Change search
Refine search result
1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Alam, Assad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Behere, Sagar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Björk, Mattias
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Garcia Alonso, Liliana
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Khaksari, Farzad
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Khan, Altamash
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Kjellberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Lyberger, Rickard
    Scania CV AB.
    Mårtensson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Nilsson, John-Olof
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Pettersson, Henrik
    Scania CV AB.
    Pettersson, Simon
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Stålklinga, Elin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Sundman, Dennis
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Zachariah, Dave
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Cooperative driving according to Scoop2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Scania are entering the GCDC 2011 under the name Scoop –Stockholm Cooperative Driving. This paper is an introduction to their team and to the technical approach theyare using in their prototype system for GCDC 2011.

  • 2.
    Besselink, Bart
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Turri, Valerio
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Van De Hoef, Sebastian Hendrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre. Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Alam, A.
    Mårtensson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Johansson, Karl Henrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Cyber-Physical Control of Road Freight Transport2016In: Proceedings of the IEEE, ISSN 0018-9219, E-ISSN 1558-2256, Vol. 104, no 5, 1128-1141 p., 7437386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Freight transportation is of outmost importance in our society and is continuously increasing. At the same time, transporting goods on roads accounts for about 26% of the total energy consumption and 18% of all greenhouse gas emissions in the European Union. Despite the influence the transportation system has on our energy consumption and the environment, road transportation is mainly done by individual long-haulage trucks with no real-time coordination or global optimization. In this paper, we review how modern information and communication technology supports a cyber-physical transportation system architecture with an integrated logistic system coordinating fleets of trucks traveling together in vehicle platoons. From the reduced air drag, platooning trucks traveling close together can save about 10% of their fuel consumption. Utilizing road grade information and vehicle-to-vehicle communication, a safe and fuel-optimized cooperative look-ahead control strategy is implemented on top of the existing cruise controller. By optimizing the interaction between vehicles and platoons of vehicles, it is shown that significant improvements can be achieved. An integrated transport planning and vehicle routing in the fleet management system allows both small and large fleet owners to benefit from the collaboration. A realistic case study with 200 heavy-duty vehicles performing transportation tasks in Sweden is described. Simulations show overall fuel savings at more than 5% thanks to coordinated platoon planning. It is also illustrated how well the proposed cooperative look-ahead controller for heavy-duty vehicle platoons manages to optimize the velocity profiles of the vehicles over a hilly segment of the considered road network.

  • 3. Farokhi, Farhad
    et al.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Johansson, Karl Henrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Cooperation Patterns between Fleet Owners for Transport Assignments2015In: 2015 IEEE CONFERENCE ON CONTROL AND APPLICATIONS (CCA 2015), IEEE conference proceedings, IEEE , 2015, 1124-1129 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study cooperation patterns between the heavy- duty vehicle fleet owners to reduce their costs, improve their fuel efficiency, and decrease their emissions. We consider a distributed cooperation pattern in which the fleet owners can communicate directly with each other to form alliances. A centralized cooperation pattern is studied in which the fleet owners pay to subscribe to a third-party service provider that pairs their vehicles for cooperation. The effects of various pricing strategies on the behaviour of fleet owners and their inclusiveness are analyzed. It is shown that the fleet size has an essential role. 

  • 4.
    Larson, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Kammer, Christoph
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    Research and Developement, Scania CV AB.
    Johansson, Karl Henrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Coordinated route optimization for heavy-duty vehicle platoons2013In: IEEE Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems, Proceedings, ITSC, IEEE conference proceedings, 2013, 1196-1202 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heavy-duty vehicles traveling in platoons consume fuel at a reduced rate. In this paper, we attempt to maximize this benefit by introducing local controllers throughout a road network to facilitate platoon formations with minimal information. By knowing a vehicle's position, speed, and destination, the local controller can quickly decide how its speed should be possibly adjusted to platoon with others in the near future. We solve this optimal control and routing problem exactly for small numbers of vehicles, and present a fast heuristic algorithm for real-time use. We then implement such a distributed control system through a large-scale simulation of the German autobahn road network containing thousands of vehicles. The simulation shows fuel savings from 1-9%, with savings exceeding 5% when only a few thousand vehicles participate in the system. We assume no vehicles will travel more than the time required for their shortest paths for the majority of the paper. We conclude the results by analyzing how a relaxation of this assumption can further reduce fuel use.

  • 5. Larson, Jeffrey
    et al.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre. Scania CV AB, Sweden .
    Johanson, Karl H.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    A Distributed Framework for Coordinated Heavy-Duty Vehicle Platooning2015In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 16, no 1, 419-429 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) traveling in single file with small intervehicle distances experience reduced aerodynamic drag and, therefore, have improved fuel economy. In this paper, we attempt to maximize the amount of fuel saved by coordinating platoon formation using a distributed network of controllers. These virtual controllers, placed at major intersections in a road network, help coordinate the velocity of approaching vehicles so they arrive at the junction simultaneously and can therefore platoon. This control is initiated only if the cost of forming the platoon is smaller than the savings incurred from platooning. In a largescale simulation of the German Autobahn network, we observe that savings surpassing 5% when only a few thousand vehicles participate in the system. These results are corroborated by an analysis of real-world HDV data that show significant platooning opportunities currently exist, suggesting that a slightly invasive network of distributed controllers, such as the one proposed in this paper, can yield considerable savings.

  • 6.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Coordination and Routing for Fuel-Efficient Heavy-Duty Vehicle Platoon Formation2014Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) manufacturers and fleet owners are facing great challenges for a maintained sustainable transport system as the demand for road freight transport is continuously increasing. HDV platooning is one potential solution topartially mitigate the environmental impacts as well as to reduce the fuel consumption, improve safety, and increase the throughput on congested highways. Although the concept of vehicle platooning has existed for decades, it has only been recently possible to implement in practice. Advancement in information and communications technology as well as in on-board technology allow the vehicles to connect with each other and the infrastructure. As goods have different origins, destinations, and time restrictions, it is not evident how the HDVs can fully utilize the platooning benefits during transport missions. There is a need to systematically coordinate scattered vehicles on the road network to form platoons in order to maximize the benefits of platooning. This thesis presents a framework for the coordination of HDV platoon formations. The focus lies on analyzing and validating the possibility to form platoons through fuel-efficient coordination decisions. A functional architecture for goods transport is presented, which divides the overall complex transport system into manageable layers. A vehicle model is developed to compute the impact a coordination decision has on the fuel cost. Platoon coordination consists of rerouting vehicles, adjusting departure times, and adjusting speed profiles. The focus in this thesis is on adjusting vehicles’ speeds through catch-up coordination. The first main contribution of the thesis is the investigation of how and when a pair of vehicles should form platoons given their position, speed, and destination. We derive a break-even ratio where the fuel cost of catching up and platooning is equal to the fuel cost of maintaining the original profile. By comparing the distance to destination and the distance to the candidate vehicle ahead with the break-even ratio, we can conclude whether a catch-up coordination would be beneficial or not. We also show that the road topography has little or no impact on the fuel savings of catch-up coordination. The second contribution is the study of extending the catch-up coordination into a road network with scattered vehicles with the possibility to form platoons and plan routes on junctions. Incoming vehicles on a road junction are aware of other incoming vehicles and of their position, speed, and destination. The vehicles can decide if a platoon should be formed and which path to take. Simulations on the German road network show fuel savings exceeding 5% with a few thousand vehicles. For our third contribution, we use real vehicle probe data obtained from a fleet management system to investigate how catch-up coordination and departure time adjustments can increase the fuel savings from today’s spontaneous platooning. The results show that coordination can increase the fuel savings and the platooning rate significantly. We managed to increase it with a factor of nine despite having only 200–350 active HDVs on the network. The main results of the thesis indicate that it is possible to increase fuel savings noticeably with simple regional coordination schemes for vehicle platoons.

  • 7.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Fuel-Efficient Heavy-Duty Vehicle Platoon Formation2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for intelligent freight transport solutions as the demand for road freight transport is continuously increasing while carbon footprint needs to be significantly reduced. Heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) platooning is one potential solution to partially mitigate the environmental impacts as well as to reduce fuel consumption, improve traffic safety, and increase traffic throughput on congested highways. However, as each goods transport has different origin, destination, and time restriction, it is not evident how the HDVs, carrying the goods, can fully utilize the platooning benefits during individual transport missions. Thus, there is a need to systematically coordinate scattered vehicles on the road to form platoons in order to maximize the benefits of platooning. 

     

    This thesis addresses the problem of merging scattered HDVs to form platoons in traffic. The first contribution of the thesis is the investigation of how and when a pair of HDVs should form platoons given their positions, speeds, and destinations. We formulate the problem as an optimization problem and we derive a break-even ratio that describes how far a vehicle should check for possible vehicles to platoon with. The second contribution is to consider traffic during the merging maneuver when forming a platoon. Traffic may disturb and delay when the two HDVs will form a platoon and such delay leads to less fuel saved than initially planned. Based on shockwave and moving bottleneck theories, we derive a merge distance predictor that calculates where the HDVs will merge depending on the traffic condition. We first validate this in a microscopic traffic simulation tool. Then, we also conduct an experimental study during one month on a public highway between Stockholm and Södertälje to evaluate the merging maneuver with different traffic densities. Lastly, we use vehicle probe data obtained from a fleet management system to investigate the potential fuel savings from coordination in a larger road network. The number of vehicles platooning can be increased significantly through coordination compared to today. 

     

    The main result of this thesis indicates that merging HDVs to form platoons leads to great fuel savings and that there are significant potentials to do so in reality. Traffic needs to be considered in order to guarantee that the HDVs save fuel and deliver the goods in time. Furthermore, the earlier the transport assignment is planned ahead of time, the more opportunities there are to collaborate with other fleet owners to reduce the fuel consumption. 

  • 8.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Alam, Assad
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Gattami, Ather
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    The Impact of Heterogeneity and Order in Heavy Duty Vehicle Platooning Networks2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is formally known that by establishing a heavy duty vehicle platoon, the fuel consumption is reduced for the follower vehicle due to the lower air drag. However, it is not clear how the platoon should be formed with respect to the heavy duty vehicle properties. String stability is a well discussed issue in vehicle platooning. However, each vehicle’s properties have to be taken into consideration when analyzing the platoon system. In this paper, we analyze one property of heavy duty vehicles the mass. The results show that the robustness is influenced by the order and physical characteristics of the vehicles in the platoon. When utilizing identical PID controllers for all vehicles in the platoon, it is better to arrange the heaviest vehicle first with decreasing mass order when considering the platoon behavior. However, in reality it is difficult to start rearranging a platoon in the middle of a highway and it would also require V2Vcommunication. A controller is often optimized for a particular configuration set that can cause slinky effects to the platoon. Therefore, a mass-dependent PID controller is introduced to establish a better platoon behavior for heavy duty vehicles. The results show no slinky effects regardless of the vehicle order in the platoon.

  • 9.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Deng, Qichen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Mårtensson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Ma, Xiaoliang
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Johansson, Karl Henrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    The Influence of Traffic on Heavy-Duty Vehicle Platoon Formation2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) platooning is a mean to significantly reduce the fuel consumption for the trailing vehicle. By driving close to the vehicle in front, the air drag is reduced tremendously. Due to each HDV being assigned with different transport missions, platoons will need to be frequently formed, merged, and split. Driving on the road requires interaction with surrounding traffic and road users, which will influence how well a platoon can be formed. In this paper, we study how traffic may affect a merging maneuver of two HDVs trying to form a platoon. We simulate this for different traffic densities and for different HDV speeds. Even on moderate traffic density, a platoon merge could be delayed with 20% compared to the ideal case with no traffic. 

  • 10.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Johansson, Karl H.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Experiments on Platoon Formation of Heavy Trucks in Traffic2016In: 2016 IEEE 19TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS (ITSC), IEEE, 2016, 1813-1819 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Truck platooning is a means to significantly reduce the fuel consumption for the follower vehicle as the air drag is reduced when the inter-vehicle gap between the trucks is reduced. As each truck is assigned with different start and end locations, platoons will be frequently formed and split, while driving to their respective destinations. Additionally, the trucks are not the only ones driving on the road as there are other road users, which may influence how well a platoon can be formed. In this paper, an experimental study is conducted to investigate how traffic may affect a merging maneuver of two trucks trying to form a platoon on a public highway during rush hours. We obtained traffic data from Stockholm's motorway control system to determine the traffic condition for each testrun. Furthermore, we tried different truck speeds to study if it had any impacts on merge delay. Even in light traffic condition, a platoon merge could be delayed with over 10 % compared to the ideal case with the absence of traffic. This is partially caused by persistent drivers in which we encountered them in a fourth of the runs.

  • 11.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre. Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Johansson, Karl H.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Fuel-Saving Potentials of Platooning Evaluated through Sparse Heavy-Duty Vehicle Position Data2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vehicle platooning is important for heavy-duty vehicle manufacturers, due to the reduced aerodynamic drag for the follower vehicles, which gives an overall lower fuel consumption. Heavy-duty vehicle drivers are aware this fact and sometimes drive close to other heavy-duty vehicles. However, it is not currently well known how many vehicles are actually driving in such spontaneous platoons today. This paper studies the platooning rate of 1,800 heavy-duty vehicles by analyzing sparse vehicle position data from a region in Europe during one day. Map-matching and path-inference algorithms are used to determine which paths the vehicles took. The spontaneous platooning rate is found to be 1.2 %, which corresponds to a total fuel saving of 0.07% compared to if none of the vehicles were platooning. Furthermore, we introduce several virtual coordination schemes. We show that coordinations can increase the platooning rate and fuel saving with a factor of ten with minor adjustments from the current travel schedule. The platooning rate and fuel savings can be significantly greater if higher flexibility is allowed.

  • 12.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Mårtensson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Johansson, Karl H.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Heavy-Duty Vehicle Platoon Formation for Fuel Efficiency2016In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 17, no 4, 1051-1061 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heavy-duty vehicles driving close behind each other, also known as platooning, experience a reduced aerodynamic drag, which reduces the overall fuel consumption up to 20% for the trailing vehicle. However, due to each vehicle being assigned with different transport missions (with different origins, destinations, and delivery times), platoons should be formed, split, and merged along the highways, and vehicles have to drive solo sometimes. In this paper, we study how two or more scattered vehicles can cooperate to form platoons in a fuel-efficient manner. We show that when forming platoons on the fly on the same route and not considering rerouting, the road topography has a negligible effect on the coordination decision. With this, we then formulate an optimization problem when coordinating two vehicles to form a platoon. We propose a coordination algorithm to form platoons of several vehicles that coordinates neighboring vehicles pairwise. Through a simulation study with detailed vehicle models and real road topography, it is shown that our approach yields significant fuel savings.

  • 13.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Mårtensson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Johansson, Karl Henrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    When is it Fuel Efficient for a Heavy Duty Vehicle to Catch Up With a Platoon?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vehicle platooning has in recent years become an important research eld for thevehicle industry. By establishing a platoon of heavy duty vehicles, the fuel consumption can bereduced for the follower vehicles due to the slipstream eect. However, as vehicles are scatteredon the road driving by themselves, coordination amongst the vehicles is required. In this paperwe study the problem of when it is benecial for a heavy duty vehicle to drive faster in orderto catch up and join a platoon. We derive a formula, based on at road and with no vehicleaccelerations, to calculate if it is more fuel-ecient for a vehicle to drive faster and platoonor keep driving alone. Depending on the distance between the vehicles and the distance to thedestination, the fuel savings vary. For a trip of 350 km, with a distance of 10km to the vehicleahead, the fuel saving could be up to 7% if the follower vehicle decides to increase the speed from80 km/h to 90 km/h in order to catch up and form a platoon, assuming an air drag reductionof 32% when platooning. Sensitivity analysis has shown that the speeds need to be relativelyaccurate in order to not give any false positive catch up decisions.

  • 14.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    van de Hoef, Sebastian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Terelius, Hakan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Turri, Valerio
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Besselink, Bart
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Martensson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Johansson, Karl H.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Networked control challenges in collaborative road freight transport2016In: European Journal of Control, ISSN 0947-3580, E-ISSN 1435-5671, Vol. 30, 2-14 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Freight transport is of major importance for the European economy and is growing thanks to increasing global trade. About three quarters of inland freight transport in the European Union is on roads. It has the potential to go through a dramatic change over the next decades thanks to the recent development of technologies such as wireless communication, cloud computing, sensor devices, and vehicle electronics. They enable a new integrated goods transport system based on optimized logistics, real-time traffic information, vehicular communications, collaborative driving, and autonomous vehicles. In this paper, we discuss challenges in creating a more efficient and sustainable goods road transportation system and how some of them can be tackled with a networked control approach. In particular, we discuss a method to improve the efficiency of the transportation system by minimizing the number of empty transports needed to fulfill the assignments on a given road network. Assignments with overlapping route segments might lead to further improvements, as the formation of vehicle platoons yields reduced fuel consumption. For realistic scenarios, it is shown that such collaboration opportunities arise already with relatively few vehicles. The fuel-efficient formation and control of platoons is also discussed. Some of the presented methods have been tested on real vehicles in traffic. The paper shows experimental results on automatic formation of vehicle platoons on a Swedish highway. The influence of traffic density on the merge maneuver is illustrated. The results indicate that platoon coordination could be improved by support from appropriate traffic monitoring technologies.

  • 15.
    Mårtensson, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Alam, Assad
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Behere, Sagar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Khan, Altamash
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Kjellberg, Joakim
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Pettersson, Henrik
    Sundman, Dennis
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Theory. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    The development of a cooperative heavy-duty vehicle for the GCDC 2011: Team Scoop2012In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 13, no 3, 1033-1049 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first edition of the Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge (GCDC) was held in the Netherlands in May 2011. Nine international teams competed in urban and highway platooning scenarios with prototype vehicles using cooperative adaptive cruise control. Team Scoop, a collaboration between KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, and Scania CV AB, Sodertalje, Sweden, participated at the GCDC with a Scania R-series tractor unit. This paper describes the development and design of Team Scoop's prototype system for the GCDC. In particular, we present considerations with regard to the system architecture, state estimation and sensor fusion, and the design and implementation of control algorithms, as well as implementation issues with regard to the wireless communication. The purpose of the paper is to give a broad overview of the different components that are needed to develop a cooperative driving system: from architectural design, workflow, and functional requirement descriptions to the specific implementation of algorithms for state estimation and control. The approach is more pragmatic than scientific; it collects a number of existing technologies and gives an implementation-oriented view of a cooperative vehicle. The main conclusion is that it is possible, with a modest effort, to design and implement a system that can function well in cooperation with other vehicles in realistic traffic scenarios.

1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf