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  • 1001.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Amulticenter study evaluating the effects of the Swedish ACE programme2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A multicenter study evaluating the effects of the Swedish ACE programme

    Author  Öberg, Marie

    1. Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Centre, Region Östergötland, Sweden

    2. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden.

     Objective: This study investigated the effects of a modified Swedish version of an interactive group education programme: the Active Communication Education programme (ACE) in five  Swedish regions. This study also explored whether the pre- and post-programme outcomes differed with regard to region, age, gender, hearing loss (HL) or the attendance of significant others (SOs).

    Design: An intervention study with between- and within-group measurements was applied.

    Sample: A total of 77 individuals with hearing impairments and a mean age of 73.9 years (SD=9.8) from five different regions of Sweden participated.

    Results: Statistically significant short- and long-term effects were found with regard to communication strategy use, activity, and participation. The ACE programme was most effective for older individuals, women and participants with more severe HL. Individuals who attended with an SO showed a tendency towards better communication strategies. No regional differences were found. The qualitative results indicated that the programme increased individuals’ ability to cope and restored their social identities.

    Conclusion: The ACE programme is effective, and is suggested to be implemented in clinical settings and considered as an alternative or additional treatment to hearing aid rehabilitation. Additional studies that include younger individuals and a control group are recommended. 

     

  • 1002.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Nationellutvärdering av Aktiv Kommunikation.2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 1003.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Peter
    3. Dept. of Speech, Music and Hearing School of Computer Science and Communication KTH - Royal Institute of.
    Swedish quality register of hearing aid rehabilitation – Results from a large data set2016In: Swedish quality register of hearing aid rehabilitation – Results from a large data set, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract:

    Purpose

    The aim of the study is to present normative data of hearing aid rehabilitation for a Swedish population with regard to gender, age, return

    clients/first time user and bilateral/unilateral hearing aid use.

    Method

    Questionnaires with 19 items were sent by mail to clients 3-6 months after completed hearing aid rehabilitation. In addition to the seven IOI-HA

    items there were five items concerning satisfaction with reception, information and participation and seven items concerning functionality with the

    hearing aids.

    Results

    Approximately 60 000 hearing aid users returned the questionnaire during the period 2011-2014 (response rate 52.5%). Differences were found

    with regard to hearing aid experiences, gender and unilateral versus bilateral hearing aid fitting. Women compared to men and bilaterally fitted

    compared to unilaterally fitted, reported significantly higher scores for all seven items in IOI-HA. The largest differences in mean score were found

    for the item hearing aid use between experienced and first-time user where experienced users used the aids more. No correlation was found

    between mean IOI-HA score and average hearing threshold level.

    Conclusion

    When evaluating hearing aid rehabilitation differences between groups need to be considered.

  • 1004.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elisabet, Sundewall Thorén
    Eriksholm Reserach Centre, Denmark.
    Teodorescu, Ina
    Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Clinical Sciences Lund University, Sweden.
    Hagejärd, Lena
    Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Clinical Sciences Lund University, Sweden.
    Online Individualized Active Communication Education- -a Swedish pilot study2015In: Online Individualized Active Communication Education- -a Swedish pilot study, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The group rehabilitation program Active Communication Education program (ACE), has been translated and evaluated in two Swedish studies. Statistically significant effects were found for activity and participation and communication strategies. The qualitative analyze showed that the participants found the structure and the content of the program to be beneficial and “learning from the group” was found to be the most pronounced advantage of the program. All individuals do not want to or do not have the possibility to participate in group activities and therefore are individual education programs requested. Could an individual educational program, administered via the internet, be beneficial even without the possibility to learn from the peers in a group? The aim with this study was to translate and, in a pilot study, evaluate the Individual Active Communication Education program (I-ACE) for a Swedish population.

    Method                                                                                                                                                                      

    The originally I-ACE program, developed in Australian, was translated and mixed with contents from the Swedish ACE program to a five week, online education program. Participants were recruited by advertisements in hearing health care centers and at social medium forums. Twenty-four individuals participated and received I-ACE material by mail every week. The effects were evaluated with standardized questionnaires and open ended items.

    Result

    Statistically significant effects were found for activity and participation and for communication strategies. The qualitative analyze showed that the participants were satisfied with the content of the program. Learning about communication strategies and own reflections about the hearing problems were the most pronounced advantages.

    Conclusion

    The Swedish version of the I-ACE with material administered by mail worked well and was found to increase participants’ activity and participation and communication strategies. Further research, including a control group, is needed to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of the I-ACE program.

  • 1005.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Ingo, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    On-line supportsystem för audionomer och förstagångsbrukare2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 1006.
    Östh, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öst, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Concentration of beta-Carotene in Human Adipocytes, but Not the Whole-Body Adipocyte Stores, Is Reduced in Obesity2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 1, 85610- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have examined the concentration of beta-carotene in the fat of isolated abdominal subcutaneous adipocytes obtained from lean (BMIless than23 kg/m(2)), non-obese with higher BMI (23 less than= BMIless than28 kg/m(2)), obese (BMI greater than= 28 kg/m(2)), and from a group of obese subjects with type 2 diabetes. The concentration of b-carotene was 50% lower in the adipocytes from the obese and obese/diabetic groups compared with the lean and non-obese groups. Interestingly, the total amount of beta-carotene in the adipocyte stores of each subject was constant among all groups. Triacylglycerol constituted 92 +/- 1% (by weight) of the adipocyte lipids in the lean group and this was increased to 99 +/- 2% in the obese group with diabetes (pless than0.05). The concentration of cholesteryl esters was in all cases less than0.1 g per 100 g of total lipids, demonstrating that mature human adipocytes have negligible stores of cholesteryl ester. Our findings demonstrate that adipocyte concentrations of beta-carotene are reduced in obese subjects. The lower concentrations in adipocytes from subjects with type 2 diabetes apparently reflect subjects obesity. Our finding that whole-body stores of beta-carotene in adipocytes are constant raises new questions regarding what function it serves, as well as the mechanisms for maintaining constant levels in the face of varied adipose tissue mass among individuals over a period of time.

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