy.
    Moore, Ernest E.
    Denver Health Medical Centre, CO USA.
    Soreide, Kjetil
    Stavanger University Hospital, Norway.
    Griffiths, Ewen
    University Hospital Birmingham NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    De Castro, Steve
    OLVG, Netherlands.
    Kashuk, Jeffry
    University of Jerusalem, Israel.
    Kluger, Yoram
    Rambam Health Care Campus, Israel.
    Leppaniemi, Ari
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Ansaloni, Luca
    Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Italy.
    Andersson, Manne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Coccolini, Federico
    Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Italy.
    Coimbra, Raul
    UCSD Health Syst, CA USA.
    Gurusamy, Kurinchi S.
    UCL, England.
    Cesare Campanile, Fabio
    San Giovanni Decollato Andosilla Hospital, Italy.
    Biffl, Walter
    University of Hawaii, HI USA.
    Chiara, Osvaldo
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Italy.
    Moore, Fred
    University of Florida, FL USA.
    Peitzman, Andrew B.
    University of Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Fraga, Gustavo P.
    University of Estadual Campinas, Brazil.
    Costa, David
    Alicante, Spain.
    Maier, Ronald V.
    University of Washington, WA USA.
    Rizoli, Sandro
    St Michaels Hospital, Canada.
    Balogh, Zsolt J.
    John Hunter Hospital, Australia.
    Bendinelli, Cino
    John Hunter Hospital, Australia.
    Cirocchi, Roberto
    University of Perugia, Italy.
    Tonini, Valeria
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Piccinini, Alice
    AUSL, Italy.
    Tugnoli, Gregorio
    AUSL, Italy.
    Jovine, Elio
    AUSL, Italy.
    Persiani, Roberto
    Catholic University, Italy.
    Biondi, Antonio
    University of Catania, Italy.
    Scalea, Thomas
    R Adams Cowley Trauma Centre, MD USA.
    Stahel, Philip
    Denver Health Medical Centre, CO USA.
    Ivatury, Rao
    Virginia Commonwealth University, VA USA.
    Velmahos, George
    Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    WSES Jerusalem guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis2016In: World Journal of Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1749-7922, Vol. 11, no 34Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute appendicitis (AA) is among the most common cause of acute abdominal pain. Diagnosis of AA is challenging; a variable combination of clinical signs and symptoms has been used together with laboratory findings in several scoring systems proposed for suggesting the probability of AA and the possible subsequent management pathway. The role of imaging in the diagnosis of AA is still debated, with variable use of US, CT and MRI in different settings worldwide. Up to date, comprehensive clinical guidelines for diagnosis and management of AA have never been issued. In July 2015, during the 3rd World Congress of the WSES, held in Jerusalem (Israel), a panel of experts including an Organizational Committee and Scientific Committee and Scientific Secretariat, participated to a Consensus Conference where eight panelists presented a number of statements developed for each of the eight main questions about diagnosis and management of AA. The statements were then voted, eventually modified and finally approved by the participants to The Consensus Conference and lately by the board of co-authors. The current paper is reporting the definitive Guidelines Statements on each of the following topics: 1) Diagnostic efficiency of clinical scoring systems, 2) Role of Imaging, 3) Non-operative treatment for uncomplicated appendicitis, 4) Timing of appendectomy and in-hospital delay, 5) Surgical treatment 6) Scoring systems for intra-operative grading of appendicitis and their clinical usefulness 7) Non-surgical treatment for complicated appendicitis: abscess or phlegmon 8) Pre-operative and post-operative antibiotics.

  • 210.
    Dillner, L
    et al.
    Microbiology and Tumor Biology Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zellbi, A
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Heino, P
    Eklund, C
    Pettersson, C A
    Forslund, O
    Hansson, B G
    Grandien, M
    Bistoletti, P
    Association of serum antibodies against defined epitopes of human papillomavirus L1, E2, and E7 antigens and of HPV DNA with incident cervical cancer.1995In: Cancer Detection and Prevention, ISSN 0361-090X, E-ISSN 1525-1500, Vol. 19, no 5, 381-93 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to provide a large-scale evaluation of the association with cervical cancer of antibodies against human papillomavirus (HPV) antigens, sera from 233 patients with primary, untreated cervical cancer and from 157 healthy age- and sex-matched blood donors were analyzed for IgG and IgA antibodies against HPV-derived peptide antigens and against bovine papillomavirus. Several serological responses were strongly associated with cervical cancer, notably the IgG response against the HPV 16 epitopes L1:13 (Relative risk [RR]: 5.3), E2:9 (RR: 2.9), and E7:5 (RR: 4.3), and the IgA response against an HPV 18 E2-derived antigen (245:18, RR: 3.1). HPV DNA in corresponding cervical tumors was analyzed by Southern blotting (SB) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 47 patients. Sixty-six percent of the patients carried HPV DNA as determined by SB, 91% of patients analyzed by PCR. Neither the antibody responses, nor the presence of HPV DNA were significantly associated with the biological properties of the tumors.

  • 211.
    Ding, Zhen-Yu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Liu, Gui-Hong
    Sichuan University, China.
    Olsson, Birgit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Upregulation of the antiapoptotic factor Livin contributes to cisplatin resistance in colon cancer cells2013In: Tumor Biology, ISSN 1010-4283, E-ISSN 1423-0380, Vol. 34, no 2, 683-693 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The antiapoptotic factor Livin has been considered critical for tumor progression and poor prognosis for variant types of tumors. However, there are only limited reports regarding its expression and biological functions in colon cancer. Here, we examined Livin expression in four colon cancer cell lines (HCT116, RKO, KM12C, and SW620) in the presence or absence of cisplatin that was used as a model reagent. We found the different response to cisplatin was related to endogenous Livin expression level. From among a panel of apoptosis-related factors (p53, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, BAX, and survivin), the expression of Livin was upregulated after cisplatin treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Both immunocytochemistry and nuclear cytoplasmic fractionation indicated Livin remained in the cytoplasm after treatment with cisplatin. In an attempt to explore the mechanism, we found the elevated expression of Livin was not due to the decreased degradation by proteosome but was enhanced at the mRNA level. Besides, cisplatin treatment activated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway as shown by increased phosphorylation of Akt1, mTOR, S6K, and 4E-BP1, together with the elevated Livin. The PI3K inhibitor LY294002 inhibited both the phosphorylation of mTOR and upregulation of Livin. The stable overexpression of Livin inhibited the activation of caspase-3 and led to resistance to cisplatin, while the knockdown of Livin by siRNA rendered colon cancer cells more sensitive to cisplatin. Our study, along with others, highlighted the potential of Livin for cancer therapy in colon cancer.

  • 212.
    Ding, Zhen-Yu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Adell, Gunnar
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Olsson, Birgit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Livin expression is an independent factor in rectal cancer patients with or without preoperative radiotherapy2013In: Radiation Oncology, ISSN 1748-717X, Vol. 8, no 281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study was aimed to investigate the expression significance of Livin in relation to radiotherapy (RT), clinicopathological and biological factors of rectal cancer patients. Methods: This study included 144 primary rectal cancer patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Tissue microarray samples from the excised primary rectal cancers, normal mucosa and lymph node metastases were immunostained with Livin antibody. The proliferation of colon cancer cell lines SW620 and RKO was assayed after Livin knock-down. Results: The expression of Livin was significantly increased from adjacent (P = 0.051) or distant (P = 0.028) normal mucosa to primary tumors. 15.4% (2/13) and 39.7% (52/131) patients with Livin-negative and positive tumors died at 180 months after surgery, and the difference tended to be statistically significant (P = 0.091). In multivariate analyses, the difference achieved statistical significance, independent of TNM stage, local and distant recurrence, grade of differentiation, gender, and age (odds ratio = 5.09, 95% CI: 1.01-25.64, P = 0.048). The in vitro study indicated colon cancer cells with Livin knock-down exhibited decreased proliferation compared with controls after RT. Conclusions: The expression of Livin was was independently related to survival in rectal cancer patients, suggesting Livin as a useful prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients.

  • 213.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Oxaliplatin induced neurotoxicity among patients with colorectal cancer: documentation in medical records - a pilot study2014In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, 265-274 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) can have chemotherapy with oxaliplatin postoperatively.Oxaliplatin can cause acute and chronic neurotoxicity. It is important to be aware of neurotoxicside effects so they can be documented and action taken at an early stage. The study aimed toidentify and explore neurotoxic side effects documented in the medical records of patients withcolorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Data in this study weremedical records; presenting documentation about patients treated at the University Hospital inthe south of Sweden between 2009 and 2010. A summative content analysis approach was used toexplore the neurotoxic side effects. Identification and quantification of the content of medical recordswere carried out by using a study-specific protocol. “Cold sensitivity” and “tingling in thehands” were the most frequently documented neurotoxicity-related terms in the medical records.This identification was followed by interpretation. Three categories were identified in the interpretivepart of the study: acute, chronic, and degree of neurotoxicity. The results show the importanceof awareness of neurotoxic side effects so that they can be documented and action taken atan early stage. The documentation could be more reliable if patient-reported structured measurementswere used, combined with free descriptions in the medical records. Being able to followthe progression of the symptoms during and after treatment would improve patient’s safety andalso quality of life. The protocol that we developed and used in this review of medical records maybe helpful to structure the documentation in the electronic system for documentation of neurotoxicityside effects.

     

  • 214.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The trajectory of neurotoxic side effects' impact on daily life: a qualitative study2016In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 24, no 8, 3455-3461 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxic side effects among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and how these side effects influenced their daily lives over time.

    METHODS:

    To assess neurotoxic side effects, ten patients were repeatedly interviewed. The patients were recruited from two hospitals in south of Sweden, had stage II-III CRC, and had been treated with adjuvant oxaliplatin postoperatively, from November 2013 to October 2015. They had received FOLFOX and XELOX, with a mean total dose of 791 mg oxaliplatin. After completed chemotherapy, at 3, 6, and 12 months into the post-treatment phase, 25 interviews were conducted and thematic analysis was used according to Braun and Clarke.

    RESULTS:

    Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity affects patients in several ways in the long term. Four themes were identified: Expectation of cure, Dubiety, Normalization, and Learn to live with neurotoxicity. The findings of this study describe the trajectory of neurotoxicity and its impact on these patients' life situation. The findings confirmed that neurotoxicity is multi-faceted and that the experience of it changes over time.

    CONCLUSION:

    The desire to survive stimulates adaptations and strategies to manage daily life, and patients learn to live with the neurotoxic side effects. This study provides evidence that these patients need individual attention and support during the trajectory of neurotoxic side effects. Current care provision is inadequate due to a lack of knowledge of the ways in which neurotoxicity impacts the patient's daily life. This study provides insights that could be used to develop a more person-centered care.

  • 215.
    du Bois, A
    et al.
    Department of Gynecology & Gynecologic Oncology, Wiesbaden, Germany..
    Quinn, M
    Thigpen, T
    Vermorken, J
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bookman, M
    Bowtell, D
    Brady, M
    Casado, A
    Cervantes, A
    Eisenhauer, E
    Friedlaender, M
    Fujiwara, K
    Grenman, S
    Guastalla, J P
    Harper, P
    Hogberg, T
    Kaye, S
    Kitchener, H
    Kristensen, G
    Mannel, R
    Meier, W
    Miller, B
    Neijt, J P
    Oza, A
    Ozols, R
    Parmar, M
    Pecorelli, S
    Pfisterer, J
    Poveda, A
    Provencher, D
    Pujade-Lauraine, E
    Randall, M
    Rochon, J
    Rustin, G
    Sagae, S
    Stehman, F
    Stuart, G
    Trimble, E
    Vasey, P
    Vergote, I
    Verheijen, R
    Wagner, U
    2004 consensus statements on the management of ovarian cancer: final document of the 3rd International Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference (GCIG OCCC 2004).2005In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 16, no 8, viii7-viii12 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 216.
    Dutta, Ravi Kumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Genetics of primary hyperaldosteronism2016In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 23, no 10, R437-R454 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypertension is a common medical condition and affects approximately 20% of the population in developed countries. Primary aldosteronism is the most common form of secondary hypertension and affects 8-13% of patients with hypertension. The two most common causes of primary aldosteronism are aldosterone-producing adenoma and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. Familial hyperaldosteronism types I, II and III are the known genetic syndromes, in which both adrenal glands produce excessive amounts of aldosterone. However, only a minority of patients with primary aldosteronism have one of these syndromes. Several novel susceptibility genes have been found to be mutated in aldosterone-producing adenomas: KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3, CTNNB1, CACNA1D, CACNA1H and ARMC5. This review describes the genes currently known to be responsible for primary aldosteronism, discusses the origin of aldosterone-producing adenomas and considers the future clinical implications based on these novel insights.

  • 217.
    Dutta, Ravi Kumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brauckhoff, Michael
    Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen; University of Bergen, Norway .
    Walz, Martin
    Klinikum Essen Mitte, Essen, Germany .
    Alesina, Piero
    Klinikum Essen Mitte, Essen, Germany .
    Arnesen, Thomas
    Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Complementary somatic mutations of KCNJ5, ATP1A1, and ATP2B3 in sporadic aldosterone producing adrenal adenomas2014In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 21, no 1, L1-L4 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 218.
    Edström, Måns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Huddinge University Hospital.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Regulatory T cells in Multiple Sclerosis – Indications of impaired function of suppressive capacity and a role for chemokines2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical for immune regulation and homeostasis. In multiple sclerosis (MS), the function of these cells has been shown to be impaired, although the underlying mechanism has yet to be shown. In the current study, we aimed to characterize and assess the phenotypical, functional and transcriptional characteristics of memory and naïve Treg in MS patients and controls.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS 27 patients with relapsing-remitting disease were included, along with 29 healthy controls. Flow cytometry was used for detailed phenotyping of Treg subpopulations CD4+CD45RA+/- and CD4dimCD25++ and their expression of FOXP3, CD39 and HELIOS. CFSE (proliferation marker) and CD69 (activation marker) were used to investigate the functional capacity of Treg. A microarray was employed for genome-wide transcriptional characterization of isolated Treg.

    RESULTS CD4+CD45RA–CD25++ activated Treg displayed a higher expression of FOXP3 and CD39 than resting CD4+CD45RA+CD25+ Treg, while no significant phenotypical differences were observed in Treg subpopulations between patients and controls. However, a lower anti-proliferative capacity was observed in activated Treg of MS patients compared with those of controls (p<0.05), while suppression of activation was similar to controls. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of microarray data revealed enrichment for the GO gene set ‘chemokine receptor binding’ in MS Treg.

    CONCLUSION Although numerical phenotypical assessment of resting and activated Tregs did not reveal any significant difference between patients and controls, functional co-culturing experiments showed an impaired function in activated Treg of MS patients. Furthermore, GSEA revealed immune-related gene sets overexpressed in Treg of MS patients, possibly containing clues to the functional impairment. In particular over-activity in chemokine signalling in Treg would be of interest for further investigation.

  • 219.
    Ehinger, Anna
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Blekinge County Hospital, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Per
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bendahl, Pär-Ola
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Elston, Christopher W.
    Nottingham University Hospital NHS Trust, England.
    Falck, Anna-Karin
    Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Forsare, Carina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Grabau, Dorthe
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Histological grade provides significant prognostic information in addition to breast cancer subtypes defined according to St Gallen 20132017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 1, 68-74 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The St Gallen surrogate definition of the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer consist of five subgroups based on estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), and Ki-67. PgR and Ki-67 are used for discriminating between the Luminal A-like and Luminal B-like (HER2-negative) subtypes. Histological grade (G) has prognostic value in breast cancer; however, its relationship to the St Gallen subtypes is not clear. Based on a previous pilot study, we hypothesized that G could be a primary discriminator for ER-positive/HER2-negative breast cancers that were G1 or G3, whereas Ki-67 and PgR could provide additional prognostic information specifically for patients with G2 tumors. To test this hypothesis, a larger patient cohort was examined. Patients and methods: Six hundred seventy-one patients (amp;gt;= 35 years of age, pT1-2, pN0-1) with ER-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer and complete data for PgR, Ki-67, G, lymph node status, tumor size, age, and distant disease-free survival (DDFS; median follow-up 9.2 years) were included. Results: Luminal A-like tumors were mostly G1 or G2 (90%) whereas Luminal B-like tumors were mostly G2 or G3 (87%) and corresponded with good and poor DDFS, respectively. In Luminal B-like tumors that were G1 (n = 23), no metastasis occurred, whereas 14 of 40 Luminal A-like tumors that were G3 metastasized. In the G2 subgroup, low PgR and high Ki-67 were associated with an increased risk of distant metastases, hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8 (0.95-3.4) and 1.5 (0.80-2.8), respectively. Conclusions: Patients with ER-positive/HER2-negative/G1 breast cancer have a good prognosis, similar to that of Luminal A-like, while those with ER-positive/HER2-negative/G3 breast cancer have a worse prognosis, similar to that of Luminal B-like, when assessed independently of PgR and Ki-67. Therapy decisions based on Ki-67 and PgR might thus be restricted to the subgroup G2.

  • 220.
    Ekbäck, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Tedner, Michaela
    Pediatric Clinic, Täby, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Devenney, Irene
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Oldaeus, Göran
    Pediatric Clinic, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Norrman, Gunilla
    Pediatric Clinic, Hudiksvall, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Leif
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Severe Eczema in Infancy Can Predict Asthma Development. A Prospective Study to the Age of 10 Years2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 6, e99609- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children with atopic eczema in infancy often develop allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma, but the term "atopic march has been questioned as the relations between atopic disorders seem more complicated than one condition progressing into another. Objective: In this prospective multicenter study we followed children with eczema from infancy to the age of 10 years focusing on sensitization to allergens, severity of eczema and development of allergic airway symptoms at 4.5 and 10 years of age. Methods: On inclusion, 123 children were examined. Hanifin-Rajka criteria and SCORAD index were used to describe the eczema. Episodes of wheezing were registered, skin prick tests and IgE tests were conducted and questionnaires were filled out. Procedures were repeated at 4.5 and 10 years of age with additional examinations for ARC and asthma. Results: 94 out of 123 completed the entire study. High SCORAD points on inclusion were correlated with the risk of developing ARC, (B = 9.86, P = 0.01) and asthma, (B = 10.17, P = 0.01). For infants with eczema and wheezing at the first visit, the OR for developing asthma was 4.05(P = 0.01). ARC at 4.5 years of age resulted in an OR of 11.28(P = 0.00) for asthma development at 10 years. Conclusion: This study indicates that infant eczema with high SCORAD points is associated with an increased risk of asthma at 10 years of age. Children with eczema and wheezing episodes during infancy are more likely to develop asthma than are infants with eczema alone. Eczema in infancy combined with early onset of ARC seems to indicate a more severe allergic disease, which often leads to asthma development. The progression from eczema in infancy to ARC at an early age and asthma later in childhood shown in this study supports the relevance of the term "atopic march, at least in more severe allergic disease.

  • 221.
    Ekholm, Maria
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Bendahl, Par-Ola
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Two Years of Adjuvant Tamoxifen Provides a Survival Benefit Compared With No Systemic Treatment in Premenopausal Patients With Primary Breast Cancer: Long-Term Follow-Up (> 25 years) of the Phase III SBII:2pre Trial2016In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 34, no 19, 2232-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effect of 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen compared with no systemic treatment (control) in premenopausal patients with breast cancer over different time periods through long-term (amp;gt; 25 years) follow-up. Patients and Methods Premenopausal patients with primary breast cancer (N = 564) were randomly assigned to 2 years of tamoxifen (n = 276) or no systemic treatment (n = 288). Data regarding date and cause of death were obtained from the Swedish Cause of Death Register. End points were cumulative mortality (CM) and cumulative breast cancer-related mortality (CBCM). The median follow-up for the 250 patients still alive in April 2014 was 26.3 years (range, 22.7 to 29.7 years). Results In patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors (n = 362), tamoxifen was associated with a marginal reduction in CM (hazard ratio [HR], 0.77; 95% CI, 0.58 to 1.03; P = .075) and a significant reduction in CBCM (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.99; P = .046). The effect seemed to vary over time (CM years 0 to 5: HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.73; years amp;gt;5 to 15: HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.91; and after 15 years: HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.42; CBCM years 0 to 5: HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.82; years amp;gt;5 to 15: HR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.86; and after 15 years: HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.36 to 1.44). Conclusion Two years of adjuvant tamoxifen resulted in a long-term survival benefit in premenopausal patients with estrogen receptor-positive primary breast cancer. (C) 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

  • 222.
    Eklund Rimsten, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    "Det ger sig självt om man är en bra terapeut". En intervjustudie av hemuppgifter i familjeterapi.2014Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The homework is an important part of both Functional Family Therapy (FFT) and Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). The goal of this essay has been to determine if, and in what way, homework is used in the context of family therapy, that is the frame of FFT. One hypothesis at the beginning of this work was that the interactional home assignments have started to be replaced by the behavior oriented ones that are a part of DBT.

    The individuals participating in the study are all working in a psychiatric outpatient clinic (BUP) in Uppsala. They are all using either Functional Family Therapy (n=3) or Dialectical Behavior Therapy (n=2) as treatment methods.

    The purpose of the study has been to try to understand more of the homework as a therapeutic instrument, especially the relational homework that family therapists are expected to work out on the basis of a manual that is provided within FFT. Two methods have been used to examine this: a survey and focus group interview.

    The results show a relatively large width when it comes to the therapists view on and practice of homework, though the general pattern indicates that they work out both relational as well as behavior oriented assignments in their practical work. However, there is a need and a wish of the family therapists to gain more clarity on how to determine and give a family a relational oriented homework. The conclusion of this essay is that a clarification like that is not possible, unless you go to the bottom with and define what the relational function is and how to use it in what within Functional Family Therapy is called the Relational Assessment Phase.

  • 223.
    Ekstrom, Klas
    et al.
    Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Sweden.
    Pulkkinen, Mari-Anne
    Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Sweden; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Carlsson-Skwirut, Christine
    Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Sweden.
    Brorsson, Anna-Lena
    Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Sweden.
    Ma, Zhulin
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Frystyk, Jan
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Bang, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tissue IGF-I Measured by Microdialysis Reflects Body Glucose Utilization After rhIGF-I Injection in Type 1 Diabetes2015In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 100, no 11, 4299-4306 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Type 1 diabetes is associated with portal insulin deficiency and disturbances in the GH-IGF axis including low circulating IGF-I and GH hypersecretion. Whether peripheral hyperinsulinemia and GH hypersecretion, which are relevant to the development of vascular complications, result in elevated tissue IGF-I remains unknown. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between whole-body glucose uptake and tissue IGF-I measured by microdialysis. Design: This was a single-blind placebo-controlled crossover study. Setting: The setting was a tertiary pediatric endocrine referral center. Participants: The participants were seven young male adults with type 1 diabetes. Intervention: After an overnight fast, a 6-h lasting euglycemic clamp was performed (constant insulin infusion at 0.5mU/kg x minute and variable glucose infusion rate [GIR]) and a subcutaneous injection of recombinant human (rh) IGF-I (120 mu g/kg) or saline was given after 2 hours. In parallel, tissue IGF-I levels were determined by microdialysis (md-IGF-I). Main Outcome Measures: md-IGF-I levels in muscle and subcutaneous fat, and GIR were determined. Results: md-IGF-I levels were detectable but unchanged after saline. After rhIGF-I, muscle and subcutaneous fat md-IGF-I increased during the second and third hour and then reached a plateau up to 10-fold higher than baseline (P less than .001). GIR was unchanged after saline, whereas it increased 2.5-fold concomitantly with the increase in md-IGF-I (P less than .0001). In contrast, serum IGF-I was increased already at 30 minutes after rhIGF-I and reached a plateau 2-fold above baseline (P less than .0001). Conclusion: We demonstrate that md-IGF-I measurements are valid and physiologically relevant by reflecting rhIGF-I-induced glucose uptake. Future studies should be conducted to elucidate the role of local tissue IGF-I in diabetic vascular complications.

  • 224.
    El Ouali, Mourad
    et al.
    University of Kiel, Germany.
    Fohlin, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Srivastav, Anand
    University of Kiel, Germany.
    A randomised approximation algorithm for the hitting set problem2014In: Theoretical Computer Science, ISSN 0304-3975, Vol. 555, 23-34 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Let H = (V, epsilon) be a hypergraph with vertex set V and edge set epsilon, where n := vertical bar V vertical bar and m := vertical bar epsilon vertical bar. Let l be the maximum size of an edge and Delta be the maximum vertex degree. A hitting set (or vertex cover) in H is a subset of V in which all edges are incident. The hitting set problem is to find a hitting set of minimum cardinality. It is known that an approximation ratio of l can be achieved easily. On the other hand, for constant l, an approximation ratio better than l cannot be achieved in polynomial time under the unique games conjecture (Khot and Regev, 2008 [17]). Thus breaking the l-barrier for significant classes of hypergraphs is a complexity-theoretically and algorithmically interesting problem, which has been studied by several authors (Krivelevich, 1997 [18], Halperin, 2000 [12], Okun, 2005 [23]). We propose a randomised algorithm of hybrid type for the hitting set problem, which combines LP-based randomised rounding, graphs sparsening and greedy repairing and analyse it for different classes of hypergraphs. For hypergraphs with Delta = O(n1/4) and l = O (root n) we achieve an approximation ratio of l(1 - c/Delta), for some constant c greater than 0, with constant probability. For the case of hypergraphs where l and Delta are constants, we prove a ratio of l(1 - l-1/8 Delta). The latter is done by analysing the expected size of the hitting set and using concentration inequalities. Moreover, for quasi-regularisable hypergraphs, we achieve an approximation ratio of l(1 - n/8m). We show how and when our results improve over the results of Krivelevich, Halperin and Okun.

  • 225.
    El Ouali, Mourad
    et al.
    University of Kiel, Germany.
    Fohlin, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Srivastav, Anand
    University of Kiel, Germany.
    An approximation algorithm for the partial vertex cover problem in hypergraphs2016In: Journal of combinatorial optimization, ISSN 1382-6905, E-ISSN 1573-2886, Vol. 31, no 2, 846-864 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Let be a hypergraph with set of vertices and set of (hyper-)edges . Let be the maximum size of an edge, be the maximum vertex degree and be the maximum edge degree. The -partial vertex cover problem in hypergraphs is the problem of finding a minimum cardinality subset of vertices in which at least hyperedges are incident. For the case of and constant it known that an approximation ratio better than cannot be achieved in polynomial time under the unique games conjecture (UGC) (Khot and Ragev J Comput Syst Sci, 74(3):335-349, 2008), but an -approximation ratio can be proved for arbitrary (Gandhi et al. J Algorithms, 53(1):55-84, 2004). The open problem in this context has been to give an -ratio approximation with , as small as possible, for interesting classes of hypergraphs. In this paper we present a randomized polynomial-time approximation algorithm which not only achieves this goal, but whose analysis exhibits approximation phenomena for hypergraphs with not visible in graphs: if and are constant, and , we prove for -uniform hypergraphs a ratio of , which tends to the optimal ratio 1 as tends to . For the larger class of hypergraphs where , is not constant, but is a constant, we show a ratio of . Finally for hypergraphs with non-constant , but constant , we get a ratio of for , leaving open the problem of finding such an approximation for k &lt; m/4(.)

  • 226.
    Elawa, Sherif
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Intestinal obstruction following harvest of VRAM-flap for reconstruction of a large perineal defect2015In: Case Reports in Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2332-0885, Vol. 2, no 3-4, 88-91 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A patient with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum was operated with abdominoperineal resection and perineal reconstruction with a vertical rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. Six days postoperatively, there was herniation of the small bowel, between the anterior and posterior rectus sheaths, to a subcutaneous location.

  • 227.
    Elenis, Evangelia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Akerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Adverse obstetric outcomes in pregnancies resulting from oocyte donation: a retrospective cohort case study in Sweden2015In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 15, no 247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oocyte donation has been associated to gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorders, placental abnormalities, preterm delivery and increased rate of caesarean delivery while simultaneously being characterized by high rates of primiparity, advanced maternal age and multiple gestation constituting the individual risk of mode of conception difficult to assess. This study aims to explore obstetrical outcomes among relatively young women with optimal health status conceiving singletons with donated versus autologous oocytes (via IVF and spontaneously). Methods: National retrospective cohort case study involving 76 women conceiving with donated oocytes, 150 nulliparous women without infertility conceiving spontaneously and 63 women conceiving after non-donor IVF. Data on obstetric outcomes were retrieved from the National Birth Medical Register and the medical records of oocyte recipients from the treating University Hospitals of Sweden. Demographic and logistic regression analysis were performed to examine the association of mode of conception and obstetric outcomes. Results: Women conceiving with donated oocytes (OD) had a higher risk of hypertensive disorders [adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR) 2.84, 95 % CI (1.04-7.81)], oligohydramnios [aOR 12.74, 95 % CI (1.24-130.49)], postpartum hemorrhage [aOR 7.11, 95 % CI (2.02-24.97)] and retained placenta [aOR 6.71, 95 % CI (1.58-28.40)] when compared to women who conceived spontaneously, after adjusting for relevant covariates. Similar trends, though not statistically significant, were noted when comparing OD pregnant women to women who had undergone non-donor IVF. Caesarean delivery [aOR 2.95, 95 % CI (1.52-5.71); aOR 5.20, 95 % CI (2.21-12.22)] and induction of labor [aOR 3.00, 95 % CI (1.39-6.44); aOR 2.80, 95 % CI (1.10-7.08)] occurred more frequently in the OD group, compared to the group conceiving spontaneously and through IVF respectively. No differences in gestational length were noted between the groups. With regard to the indication of OD treatment, higher intervention was observed in women with diminished ovarian reserve but the risk for hypertensive disorders did not differ after adjustment. Conclusion: The selection process of recipients for medically indicated oocyte donation treatment in Sweden seems to be effective in excluding women with severe comorbidities. Nevertheless, oocyte recipients-despite being relatively young and of optimal health status-need careful counseling preconceptionally and closer monitoring prenatally for the development of hypertensive disorders.

  • 228.
    Elenis, Evangelia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Neonatal outcomes in pregnancies resulting from oocyte donation: a cohort study in Sweden2016In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 16, no 170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pregnancies resulting through oocyte donation have been associated with increased risk for adverse outcomes for the mother, such as gestational hypertensive disorders. However, little is known about possible neonatal complications of such pregnancies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neonatal health outcomes among singleton pregnancies in a population of relatively young and healthy oocyte recipients in Sweden, taking into account the medical indication leading to treatment. Methods: This cohort study involved 76 women conceiving with donated oocytes, 149 age-matched nulliparous women conceiving spontaneously and 63 women conceiving after non-donor IVF. Participants were recruited during 2005-2008 and followed up until delivery. Data on neonatal outcomes were retrieved from the National Birth Medical Register and the medical records of oocyte recipients from seven Swedish University Hospitals with IVF clinics. Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association of mode of conception and neonatal outcomes, adjusted for maternal age and BMI, gestational age and delivery by cesarean section. Results: Infants conceived through oocyte donation had higher odds for premature delivery [OR 2.36, 95 % CI (1.02-5.45)], for being small for gestational age [OR 4.23, 95 % CI (1.03-17.42)] and having Apgar score below 7 at 5 min [OR 10.57, 95 % CI (1.21-92.20)] compared to spontaneously conceived infants. Similar trends were observed when comparing infants conceived through oocyte donation to those conceived by traditional IVF. Furthermore, donor oocyte infants had a lower mean birthweight and length compared to autologous oocyte neonates (p = 0.013); however no differences were noted among infants born at term. Neonatal outcomes were more favorable among women with diminished ovarian reserve compared to those with other indications for oocyte donation. Conclusions: Infants conceived after oocyte donation in Sweden have higher odds of being born prematurely and having lower mean birthweight in comparison to non-donor infants. It seems that these unfavorable neonatal outcomes are present despite the age, weight and health restrictions applied to recipients before oocyte donation treatment in Sweden.

  • 229.
    Eliasson, Pernilla T.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Svensson, Rene B.
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Giannopoulos, Antonis
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Eismark, Christian
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kjaer, Michael
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Schjerling, Peter
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Heinemeier, Katja M.
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Simvastatin and atorvastatin reduce the mechanical properties of tendon constructs in vitro and introduce catabolic changes in the gene expression pattern2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, e0172797Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treatment with lipid-lowering drugs, statins, is common all over the world. Lately, the occurrence of spontaneous tendon ruptures or tendinosis have suggested a negative influence of statins upon tendon tissue. But how statins might influence tendons is not clear. In the present study, we investigated the effect of statin treatment on mechanical strength, cell proliferation, collagen content and gene expression pattern in a tendon-like tissue made from human tenocytes in vitro. Human tendon fibroblasts were grown in a 3D tissue culture model (tendon constructs), and treated with either simvastatin or atorvastatin, low or high dose, respectively, for up to seven days. After seven days of treatment, mechanical testing of the constructs was performed. Collagen content and cell proliferation were also determined. mRNA levels of several target genes were measured after one or seven days. The maximum force and stiffness were reduced by both statins after 7 days (pamp;lt;0.05), while the cross sectional area was unaffected. Further, the collagen content was reduced by atorvastatin (p = 0.01) and the cell proliferation rate was decreased by both types of statins (pamp;lt;0.05). Statin treatment also introduced increased mRNA levels of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, TIMP-1 and decreased levels of collagen type 1 and 3. In conclusion, statin treatment appears to have a negative effect on tendon matrix quality as seen by a reduced strength of the tendon constructs. Further, activated catabolic changes in the gene expression pattern and a reduced collagen content indicated a disturbed balance in matrix production of tendon due to statin administration.

  • 230.
    Elluru, Ramulu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kaveri, Srini V.
    Institute National Sante and Rech Med, France; University of Paris 06, France; University of Paris 05, France; France Indian Council Medical Research India, India.
    Bayry, Jagadeesh
    Institute National Sante and Rech Med, France; University of Paris 06, France; University of Paris 05, France; France Indian Council Medical Research India, India.
    The protective role of immunoglobulins in fungal infections and inflammation2015In: Seminars in Immunopathology, ISSN 1863-2297, E-ISSN 1863-2300, Vol. 37, no 2, 187-197 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased incidence of fungal infections in the immunocompromised individuals and fungi-mediated allergy and inflammatory conditions in immunocompetent individuals is a cause of concern. Consequently, there is a need for efficient therapeutic alternatives to treat fungal infections and inflammation. Several studies have demonstrated that antibodies or immunoglobulins have a role in restricting the fungal burden and their clearance. However, based on the data from monoclonal antibodies, it is now evident that the efficacy of antibodies in fungal infections is dependent on epitope specificity, abundance of protective antibodies, and their isotype. Antibodies confer protection against fungal infections by multiple mechanisms that include direct neutralization of fungi and their antigens, inhibition of growth of fungi, modification of gene expression, signaling and lipid metabolism, causing iron starvation, inhibition of polysaccharide release, and biofilm formation. Antibodies promote opsonization of fungi and their phagocytosis, complement activation, and antibody-dependent cell toxicity. Passive administration of specific protective monoclonal antibodies could also prove to be beneficial in drug resistance cases, to reduce the dosage and associated toxic symptoms of anti-fungal drugs. The longer half-life of the antibodies and flexibilities to modify their structure/forms are additional advantages. The clinical data obtained with two monoclonal antibodies should incite interests in translating pre-clinical success into the clinics. The anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory role of antibodies in fungal inflammation could be exploited by intravenous immunoglobulin or IVIg.

  • 231.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt .
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Letter: "Is the length of time in acute burn surgery associated with poorer outcomes?"2014In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 40, no 4, 772-773 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 232.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Plast Surg Unit, Dept Surg, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abbas, Ashraf H.
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Treatment of Children With Scalds by Xenografts: Report From a Swedish Burn Centre2016In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 37, no 6, E586-E591 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scalds are the most common type of burn in children, and one way to treat them is with xenografts with no topical antimicrobials in line with the recommendations of a recent review. However, this treatment has not been examined in detail. Our aim was to describe the treatment of such children when biological dressings (xenografts) were used without local antimicrobials. We reviewed the medical records of all children admitted to a Swedish National Burn Centre during the period 2010-2012 with scalds who were treated with xenografts. Percentage TBSA injured, age, length of hospital stay, number of operations, antibiotics given, duration of antibiotic treatment, and pain score during the first 3 days, application of xenografts, and clinical notes of wound infection were recorded. We studied 67 children, (43 of whom were boys), with a median (interquartile range [IQR]) age of 1 (1-2) year and median (IQR) TBSA% 6.2 (4-11). Twenty children (30%) required operation. Twelve (18%) developed a wound infection, 29 (43%) had other infections, and 26 (39%) were free from infection. The median (IQR) duration of systemic antibiotics was 10 (6-13) days. On the day that the xenografts were applied 10 of the children had a Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability (FLACC) score between 3 and 7, and during the following 2 days, only four children scored in this range. The remaining 57 children had scores amp;lt;3 on the day that xenografts were applied and on the following 2 days. Median (IQR) length of stay/TBSA% was 0.7 (0.4-1.0). Treatment with xenografts was associated with median length of stay/TBSA% amp;lt; 1 and low pain scores. Despite a high rate of prescription of systemic antibiotics, most were for reasons other than wound infection.

    The full text will be freely available from 2017-12-15 15:52
  • 233.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Staged excisions of moderate-sized burns compared with total excision with immediate autograft: an evaluation of two strategies.2017In: International journal of burns and trauma, ISSN 2160-2026, Vol. 7, no 1, 6-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Different surgical techniques have evolved since excision and autografting became the treatment of choice for deep burns in the 1970s. The treatment plan at the Burn Center, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden, has shifted from single-stage excision and immediate autografting to staged excisions and temporary cover with xenografts before autografting. The aim of this study was to find out if the change in policy resulted in extended duration of hospital stay/total body surface area burned (LOS/TBSA%).

    METHODS: Retrospective clinical cohort including surgically-managed patients with burns of 15%-60% TBSA% within each treatment group. The first had early full excisions of deep dermal and full thickness burns and immediate autografts (1997-98), excision and immediate autograft group) and the second had staged excisions before final autografts using xenografts for temporary cover (2010-11, staged excision group).

    RESULTS: The study included 57 patients with deep dermal and full-thickness burns, 28 of whom had excision and immediate autografting, and 29 of whom had staged excisions with xenografting before final autografting. Adjusted (LOS/TBSA%) was close to 1, and did not differ between groups. Mean operating time for the staged excision group was shorter and the excised area/operation was smaller. The total operating time/TBSA% did not differ between groups.

    CONCLUSION: Staged excisions with temporary cover did not affect adjusted LOS/TBSA% or total operating time. Staged excisions may be thought to be more expensive because of the cost of covering the wound between stages, but this needs to be further investigated as do the factors that predict long term outcome.

  • 234.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abbas, A.H.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, O.A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Temporary coverage of burns with a xenograft and sequential excision, compared with total early excision and autograft2016In: Annals of burns and fire disasters, ISSN 1592-9558, Vol. 29, no 3, 196-201 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 80s and 90s, early and total excision of full thickness burns followed by immediate autograft was the most common treatment, with repeated excision and grafting, mostly for failed grafts. It was hypothesized, therefore, that delayed coverage with an autograft preceded by a temporary xenograft after early and sequential smaller excisions would lead to a better wound bed with fewer failed grafts, a smaller donor site, and possibly also a shorter duration of stay in hospital. We carried out a case control study with retrospective analysis from our National Burn Centre registry for the period 1997-2011. Patients who had been managed with early total excision and autograft were compared with those who had had sequential smaller excisions covered with temporary xenografts until the burn was ready for the final autograft. The sequential excision and xenograft group (n=42) required one-third fewer autografts than patients in the total excision and autograft group (n=45), who needed more than one operation (p<0.001). We could not detect any differences in duration of stay in hospital / total body surface area burned% (duration of stay/TBSA%) (2.0 and 1.8) (p=0.83). The two groups showed no major differences in terms of adjusted duration of stay, but our findings suggest that doing early, smaller, sequential excisions using a xenograft for temporary cover can result in shorter operating times, saving us the trouble of making big excisions. However, costs tended to be higher when the burns were > 25% TBSA.

  • 235.
    Elmerstig, Eva
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sandell, Kerstin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sexual interaction or a solitary action: young Swedish men's ideal images of sexual situations in relationships and in one-night stands2014In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, Vol. 5, no 3, 149-155 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    It seems that traditional gender norms influence young women's and men's sexuality differently. However, little attention has been paid to ideal images of sexual situations. This study identifies young heterosexual men's ideal images of sexual situations and their expectations of themselves in sexual situations.

    Study design

    The present study employs a qualitative design. Twelve Swedish men (aged 16–20) participated in individual in-depth qualitative interviews. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the constant comparative method from grounded theory.

    Results

    Our study revealed that the young men's conceptions of normal sexual situations were divided into two parts: sexual situations in relationships, and sexual situations in one-night stands. Their ideal image, “a balanced state of emotional and physical pleasure”, was influenced by the presence/absence of intimacy, the partner's response, and their own performance. The greatest opportunities to experience intimacy and the partner's response were found during sexual situations in relationships. In one-night stands, the men wanted to make a good impression by performing well, and behaved according to masculine stereotypes.

    Conclusion

    Stereotyped masculinity norms regulate young heterosexual men's sexuality, particularly in one-night stands. Sexual health promotion should emphasize the presence of these masculinity norms, which probably involve costs in relation to young men's sexual wellbeing.

  • 236.
    Elmerstig, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prioritizing the partners enjoyment: a population-based study on young Swedish women with experience of pain during vaginal intercourse2013In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 34, no 2, 82-89 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines the prevalence of women who continue to have vaginal intercourse (VIC) despite pain, avoid telling the partner, and feign enjoyment. It also considers the reasons for this behavior. A sample of 1566 female senior high school students (aged 18-22 years) completed a questionnaire concerning their experiences and attitudes toward their body and sexuality. Forty-seven percent (270/576) of those women who reported pain during VIC continued to have VIC despite the pain. The most common reasons were that they did not want to spoil sex for or hurt the partner by interrupting VIC. Feigning enjoyment and not telling the partner about their pain were reported by 22 and 33%, respectively. Continuing to have VIC despite pain was associated with feelings of being inferior to the partner during sex, dissatisfaction with their own sex lives and feigning enjoyment while having pain. Pain during VIC is reported by every third young Swedish woman, and almost half of those still continue to have VIC. The major reason given is noteworthy - prioritizing the partners enjoyment before their own - and indicates that young women who continue to have VIC despite pain take a subordinate position in sexual interactions.

  • 237.
    Elmerstig, Eva
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Being "Good in Bed"Body Concerns, Self-Perceptions, and Gender Expectations Among Swedish Heterosexual Female and Male Senior High-School Students2017In: Journal of sex & marital therapy, ISSN 0092-623X, E-ISSN 1521-0715, Vol. 43, no 4, 326-342 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated gender differences regarding body perceptions, self-perceptions, values and expectations in sexual situations, and factors associated with expectations, among Swedish heterosexual female and male high-school students. A total of 2,765 students (aged 18 to 22) completed questionnaires. Women reported lower satisfaction with themselves and their body appearance (p amp;lt; 0.001), and felt more inferior to their partner (p amp;lt; 0.001). Men felt more superior to their partner, and felt higher expectations (p amp;lt; 0.001). Male sex, difficulty saying no to sex, dissatisfaction with the body, feeling inferior or superior to partner, and considering partners satisfaction as more important, were all associated with feeling expectations during sex.

  • 238.
    Emilsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Health Science, Section of Nursing Graduate Level, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Per A
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN).
    Öhnström, Gisela
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN).
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Beliefs regarding medication and side effects influence treatment adherence in adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder2017In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 26, no 5, 559-571 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adherence to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatment is important because, when untreated, it may have serious consequences with lifelong effects. In the case of adolescents on long-term medicine prescription, more knowledge is needed regarding adherence and factors influencing adherence, which was the purpose of this study. Adolescents (n = 101) on ADHD medication ≥6 months were administrated questionnaires at a monitoring appointment: Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS), beliefs about medicines (BMQ) and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ). Adherence was high, the mean value was 88% of the maximum MARS score, and correlated positively with the “BMQ-necessity-concerns differential” but negatively with “BMQ-concerns” and “BMQ-side effects”. Adolescents with more belief in the necessity of the medication, less concerns and less experience of side effects tended to be more adherent to medication prescription (“intentional non-adherence”), while “unintentional non-adherence” (forgetfulness) was associated with how much they perceived that their ADHD affected their lives. In a multiple regression model, the variance of MARS total (R2 = 0.21) and “intentional non-adherence” (R2 = 0.24) was explained by the “BMQ-necessity–concern differential” and “BMQ-experienced side effects”. The variance of “unintentional non-adherence” (R2 = 0.12) was explained by the “BMQ-necessity–concern differential” and “B-IPQ-consequences of ADHD”. In conclusion, adolescents on long-term medication reported good adherence, mainly influenced by more beliefs in the necessity versus concerns of the medications, less experienced side effects and more perceived consequences of ADHD. BMQ could be useful to identify risks of low adherence, which should be counteracted by partially gender-specific interventions.

  • 239.
    Enblom, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap, Osher centrum för integrativ medicin, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Institutionen för onkologi-patologi, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper, avdelning för onkologi, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Reduced Need for Rescue Antiemetics and Improved Capacity to Eat in Patients Receiving Acupuncture Compared to Patients Receiving Sham Acupuncture or Standard Care during Radiotherapy.2017In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, Vol. 2017, 5806351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate if consumption of emesis-related care and eating capacity differed between patients receiving verum acupuncture, sham acupuncture, or standard care only during radiotherapy. Methods. Patients were randomized to verum (n = 100) or sham (n = 100) acupuncture (telescopic blunt sham needle) (median 12 sessions) and registered daily their consumption of antiemetics and eating capacity. A standard care group (n = 62) received standard care only and delivered these data once. Results. More patients in the verum (n = 73 of 89 patients still undergoing radiotherapy; 82%, Relative Risk (RR) 1.23, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.01-1.50) and the sham acupuncture group (n = 79 of 95; 83%, RR 1.24, CI 1.03-1.52) did not need any antiemetic medications, as compared to the standard care group (n = 42 out of 63; 67%) after receiving 27 Gray dose of radiotherapy. More patients in the verum (n = 50 of 89; 56%, RR 1.78, CI 1.31-2.42) and the sham acupuncture group (n = 58 of 94 answering patients; 62%, RR 1.83, CI 1.20-2.80) were capable of eating as usual, compared to the standard care group (n = 20 of 63; 39%). Conclusion. Patients receiving acupuncture had lower consumption of antiemetics and better eating capacity than patients receiving standard antiemetic care, plausible by nonspecific effects of the extra care during acupuncture.

  • 240.
    Engerström, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Kramer, Andrew A.
    Prescient Healthcare Consulting, Charlottesville, VA.
    Nolin, Thomas
    The Swedish Intensive Care Registry, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Karlström, Göran
    The Swedish Intensive Care Registry, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Academic Research Center, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Walther, Sten M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Comparing Time-Fixed Mortality Prediction Models and Their Effect on ICU Performance Metrics Using the Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3.2016In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 44, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine ICU performance based on the Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 using 30-day, 90-day, or 180-day mortality as outcome measures and compare results with 30-day mortality as reference.

    DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study of ICU admissions from 2010 to 2014.

    SETTING: Sixty-three Swedish ICUs that submitted data to the Swedish Intensive Care Registry.

    PATIENTS: The development cohort was first admissions to ICU during 2011-2012 (n = 53,546), and the validation cohort was first admissions to ICU during 2013-2014 (n = 57,729).

    INTERVENTIONS: None.

    MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Logistic regression was used to develop predictive models based on a first level recalibration of the original Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 model but with 30-day, 90-day, or 180-day mortality as measures of outcome. Discrimination and calibration were excellent for the development dataset. Validation in the more recent 2013-2014 database showed good discrimination (C-statistic: 0.85, 0.84, and 0.83 for the 30-, 90-, and 180-d models, respectively), and good calibration (standardized mortality ratio: 0.99, 0.99, and 1.00; Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit H-statistic: 66.4, 63.7, and 81.4 for the 30-, 90-, and 180-d models, respectively). There were modest changes in an ICU's standardized mortality ratio grouping (< 1.00, not significant, > 1.00) when follow-up was extended from 30 to 90 days and 180 days, respectively; about 11-13% of all ICUs.

    CONCLUSIONS: The recalibrated Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 hospital outcome prediction model performed well on long-term outcomes. Evaluation of ICU performance using standardized mortality ratio was only modestly sensitive to the follow-up time. Our results suggest that 30-day mortality may be a good benchmark of ICU performance. However, the duration of follow-up must balance between what is most relevant for patients, most affected by ICU care, least affected by administrative policies and practically feasible for caregivers.

  • 241.
    Engstrand, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hand function and quality of life before and after fasciectomy for Dupuytren contracture2014In: Journal of Hand Surgery-American Volume, ISSN 0363-5023, E-ISSN 1531-6564, Vol. 39, no 7, 1333-1343 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To describe changes in joint motion, sensibility, and scar pliability and to investigate the patients' expectations, self-reported recovery, and satisfaction with hand function, disability, and quality of life after surgery and hand therapy for Dupuytren disease.

    METHODS:

    This prospective cohort study collected measurements before surgery and 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery and hand therapy. Ninety patients with total active extension deficits of 60° or more from Dupuytren contracture were included. Outcomes measures were range of motion; sensibility; scar pliability; self-reported outcomes on expectations, recovery, and satisfaction with hand function; Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores; safety and social issues of hand function; physical activity habits; and quality of life with the Euroqol.

    RESULTS:

    The extension deficit decreased, and there was a transient decrease in active finger flexion during the first year after surgery. Sensibility remained unaffected. Generally, patients with surgery on multiple fingers had worse scar pliability. The majority of the patients had their expectations met, and at 6 months, 32% considered hand function as fully recovered, and 73% were satisfied with their hand function. Fear of hurting the hand and worry about not trusting the hand function were of greatest concern among safety and social issues. The Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score and the Euroqol improved over time.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    After surgery and hand therapy, disability decreased independent of single or multiple operated fingers. The total active finger extension improved enough for the patients to reach a functional range of motion despite an impairment of active finger flexion still present 12 months after treatment.

  • 242.
    Ericsson, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Effect of Electrode Belt and Body Positions on Regional Pulmonary Ventilation- and Perfusion-Related Impedance Changes Measured by Electric Impedance Tomography2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 6, e0155913- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ventilator-induced or ventilator-associated lung injury (VILI/VALI) is common and there is an increasing demand for a tool that can optimize ventilator settings. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) can detect changes in impedance caused by pulmonary ventilation and perfusion, but the effect of changes in the position of the body and in the placing of the electrode belt on the impedance signal have not to our knowledge been thoroughly evaluated. We therefore studied ventilation-related and perfusion-related changes in impedance during spontaneous breathing in 10 healthy subjects in five different body positions and with the electrode belt placed at three different thoracic positions using a 32-electrode EIT system. We found differences between regions of interest that could be attributed to changes in the position of the body, and differences in impedance amplitudes when the position of the electrode belt was changed. Ventilation-related changes in impedance could therefore be related to changes in the position of both the body and the electrode belt. Perfusion-related changes in impedance were probably related to the interference of major vessels. While these findings give us some insight into the sources of variation in impedance signals as a result of changes in the positions of both the body and the electrode belt, further studies on the origin of the perfusion-related impedance signal are needed to improve EIT further as a tool for the monitoring of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion.

  • 243.
    Eriksson, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, and Deptartment of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Andersson, Therese M-L
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The proportion cured of patients diagnosed with Stage III-IV cutaneous malignant melanoma in Sweden 1990-2007: A population-based study.2016In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 138, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The survival in cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) is highly dependent on the stage of the disease. Stage III-IV CMM patients are at high risk of relapse with a heterogeneous outcome, but not all experience excess mortality due to their disease. This group is referred to as the cure proportion representing the proportion of patients who experience the same mortality rate as the general population. The aim of this study was to estimate the cure proportion of patients diagnosed with Stage III-IV CMM in Sweden. From the population-based Swedish Melanoma Register, we included 856 patients diagnosed with primary Stage III-IV CMM, 1990-2007, followed-up through 2013. We used flexible parametric cure models to estimate cure proportions and median survival times (MSTs) of uncured by sex, age, tumor site, ulceration status (in Stage III patients) and disease stage. The standardized (over sex, age and site) cure proportion was lower in Stage IV CMMs (0.15, 95% CI 0.09-0.22) than non-ulcerated Stage III CMMs (0.48, 95% CI 0.41-0.55) with a statistically significant difference of 0.33 (95% CI = 0.24-0.41). Ulcerated Stage III CMMs had a cure proportion of 0.27 (95% CI 0.21-0.32) with a statistically significant difference compared to non-ulcerated Stage III CMMs (difference 0.21; 95% CI = 0.13-0.30). The standardized MST of uncured was approximately 9-10 months longer for non-ulcerated versus ulcerated Stage III CMMs. We could demonstrate a significantly better outcome in patients diagnosed with non-ulcerated Stage III CMMs compared to ulcerated Stage III CMMs and Stage IV disease after adjusting for age, sex and tumor site.

  • 244.
    Eriksson, Hanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Månsson-Brahme, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Frohm-Nilsson, Margareta
    Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ingvar, Christian
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lindholm, Christer
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Naredi, Peter
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stierner, Ulrika
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hansson, Johan
    Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Later stage at diagnosis and worse survival in cutaneous malignant melanoma among men living alone: a nationwide population-based study from Sweden2014In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 32, no 13, 1356-1364 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To investigate the association between cohabitation status, clinical stage at diagnosis, and disease-specific survival in cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM).

    METHODS:

    This nationwide population-based study included 27,235 patients from the Swedish Melanoma Register diagnosed with a primary invasive CMM between 1990 and 2007 and linked data to nationwide, population-based registers followed up through 2012.

    RESULTS:

    After adjustment for age at diagnosis, level of education, living area, period of diagnosis, and tumor site, the odds ratios (ORs) of higher stage at diagnosis were significantly increased among men living alone versus men living with a partner (stage II v stage I: OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.29 to 1.57; stage III or IV v stage I: OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.79). The OR for stage II versus stage I disease was also increased among women living alone (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.28). After adjustments for the factors listed earlier, the CMM-specific survival was significantly decreased among men living alone (hazard ratio [HR] for death, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.33 to 1.65; P < .001). After additional adjustments for all potential and established prognostic factors, CMM-specific survival among men living alone versus men living with a partner remained significantly decreased (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.46; P < .001), suggesting a residual adverse effect on survival not accounted for by these parameters.

    CONCLUSION:

    In all age groups among men, living alone is significantly associated with reduced CMM-specific survival, partially attributed to a more advanced stage at diagnosis. This emphasizes the need for improved prevention and early detection strategies for this group.

  • 245.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Holm, Torbjörn
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pettersson, David
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Norrtalje Hospital, Sweden.
    Berglund, Åke
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Cedermark, Björn
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Radu, Calin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Hemming
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Machado, Mikael
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hjern, Fredrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Syk, Ingvar
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Martling, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Optimal fractionation of preoperative radiotherapy and timing to surgery for rectal cancer (Stockholm III): a multicentre, randomised, non-blinded, phase 3, non-inferiority trial2017In: The Lancet Oncology, ISSN 1470-2045, E-ISSN 1474-5488, Vol. 18, no 3, 336-346 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Radiotherapy reduces the risk of local recurrence in rectal cancer. However, the optimal radiotherapy fractionation and interval between radiotherapy and surgery is still under debate. We aimed to study recurrence in patients randomised between three different radiotherapy regimens with respect to fractionation and time to surgery. Methods In this multicentre, randomised, non-blinded, phase 3, non-inferiority trial (Stockholm III), all patients with a biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the rectum, without signs of non-resectability or distant metastases, without severe cardiovascular comorbidity, and planned for an abdominal resection from 18 Swedish hospitals were eligible. Participants were randomly assigned with permuted blocks, stratified by participating centre, to receive either 5 x 5 Gy radiation dose with surgery within 1 week (short-course radiotherapy) or after 4-8 weeks (short-course radiotherapy with delay) or 25 x 2 Gy radiation dose with surgery after 4-8 weeks (long-course radiotherapy with delay). After a protocol amendment, randomisation could include all three treatments or just the two short-course radiotherapy treatments, per hospital preference. The primary endpoint was time to local recurrence calculated from the date of randomisation to the date of local recurrence. Comparisons between treatment groups were deemed non-inferior if the upper limit of a double-sided 90% CI for the hazard ratio (HR) did not exceed 1.7. Patients were analysed according to intention to treat for all endpoints. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00904813. Findings Between Oct 5, 1998, and Jan 31, 2013, 840 patients were recruited and randomised; 385 patients in the three-arm randomisation, of whom 129 patients were randomly assigned to short-course radiotherapy, 128 to short-course radiotherapy with delay, and 128 to long-course radiotherapy with delay, and 455 patients in the two-arm randomisation, of whom 228 were randomly assigned to short-course radiotherapy and 227 to short-course radiotherapy with delay. In patients with any local recurrence, median time from date of randomisation to local recurrence in the pooled short-course radiotherapy comparison was 33.4 months (range 18.2-62.2) in the short-course radiotherapy group and 19.3 months (8.5-39.5) in the short-course radiotherapy with delay group. Median time to local recurrence in the long-course radiotherapy with delay group was 33.3 months (range 17.8-114.3). Cumulative incidence of local recurrence in the whole trial was eight of 357 patients who received short-course radiotherapy, ten of 355 who received short-course radiotherapy with delay, and seven of 128 who received long-course radiotherapy (HR vs short-course radiotherapy: short-course radiotherapy with delay 1.44 [95% CI 0.41-5.11]; long-course radiotherapy with delay 2.24 [0.71-7.10]; p=0.48; both deemed non-inferior). Acute radiation-induced toxicity was recorded in one patient (amp;lt;1%) of 357 after short-course radiotherapy, 23 (7%) of 355 after short-course radiotherapy with delay, and six (5%) of 128 patients after long-course radiotherapy with delay. Frequency of postoperative complications was similar between all arms when the three-arm randomisation was analysed (65 [50%] of 129 patients in the short-course radiotherapy group; 48 [38%] of 128 patients in the short-course radiotherapy with delay group; 50 [39%] of 128 patients in the long-course radiotherapy with delay group; odds ratio [OR] vs short-course radiotherapy: short-course radiotherapy with delay 0.59 [95% CI 0.36-0.97], long-course radiotherapy with delay 0.63 [0.38-1.04], p=0.075). However, in a pooled analysis of the two short-course radiotherapy regimens, the risk of postoperative complications was significantly lower after short-course radiotherapy with delay than after short-course radiotherapy (144 [53%] of 355 vs 188 [41%] of 357; OR 0.61 [95% CI 0.45-0.83] p=0.001). Interpretation Delaying surgery after short-course radiotherapy gives similar oncological results compared with short-course radiotherapy with immediate surgery. Long-course radiotherapy with delay is similar to both short-course radiotherapy regimens, but prolongs the treatment time substantially. Although radiation-induced toxicity was seen after short-course radiotherapy with delay, postoperative complications were significantly reduced compared with short-course radiotherapy. Based on these findings, we suggest that short-course radiotherapy with delay to surgery is a useful alternative to conventional short-course radiotherapy with immediate surgery.

  • 246.
    Ermund, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Gustafsson, Jenny K.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Hansson, Gunnar C.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mucus Properties and Goblet Cell Quantification in Mouse, Rat and Human Ileal Peyers Patches2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, 83688- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peyers patches (PPs) are collections of lymphoid follicles in the small intestine, responsible for scanning the intestinal content for foreign antigens such as soluble molecules, particulate matter as well as intact bacteria and viruses. The immune cells of the patch are separated from the intestinal lumen by a single layer of epithelial cells, the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE). This epithelium covers the dome of the follicle and contains enterocyte-like cells and M cells, which are particularly specialized in taking up antigens from the gut. However, the presence and number of goblet cells as well as the presence of mucus on top of the FAE is controversial. When mouse ileal PPs were mounted in a horizontal Ussing-type chamber, we could observe a continuous mucus layer at mounting and new, easily removable mucus was released from the villi on the patch upon stimulation. Confocal imaging using fluorescent beads revealed a penetrable mucus layer covering the domes. Furthermore, immunostaining of FAE from mice, rats and humans with a specific antibody against the main component of intestinal mucus, the MUC2 mucin, clearly identify mucin-containing goblet cells. Transmission electron micrographs further support the identification of mucus releasing goblet cells on the domes of PPs in these species.

  • 247.
    Ernvik, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anknytningsbeteenden i familjer tillhörande ett ursprungsfolk.2014Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    By observations in seven families belonging to the Karen people, I have been able to study the attachmentpatterns in families of an indigenous group living in villages in the mountains of Northern Thailand. The purpose of the study is to observe and describe how attachment and bonding is built up in families where the children live very close to their parents, and where several generations live together. The question I brought in to the study was: ”How do family members in a Karen family bond with each other?” I studied the interaction in between children and parents, in between the parents, and sometimes in between grandparents and other family members. Interviews were added to the observations.

    In the study it becomes clear that culture, physiological conditions as how the families live, as well as socio-economical factors as how the family gets there income, are all affecting the attachment patterns in the family. All families in the study are self-sufficient farmers, which makes it possible for the children to be together with their parents throughout the day. Different generations live close to each other, and the children often have several attachment figures. The children use their attachment figures as safe bases throughout their childhood, also having a lot of freedom to explore the world in and around the village. The parents are well aware about that children need a lot of time and proximity with their parents. As everyone is doing their work sitting on the floor, the children have easily access to the adults. Conversations, smiles and laughters are important parts of the bonding process in between the family members. The physical closeness in between children and parents is constantly there, while the strongest bonding factor in between the parents is the fact that they need each other.

  • 248.
    Ernvik, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anknytningsbeteenden i familjer tillhörande ett urspungsfolk2014Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    By observations in seven families belonging to the Karen people, I have been able to study the attachmentpatterns in families of an indigenous group living in villages in the mountains of Northern Thailand. The purpose of the study is to observe and describe how attachment and bonding is built up in families where the children live very close to their parents, and where several generations live together. The question I brought in to the study was: ”How do family members in a Karen family bond with each other?” I studied the interaction in between children and parents, in between the parents, and sometimes in between grandparents and other family members. Interviews were added to the observations.

    In the study it becomes clear that culture, physiological conditions as how the families live, as well as socio-economical factors as how the family gets there income, are all affecting the attachment patterns in the family. All families in the study are self-sufficient farmers, which makes it possible for the children to be together with their parents throughout the day. Different generations live close to each other, and the children often have several attachment figures. The children use their attachment figures as safe bases throughout their childhood, also having a lot of freedom to explore the world in and around the village. The parents are well aware about that children need a lot of time and proximity with their parents. As everyone is doing their work sitting on the floor, the children have easily access to the adults. Conversations, smiles and laughters are important parts of the bonding process in between the family members. The physical closeness in between children and parents is constantly there, while the strongest bonding factor in between the parents is the fact that they need each other.

  • 249.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Patient Safety.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis.
    Lagerfelt, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ahlström, Ulla
    Vårdcentralen Kungsgatan Linköping, Sweden Region Östergötland, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Modifierad brittisk modell kortade ledtid till datortomografi av kolon2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The British national Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has presented guidelines based on signs and symptoms which should raise a suspicion of colorectal cancer. A slightly modified version of these guidelines, adapted to Swedish conditions, named Swedish NICE (sNICE) criteria, was implemented at eight primary care centres. By following the sNICE criteria, cases with higher degree of suspicion of colorectal cancer were advised for computer tomography (CT) of the colon, whereas cases of low degree of suspicion were advised for the considerably less time and patient demanding CT of the abdomen. For patients with isolated anal symptoms without presence of sNICE criteria, active expectancy for six weeks was recommended, followed by renewed consideration. Results showed that the ratio between CT colon and CT abdomen was reduced from 2.2 to 1.1 after introduction of the sNICE criteria. Also, the proportion of patients undergoing CT colon within two weeks from admittance was increased from 3 to 25 %. We conclude that the sNICE criteria may be a useful supportive tool for the primary care physician.

  • 250.
    Fan, C-W
    et al.
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Chen, T
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Shang, Y-N
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Gu, Y-Z
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Zhang, S-L
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Lu, R
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    OuYang, S-R
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Zhou, X
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Li, Y
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Meng, W-T
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Hu, J-K
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Lu, Y
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Bu, H
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Zhou, Z-G
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Mo, X-M
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Cancer-initiating cells derived from human rectal adenocarcinoma tissues carry mesenchymal phenotypes and resist drug therapies2013In: Cell Death and Disease, ISSN 2041-4889, Vol. 4, e828- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accumulating evidence indicates that cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are responsible for cancer initiation, relapse, and metastasis. Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is typically classified into proximal colon, distal colon, and rectal cancer. The gradual changes in CRC molecular features within the bowel may have considerable implications in colon and rectal CICs. Unfortunately, limited information is available on CICs derived from rectal cancer, although colon CICs have been described. Here we identified rectal CICs (R-CICs) that possess differentiation potential in tumors derived from patients with rectal adenocarcinoma. The R-CICs carried both CD44 and CD54 surface markers, while R-CICs and their immediate progenies carried potential epithelial–mesenchymal transition characteristics. These R-CICs generated tumors similar to their tumor of origin when injected into immunodeficient mice, differentiated into rectal epithelial cells in vitro, and were capable of self-renewal both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, subpopulations of R-CICs resisted both 5-fluorouracil/calcium folinate/oxaliplatin (FolFox) and cetuximab treatment, which are the most common therapeutic regimens used for patients with advanced or metastatic rectal cancer. Thus, the identification, expansion, and properties of R-CICs provide an ideal cellular model to further investigate tumor progression and determine therapeutic resistance in these patients.

2345678 201 - 250 of 1006
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf