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  • 1.
    Boujemaoui, Assya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Sanchez, Carmen Cobo
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Engström, Joakim
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bruce, Carl
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. RISE Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Polycaprolactone Nanocomposites Reinforced with Cellulose Nanocrystals Surface-Modified via Covalent Grafting or Physisorption: A Comparative Study2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 40, p. 35305-35318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work, cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) have been surface-modified either via covalent grafting or through physisorption of poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) and employed as reinforcement in PCL. Covalent grafting was achieved by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Two approaches were utilized for the physisorption: using either micelles of poly(dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA-b-PBMA) or latex nanoparticles of poly(dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid)-block-poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (P(DMAEMA-co-MAA)-b-PBMA). Block copolymers (PDMAEMA-b-PBMA)s were obtained by ATRP and subsequently micellized. Latex nanoparticles were produced via reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) mediated surfactant-free emulsion polymerization, employing polymer-induced self-assembly (PISA) for the particle formation. For a reliable comparison, the amounts of micelles/latex particles adsorbed and the amount of polymer grafted onto the CNCs were kept similar. Two different chain lengths of PBMA were targeted, below and above the critical molecular weight for chain entanglement of PBMA (M-n,M-c similar to 56 000 g mo1(-1)). Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocomposites reinforced with unmodified and modified CNCs in different weight percentages (0.5, 1, and 3 wt %) were prepared via melt extrusion. The resulting composites were evaluated by UV-vis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and tensile testing. All materials resulted in higher transparency, greater thermal stability, and stronger mechanical properties than unfilled PCL and nanocomposites containing unmodified CNCs. The degradation temperature of PCL reinforced with grafted CNCs was higher than that of micelle-modified CNCs, and the latter was higher than that of latex-adsorbed CNCs with a long PBMA chain length. The results clearly indicate that covalent grafting is superior to physisorption with regard to thermal and mechanical properties of the final nanocomposite. This unique study is of great value for the future design of CNC-based nanocomposites with tailored properties.

  • 2.
    Cobo Sanchez, Carmen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Inorganic and organic polymer-grafted nanoparticles: their nanocomposites and characterization2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocomposites (NCs) have been widely studied in the past decades due to the promising properties that nanoparticles (NPs) offer to a polymer matrix, such as increased thermal stability and non-linear electrical resistivity. It has also been shown that the interphase between the two components is the key to achieving the desired improvements. In addition, polymer matrices are often hydrophobic while NPs are generally hydrophilic, leading to NP aggregation. To overcome these challenges, NPs can be surface-modified by adding specific molecules and polymers. In the present work, a range of organic and inorganic NPs have been surface-modified with polymers synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) or surface-initiated ATRP (SI-ATRP).Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) are highly crystalline NPs that can potentially increase the Young’s modulus of the NC. In this study, a matrix-free NC was prepared by physisorption of a block-copolymer containing a positively charged (quaternized poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate), qPDMAEMA) and a thermo-responsive (poly di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate, PDEGMA). The modified CNF exhibited a thermo-responsive, reversible behavior. CNCs were polymer-modified either via SI-ATRP or physisorbed with poly (butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) to improve the dispersion and interphase between them and a polycaprolactone (PCL) matrix during extrusion. The mechanical properties of the NCs containing CNC modified via SI-ATRP were superior to the reference and unmodified materials, even at a high relative humidity.Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) are interesting for electrical and electronic applications. However, the matrices used for these applications, such as poly(ethylene-co-butyl acrylate) (EBA) and low density polyethylene (LDPE) are mainly hydrophobic, while the NPs are hydrophilic. rGO was modified via SI-ATRP using different chain lengths of PBMA and subsequently mixed with an EBA matrix. Al2O3 was modified with two lengths of poly(lauryl methacrylate) (PLMA), and added to LDPE prior to extrusion. Agglomeration and dispersion of the NCs were dependent on the lengths and miscibilities of the grafted polymers and the matrices. rGO-EBA NCs showed non-linear direct current (DC) resistivity upon modification, as the NP dispersion improved with increasing PBMA length. Al2O3-LDPE systems improved the mechanical properties of the NCs when low amounts of NPs (0.5 to 1 wt%) were added, while decreasing power dissipation on the material.Finally, PLMA-grafted NPs with high polymer quantities and two grafting densities in Al2O3 and silicon oxide (SiO2) nanoparticles were synthesized by de-attaching some of the silane groups from the surfaces, either by hydrolysis or by a mild tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF) cleavage. These compounds were characterized and compared to the bulk PLMA, and were found to have very interesting thermal properties.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-04-24 14:42
  • 3.
    Cobo Sanchez, Carmen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Karlsson, Mattias
    Wåhlander, Martin
    Hillborg, Henrik
    Malmström, Eva
    Nilsson, Fritjof
    Characterization of Reduced and Surface-modified Graphene Oxide in EBA Composites for Electrical ApplicationsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    The full text will be freely available from 2020-04-24 14:13
  • 4.
    Cobo Sanchez, Carmen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Matrix-free Nanocomposites based on Poly(lauryl methacrylate)-Grafted Nanoparticles: Effect of Graft Length and Grafting DensityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    The full text will be freely available from 2020-04-24 14:17
  • 5.
    Engström, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Hatton, Fiona
    Loughborough Univ, Dept Mat, Loughborough, Leics, England..
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Freire, Carmen
    Univ Aveiro, Aveiro Inst Mat, Aveiro, Portugal..
    Vilela, Carla
    Univ Aveiro, Aveiro Inst Mat, Aveiro, Portugal..
    Boujemaoui, Assya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Sanchez, Carmen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Lo Re, Giada
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    D'Agosto, Franck
    UCBL, CPE Lyon, C2P2, CNRS,CPE, Bat 308F, Villeurbanne, France..
    Lansalot, Muriel
    UCBL, CPE Lyon, C2P2, CNRS,CPE, Bat 308F, Villeurbanne, France..
    Carlmark, Anna
    RISE, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Tailored PISA-latexes for modification of nanocellulosics: Investigating compatibilizing and plasticizing effects2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Engström, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hatton, Fiona
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Chem, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Boujemaoui, Assya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Sanchez, Carmen Cobo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    D'Agosto, Franck
    C2P2 CNRS CPE UCBL, CPE Lyon, Bat 308F, Villeurbanne, France..
    Lansalot, Muriel
    C2P2 CNRS CPE UCBL, CPE Lyon, Bat 308F, Villeurbanne, France..
    Fogelstrom, Linda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. RISE Res Inst Sweden Div Bioecon, Nanocellulose, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tailored nano-latexes for modification of nanocelluloses: Compatibilizing and plasticizing effects2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Kaldéus, Tahani
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Leggieri, Maria Rosella Telaretti
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Sanchez, Carmen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    All-Aqueous SI-ARGET ATRP from Cellulose Nanofibrils Using Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Monomers2019In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 1937-1943Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An all-water-based procedure for "controlled" polymer grafting from cellulose nanofibrils is reported. Polymers and copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (POEGMA) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were synthesized by surface-initiated activators regenerated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ARGET ATRP) from the cellulose nanofibril (CNF) surface in water. A macroinitiator was electrostatically immobilized to the CNF surface, and its amphiphilic nature enabled polymerizations of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic monomers in water. The electrostatic interactions between the macroinitiator and the CNF surface were studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation energy (QCM-D) and showed the formation of a rigid adsorbed layer, which did not desorb upon washing, corroborating the anticipated electrostatic interactions. Polymerizations were conducted from dispersed modified CNFs as well as from preformed modified CNF aerogels soaked in water. The polymerizations yielded matrix-free composite materials with a CNF content of approximately 1-2 and 3-6 wt % for dispersion-initiated and aerogel-initiated CNFs, respectively.

  • 8.
    Larsson, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Cobo Sanchez, Carmen
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Karabulut, Erdem
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Modification of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) with thermo-responsive block copolymers2013In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 245Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Larsson, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cobo Sanchez, Carmen
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Porsch, Christian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Karabulut, Erdem
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Thermo-responsive nanofibrillated cellulose by polyelectrolyte adsorption2013In: European Polymer Journal, ISSN 0014-3057, E-ISSN 1873-1945, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 2689-2696Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, thermo-responsive nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) has been produced by the adsorption of thermo-responsive polyelectrolytes to the NFC. Three block copolymers were synthesized in which the polyelectrolyte block was composed of quaternized poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (qPDMAEMA) and the thermo-responsive block was composed of poly(di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (PDEGMA). The block copolymers were synthesized employing atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and the PDMAEMA block was utilized as a macroinitiator for the polymerizations of PDEGMA. The length and charge of the PDMAEMA block were kept constant in all three block copolymers, while three different molecular weights of the PDEGMA block was synthesized. The PDMAEMA block was quaternized to introduce positive charges and the block copolymers were subsequently adsorbed onto the negatively charged NFC that was dispersed in water. The lower critical solution temperatures (LCSTs) of the free block copolymers in solution were analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The composites were analyzed by QCM-D, FT-IR and TGA, which clearly showed an adsorption of the block copolymer onto the NFC. The grafted NFC showed a thermo-responsive behavior in solution upon heating and cooling, thus supporting that the properties of the polyelectrolyte can be transferred to the cellulose. By this methodology, thermo-responsive NFC materials can be produced in a straight-forward manner in water dispersions, without performing any chemical reactions on the NFC.

  • 10.
    Liu, Dongming
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Pourrahimi, Amir Masoud
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Pallon, Love K. H.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Sanchez, Carmen Cobo
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Olsson, Richard T.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Gedde, Ulf W.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Interactions between a phenolic antioxidant, moisture, peroxide and crosslinking by-products with metal oxide nanoparticles in branched polyethylene2016In: Polymer degradation and stability, ISSN 0141-3910, E-ISSN 1873-2321, Vol. 125, p. 21-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyethylene composites based on metal oxide nanoparticles are emerging materials for use in the insulation of extruded HVDC cables. The short-term electrical performance of these materials is adequate, but their stability for extended service needs to be assessed. This study is focussed on the capacity of the nanoparticles to adsorb polar species (water, dicumyl peroxide and byproducts from peroxide-vulcanisation, acetophenone and cumyl alcohol) that have an impact on the electrical conductivity of nanocomposites, the oxidative stability by adsorption of phenolic antioxidants on the nanoparticles and the potential transfer of catalytic impurities from the nanoparticles to the polymer. The adsorption of water, dicumyl peroxide, acetophenone, cumyl alcohol and Irganox 1076 (phenolic antioxidant) on pristine and coated (hydrophobic silanes and poly(lauryl methacrylate)) Al2O3, MgO and ZnO particles ranging from 25 nm to 2 gm was assessed. Composites based on low-density polyethylene and the particles mentioned (<= 12 wt.%) were prepared, the degree of adsorption of Irganox 1076 onto the particles was assessed by OIT measurements, and the release of volatile species at elevated temperature was assessed by TG. The concentration of moisture adsorbed on the particles at 25 degrees C increased linearly with both increasing hydroxyl group concentration on the particle surfaces and increasing relative humidity. Dicumyl peroxide showed no adsorption on any of the nanoparticles. Acetophenone and cumyl alcohol showed a linear increase in adsorption with increasing concentration of hydroxyl groups, but the quantities were much smaller than those of water. Irganox 1076 adsorbed only onto the uncoated nanoparticles. Uncoated ZnO nanoparticles that contained ionic species promoted radical formation and a lowering of the OIT. This study showed that carefully coated pure metal oxide nano particles are not likely to adsorb phenolic antioxidants or dicumyl peroxide, but that they have the capacity to adsorb moisture and polar byproducts from peroxide vulcanisation, and that they will not introduce destabilizing ionic species into the polymer matrix. Low contents of dry, equiaxed ZnO and MgO particles strongly retarded the release of volatile species at temperatures above 300 degrees C.

  • 11.
    Malmström, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hillborg, Henrik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Sanchez, Carmen
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wåhlander, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Polymer-grafted nanoparticles in nanocomposites for tailoring dielectric properties2017In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 254Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Sanchez, Carmen Cobo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wåhlander, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Taylor, Nathaniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Novel Nanocomposites of Poly(lauryl methacrylate)-Grafted Al2O3 Nanoparticles in LDPE2015In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 7, no 46, p. 25669-25678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aluminum oxide nanoparticles (NPs) were surface-modified by poly(lauryl methacrylate) (PLMA) using surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of lauryl methacrylate. Nanocomposites were obtained by mixing the grafted NPs in a low-density polyethylene (LDPE) matrix in different ratios. First, the NPs were silanized with different aminosilanes, (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, and 3-aminopropyl(diethoxy)methylsilane (APDMS). Subsequently, a-BiB, an initiator for SI-ATRP, was attached to the amino groups, showing higher immobilization ratios for APDMS and confirming that fewer self-condensation reactions between silanes took place. In a third step SI-ATRP of LMA at different times was performed to render PLMA-grafted NPs (NP-PLMAs), showing good control of the polymerization. Reactions were conducted for 20 to 60 min, obtaining a range of molecular weights between 23?000 and 83?000 g/mol, as confirmed by size-exclusion chromoatography of the cleaved grafts. Nanocomposites of NP-PLMAs at low loadings in LDPE were prepared by extrusion. At low loadings, 0.5 wt % of inorganic content, the second yield point, storage, and loss moduli increased significantly, suggesting an improved interphase as an effect of the PLMA grafts. These observations were also confirmed by an increase in transparency of the nanocomposite films. At higher loadings, 1 wt % of inorganics, the increasing amount of PLMA gave rise to the formation of small aggregates, which may explain the loss of mechanical properties. Finally, dielectric measurements were performed, showing a decrease in tan d values for LDPE-NP-PLMAs, as compared to the nanocomposites containing unmodified NP, thus indicating an improved interphase between the NPs and LDPE.

  • 13.
    Sanchez, Carmen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wåhlander, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Karlsson, Mattias E.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Quintero, Diana C. Marin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Hillborg, Henrik
    ABB Power Technol, SE-72178 Vasteras, Sweden..
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Nilsson, Fritjof
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Characterization of Reduced and Surface-Modified Graphene Oxide in Poly(Ethylene-co-Butyl Acrylate) Composites for Electrical Applications2019In: Polymers, ISSN 2073-4360, E-ISSN 2073-4360, Vol. 11, no 4, article id 740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Promising electrical field grading materials (FGMs) for high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) applications have been designed by dispersing reduced graphene oxide (rGO) grafted with relatively short chains of poly (n-butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) in a poly(ethylene-co-butyl acrylate) (EBA) matrix. All rGO-PBMA composites with a filler fraction above 3 vol.% exhibited a distinct non-linear resistivity with increasing electric field; and it was confirmed that the resistivity could be tailored by changing the PBMA graft length or the rGO filler fraction. A combined image analysis- and Monte-Carlo simulation strategy revealed that the addition of PBMA grafts improved the enthalpic solubility of rGO in EBA; resulting in improved particle dispersion and more controlled flake-to-flake distances. The addition of rGO and rGO-PBMAs increased the modulus of the materials up to 200% and the strain did not vary significantly as compared to that of the reference matrix for the rGO-PBMA-2 vol.% composites; indicating that the interphase between the rGO and EBA was subsequently improved. The new composites have comparable electrical properties as today's commercial FGMs; but are lighter and less brittle due to a lower filler fraction of semi-conductive particles (3 vol.% instead of 30-40 vol.%).

  • 14.
    Wåhlander, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Nilsson, Fritjof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Andersson, Richard L.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Cobo Sanchez, Carmen
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Taylor, Nathaniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Hillborg, Henrik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials. ABB AB.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Tailoring Dielectric Properties using Designed Polymer-Grafted ZnO Nanoparticles in Silicone Rubber2017In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 5, p. 14241-14258, article id C6TA11237DArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer grafts were used to tailor the interphases between ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) and silicone matrices. The final electrical properties of the nanocomposites were tuned by the grafted interphases, by controlling the inter-particle distance and the NP-morphology. The nanocomposites can be used in electrical applications where control of the resistivity is desired. Hansen's solubility parameters were used to select a semi-compatible polymer for grafting to obtain anisotropic NP morphologies in silicone, and the grafted NPs self-assembled into various morphologies inside the silicone matrices. The morphologies in the semi-compatible nanocomposites could be tuned by steering the graft length of poly(n-butyl methacrylate) via entropic matrix-graft wetting using surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization. Image analysis models were developed to calculate the radius of primary NPs, the fraction of aggregates, the dispersion, and the face-to-face distance of NPs. The dielectric properties of the nanocomposites were related to the morphology and the face-to-face distance of the NPs. The dielectric losses, above 100 Hz, for nanocomposites with grafted NPs were approximately one decade lower than those of pristine NPs. The isotropic nanocomposites increased the resistivity up to 100 times compared to that of neat silicone rubber, due to the trapping of charge carriers by the interphase of dispersed NPs and nanoclusters. On the other hand, the resistivity of anisotropic nanocomposites decreased 10–100 times when the inter-particle distance in continuous agglomerates was close to the hopping distance of charge carriers. The electrical breakdown strength increased for compatible isotropic nanocomposites, and the temperature dependence of the resistivity and the activation energy were ∼50% lower in the nanocomposites with grafted NPs. These flexible dielectric nanocomposites are promising candidates for low-loss high-voltage transmission cable accessories, mobile electronic devices, wearables and sensors.

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Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf