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  • 1.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Wingård, Lasse
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    THE PEDAGOGICAL DEVELOPERS INITIATIVE: SYSTEMATIC SHIFTS, SERENDIPITIES, AND SETBACKS2017In: 13th International CDIO Conference in Calgary, Canada, June 18-22, 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pedagogical projects have often, at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, as well as elsewhere, been initiated and managed by individual enthusiasts rather than dedicated teams. This generally decreases the possibility of successful implementation of more ambitious ideas, e.g., changing educational programs, implementing the CDIO syllabus, or strengthening the pedagogical development of larger parts of the faculty. To enable wider and more effective change, KTH top management therefore launched a universityencompassing three-year project in 2014, in which a group of highly motivated teachers from all schools at KTH were appointed part-time pedagogical developers (PDs). The PDs were given the task of promoting pedagogical development and facilitate cooperation and knowledge exchange among faculty members, as described in two previous papers at CDIO conferences. From 2017, the outcomes of this project are supposed to be integrated parts of the KTH line organization. The project has led to numerous actions, which would have been difficult to set in motion unless given the freedom in time to explore and to develop into a collective effort rather than a myriad of individual “stand-alone” examples. By addressing key areas for pedagogical development, our group of dedicated faculty have tried to surpass the suboptimal "lock-in" of strict individual reasoning and to deal with surfaced questions and relevant issues in a broader collective manner. A major insight confirmed by the project and its many sub-projects has indeed been the fundamental importance of collegial discussions and the creation of processes that facilitate and support teacher cooperation. We have also, through discussions with faculty at KTH, confirmed the need for clearly defined, tangible incentives for teachers, motivating them to participate in pedagogical development activities, even if this means less time left for the traditional pathway to rewards within academia, i.e. research. In this paper, we chart changes that have occurred in the educational practices at KTH by describing and discussing the project’s focus on pedagogical development of faculty, actual execution of changes in the engineering educations, lessons learned along the way, and visions yet to be realised.

  • 2.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology. KTH.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. KTH.
    Wingård, Lasse
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. KTH.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Soulard, Juliette
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    The pedagogical developers initiative - development, implementation and lessons learned from a systematic approach to faculty development2016In: Proceedings of the 12th International CDIO Conference, Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland, June 12-16, 2016, Turku University , 2016, p. 497-508Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a systematic, university--wide approach to creating an encompassing movement towards faculty development. In 2014, KTH Royal Institute of Technology launched the pedagogical developers initiative, appointing part--time pedagogical developers among teachers from all schools of KTH, to implement and strengthen good teaching and learning practices among faculty and students. They are teachers active in different educational programmes, with experience of, and interest in, pedagogical issues. In line with CDIO standard 10, the purpose of the pedagogical developers’ initiative is to facilitate cooperation and knowledge exchange between faculty members, and to establish communities of practice. The paper presents the activities, processes for developing these activities and preliminary results from the initiative’s second year, which focused much on supporting faculty development by putting into place a series of workshops, a format chosen for its combination of active community-building learning and time efficiency. The topics of the workshops emerged to meet faculty needs identified by the pedagogical developers during the first year. The workshops were created by smaller teams of pedagogical developers from different schools of KTH. This enabled a wide array of experiences and perspectives to be incorporated into the workshops. Main focuses of the workshops have been on creating internal discussions in dynamic communities of practice on specific subjects of interest, and on creating forums for exchange of ideas, open to the whole faculty. During Autumn 2015, the workshops have been offered as voluntary add-on parts of the basic course in teaching and learning offered to faculty at KTH. This first round of workshops generated a positive interest from teachers, and participant feedback indicates that they particularly appreciated the opportunity to work directly with their own courses and the opportunity to discuss pedagogical aspects with peers. 

  • 3.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Johansson, Hans Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT).
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Soulard, Juliette
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electrical Energy Conversion.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    The Pedagogical Developers Initiative – Changing Educational Practices and Strengthening CDIO skills2015In: Proceedings of the 11th International CDIO Conference, Chengdu, China, June 8-11 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper put emphasis on change agents within the universities and how local initiatives can be systematically approached and ramped up. Rooted in the challenges and constraints that have been addressed in past educational program initiatives, the case consists of specific focus areas to leverage impact. Universities continuously strives to provide the best conditions for an inspiring and prosperous learning environment, and to provide educational programs with teaching of excellent educational quality. KTH is no exception and therefore the university management has initiated a pedagogical program starting in 2014. One of the first thing initiated within the framework of this pedagogical program is the creation of a group of 24 pedagogical developers.

    The focus for the pedagogical developers is to facilitate the opportunities for KTHs faculty to work together and create consensus on educational development in different teaching teams. This paper presents the University's pedagogical developers' initiative as a whole and how this has been outlined in detail to reach specific redesign targets. The School of Industrial Engineering and Management pedagogical group consists of five practicing teachers that besides this new role also engage heavily in various courses of the School's departments. Since the pedagogical initiative is aligned with several important CDIO aspects, e.g. the learning environment, formats of formative feedback, assessment and examination there is also importance to reassure this in the existing Master level programs.

    At KTH the five-year comprehensive Master of Science in Engineering programs concern distinct vocational educations in which the CDIO aspects are very important. At the same time the programs has been divided in a basic level (B.Sc. in Engineering) of three years and a advanced level (M.Sc.) of two years. This has for instance made it harder to align the progression between first cycle level and second cycle level regarding for instance the CDIO efforts (e.g. oral and written communication, teamwork). This paper will therefore discuss and enhance how the pedagogical programme, we as pedagogical developers, can support and strengthen the initiation and implementation of the CDIO aspects in the education.

  • 4.
    Blomgren, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Business Development and Entrepreneurship (Closed 20130101).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Uppvall, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Educating the new Engineer and Retargeting the Engineering Curriculum for the future Industrial Landscape2011In: INTED2011 Proceedings, 2011, p. 1145-1152Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the former U.S. Secretary of Education expressed it: “We are currently preparing students for jobs and technologies that done yet exist…in order to solve problems we don’t know are problems yet”. This implies a need for Engineering Education to adapt to the fact that the nature of work is changing. This paper discuss how a retargeted Engineering Curriculum can be defined with the help of future pictures of industry. By presenting a different categorization of labor employment statistics new pictures of industry future can be predicted usable when developing the new Engineering Curriculum.

  • 5.
    Engwall, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Exploring the multi-project matrix: Process dynamics of a projectified organization.2001In: 61st Annual meeting of the Academy of Management., 2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Engwall, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    The resource allocation syndrome.2003In: International journal of project management., Vol. 21, p. 403-409Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Engwall, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    The Resource Allocation Syndrome: The Prime Challenge of Multi-Project Management?2003In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 6, no 21, p. 403-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the nature of organizational settings, where a large extent of the operations is organized as simultaneous or successive projects. Anchored in qualitative case studies, the paper analyzes why the resource allocation syndrome is the number one issue for multi-project management and discusses the underlying mechanisms behind this phenomenon.

  • 8.
    Engwall, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Where structure meets chaos: Management challenges in a multi-project setting.2002In: IRNOP V:: International research network and organizing by projects. R, 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Engwall, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Where structure meets chaos:: Management challenges in a multi-project setting.2002In: IRNOP V:: International research network and organizing by projects., 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Engwall, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Karlsson, Bo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Storm, Per
    Modern industriell ekonomi2017Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Engwall, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Karlsson, Bo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Storm, Per
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Westin, Paul
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Industriell ekonomi: Metoder och verktyg2014Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Flening, Elias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Worlds Apart and Close Together: Relating mechatronics and project management research2018In: Proceedings of International Design Conference, DESIGN, 2018, p. 2867-2878Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While they originate from different contexts and values, the Mechatronic and Project Management research communities are both committed to the study of the process of complex engineering systems design. These two fields have generally been engaged in their research separated from each other. Recently, calls have been heard from both to end such disciplinary separation. This paper seeks to conceptually relate the two research communities, seeking to understand how they can be seen as different, related and inclusive of each other through offering three conceptual models of their relationships. 

  • 13. Gessler, Fredrik
    et al.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Industriell ekonomi: övningsbok1999Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Innovativity or industrialization?: Service managers’ views on competitive service work2009In: Nordic academy of Management: Business as usual, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Avd.).
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Avd.).
    Innovativity or industrialization?: Service managers’ views on competitive service work2009In: Nordic academy of Management: Business as usual, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Malmi, Lauri
    Alto University.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Kinnunen, Päivi
    Alto University.
    Strömberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Villadsen, Jørgen
    Technical University of Denmark (DTU).
    Baggerud, Bjørn
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Munkebo Hussmann, Peter
    Technical University of Denmark (DTU).
    Program leadership from a nordic perspective: Program leaders' power to influence their program2013In: Proceedings of the 9th International CDIO Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a continuation research at five technical universities in Nordic countries (N5T network) in 2012 is presented, wheretheaim was to find out how the program leadersconceived their function, role and mandate, and the work situations between the universitieswere compared. The previous research demonstrated that programleadershave quite different positions, strategies and methods when it comes to monitoring and developing their programs.In this paper, a deeper investigationis carried out ofthe (im-) possibilitiesto make realinfluence on the study courses that constitutesthe respective Engineering study programs. Eightprogram leaders from thefiveN5Tuniversities have been interviewed, and theanalysis of these studies, has culminatedina model for the analysis of program leadership for Engineering educationdevelopment.

  • 17.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Malmi, Lauri
    Aalto Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Helsinki, Finland.;Aalto Univ, Deans Unit, Sch Business, Helsinki, Finland..
    Kinnunen, Paivi
    Aalto Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Helsinki, Finland.;Aalto Univ, Deans Unit, Sch Business, Helsinki, Finland..
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Strömberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Villadsen, Jorgen
    DTU Tech Univ Denmark, Dept Appl Math & Comp Sci, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Leading the teacher team - balancing between formal and informal power in program leadership2018In: Tertiary Education and Management, ISSN 1358-3883, E-ISSN 1573-1936, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 49-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This continuous research within Nordic engineering institutions targets the contexts and possibilities for leadership among engineering education program directors. The IFP-model, developed based on analysis of interviews with program leaders in these institutions, visualizes the program director's informal and formal power. The model is presented as a tool for starting a shared discussion on the complexities of the leadership of engineering program development. The authors liken program development to hunting in teams. Each individual expert in the program is needed, and all experts will need to work and collaborate for the same target. This calls for strategic and long-term thinking of engineering education development. Institutions should support the development of both formal structures as well as informal leadership skills among their program directors, but never fall for the temptation to see the program director as the only actor on the stage.

  • 18.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    A Maturation Model For Project-Based Organisations - With Uncertainty Management As An Ever-Present Multi-Project Management Focus2014In: South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences, ISSN 1015-8812, E-ISSN 2222-3436, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 33-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The classical view of multi-project management does not capture its dynamic nature. Current theory falls short in its ability to explain how the management of project-based companies evolves because of their need to be agile and adaptable in a changing environment. The purpose of this paper is therefore to present a descriptive model that elucidates the maturation processes in a project-based organisation as well as to provide an enhanced understanding of multi-project management in practice. The maturation model illustrates the way the management of project-based organisations evolves between structuring administration and managing uncertainties, and emphasises the importance of active individual actions and situated management actions that have to be undertaken in order to coordinate, synchronise and communicate the required knowledge and skills. The outcomes primarily reveal that, although standardised project models are used and considerable resources are spent on effective project portfolio management, the way information and communication are dealt with is vitally important in the management of project-based organisations. This is particularly true of informal and non-codified communication.

  • 19.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Management and control of a project-based industrial business: - a balance between structure and insecurity?2010In: Projektvärlden : en tidning från svenskt projektforum, ISSN 1652-3016, Vol. 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Management and control of a project-based industrial business: a balance between structure and insecurity?2010In: Bonniers Projektledarhanbok, Bonnier , 2010Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Management and control of several IT projects in parallell: a choice between creativity and flexibility or structure?2010In: Bonniers projektledarhandbok, Bonnier , 2010Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Organisering av projektbaserade företag: Ledning, styrning och genomförande av projektbaserad industriell verksamhet2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the management and organizing of project-based companies, and the purpose is to enhance the understanding of multi-project management. The main part of the research and literature on project-based organizations has too narrow focus, since it is mainly interested in how to handle the difficulties that arise when executing a multi-project portfolio. Multi-project management is also often dominated by the thought of effectiveness and rationality through the use of project portfolio management methods and tools, which makes resource allocation and project priority the number one issue.

    Therefore, the profound theoretical ambition with this thesis is to complement the literature on project-based organizations with an empirically based understanding, inspired by organizing theory, for both research on, and practical execution of, multi-project management from a project-as-practice perspective. The thesis is based on case studies of two different project-based industrial companies, and the main methods for the empirical fieldwork were interviews and observations.

    The need for an organizing perspective on industrial organizations’ management and control of their project-based business originates from the importance of managing the need for organizational cooperation that arises because of the increased amount of temporary organizing procedures in a project-based company. This study sheds light on several important aspects for management and organizing of the special dynamics that characterize project-based organizations. One aspect is how the organizing of a project-based business demands a kind of insecurity-management, actions and activities aiming to balance the need for structure with the need for situated management. Another aspect is the importance of integrating the management and organizing of the multi-project business on a top management level.

  • 23.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Organising project-based companies: Management, control and execution of project-based industrial organisations.2013In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 6, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeWith the purpose of enhancing the understanding of multi-project management, this paper is based on the findings of a doctoral thesis that focuses on the management and organisation of project-based companies. Design/methodology/approachThe research presented here is based on an inductive and qualitative case study approach, characterised by an exploratory purpose and based on an in depth analysis of two individual cases. FindingsThe study sheds light on several important aspects for managing and organising the special dynamics that characterise project-based organisations. The thesis discusses how the balance between structuring mechanisms and the ability to handle the ever-present uncertainty in project-based organisations (PBOs) can be understood. This balance is necessary in order to handle the amount of changing requirements – both operational and contextual – during a certain period of time, thereby, being given the opportunity to encourage the organisation's dynamic capability. Practical implicationsThis research proposes that the traditional theoretical focus of “How to … ” in project portfolio management is neither adequately efficient, nor sufficient. This view must be complemented with active individual and situated management actions, and the findings encapsulate the importance of the multi-project management to focus on the balance between creativity, flexibility, and structure. Originality/valueThe profound theoretical ambition with this work is to complement the literature on project-based organisations with an empirically-based understanding inspired by organising theory, for both the research and practical execution of multi-project management from a project-as-practice perspective. This research expands the conceptual view on the balance between structuring mechanisms and the ability to handle the ever-present uncertainty in PBOs

  • 24.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    The Oxford Handbook of Project Management2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 353-354Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Organizational design of project-based firms.2011In: Back to the future / [ed] Luca Gnahn, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    The importance of strategic aspects with PPM for NPD portfolios2011In: IAMOT 2011 - International Association for Management of Technology: Technology and the Global Challanges: Security, Energy, Water, and the Environment / [ed] Dr. Yasser Hosni, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Hammarström, Maria
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Service in practice: The role and responsibility of first-line managers in technical consultancy companies2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Improvising in multi-project settings2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Managing project portfolios: balancing flexibility and structure by improvising2013In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 152-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to situate project portfolio management practice and explore its improvisational nature. The overall aim is to deepen the knowledge of what project portfolio managers do when they manage portfolios based on an organizational theory perspective.Design/methodology/approach – This research explores the situated actions of project portfolio managers managing project portfolios and is based on two different case studies. The approach is qualitative and interpretative, with the aim of gradually developing an understanding.Findings – The primary contributions in this paper are insights that enhance the understanding of project portfolio management practice, and the differences in practice between portfolio managers and project managers when creating “action space” and improvising. This knowledge is important for both project theory and project practice, for example when developing managerial competences and sense making structures as well as organizational design in order to increase competitiveness. The findings also contribute to project theory in relation to research on the “Practice Turn” and the literature on re‐situating projects.Research limitations/implications – The research implications emphasize the need for a better understanding of project portfolio management in practice, and an awareness of the need of uncertainty management executed by the portfolio managers situated actions (i.e. fulfilled by walk‐tour and circle communication).Practical implications – The practical implications are an awareness of the fact that project‐based organizational settings have to emphasize a holistic approach and acknowledge the need for situated leadership (in particular for their project portfolio managers).Originality/value – This paper fulfills an identified need to study situated project portfolio management practice.

  • 30.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Kaulio, Matti A.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Ernsell, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Agile and Traditional Methods in Software Projects:: Toward an Integrated Approach for IT consultants2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently a debate exists among R&D management scholars in which Agile and Traditional (i.e. sequential/waterfall/ plan-driven) models are compared. Typically, this debate is driven from a polarized either/or perspective, where one (process) model is confronted to the other. Based on an in-depth ethnographic case study, within a Swedish IT consultancy firm, this paper aims to nuance this either/or perspective. More specifically, the paper investigates challenges of implementing Agile methodologies in client-specific IT projects. Findings reveal that, in contrast to consumer-oriented IT products, were products are released continuously, client-specific IT projects includes a contractual relation linked to a payment structure defining the delivery. Accordingly, in client-specific project a tension exists between on the one hand agility and on the other hand transparent and mutually agreed deliveries which needs to be managed. The current Agile-Traditional debate is dominated by an argumentation on the process level. In practice, processes are embodied and supported by a variety of (IT) tools. These tools may, or may not, support Agile methodologies and without considering these tools the implementation of Agile methodologies will only become a façade. Finally, the process needs also to be put in the context of initial project structure and customer involvement. 

  • 31.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Linde, Anneli
    Umeå Handelshögskola.
    Multi-project management: A gigantic spillekins2008In: Projektvärlden, Svenskt Projektforums branschtidning, ISSN 1652-3016Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Linde, Anneli
    Umeå Handelshögskola.
    Multi-project organizing from the perspective of the Project Management Office2009In: Nordic academy of Management: Business as usual, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33. Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    Miterev, Maxim
    Engwall, Mats
    Integrating strategic aspects with project portfolio management: Exploring different ways to deal with organizational dependencies2014In: 1st ANNUAL EDIM PhD CONFERENCE: Research Challenges in Contemporary Management Engineering, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dominant part of project portfolio management literature is focused on standardized project management methods for planning, prioritizing, and resource allocation. Comprehensively addressing the resource dependency challenge, the mainstream literature overlooks other types of project dependencies, namely, technological and organizational dependencies. Arguing that a more comprehensive understanding of the dependencies is necessary, we explore how they can be dealt with when integrating the strategic aspects in the project portfolio management. The comparative case study of two different multi-project settings reveals that in both contexts a combination of vertical and horizontal communication mechanisms was used in order to enhance the strategic alignment. At the same time, principal mechanisms in the combinations were different. In the first case, a departmental head ensured the vertical connection to strategy and a PMO head enhanced the horizontal connections. In the second case, program steering groups both communicated the strategy and represented arenas for political negotiation. In turn, program managers further contributed to resolving organizational dependencies. The aim of this paper is to contribute to an improved understanding of different ways in which strategic aspects can be integrated with portfolio management, by exploring different ways to deal with the organizational dependencies.

  • 34.
    Jovanovic, Marin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain; ESADE Business School.
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Matching Service Offerings and Product Operations: A Key to Servitization Success2016In: Research technology management, ISSN 0895-6308, E-ISSN 1930-0166, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 29-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many manufacturers are moving to servitization, but making that move successfully requires considering the underlying business logic of a division or product. Differences in existing conditions, such as product characteristics or other business attributes, may determine success in transition to a services-based business model and create challenges for a firm moving, for instance, from a spare-parts model to advanced service contracts. Our study pinpoints a number of key product attributes that define how far a company can move up the service ladder. The findings suggest that the Power-by-the-Hour model pioneered by Rolls-Royce suits products that constitute critical ancillary input to, and not essential elements of, customers' core processes; that require low initial investments relative to high total costs of ownership; that are used in controllable operating environments with measurable performance requirements; and that are associated with high risk and high costs in the event of failure. Further, the service delivery system must be integrated and orchestrated to be product-specific-that is, aligned with the function and operating conditions of the product in use.

  • 35.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Task lists as infrastructure: an empirical study of multi-project work2012In: International Journal of Project Organisation and Management, ISSN 1740-2891, E-ISSN 1740-2905, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 272-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multi-project work is fragmented and unpredictable making project professionals continuously facing the risk of experienced control being reduced. In such work settings, there is an increased need for (temporary) sense making structures. In this article, the concept of infrastructure (Bowker and Star, 2002) is applied to multi-project work. The findings, which are based on 43 interviews with multi-project professionals, reveals that task lists are important infrastructures created for supporting sense making, control and prioritising. The task lists reduces ambiguity and uncertainty and thus bridge the gap between organisational demands and individual resources providing room for improvised action.

  • 36.
    Linse, Charlotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Knowledge Management through a Collaborative Web-tool2011In: IAMOT 2011 - International Association for Management of Technology: Technology and the Global Challanges: Security, Energy, Water, and the Environment / [ed] Dr. Yasser Hosni, Miami Beach, Florida, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge transfer is described as problematic, both in literature and in practice. Ideas, information and knowledge are shared through a multitude of formal and informal channels within the organization. Industrial companies have over time applied different methods for capturing and sharing knowledge within the organization.

    For instance it is very common to use different kinds of IT systems. When doing this, traditional computerized systems often functions as databases or suggestion boxes. As social networking has entered society a new way of sharing ideas and knowledge has emerged. Due to the newness of the social networks the applicability in organizations is still unclear.

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the expectations and goals of implementing a knowledge management web-tool in a company. The research is based on a case study at a mid-sized IT-company. During a time span of six months semi- structured interviews have been conducted with 11 employees. Additionally, participant observations in daily activities have been performed, such as observing internal meetings. Total time spent with the company is more than 25 hours. The study was initiated at the strategic level, in the Quality & Practice Development department, which works in close collaboration with the CEO.

    The findings in the case study so far indicate that their need is two folded; one being communication and the other knowledge diffusion. Therefore one expected result of implementing an IT-system is that reuse of best-practices, ideas, experiences, insights and solutions is enhanced. “The system is really an opportunity for us to both communicate with our customers [...] and document our progress in projects, as well as exchanging experience through a type of in-house wiki.” - CEO

    The paper will end in conclusions concerning how the system increases knowledge management, which in turn enables management of technology.

  • 37.
    Linse, Charlotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Understanding the myths about creativity: Internal work & external image2012In: 19th International Product Development Management Conference: Transformative research in product and service innovation, Manchester, U.K., 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many established perceptions, assumptions and myths surrounding creativity. On the contrary to common perceptions creativity and innovation does not appear out of chaos and geniality, but is the result of preparations, hard work and thoroughness. The aim of this paper is to explain how organizational creativity is achieved during the doing of industrial design, as well as how the practice differs from the image of the design work that is conveyed to customers and the general public. The service designers in the studied case do not claim to see themselves as creative, but rather that creative solutions may sometimes be the result of their group collaborations. As this paper displays, the organization simultaneously utilize the creative mythmaking as part of their institutional image and value proposition to clients. A managerial implication argued for in the paper is to realize the uncertainty in prevailing perceptions, and possibly embrace a complementary perspective in which the view on creativity in design consultancy firms is closer to practice, than the external images that are conveyed for branding purposes.

  • 38.
    Linse, Charlotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Creativity on demand2012In: Norddesign 2012 Proceedings: The Ninth Norddesign Conference, 2012 / [ed] Poul Kyvsgaard Hansen, John Rasmussen, Kaj Jørgensen, Christian Tollestrup, Aalborg, Denmark, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze how designers perceive that managerial structures affect creativity and efficiency in the design work. The findings indicate that the designers think their creativity is enhanced rather than hindered when each step of the design process has a standardized purpose of what should be achieved.

  • 39.
    Miterev, Maxim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Exploring program management competences for different program types2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Miterev, Maxim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. Politecnico di Milano, Italy.
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Exploring program management competences for various program types2016In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 545-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper challenges the implicit 'one-size-fits-all' assumption that dominates mainstream program management competence literature. Findings from case studies of 10 programs executed in a large pharmaceutical company suggest that different programs require different competences of program managers. Based on the Pellegrinelli's (1997) program typology we put forward a framework, linking specific management competences to program types. By establishing the link between the program typologies literature and program management competence literature, the paper shows that programs should not be treated as a generic and homogenous category in discussions on program management competences. In addition, the findings highlight program content as a significant contingency variable for understanding program management dynamics. The paper suggests a conceptual framework that combines program types with program management competence profiles that could be applied to appointment decisions, staff assessments and organizational development.

  • 41.
    Miterev, Maxim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Mechanisms of isomorphism in project-based organizations2017In: Project Management Journal, ISSN 8756-9728, E-ISSN 1938-9507, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 9-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article challenges the dominant assumption of goal rationality behind temporary organizations’ design in project-based organizations (PBOs). While extant literature posits that organizations strive to select the most appropriate project arrangements to fit particular task requirements at hand, findings from an in-depth ethnography-inspired case study suggest that projects in PBOs tend to imitate each other's structures, strategies, and practices with little consideration of the potential performance effects. Building upon the new institutionalism, this article conceptualizes the PBO as an organizational field of temporary and permanent organizations embedded in wider organizational and institutional fields and explicates isomorphic processes among temporary organizations in PBOs.

  • 42.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    FLIPPED EDUCATION - SUPPORTING SYSTEMS THINKING AND CDIO2017In: INTED2017: 11TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION & DEVELOPMENT , 2017, p. 9988-9996Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing an engineering education program is much like systems engineering. Programs have a lifecycle and will be responding differently depending on how early in the life cycle or how mature the program is. This is shown in this study in which two programs at vastly different lifecycle stages are compared, one new and one mature. The new one is still under development and implementation and is verified in terms of CDIO (Conceive, Design, Implement and Operate) and how it supports system thinking with a flipped education approach in combination with extended "flipped" aspects like gamification and close industry collaboration. The purpose is mainly to verify the concept of the new program and assess progress of a mature program. In this study, the development and continuous improvement of CDIO is compared for two programs in different life cycle stages. For comparison a self-assessment is performed using the CDIO standard 2.1.

1 - 42 of 42
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