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  • 1.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Lindström, Göran
    Uppsala University.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University.
    Dahlin, Peter
    Jönköping University.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, Integrerad produktutveckling.
    Lage Hellman, Jens
    Chalmers.
    Olofsson, Christer
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Olsson, Annika
    Lund University.
    Olsson, Magnus
    Lund University.
    Svengren Holm, Lisbeth
    Lund University.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, Integrerad produktutveckling.
    Skapa kundnärvaro i innovationsprocessen2008In: Innovationsförmåga / [ed] Annika Olsson, Malmö: Holmbergs i Malmö AB , 2008, p. 40-59Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Lindström, Göran
    Uppsala University.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University.
    Dahlin, Peter
    Jönköping University.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lage Hellman, Jens
    Chalmers.
    Olofsson, Christer
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Olsson, Annika
    Lund University.
    Olsson, Magnus
    Lund University.
    Svengren Holm, Lisbeth
    Lund University.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Skapa kundnärvaro i innovationsprocessen2008In: Innovationsförmåga / [ed] Annika Olsson, Malmö: Holmbergs i Malmö AB , 2008, p. 40-59Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Gutiérres, Ernesto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Project Portfolio Management: research for improving practice2009Report (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Gutiérrez, Ernesto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Designing work procedures for project portfolio management2008In: PROCEEDINGS OF NORDDESIGN 2008 / [ed] Roosimolder, L., TALLINN UNIV TECH , 2008, p. 285-294Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Project Portfolio Management (PPM) is about how companies evaluate, select and prioritize ideas and projects for developing new products. This is aimed to align development investments with company's strategic goals and to reduce the risk caused by uncertainty. Research regarding the procedural aspects of PPM is still considered not enough developed. It is needed a better theoretical ground about which organizational processes should be included in PPM, how they influence each other, and how a work procedure should be designed for suiting a specific company. This paper focuses on understanding the characteristics of processes and activities within PPM. It is grounded on an empirical study in three companies based on qualitative research inter-views. It was found that that processes within PPM have five main characteristics: reciprocal influence, parallel running, network of actors, multiple decision levels and decision-realization gap. It is also discussed the implications of these findings for the design of work procedures for PPM.

  • 5.
    Gutiérrez, Ernesto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innovation and decision making: understanding selection and prioritization of development projects2008In: 2008 IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MANAGEMENT OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY, VOLS 1-3, IEEE , 2008, p. 333-338Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the problems decision makers experience when selecting and prioritizing new ideas and development projects. It is based on an explorative study, with interviews carried out in three companies that have new product development as a core competitive factor.

    The findings indicate that to deal with all the situations and problems that may arise in the innovation process, various approaches for making decisions and understanding innovation are needed. However, regardless of the appropriateness of these approaches for given circumstances, they receive different levels of acceptance at an organizational plane. This puts decision makers in the conflictive situation of sometimes having to use approaches to work that are appropriate but not accepted, and other times accepted but inappropriate. Furthermore, an organization's potential to create new products, and consequently its future competitiveness, depends on how its members deal with the organizational acceptance of the approaches used.

    We discuss the implications of these findings for designing work procedures for selecting and prioritizing ideas and projects.

  • 6.
    Hagman, J.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Stier, J. J.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    New vehicle buyers that are Battery Electric Vehicle Compatible (BEV-C)2016In: EVS 2016 - 29th International Electric Vehicle Symposium, Electric Vehicle Symposium and Exhibition , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aim to identify and investigate a group of potential adopters that are compatible with Battery Electric Vehicles (BEV) in terms of range and charging, a group labeled as BEV Compatible (BEV-C). The results reveal that the BEV-C group constitutes 14 % of new vehicle buyers and that their intention to adopt BEVs are stronger compared to the non BEV-C group. The BEV-C group can be characterized as individuals that are less likely to conduct occasional longer drives (over 150 km), perceive BEVs more positively, have higher environmental awareness and have been exposed to more BEV information compared to the non BEV-C group.

  • 7.
    Hagman, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Total Cost of Ownership paradox and its implications for Electric Vehicle diffusion2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Hagman, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Total cost of ownership and its potential implications for battery electric vehicle diffusion2016In: Research in Transportation Business and Management (RTBM), ISSN 2210-5395, E-ISSN 2210-5409, Vol. 18, p. 11-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) have been slow to diffuse on the international as well as the Swedish market. Previous studies have indicated situational factors such as economic factors, size and performance to be of major importance for vehicle purchasers in their choice of vehicle. In this paper, the authors explore a consumer centric total cost of ownership (TCO) model to investigate the possible discrepancy between purchase price and the TCO between internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs), hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and BEVs. The creation and testing of the TCO model reveals that computation could be a challenging task for consumers due to bounded access of relevant data and the prediction of future conditions. The application of the model to the vehicle sample found that BEVs could be cheaper compared to ICEVs and HEVs. The findings in this paper could prove to be of importance for policy and marketing alike in designing the most appropriate business models and information campaigns based on consumer conditions in order to further promoting the diffusion of BEVs in society.

  • 9.
    Hagman, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Stier, Jenny J.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Total cost of ownership and its potential implications for electric vehicle diffusion2014In: Proceedings of NordDesign 2014 Conference, NordDesign 2014, Aalto University , 2014, p. 366-375Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Battery Electric Vehicles have been slow to diffuse on the international as well as the Swedish market. Existing literature have pointed to situational factors such as economical factors, size and performance to be of high importance for car purchasers in their choice of car. In this paper the authors investigates the apparent discrepancy between purchase price and the Total Cost of Ownership between Internal Combustion Engine Vehicles and Battery Electric Vehicles. The Total Cost of Ownership computation reveals that Battery Electric Vehicles can be cost competitive with Internal Combustion Engine Vehicles, a significant finding that could prove to be of importance for the diffusion of Battery Electric Vehicles, although further studies are needed to test car purchasers' knowledge regarding the Total Cost of Ownership analysis.

  • 10.
    Janhager, Jenny
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Linköping University University.
    An Approach to Design for Use2001In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Engineering Design, 2001, p. 315-322Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Classification of Users: due to their Relation to the Product2003In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Hierarchical Decomposition of Technical Functions and User Actions2003In: Proceedings of the 2003 ASME Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Janhager, Jenny
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Linköping University.
    Procedure for Design of Products with Consideration to User Interactions: Theory and Applications2002Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    User Consideration in Early Stages of Product Development: Theories and Methods2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional design theories have focused on technical functions and more or less disregard a product’s user involvement. The existing methods of ergonomic designare mostly intended for analysis activities. There is a need for new dynamic methods that focus on user-product interactions. The aim of this research work is to develop design methods for user-product interactions, which should support synthesis activities in early product development phases.

    An observation study and a questionnaire survey were carried out in order to investigate product developers’ work and relation to the users for providing background information about the research problem. Furthermore, student projects in product development were followed, giving essential input. After the theories and

    methods were developed, a retrospective interview study was carried out in order to confirm the need for the developed methods. The studies showed, for instance, that companies use few formal methods and almost none of these are directed towards the user. It is also indicated that the product developers’ contact with users decreases with increasing company size. Few companies have a defined procedure for defining their intended users.

    Six methods are developed. They embrace three ways of classifying the users and their relations to products and other users (User identification, Use profile and User relations), an analysis of the users’ Activities, goals and motives behind their use of the product, a scenario technique (User-technical process scenario, UTPS), which shows the user process in parallel with the technical process, and a hierarchical decomposition of technical functions and user actions, which is named the Functionaction tree (FAT).

    All the methods, apart from FAT, were tested in real product development teams. All the tested methods stimulate communication between the group members of various competencies in the design group. Most of the methods are easy to apply and are valuable for understanding the design problem. The UTPS is also useful for comparing design solutions and generates new ideas about the design task. The other

    tested methods did not generate many new ideas, but the reason is probably that they were mainly tested on products that are already on the market. Thus, the methods are most valuable in the early design stages, when trying out a product idea or a concept.

  • 15.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Utilization of Scenario Building in the Technical Process2003In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Janhager, Jenny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Abdullah, Maizura Ailin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University.
    Enhancing the prospects for entering emerging markets via business networks2010In: Proceedings of the XXI ISPIM Conference / [ed] Huizingh, Torkkeli, Conn, Bitran, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple factors affect a company’s ability to enter a foreign market. Despite the challenges faced by SMEs, it is suggested that emerging markets (EM) possess high investment potential, thus should seriously be considered as new markets for Swedish environmental technology companies. Researchers within the field of internationalization activities suggest that psychic distance and experiential learning heavily affect market selection. This paper is based upon a case study of four companies that unite in a joint venture with the purpose of developing and constructing a complete plant in an EM based on a radical technology innovation. Of importance to the network partners is the knowledge shared between them for the purpose of successful commercialization, and also knowledge that enhances the prospects for companies to consider EM for their business.

  • 17.
    Janhager, Jenny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hagman, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Exploration of User-Technical Process Scenario Technique in Practice2007In: Proceedings of ICED 2007, the 16th International Conference on Engineering Design, 2007, p. 1-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the research described in this paper is to investigate a scenario technique based on a user-technical process. This means that the scenario is built with the aid of three processes in parallel: the mental activities of the user, the user actions and the technical functions. Four product development teams have tested the technique on products that were under development. The results from the explorations have shown that the technique assists in understanding design problems, prompts discussion within the group, presents no great problems in usage, elicits new thoughts about the design problem and serves a useful purpose in comparing different product concepts with each other.

  • 18.
    Janhager, Jenny
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Hagman, Lars Arne
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Approaches for the Identification of Users and their Relations to the Product2004In: Proceedings of the TMCE2004: The Fifth International Symposium on Tools and Methods of Competitive Engineering, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Janhager, Jenny
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Hagman, Lars Arne
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    User-Technical Process Supporting Scenario Building2004In: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Janhager, Jenny
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Högberg, Dan
    Product Developers’ Relations to their Users: an Interview Study2004In: PROCEEDINGS OF NORDDESIGN 2004: PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT IN CHANGING ENVIRONMENT / [ed] Lehtonen, T, TAMPERE: TAMPERE UNIV TECH PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY , 2004, p. 278-288Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this interview study is to investigate how people involved in product development communicate and work with the users. Four companies from two different branches have been investigated, in order to investigate differences. Two of the companies develop hand tools for professional use and the other two develop durable consumer products. Three people from each company have been interviewed: a design engineer, a market representative or a market manager and a product development manager. The result shows that none of the investigated companies have a defined and documented procedure for describing their intended end users. The two companies that develop consumer products have descriptions of their market segment. The companies that develop hand tools for professional use are more directed to the end user than for example the sales companies and its product developers have a closer direct contact with the users than the developers of consumer products. For the developers of the consumer products it is instead more vital that they also consider the distributors and sellers. The knowledge and use of product development methods for consideration of user aspects, is rather low. None of the companies use formal methods to analyse and generate new ideas about the user or the use situation.

  • 21.
    Janhager, Jenny
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Linköping University.
    Persson, Sara
    Chalmers.
    Warell, Anders
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Linköping University.
    Survey on Product Development Methods, Design Competencies, and Communication in Swedish Industry2002In: Tools and methods of competitive engineering / [ed] Imre Horváth, Peigen Li, Joris S.M. Vergeest, Huazhong University of Science and Technology printing House , 2002, , p. 18p. 189-199Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Challenges in Concept Decisions in Complex Product Development2008In: Proceedings of 15th International Product Development Management Conference, IPDMC, EIASM, June 29 - July 1, Hamburg, Germany, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    DEPENDENCIES IN CONCEPT DECISIONS IN COMPLEX PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT2008In: 10TH INTERNATIONAL DESIGN CONFERENCE - DESIGN 2008 / [ed] Marjanovic D; Storga M; Pavkovic N; Bojcetic N, 2008, no 48, p. 1159-1166Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents results from a retrospective case study in the automotive industry with the purpose to identify dependencies in product concept decisions taking into consideration social aspects, decision structures and technology. Interviews and document reviews, such as gate reports and design reviews, formed the empirical base. The company in question has a documented and mandatory product development process with defined instructions, process maps and a basic chain of command. In spite of the operational support, the company still suffers from a certain amount of rework based on incorrect concept decisions. Results from the empirical study show how both formal and informal factors did affect the concept decision in the studied case.

  • 24.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Navigating in uncertainty: identifying dependence factors in concept decision makingIn: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Gutiérrez, Ernesto
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Probe: managing the project portfolio for competitive advantage2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Sopjani, Liridona
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. humanexperience.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Aligning private and public domains for sustainable disruptive innovation2016In: Proceedings og 17th International CINet Conference / [ed] Dr. Paolo Neirotti, Turin, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the constellation of various actors from private and public

    sectors represented by three companies, a municipality, a non-profit

    organization, a research lab and users to collaborate on bringing forward a

    sustainability driven disruptive innovation. The purpose of the paper is to

    investigate how the various actors’ interests and contributions influence the

    management of the collaboration setup and what barriers and enablers boost or

    impede the outcome of the setup, i.e. deploying an innovation with sustainability

    promise. We argue that the alignment of diverse actors’ interests and aims for

    the innovation in collaborative settings is crucial for the collaboration to lead to

    desirable outcomes. However, only alignment at an abstract level cannot ensure

    success even when actors bring competencies that balance the innovation

    requirements. Rather, creating cohesion and commitment of all actors

    simultaneously at a concrete level is necessary. The integration of new

    approaches to collaboration such as design methods may strengthen

    commitment despite actors coming from different organizational cultures and

    traditions.

  • 27.
    Sopjani, Liridona
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. humanexperience.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Co-creation with diverse actors for sustainability innovation2017In: Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED17), Vol. 8: Human Behaviour in Design, Vancouver, Canada, 21.-25.08.2017 / [ed] Anja Maier, Stanko Škec, Harrison Kim, Michael Kokkolaras, Josef Oehmen, Georges Fadel, Filippo Salustri, Mike Van der Loos, Vancouver, 2017, Vol. 8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability driven innovations differ from current established technologies imposing new

    requirements on users and often interdependent with other actors’ changes. Strategic Niche Management

    (SNM) stresses interactions between actors through niches i.e. protected spaces for experimentation to

    support innovation. However, it is unclear what activities are necessary when different actors are

    involved in developing and diffusing sustainability innovation. This paper aims at identifying activities

    crucial for sustainability innovation in an implemented mobility project. The results show that cocreation

    through iterations and reflections by combinations of diverse actors and users can be considered

    a core process for sustainability innovation. Six activities are identified as critical: matching the

    interdependencies by combining the actors’ diverse competences and resources; facilitating to steer the

    group of actors into actions; engaging users at early stages of innovation; trying to drive change by

    offering the users an opportunity; co-creating through a multitude of actors with the development and

    usage simultaneously; steering and facilitating to enable co-creation.

  • 28.
    Sopjani, Liridona
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    User involvement in disruptive innovation – A study on users of a light electric vehicle sharing system2016In: Proceedings of 23rd Innovation and Product Development Management Conference / [ed] Nuran ACUR, Glasgow, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the extent to which user involvement in disruptive innovation

    influences the users in terms of their experiences when exposed to such innovation for

    a period of time. The study is conducted in an on-going research project undertaken in

    collaboration with academia and private stakeholders, which is developing and

    implementing a product-service system for light electric vehicles. This solution is

    environmentally driven and new in two ways: it integrates a different type of vehicle

    and introduces a new service concept i.e. the caretaker concept. The users are studied

    while they interact with the innovation in their own environments, where emphasis

    has been placed on the experiences of these users when disruptive innovations as such

    are introduced into their everyday life. Data from the first seven users (caretakers)

    were collected through a survey and semi-structured interviews over two periods of

    time, from which early user characteristics are presented and user experiences when

    deploying disruptive innovations, as well as enablers and barriers for integrating these

    into daily life. As disruptive innovations tend to redefine or restructure market

    trajectories to some extent, understanding these user segments and their experienced

    enablers and barriers may facilitate the creation of better strategies on how to make

    these innovations more desirable for society at large. Findings suggest that user

    involvement positively influences users experiences toward adapting to new ideas

    with regards to mobility.

  • 29.
    Sopjani, Sanije
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Georén, Peter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Involving users and user roles in the transition to sustainable mobility systems: The case of light electric vehicle sharing in Sweden2019In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 71, p. 207-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-carbon mobility alternatives, such as shared services integrating light electric vehicles, support transitions to sustainable transport systems. However, new products and services are not enough, as changes must also incorporate the practices of travelling, infrastructure, and mobility cultures in which users of mobility solutions are core stakeholders. This paper argues that userinvolvement is necessary in sustainable innovation processes but that the expected diversity of user roles and their involvement can also lead to contrasting outcomes for sustainable innovation transitions. Guided by theory in user involvement, this study investigated users and nonusers of light electric vehicles in a sharing mobility service system set up as living lab in two large workplaces in Sweden. Fifty-one interviews with employees at the workplaces were conducted during the implementation process and analysed combined with a questionnaire and data from system tracking through sensor technology. The paper finds that both users and non-users are co-creators in building momentum for sustainable mobility alternatives and provides a spectrum of user roles with defined characteristics. Four roles are distinguished within this spectrum: vigilant users, passive collaborators, active decision makers and ambassadors. We suggest that a convergent activation strategy is deployed for involving a full spectrum of users in order to capture their insights in ways that positively affect transition. Such a strategy addresses users and non-users as part of decision-making concerning alternatives and cultivates a culture of user collaboration, while also enabling a plurality of contributions in order to challenge existing regimes and established practices among individuals

  • 30.
    Wadell, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Early Stages User Involvement as a Product Innovation Capability in the Medical Technology Industry: A Literature Study2010In: Proceedings of the 11th International Design Conference DESIGN 2010 / [ed] Marjanovic D., Storga M., Pavkovic N., Bojcetic N., 2010, p. 1219-1228Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is presents a literature study related to user involvement in the early stages of the product innovation process in the medical technology industry. Five fundamental capabilities in early stages user involvement are presented and reasoned about. The capabilities are identification of users, acquiring, assimilation, and transformation of user knowledge as well as exploiting. The result of the article contributes to future research in an action research project with the medical technology industry and the public healthcare sector in Sweden.

  • 31.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University.
    Managing Innovation Processes for a Business-Driven Collaborative Network to Export Total Technical Solutions2008In: Proceedings of the 1st ISPIM Innovation Symposium: Managing Innovation in a Connected World, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a large need of environmental solutions at developing countries, where a network of small firms, e.g. in Sweden, have much opportunity for their business. This paper discusses, from both theoretical and from practical aspects, the high degree of complexity that needs to be managed when small firms export environmental-technology innovation to emerging markets. Especially, it deals with how a network of firms should manage its innovation processes. Based on the review of some 50 literature, the paper explains the methodologies adopted in an on-going project to study these issues. Discussions include differences with development of an integration of products/services within a single firm.

1 - 31 of 31
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