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  • 1.
    Blomqvist, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Wood Biotechnology.
    Djerbi, Soraya
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Wood Biotechnology.
    Aspeborg, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Wood Biotechnology.
    Teeri, Tuula
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Wood Biotechnology.
    Cellulose Biosynthesis in Forest Trees2007In: Cellulose: Molecular and Structural Biology: Selected Articles on the Synthesis, Structure, and Applications of Cellulose / [ed] R. Malcolm Brown and Inder M. Saxena, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2007, p. 85-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood formation is a fundamental biological process of significant economic andcommercial interest. During wood formation, most glucose from the carbohydratemetabolism is channeled to cellulose in the secondary cell walls. The cellulose microfibrils associate with hemicellulose, proteins, and lignin to form the strong and flexiblebiocomposite known as wood. As the main wood component, cellulose is essential forthe survival of trees and for their exploitation by man.In spite of this, the molecular details of cellulose biosynthesis have remained obscure in all plants. In particular, the toughness of wood cells makes it hard to isolateactive enzymes and study cellulose synthesis in trees. Functional genomics providespowerful new tools to study complex metabolic processes. In this way, 18 CesA geneshave been recently identified in the genome sequence of Populus trichocarpa.Expression profiling during wood formation has shown that four of these genesare specifically upregulated during xylogenesis and/or tension wood formation. Othergenes that follow the same expression pattern as the wood-related CesA genes encodethe putative Korrigan ortholog PttCel9A and a novel microtubule associated proteinPttMAP20. Cell suspension cultures of hybrid aspen with elevated expression of thesecondary cell wall specific PttCesA genes have been used for efficient in vitro synthesisof cellulose, which will facilitate future studies of this challenging process in trees.

  • 2. Colombani, A.
    et al.
    Djerbi, Soraya
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Bessueille, L.
    Blomqvist, Kristina
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Ohlsson, Anna
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Berglund, Torkel
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Teeri, Tuula
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Bulone, V.
    In vitro synthesis of (1→3)-β-D-glucan (callose) and cellulose by detergent extracts of membranes from cell suspension cultures of hybrid aspen2004In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 11, no 3-4, p. 313-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work was to optimize the conditions for in vitro synthesis of (1 --> 3)-beta-D-glucan (callose) and cellulose, using detergent extracts of membranes from hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x tremuloides) cells grown as suspension cultures. Callose was the only product synthesized when CHAPS extracts were used as a source of enzyme. The optimal reaction mixture for callose synthesis contained 100 mM Mops buffer pH 7.0, 1 mM UDP-glucose, 8 mM Ca2+, and 20 mM cellobiose. The use of digitonin to extract the membrane-bound proteins was required for cellulose synthesis. Yields as high as 50% of the total in vitro products were obtained when cells were harvested in the stationary phase of the growth curve, callose being the other product. The optimal mixture for cellulose synthesis consisted of 100 mM Mops buffer pH 7.0, 1 mM UDP-glucose, 1 mM Ca2+, 8 mM Mg2+, and 20 mM cellobiose. The in vitro beta-glucans were identified by hydrolysis of radioactive products, using specific enzymes. C-13-Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were also used for callose characterization. The (1-->3)-beta-D-glucan systematically had a microfibrillar morphology, but the size and organization of the microfibrils were affected by the nature of the detergent used for enzyme extraction. The discussion of the results is included in a short review of the field that also compares the data obtained with those available in the literature. The results presented show that the hybrid aspen is a promising model for in vitro studies on callose and cellulose synthesis.

  • 3.
    Djerbi, Soraya
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Aspeborg, Henrik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Blomqvist, Kristina
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Teeri, Tuula
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Identification and expression analysis of genes encoding putative cellulose synthases (CesA) in the hybrid aspen, Populus tremula (L.) × P. tremuloides (Michx.)2004In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 11, no 3-4, p. 301-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose is synthesized in plant cell walls by large membrane-bound protein complexes proposed to contain several copies of the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase, CesA. Here we report identification of 10 distinct CesA genes within a database of 100,000 ESTs of the hybrid aspen, Populus tremula (L.) x P. tremuloides (Michx.). Expression analyses in normal wood undergoing xylogenesis and in tension wood indicate xylem specific expression of four putative CesA isoenzymes, PttCesA1, PttCesA3-1, PttCesA3-2 and PttCesA9. Both the protein sequences and the expression profiles of PttCesA3-1 and PttCesA3-2 are very similar, and they may thus represent redundant copies of an enzyme with essentially the same function. Further, one of the generally more constitutively expressed CesA genes, PttCesA2, seems to be activated on the opposite side of a tension wood induced stem, while PttCesA6 appears to be more specific for leaf tissues. The rest of the hybrid aspen CesA genes were found to be relatively evenly expressed over the poplar tissues hereby studied.

  • 4. Gray-Mitsumune, Madoka
    et al.
    Mellerowicz, Ewa J.
    Abe, Hisashi
    Schrader, Jarmo
    Winzell, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Sterky, Fredrik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Blomqvist, Kristina
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    McQueen-Mason, Simon
    Teeri, Tuula T.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Sundberg, Björn
    Expansins abundant in secondary xylem belong to subgroup a of the alpha-expansin gene family (1 w )2004In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 135, no 3, p. 1552-1564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Differentiation of xylem cells in dicotyledonous plants involves expansion of the radial primary cell walls and intrusive tip growth of cambial derivative cells prior to the deposition of a thick secondary wall essential for xylem function. Expansins are cell wall-residing proteins that have an ability to plasticize the cellulose-hemicellulose network of primary walls. We found expansin activity in proteins extracted from the cambial region of mature stems in a model tree species hybrid aspen (Populus tremula X Populus tremuloides Michx). We identified three a-expansin genes (PttEXP1, PttEXP2, and PttEXP8) and one beta-expansin gene (PttEXPB1) in a cambial region expressed sequence tag library, among which PttEXP1 was most abundantly represented. Northern-blot analyses in aspen vegetative organs and tissues showed that PttEXP1 was specifically expressed in mature stems exhibiting secondary growth, where it was present in the cambium and in the radial expansion zone. By contrast, PttEXP2 was mostly expressed in developing leaves. In situ reverse transcription-PCR provided evidence for accumulation of mRNA of PttEXP1 along with ribosomal rRNA at the tips of intrusively growing xylem fibers, suggesting that PttEXP1 protein has a role in intrusive tip growth. An examination of tension wood and leaf cDNA libraries identified another expansin, PttEXP5, very similar to PttEXP1, as the major expansin in developing tension wood, while PttEXP3 was the major expansin expressed in developing leaves. Comparative analysis of expansins expressed in woody stems in aspen, Arabidopsis, and pine showed that the most abundantly expressed expansins share sequence similarities, belonging to the subfamily A of alpha-expansins and having two conserved motifs at the beginning and end of the mature protein, RIPVG and KNFRV, respectively. This conservation suggests that these genes may share a specialized, not yet identified function.

  • 5.
    Ohlsson, Anna B.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Djerbi, Soraya
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Winzell, Anders
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Bessueille, Laurence
    Ståldal, Veronika
    Li, Xinguo
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Blomqvist, Kristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Bulone, Vincent
    Teeri, Tuula T.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Torkel
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Cell suspension cultures of Populus tremula x P. tremuloides exhibit a high level of cellulose synthase gene expression that coincides with increased in vitro cellulose synthase activity.2006In: Protoplasma, ISSN 0033-183X, E-ISSN 1615-6102, Vol. 228, no 4, p. 221-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compared to wood, cell suspension cultures provide convenient model systems to study many different cellular processes in plants. Here we have established cell suspension cultures of Populus tremula L. x P. tremuloides Michx. and characterized them by determining the enzymatic activities and/or mRNA expression levels of selected cell wall-specific proteins at the different stages of growth. While enzymes and proteins typically associated with primary cell wall synthesis and expansion were detected in the exponential growth phase of the cultures, the late stationary phase showed high expression of the secondary-cell-wall-associated cellulose synthase genes. Interestingly, detergent extracts of membranes from aging cell suspension cultures exhibited high levels of in vitro cellulose synthesis. The estimated ratio of cellulose to callose was as high as 50 : 50, as opposed to the ratio of 30 : 70 so far achieved with membrane preparations extracted from other systems. The increased cellulose synthase activity was also evidenced by higher levels of Calcofluor white binding in the cell material from the stationary-phase cultures. The ease of handling cell suspension cultures and the improved capacity for in vitro cellulose synthesis suggest that these cultures offer a new basis for studying the mechanism of cellulose biosynthesis.

  • 6.
    Rajangam, Alex S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime.
    Kumar, Manoj
    Aspeborg, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime.
    Guerriero, Gea
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime.
    Arvestad, Lars
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Biology, CB.
    Pansri, Podjamas
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime.
    Brown, Christian J. L.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Blomqvist, Kristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime.
    Divne, Christina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime.
    Ezcurra, Inés
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime.
    Mellerowicz, Ewa
    Sundberg, Bjorn
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime.
    Teeri, Tuula T.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime.
    MAP20, a Microtubule-Associated Protein in the Secondary Cell Walls of Hybrid Aspen, Is a Target of the Cellulose Synthesis Inhibitor 2,6-Dichlorobenzonitrile2008In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 148, no 3, p. 1283-1294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have identified a gene, denoted PttMAP20, which is strongly up-regulated during secondary cell wall synthesis and tightly coregulated with the secondary wall-associated CESA genes in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x tremuloides). Immunolocalization studies with affinity-purified antibodies specific for PttMAP20 revealed that the protein is found in all cell types in developing xylem and that it is most abundant in cells forming secondary cell walls. This PttMAP20 protein sequence contains a highly conserved TPX2 domain first identified in a microtubule-associated protein (MAP) in Xenopus laevis. Overexpression of PttMAP20 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leads to helical twisting of epidermal cells, frequently associated with MAPs. In addition, a PttMAP20-yellow fluorescent protein fusion protein expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves localizes to microtubules in leaf epidermal pavement cells. Recombinant PttMAP20 expressed in Escherichia coli also binds specifically to in vitro-assembled, taxol-stabilized bovine microtubules. Finally, the herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, which inhibits cellulose synthesis in plants, was found to bind specifically to PttMAP20. Together with the known function of cortical microtubules in orienting cellulose microfibrils, these observations suggest that PttMAP20 has a role in cellulose biosynthesis.

1 - 6 of 6
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