Change search
Refine search result
1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Arvidsson, Mimmi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Dahlin, T.
    Fernlund, Joanne
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Geoelectrical imaging for aggregate quality investigations2008In: Near Surface 2008 - 14th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics, European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the aggregate industry the use of geophysical measuring is rare. The aim of this project is to investigate how geophysical instruments can be a tool in prospecting for rock quarries, and also how they can be a help in which direction they should expand in. To have control over the quality of the aggregates is important and therefore to know when the rock mass is changing is of interest for the production. Three quarries, with different properties, were investigated with different geophysical methods, of which only the result from the resistivity and IP measurement is presented here. The fracture frequency was measured as well for comparison. The depth to the bedrock is visible in the inverted resistivity sections for the three sites, and an estimation of the quantity of the till is possible to make from the 3D-inversions. It is also shown that the fracture frequency affects the resistivity of the bulk mass. The results also show that the resistivity imaging is well suited for detecting anomalies in the rock mass, which might affect the production. This is especially clear in one of the quarries where a dolerite dyke is clearly visible in the combined resistivity and IP results.

  • 2. Duarte, M.T.
    et al.
    Fernlund, Joanne
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Analysis of meso textures of geomaterials through haralick parameters2005In: PATTERN RECOGNITION AND IMAGE ANALYSIS, PT 2, PROCEEDINGS / [ed] Marques, JS; PerezdelaBlanca, N; Pina, P, 2005, Vol. 3523, p. 713-719Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The geomaterials used in this study are granites from Finland with very similar mineral composition. Visual evaluation of the rock texture is done to determine the most significant features of the patterns for the analysis of heterogeneity of meso textures are grain size and grain size spatial distribution. These are compared to results of parameters calculated using image structure analyser. Images are capture with a scanner of the polished slabs that are 9*9 cm in size. The geo textures are expressed by four main parameters: textural entropy, homogeneity, contrast and textural correlation. Reducing the number of parameters to entropy and textural correlation significantly reduce the calculation time. These two parameters are considered to be the most significant. The other two, homogeneity and contrast, can be estimated. The parameter textural correlation yields better results than does textural entropy. Comparison of the analysis of textures visually and using image analysis shows that textural parameters have to be further worked in order to have a better performance.

  • 3.
    Fernlund, Joanne M. Robison
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Tafesse, Solomon
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Magnusson, Mimmi K.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Total analysis of till using resistivity and 3D image analysisArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Fernlund, Joanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Tafesse, Solomon
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Magnusson, Mimmi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Lithological analysis of multiple size fractions of tillArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Henkel, Herbert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Puura, V.
    Flodén, T.
    Kirs, J.
    Konsa, M.
    Preeden, U.
    Lilljequist, R.
    Fernlund, Joanne
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Avike bay - a 10 km diameter possible impact structure at the Bothnian Sea coast of central Sweden.2005In: IMPACT TECTONICS / [ed] Koeberl, C; Henkel, H, 2005, p. 323-340Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Avike Bay is a 270 degrees degree wide near-circular, 114 in deep bay on the Swedish coast of the Bothnian Sea, northeast of Sundsvall. The structure has a diameter of about 10 km. It was classified as a probable impact structure because of its extraordinary circular topography in the overwiew of impact structures in Fennoscandia. Recent studies lend further support to this interpretation. The structure has a submarine central mound, which is elevated some 40 in above the adjacent sea floor. It has a very distinct tangential and radial on-shore fracture pattern as seen in the topographic map. Along the southwestern shore of the Bay, an enigmatic quartzite breccia of unknown age occurs as part of a larger outcrop of polymict breccia with clasts of crystalline rocks and quartzite of unknown age. In thin section, planar fractures can be observed in quartz and feldspar grains. A detailed investigation showed that in a few cases the quartz grains contained microdeformation features closely resembling PDFs.

  • 6.
    Magnusson, Mimmi K.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Fernlund, Joanne
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Dahlin, Torleif
    Department of Engineering Geology, Lund University.
    Geoelectrical imaging in the interpretation of geological conditions affecting quarry operations2010In: Bulletin of Engineering Geology and the Environment, ISSN 1435-9529, E-ISSN 1435-9537, Vol. 69, no 3, p. 465-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Determination of the subsurface geology is very important for the rock quarry industry. This is primarily done by drilling and mapping of the surface geology. However in Sweden the bedrock is often completely covered by Quaternary sediments making the prediction of subsurface geology quite difficult. Incorrect prediction of the rock-mass quality can lead to economic problems for the quarry. By performing geophysical measurements a more complete understanding of the subsurface geology can be determined. This study shows that by doing 2D-parallel data sampling a 3D inversion of the dataset is possible, which greatly enhances the visualization of the subsurface. Furthermore the electrical resistivity technique together with the induced polarization method proved to be very efficient in detecting fracture frequency, identification of major fracture zones, and variations in rock-mass quality all of which can affect the aggregate quality. With this technique not only the rock-mass quality is determined but also the thickness of the overburden. Implementation of geophysics can be a valuable tool for the quarry industry, resulting in substantial economic benefits.

  • 7.
    Robison Fernlund, Joanne
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    3-D image analysis size and shape method applied to the evaluation of the Los Angeles test2005In: Engineering Geology, ISSN 0013-7952, E-ISSN 1872-6917, Vol. 77, no 02-jan, p. 57-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 3-D image analysis (IA) method for size and shape determination has been used to evaluate the Los Angeles test (LA test) on granitic gneiss aggregates from the Vandle Rock Quarry north of Stockholm, Sweden. The method determines, very accurately, the 3-D size and shape of each particle in the sample. The size and shape of each particle is determined both prior and subsequent to the Los Angeles test. Thus, the size reduction and shape change of the particles is determined. Application of the image analysis method to the Los Angeles test makes it possible to evaluate the results in more detail than is possible with traditional sieve analysis. A correlation to the Los Angeles value is suggested. The method is quick, easy and extremely accurate. It can replace Sieve analysis, Flakiness index test, and Shape index test for coarse aggregate material. The 3-D image analysis method is a dynamic tool that can be used to evaluate other aggregate tests that rely on sieving for evaluation.

  • 8.
    Robison Fernlund, Joanne
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Image analysis method for determining 3-D shape of coarse aggregate2005In: Cement and Concrete Research, ISSN 0008-8846, E-ISSN 1873-3948, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 1629-1637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 3-D method for particle shape determination of coarse aggregates using image analysis, IA, is presented. It is based on the measures the axial length of all three axis of every particle in a coarse aggregate sample. Two images of the entire aggregate sample are taken, in lying and standing positions. Since the particle's intermediate axes are measured in both images they can be used to couple the shortest and longest axial dimensions for each particle. The method allows an interpretation of length/thickness, length/width and width/thickness ratios of all the particles and is thus comparable to the flakiness and shape index tests.

  • 9.
    Robison Fernlund, Joanne
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Image analysis method for determining 3-D size distribution of coarse aggregates2005In: Bulletin of Engineering Geology and the Environment, ISSN 1435-9529, E-ISSN 1435-9537, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 159-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new 3-D grain size distribution analysis method for coarse aggregates using image analysis is presented. The method is designed for a laboratory environment and requires no sieving, only imaging of the aggregate. A luminous background material eliminates unwanted shadow effects. Particles are placed so they are not touching, thus the images of the aggregates are of good quality allowing an easy and accurate image analysis with no preprocessing. All three axial lengths of every particle are measured. The results can be plotted either as a continuous curve or showing the axial size of each and every particle. The latter allows the frequency of particles in the tails to be easily evaluated. Good agreement exists between the size distribution curves obtained from the Image Analysis and hand measurements using the Danish Box.

  • 10.
    Robison Fernlund, Joanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Zimmerman, Robert W.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Influence of volume/mass on grain-size curves and conversion of image-analysis size to sieve size2007In: Engineering Geology, ISSN 0013-7952, E-ISSN 1872-6917, Vol. 90, no 04-mar, p. 124-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Image analysis of aggregates does not measure the same size as sieve analysis. The size of aggregates, determined by sieve analysis, is presented with respect to the percent cumulative mass, whereas image analysis does not measure mass. Results are often presented in percent particles or percent area. Several researchers have claimed that more accurate volume and mass determinations are necessary for accurate construction of grain-size curves. In the present work, several methods for reconstructing volume and thus mass of aggregates from image analysis (IA) have been tested to see how they influence the grain-size distribution curves. The actual mass of the individual particles was found to have little or no influence on the grain-size distribution curve, which is normalized and thus insensitive to mass. Accurate conversion of image-analysis size to sieve size is dependent upon how particles pass through sieves. Most existing methods base their conversion of image-analysis size to sieve size on the intermediate axis, multiplied by some factor. The present work shows that there is no direct correlation between the intermediate axes and sieve size. A universal conversion of image-analysis size to sieve size has been developed, using the minimum-bounding square around the minimum projected area. This measure yields very good correlation with sieve-analysis results.

  • 11.
    Tafesse, Solomon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Fernlund, Joanne
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Bergholm, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Digital sieving-Matlab based 3-D image analysis2012In: Engineering Geology, ISSN 0013-7952, E-ISSN 1872-6917, Vol. 137-138, p. 74-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new image analysis technique for determining the three-dimensional size and shape distribution of coarse particles has been developed. It entails acquiring a pair of images, one each of the maximum and minimum projected area of the particles. Glow-In-the-Dark beads were used to create luminous background, thus it is named the GID method. In this study the size and shape distribution of four coarse-grained samples, size varies from 2 to 20. cm, have been analyzed. The size distribution of the samples obtained from the GID analysis is comparable to sieve analysis results, and has an extra advantage of being applicable in the field. The algorithm was developed in Matlab; therefore users could make some optimization in the program to meet their own needs as the program code is open source.

  • 12.
    Tafesse, Solomon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Fernlund, Joanne M. Robison
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Repeatability of GID Image-analysis method for assessment size, shape and angularity of coarse particlesIn: Engineering Geology, ISSN 0013-7952, E-ISSN 1872-6917Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Tafesse, Solomon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Fernlund, Joanne M. Robison
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Sun, Wenjuan
    Bergholm, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Evaluation of image analysis methods for the quantification of particle angularityIn: Sedimentology, ISSN 0037-0746, E-ISSN 1365-3091Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Tafesse, Solomon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Robison Fernlund, Joanne M.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Sun, Wenjuan
    Bergholm, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Evaluation of image analysis methods used for quantification of particle angularity2013In: Sedimentology, ISSN 0037-0746, E-ISSN 1365-3091, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 1100-1110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Angularity is an important parameter in the characterization of particle morphology that is used to interpret the transport history of particles in sedimentary deposits. In the past, visual classification using silhouette charts was widely used to determine particle angularity, but this approach is subjective and time-consuming. With advances in modern image analysis techniques and low-cost software packages, it is possible to rapidly quantify particle angularity more objectively than using visual classification methods. This study re-examines the performance of three existing image analysis methods and one new image analysis procedure, applied to six rock and sediment samples that were visually different in angularity. To facilitate comparison between the angularity results, measurements were reduced to rankings for each aggregate sample. These results show that the four image analysis methods rank the angularity of the samples differently, and that none rank the mean angularity index in the same order as the angularity ranking using visual classification. Therefore, further research is needed to develop an image analysis method that can quantify the angularity of sedimentary particles more precisely.

  • 15.
    Tafesse, Solomon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Sun, Wenjuan
    Virginia Tech, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.
    Fernlund, Joanne
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Linbing, Wang
    Virginia Tech, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.
    A New Image Analysis Technique to Quantify Particle AngularityArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Angularity is a fundamental morphological descriptor of a particle; it determines the aggregate performance in asphalt and concrete works. This paper introduces an innovative matlab based image analysis technique to quantify the angularity of an aggregate. The algorithm is based on application of two successive b-spline smoothing techniques around the aggregate profile. The first b-spline smoothing curve is generated by joining the mid-points of the adjacent segments; and the second smoothing curve is generated by a smoothing function upon the first b-spline. Then the distribution of the perpendicular distance between these two-b-splines is evaluated, which provides an excellent estimate to the aggregate angularity. In this paper the angularity index of six aggregate samples is determined using our new technique. Then we compared the index obtained with an existing Aggregate Imaging Measurement System (AIMS) and the measurement from the two methods revealed good similarity. Therefore our new method can be considered as a useful alternative in the aggregate industry for distinguishing the angularity of the samples obtained from different sources.

1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf