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  • 1.
    Simbelis, Vygandas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Delete by Haiku: Poetry from Old SMS Messages2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work draws on repurposing practices to inform design for deletion and handling of digital waste – a way of letting go – in graceful and aesthetically appealing ways.

    Delete by Haiku 1 is a mobile phone application that explores how deleting old text messages can become an enjoyable and creative practice by turning messages into haiku poetry. Through the application users interactively repurpose selected old text messages on their mobile phone into a haiku poem aided by a haiku- generating algorithm. By repeatedly pinching the selected messages they break apart into words that tumble down in a Tetris like manner. Gradually words are deleted until the remaining words find their position and form a haiku.

    The video presents a walkthrough of how to interact with the application to select messages in various ways, how to apply ‘themes’ to gain some control over the generation process, and eventually share created poems with others through social media. 

  • 2.
    Simbelis, Vygandas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Metaphone: Distinguishing Human and Machine2016Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through various forms of interaction, the Metaphone1 project asks important questions about relationship between human and machine (in the fields of interac- tive arts and Human-Computer Interaction) and how those two may interact creating artistic knowledge. Control issue is raising questions on combinations of chaos and systematic control, while one version of the art installation provides means for creating artworks through participants’ emotions and feelings (GSR and HR sensors). However, exploring ways of expression, the notion of authorship (from artistic perspective) is still in question: debating who owns the final artwork, if the machine could own the work and create artistically, is the participant still politically in charge, while finally, live creative process is always left free and open. 

  • 3.
    Simbelis, Vygandas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Time and space in broken panorama2017In: DIS 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2017, p. 1369-1381Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This pictorial intends to show a usage-hacking case of everyday technology for creating visual narratives. Storytelling through visual appearance could be significantly relevant and inspirational to design and HCI. This technique is also a design approach in itself; by deliberate navigation and control, the user breaks the panorama view. In this pictorial, we demonstrate examples and show the process of creating our digital photography art project "Panorama Time". In this project, a mobile phone camera's panorama mode is used to tweak time and space. By showing how we hacked the digital artefact, we also discuss insights from several experiments, thereby considering possibilities of establishing such digital experiments in their own right. A presented technique could also be a method for sketching ideas through the photographic medium.

  • 4.
    Simbelis, Vygandas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Time and Space in Panoramic Photography2017In: Acoustic Space, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 233-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article intends to show a usage-hacking case of everyday technology for creating visual narratives. The photographic art project “Panorama Time” is discussed through a techno-cultural perspective and examines the spatial-temporal dimension in panoramic photography, which, in this case, is a digital camera in a mobile phone. The post-media condition and its characteristic of embracing the fusion of different media in one device without specifying any single one is examined in our project through the combination of photographic and cinematographic processes combined in the mobile device. The rolling shutter feature, which is the technological core of digital cameras, enables the strip-photography technique, in our case used in a panoramic technique to deliver a set of concepts: glitch, repetition, frozen frames, and similar. Through deliberate navigation and control, the user breaks the panoramic view, and thus the project’s technique presents the distinction between fault and glitch aesthetics. We show examples and demonstrate the process of creating our digital photography art project “Panorama Time”. By showing how we hacked the digital artifact, we also discuss insights from several experiments in connection to broader photographic concepts in relation to time and space. 

  • 5.
    Simbelis, Vygandas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Metaphone: an artistic exploration of biofeedback and machine aesthetics2013In: CHI EA '13 CHI '13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Press , 2013, p. 2995-2998Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Metaphone is an interactive art piece that transforms biosensor data extracted from participants into colorful, evocative perceivable visual patterns on a big canvas. The biosensors register movement, pulse and skin conductance, the latter two relating to emotional arousal. The machine creates a traditional art form colorful paintings which can be contrasted with the pulsating, living body of the participants and the machine-like movements of the Metaphone. Participants interacting with the machine get their own painting drawn for them a highly involving activity spurring a whole range of questions around bio-sensing technologies. The participants engaging with Metaphone have to agree to share their personal data, thereby expanding the interactive discourse while questioning the extension of the body with the machine and involving participants with public exposition of their inner worlds.

  • 6.
    Simbelis, Vygandas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lindley, Siân
    Corish, Robert
    Ferreira, Pedro
    KTH.
    Vaara, Elsa
    Changing Perspectives of Time in HCI2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this workshop is to unpack different ways of thinking about time, drawing a distinction between time as experienced, and time as counted by a ticking clock or measured by a computer algorithm. The concept of time is often taken for granted within HCI, yet high- lighting the assumptions that underpin it could provide a resource for research and innovation. In this extended abstract, we illustrate how this is so. 

  • 7.
    Simbelis, Vygandas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, AndersKTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Synesthetic Experience in S T R A T I C2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do we humanize digital interactive technology? One way is through our experience with technology. With S T R A T I C we present several post-digital concepts to discuss the relationship of the digital in regard to our human lives. We emphasize the synesthetic experience along with other aesthetic experiences and materiality issues with manifestations of the digital in the physical world, tangible approaches to sonic performances, or exposure of internal logics of technological processes.

    In this paper, we propose both exhibiting our work as an art installation and via a live performance. We regard it as being highly relevant to the topic of the TEI Arts Track exhibition: post-digital materiality at the intersection of the analog and the digital, and to its tangible aspects. 

  • 8.
    Simbelis, Vygandas
    et al.
    KTH.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH.
    Synesthetic experience in STRATI C2018In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 574-580Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do we humanize digital interactive technology? One way is through our experience with technology. With S T R A T I C we present several post-digital concepts to discuss the relationship of the digital in regard to our human lives. We emphasize the synesthetic experience along with other aesthetic experiences and materiality issues with manifestations of the digital in the physical world, tangible approaches to sonic performances, or exposure of internal logics of technological processes. In this paper, we propose both exhibiting our work as an art installation and via a live performance. We regard it as being highly relevant to the topic of the TEI Arts Track exhibition: post-digital materiality at the intersection of the analog and the digital, and to its tangible aspects.

  • 9.
    Simbelis, Vygandas Vegas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Humanizing Technology Through Post-Digital Art2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    I draw upon the idea of the post digital to create (1) art for humanization of technology and (2) art as manifestations of digital qualities in the physical world, e.g., through digital-analog convergence, or through enriching our experiences with hybrid constellations of techniques, concepts and aesthetics.

    My work consists of two parts: practice-based research in the arts and conceptualizations arising from my practice. Four art projects are presented in this thesis: Metaphone, Delete By Haiku, S T R A T I C, and Panorama Time. My post-digital approach is manifest through the hacking activities, disruptive techniques and aesthetic approaches I apply. These thrive on a set of constitutive concepts: machine aesthetics, digital upcycling, aleatoricism and chance, deletion, repetition, fault aesthetics and glitch aesthetics. My post-digital aesthetic principles depend on machinic, systematic behaviors in the technologies I explore. Machine aesthetics expose operational and mechanical principles and behaviors. Digital upcycling is a repurposing design process wherein function follows form to add value to old defunct objects. I deploy chance in the design process through a “rolling a dice” approach. I use both deletion and insertion repetitively as design principles. In my work, I also induce technical faults and take deliberate control of machine glitches. These are all aesthetic approaches that help transform the “cold” appearance of information technologies and bring them closer to people, thereby humanizing technology. Some of the aesthetic principles (e.g., machine aesthetics or glitch aesthetics) might not seem “natural” or “human” but I use them to explore digital materiality analogously to how steel, iron and other materials were approached from the early phases of the industrial revolution and Modernism. As such these aesthetic principles are ways of interrogating the digital thriving o a cultural-historical point of view. 

  • 10.
    Simbelis, Vygandas 'Vegas'
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Vaara, Elsa
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Repurposing Bits and Pieces of the Digital2015In: 34TH ANNUAL CHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS, CHI 2016, ACM Digital Library, 2015, p. 840-851Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Repurposing refers to a broad set of practices, such as recycling or upcycling, all aiming to make better use of or give new life to physical materials and artefacts. While these practices have an obvious interest regarding sustainability issues, they also bring about unique aesthetics and values that may inspire design beyond sustainability concerns. What if we can harness these qualities in digital materials? We introduce Delete by Haiku, an application that transforms old mobile text messages into haiku poems. We elaborate on how the principles of repurposing - working on a low budget, introducing chance and combining the original values with the new ones - can inform interaction design in evoking some of these aesthetic values. This approach changes our views on what constitutes "digital materials" and the opportunities they offer. We also connect recent debates concerning ownership of data with discussions in the arts on the "Death of the Author."

  • 11.
    Simbelis, Vygandas Vegas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    STRATIC: Performing the Sampling Rate2015In: 12TH ADVANCES IN COMPUTER ENTERTAINMENT TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE (ACE15), ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through our audio-visual project, STRATIC, we explore a particular technique the sampling rate, which refers to the visual appearance of line patterns. The connection of the audio and the visual is at the core and the project explores it through the visual-music technique. The STRATIC is using hardware, which captures frequencies of the produced sounds and directly generates light. Then the light and a camera compose the responsive colorful line patterns, winch appear through the sampling rate phenomenon. The artist duo is playing synthesizers and by visually responding to the produced light patterns they perform live audio-visual performances. So the music is played in responding to the real-time visual appearances. The audio-visual performance is played in a real-time creates evocative, noisy and sometimes relaxing atmosphere. We propose to experience such audio-visual performance at the ACE 2015 Creative Showcase.

  • 12.
    Šimbelis, V.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Synthesis in the audiovisual2016In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery , 2016, p. 301-304Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The S T R A T I C audiovisual project1 is based on the phenomenon that occurs when filming a pulsating light - lines appear on the screen. The thickness, color and movement of these lines are directly related to the frequency of the sound. In other words, the sound generates the visuals in real-time. The visuals are examined by the use of shutter speed and frame rate of a camera. In this project we explore the interactive potential through our live performances and the space for aesthetic expression by synthesizing the audio and the visuals. The project relates to the genre of visual music and abstraction in the arts and creates a synesthetic experience for the audience. We find it highly relevant to CHI since it concerns aspects of materiality at the intersection of the analog and the digital. 

  • 13.
    Šimbelis, Vygandas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Solsona, Jordi
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems.
    Lewandowski, Vincent
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Metaphone: Machine aesthetics meets interaction design2014In: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through our art project, Metaphone, we explored a particular form of aesthetics referred to in the arts tradition as machine aesthetics. The Metaphone machine collects the participant's bio-data, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) and Heart Rate (HR), creating a process of movement, painting and sound. The machine behaves in machine-like, aesthetically evocative ways: A shaft on two large wheels rotates on the floor, carrying paint that is dripped onto a large sheet of aquarelle paper on the floor according to bio-sensor data. A soundscape rhythmically follows the bio-sensor data, but also has its own machine-like sounds. Six commentators were invited to interact with the machine. They reported a strangely relaxing atmosphere induced by the machine. Based on these experiences we discuss how different art styles can help to describe aesthetics in interaction design generally, and how machine aesthetics in particular can be used to create interesting, sustained, stylistically coherent interactions.

1 - 13 of 13
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