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  • 1.
    Gry, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Rimini, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Strömberg, Sara
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University Hospital.
    Asplund, Anna
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University Hospital.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University Hospital.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Correlations between RNA and protein expression profiles in 23 human cell lines2009In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Central Dogma of biology holds, in famously simplified terms, that DNA makes RNA makes proteins, but there is considerable uncertainty regarding the general, genome-wide correlation between levels of RNA and corresponding proteins. Therefore, to assess degrees of this correlation we compared the RNA profiles (determined using both cDNA- and oligo-based microarrays) and protein profiles (determined immunohistochemically in tissue microarrays) of 1066 gene products in 23 human cell lines. Results: A high mean correlation coefficient (0.52) was obtained from the pairwise comparison of RNA levels determined by the two platforms. Significant correlations, with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.445, between protein and RNA levels were also obtained for a third of the specific gene products. However, the correlation coefficients between levels of RNA and protein products of specific genes varied widely, and the mean correlations between the protein and corresponding RNA levels determined using the cDNA- and oligo-based microarrays were 0.25 and 0.20, respectively. Conclusion: Significant correlations were found in one third of the examined RNA species and corresponding proteins. These results suggest that RNA profiling might provide indirect support to antibodies’ specificity, since whenever a evident correlation between the RNA and protein profiles exists, this can sustain that the antibodies used in the immunoassay recognized their cognate antigens.

  • 2.
    Rimini, Rebecca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sundberg, Marten
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    Klevebring, Daniel
    Gry, Marcus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Validation of serum protein profiles by a dual antibody array approach2009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, affinity-based technologies have become important tools for serum profiling to uncover protein expression patterns linked to disease state or therapeutic effects. In this study, we describe a path towards the production of an antibody microarray to allow protein profiling of biotinylated human serum samples with reproducible sensitivity in the picomolar range. With the availability of growing numbers of affinity reagents, protein profiles are to be validated in efficient manners and we describe a cross-platform strategy based on data concordance with a suspension bead array to interrogate the identical set of antibodies with the same cohort of serum samples. Comparative analysis enabled to screen for high-performing antibodies, which were displaying consistent results across the two platforms and targeting known serum components. Moreover, data processing methods such as sample referencing and normalization were evaluated for their effects on inter-platform agreement. Our work suggests that mutual validation of protein expression profiles using alternative microarray platforms holds great potential in becoming an important and valuable component in affinity-based high-throughput proteomic screenings as it allows to narrow down the number of discovered targets prior to orthogonal, uniplexed validation approaches.

  • 3.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Gry, Marcus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Rimini, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Antibody suspension bead arrays within serum proteomics2008In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 7, no 8, p. 3168-3179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody microarrays offer a powerful tool to screen for target proteins in complex samples. Here, we describe an approach for systematic analysis of serum, based on antibodies and using color-coded beads for the creation of antibody arrays in suspension. This method, adapted from planar antibody arrays, offers a fast, flexible, and multiplexed procedure to screen larger numbers of serum samples, and no purification steps are required to remove excess labeling substance. The assay system detected proteins down to lower picomolar levels with dynamic ranges over 3 orders of magnitude. The feasibility of this workflow was shown in a study with more than 200 clinical serum samples tested for 20 serum proteins.

  • 4.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Agaton, Charlotta
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Amini, Bahram
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Andersen, Elisabet
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Andersson, Ann-Catrin
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Angelidou, Pia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Asplund, Caroline
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Berglund, Lisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Bergström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Cerjan, Dijana
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Ekström, Marica
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Elobeid, Adila
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Eriksson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Falk, Ronny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Fall, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Forsberg, Mattias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gry Björklund, Marcus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gumbel, Kristoffer
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Halimi, Asif
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hallin, Inga
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Hamsten, Carl
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Hansson, Marianne
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hercules, Görel
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Larsson, Karin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lindskog, Mats
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lodewyckx, Wald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lund, Jan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Magnusson, Kristina
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Malm, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Ödling, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Olsson, Ingmarie
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Öster, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Ottosson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Paavilainen, Linda
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Rimini, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Runeson, Marcus
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sköllermo, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Steen, Johanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Stenvall, Maria
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sterky, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Strömberg, Sara
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Tourle, Samuel
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wahlund, Eva
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Waldén, Annelie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wan, Jinghong
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology (closed 20130101).
    Wernérus, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Westberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wester, Kenneth
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Wrethagen, Ulla
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Xu, Lan Lan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    A human protein atlas for normal and cancer tissues based on antibody proteomics2005In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 1920-1932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody-based proteomics provides a powerful approach for the functional study of the human proteome involving the systematic generation of protein-specific affinity reagents. We used this strategy to construct a comprehensive, antibody-based protein atlas for expression and localization profiles in 48 normal human tissues and 20 different cancers. Here we report a new publicly available database containing, in the first version, similar to 400,000 high resolution images corresponding to more than 700 antibodies toward human proteins. Each image has been annotated by a certified pathologist to provide a knowledge base for functional studies and to allow queries about protein profiles in normal and disease tissues. Our results suggest it should be possible to extend this analysis to the majority of all human proteins thus providing a valuable tool for medical and biological research.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
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  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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