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  • 1. Colwill, Karen
    et al.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Schwenk, Jochen M
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ottosson Takanen, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Gräslund, Susanne
    et, al.
    A roadmap to generate renewable protein binders to the human proteome2011In: Nature Methods, ISSN 1548-7091, E-ISSN 1548-7105, Vol. 8, no 7, p. 551-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the wealth of commercially available antibodies to human proteins, research is often hindered by their inconsistent validation, their poor performance and the inadequate coverage of the proteome. These issues could be addressed by systematic, genome-wide efforts to generate and validate renewable protein binders. We report a multicenter study to assess the potential of hybridoma and phage-display technologies in a coordinated large-scale antibody generation and validation effort. We produced over 1,000 antibodies targeting 20 SH2 domain proteins and evaluated them for potency and specificity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), protein microarray and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). We also tested selected antibodies in immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. Our results show that high-affinity, high-specificity renewable antibodies generated by different technologies can be produced quickly and efficiently. We believe that this work serves as a foundation and template for future larger-scale studies to create renewable protein binders.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Agaton, Charlotta
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Kånge, Rikard
    Sundberg, Marten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Ek, Bo
    Uhlen, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Gustafsson, Magnus
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Microfluidic analysis of antibody specificity in a compact disk format2006In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 1568-1574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new and flexible technology for high throughput analysis of antibody specificity and affinity is presented. The method is based on microfluidics and takes advantage of compact disks (CDs) in which the centrifugal force moves fluids through microstructures containing immobilized metal affinity chromatography columns. Analyses are performed as a sandwich assay, where antigen is captured to the column via a genetically attached His(6)-tag. The antibodies to be analyzed are applied onto the columns. Thereafter, fluorescently labeled secondary antibodies recognize the bound primary antibodies, and detection is carried out by laser-induced fluorescence. The CDs contain 104 microstructures enabling analysis of antibodies against more than 100 different proteins using a single CD. Importantly, through the three- dimensional visualization of the binding patterns in a column it is possible to separate high affinity from low affinity binding. The method presented here is shown to be very sensitive, flexible and reproducible.

  • 3.
    Gantelius, Jesper
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Nano Biotechnology (closed 20130101).
    Bass, Tarek
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology (closed 20130101).
    Gundberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Andersson-Svahn, Helene
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Nano Biotechnology (closed 20130101).
    A ten-minute high density lateral flow protein microarray assay2011In: 15th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences 2011: (MicroTAS 2011), 2011, p. 1176-1178Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein microarrays are useful tools for highly multiplexed determination of presence or levels of clinically relevant biomarkers in human tissues and biofluids. However, such tools have thus far been restricted to laboratory environments. Here, we present a novel 384-plexed easy to use lateral flow protein microarray device capable of sensitive (<50ng/ml) determination of antigen specific antibodies in less than ten minutes total assay time. Results were developed with gold nanobeads and could be recorded by a cell-phone camera or table top scanner. Excellent accuracy (AUC=99.4%) was achieved in comparison with an established glass microarray assay for 26 antigen-specific antibodies.

  • 4. Janzi, M.
    et al.
    Ödling, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology.
    Pan-Hammarstrom, Q.
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology.
    Hammarstrom, L.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology.
    Serum microarrays for large scale screening of protein levels2005In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 1942-1947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a great need for comprehensive proteomic analysis of large patient cohorts of plasma and serum samples to identify biomarkers of human diseases. Here we describe a new antibody-based proteomic approach involving a reverse array format where serum samples are spotted on a microarray. This enables all samples to be screened for their content of a certain serum protein in a single experiment using target-recognizing antibodies and fluorescently labeled secondary antibodies. The procedure is illustrated with the analysis of the IgA levels in 2009 spotted serum samples, and the data are compared with clinical routine measurements. The results suggest that it is possible to simultaneously screen thousands of complex clinical serum samples for their content of the relative amount of specific serum proteins of clinical relevance.

  • 5.
    Lundberg, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gräslund, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Andersson-Svahn, Helene
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    A novel method for reproducible fluorescent labeling of small amounts of antibodies on solid phase2007In: JIM - Journal of Immunological Methods, ISSN 0022-1759, E-ISSN 1872-7905, Vol. 322, no 1-2, p. 40-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fluorescently labeled antibodies are very important tools in cell biology, providing for specific and quantitative detection of antigens. To date, fluorophore labeling of antibodies has been performed in solution and has been limited by low-throughput methods requiring a substantial amount of pure antibody sample at a high concentration. We have developed a novel solid-phase labeling protocol for small amounts (i.e. micrograms) of antibodies with fluorescent dyes. Protein A affinity medium was used as solid support in a micropipette tip format. This solid-phase approach, including the advantage of the strong and specific interaction between Protein A and antibodies, allows for simultaneous purification, labeling and concentration of the antibody sample, making it possible to start with unpure antibody samples at low concentrations. We have optimized the protocol with regard to reaction pH, time, temperature and amount of amine reactive dye. In addition, we have evaluated the stability and activity of the labeled antibodies. To evaluate the reproducibility and robustness of this method we labeled eight antibodies with amine reactive fluorescent dyes followed by evaluation of antibody specificity on protein arrays. Interestingly, this gave an extremely high conformity in the degree of labeling, showing the robustness of the method. The solid-phase method also gave predictable and reproducible results and by varying the amount of reactive dye, the desired degree of labeling can easily be achieved. Antibodies labeled using this solid-phase method were similar in stability and activity to antibodies labeled in solution. This novel solid-phase antibody labeling method may also be applicable for other conjugation chemistries and labels, and has potential for throughput applications.

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Larsson, Karin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Wernérus, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Ottoson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ödling, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Paavilainen, Linda
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Ann-Catrin
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wester, Kenneth
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Towards a human proteome atlas: High-throughput generation of mono-specific antibodies for tissue profiling2005In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 5, p. 4327-4337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A great need exists for the systematic generation of specific antibodies to explore the human proteome. Here, we show that antibodies specific to human proteins can be generated in a high-throughput manner involving stringent affinity purification using recombinant protein epitope signature tags (PrESTs) as immunogens and affinity-ligands. The specificity of the generated affinity reagents, here called mono-specific antibodies (msAb), were validated with a novel protein microarray assay. The success rate for 464 antibodies generated towards human proteins was more than 90% as judged by the protein array assay. The antibodies were used for parallel profiling of patient biopsies using tissue microarrays generated from 48 human tissues. Comparative analysis with well-characterized monoclonal antibodies showed identical or similar specificity and expression patterns. The results suggest that a comprehensive atlas containing extensive protein expression and subcellular localization data of the human proteome can be generated in an efficient manner with mono-specific antibodies.

  • 7.
    Rimini, Rebecca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sundberg, Marten
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    Klevebring, Daniel
    Gry, Marcus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Validation of serum protein profiles by a dual antibody array approach2009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, affinity-based technologies have become important tools for serum profiling to uncover protein expression patterns linked to disease state or therapeutic effects. In this study, we describe a path towards the production of an antibody microarray to allow protein profiling of biotinylated human serum samples with reproducible sensitivity in the picomolar range. With the availability of growing numbers of affinity reagents, protein profiles are to be validated in efficient manners and we describe a cross-platform strategy based on data concordance with a suspension bead array to interrogate the identical set of antibodies with the same cohort of serum samples. Comparative analysis enabled to screen for high-performing antibodies, which were displaying consistent results across the two platforms and targeting known serum components. Moreover, data processing methods such as sample referencing and normalization were evaluated for their effects on inter-platform agreement. Our work suggests that mutual validation of protein expression profiles using alternative microarray platforms holds great potential in becoming an important and valuable component in affinity-based high-throughput proteomic screenings as it allows to narrow down the number of discovered targets prior to orthogonal, uniplexed validation approaches.

  • 8.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lindberg, Johan
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Determination of binding specificities in highly multiplexed bead-based assays for antibody proteomics2007In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 125-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the major challenges of antibody-based proteomics is the quality assurance of the generated antibodies to ensure specificity to the target protein. Here we describe a single tube multiplex approach to simultaneously analyze the binding of antibodies to a large number of different antigens. This bead-based assay utilizes the full multiplexing capacity theoretically offered by the Luminex suspension array technology. A protocol for an increased coupling throughput for the immobilization of antigens was developed and used to set up complex and stabile 100-plex bead mixtures. The possibility of using a two-dimensional multiplexing, in terms of high numbers of both analytes and samples or as in this case antigens and antibodies, enables the specificity of 96 antibodies versus 100 different antigens to be determined in 2 h. This high throughput analysis will potentially have great impact on the possibility for the utilization of different antibody proteomics approaches where the quality assessment of antibodies is of the utmost importance.

  • 9.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Gundberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays2011In: New Biotechnology, ISSN 1871-6784, E-ISSN 1876-4347, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 555-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  • 10.
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Protein microarrays for validation of affinity binders2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Is specificity an important issue regarding affinity reagents? What about the validation of affinity reagents today, is it good enough? This depends on the application and the producer of the reagent. Validation should be the most important marketing argument that can be found.Today there is a continuous growth of both the number of affinity reagents that are produced and the different types of affinity reagents that are developed. In proteomics they become more and more important in exploring the human proteome. Therefore, validated affinity reagents should be on top of every proteomic researcher’s list. How should this be accomplished?Better international agreements on how affinity reagents should be tested to be regarded as functional reagents are needed. One of the most important issues is the specificity of the affinity reagent. An international standard for which specific validation that is needed for different kinds of applications would be very useful.In this thesis, it is shown that the protein microarray platform that was established within the HPA project at KTH is a very good tool to determine the specificity of different affinity binders.In the first study, the production of mono-specific antibodies for tissue profiling in the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) project is presented. The section describing the use of protein microarrays for validation of the antibodies is relevant for this thesis. The implementation of protein microarrays in the HPA workflow was an important addition, because a deeper insight of the specificity of all the antibodies produced were now available.In a second study, bead based arrays were compared to planar protein microarrays used in the HPA project. In this study, 100 different bead identities were coupled with 100 different antigens and mixed together to generate an array. The correlation between the two types of assays was very high and the conclusion was that the methods can be used as backup to each other.A third study was a part of an international initiative to produce renewable affinity binders against proteins containing SH2 domain. Here, the HPA protein microarrays were modified to analyze different types of reagents produced at six laboratories around the world. Monoclonal antibodies, single chain fragment and fibronectin scaffolds were tested as well as mono-specific antibodies. It was shown to be possible to adapt protein microarrays used in the HPA project to validate other kinds of affinity reagents.

  • 11.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Agaton, Charlotta
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Amini, Bahram
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Andersen, Elisabet
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Andersson, Ann-Catrin
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Angelidou, Pia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Asplund, Caroline
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Berglund, Lisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Bergström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Cerjan, Dijana
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Ekström, Marica
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Elobeid, Adila
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Eriksson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Falk, Ronny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Fall, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Forsberg, Mattias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gry Björklund, Marcus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gumbel, Kristoffer
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Halimi, Asif
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hallin, Inga
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Hamsten, Carl
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Hansson, Marianne
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hercules, Görel
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Larsson, Karin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lindskog, Mats
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lodewyckx, Wald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lund, Jan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Magnusson, Kristina
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Malm, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Ödling, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Olsson, Ingmarie
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Öster, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Ottosson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Paavilainen, Linda
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Rimini, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Runeson, Marcus
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sköllermo, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Steen, Johanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Stenvall, Maria
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sterky, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Strömberg, Sara
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Tourle, Samuel
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wahlund, Eva
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Waldén, Annelie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wan, Jinghong
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology (closed 20130101).
    Wernérus, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Westberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wester, Kenneth
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Wrethagen, Ulla
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Xu, Lan Lan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    A human protein atlas for normal and cancer tissues based on antibody proteomics2005In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 1920-1932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody-based proteomics provides a powerful approach for the functional study of the human proteome involving the systematic generation of protein-specific affinity reagents. We used this strategy to construct a comprehensive, antibody-based protein atlas for expression and localization profiles in 48 normal human tissues and 20 different cancers. Here we report a new publicly available database containing, in the first version, similar to 400,000 high resolution images corresponding to more than 700 antibodies toward human proteins. Each image has been annotated by a certified pathologist to provide a knowledge base for functional studies and to allow queries about protein profiles in normal and disease tissues. Our results suggest it should be possible to extend this analysis to the majority of all human proteins thus providing a valuable tool for medical and biological research.

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