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  • 1.
    Aghaali, Habib
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Exhaust Heat Utilisation and Losses in Internal Combustion Engines with Focus on the Gas Exchange System2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Exhaust gas energy recovery should be considered in improving fuel economy of internal combustion engines. A large portion of fuel energy is wasted through the exhaust of internal combustion engines. Turbocharger and turbocompound can, however, recover part of this wasted heat. The energy recovery depends on the efficiency and mass flow of the turbine(s) as well as the exhaust gas state and properties such as pressure, temperature and specific heat capacity. The exhaust gas pressure is the principal parameter which is required for the turbine energy recovery, but higher exhaust back-pressures on the engines create higher pumping losses. This is in addition to the heat losses in the turbochargers what makes any measurement and simulation of the engines more complex.

    This thesis consists of two major parts. First of all, the importance of heat losses in turbochargers has been shown theoretically and experimentally with the aim of including heat transfer of the turbochargers in engine simulations. Secondly, different concepts have been examined to extract exhaust heat energy including turbocompounding and divided exhaust period (DEP) with the aim of improved exhaust heat utilisation and reduced pumping losses.

    In the study of heat transfer in turbochargers, the turbocharged engine simulation was improved by including heat transfer of the turbocharger in the simulation. Next, the heat transfer modelling of the turbochargers was improved by introducing a new method for convection heat transfer calculation with the support of on-engine turbocharger measurements under different heat transfer conditions. Then, two different turbocharger performance maps were assessed concerning the heat transfer conditions in the engine simulation. Finally, the temperatures of turbocharger’s surfaces were predicted according to the measurements under different heat transfer conditions and their effects are studied on the turbocharger performance. The present study shows that the heat transfer in the turbochargers is very crucial to take into account in the engine simulations, especially in transient operations.

    In the study of exhaust heat utilisation, important parameters concerning turbine and gas exchange system that can influence the waste heat recovery were discussed. In addition to exhaust back-pressure, turbine speed and turbine efficiency, the role of the air-fuel equivalence ratio was demonstrated in details, because lower air-fuel equivalence ratio in a Diesel engine can provide higher exhaust gas temperature. The results of this study indicate that turbocompound engine efficiency is relatively insensitive to the air-fuel equivalence ratio.

    To decrease the influence of the increased exhaust back-pressure of a turbocompound engine, a new architecture was developed by combining the turbocompound engine with DEP. The aim of this study was to utilise the earlier phase (blowdown) of the exhaust stroke in the turbine(s) and let the later phase (scavenging) of the exhaust stroke bypass the turbine(s). To decouple the blowdown phase from the scavenging phase, the exhaust flow was divided between two different exhaust manifolds with different valve timing.

    According to this study, this combination improves the fuel consumption in low engine speeds and deteriorates it at high engine speeds. This is mainly due to long duration of choked flow in the exhaust valves because this approach is using only one of the two exhaust valves on each cylinder at a time.

    Therefore, the effects of enlarged effective flow areas of the exhaust valves were studied. Two methods were used to enlarge the effective flow area i.e. increasing the diameters of the blowdown and scavenging valves by 4 mm; and modifying the valve lift curves of the exhaust valves to fast opening and closing. Both methods improved BSFC in the same order even though they were different in nature. Fast opening and closing of the exhaust valves required shorter blowdown duration and longer scavenging duration. The modified lift curves provided less pumping losses, less available energy into the turbine and larger amplitude of the pulsating flow through the turbine.

    In order for defining a set of important parameters that should be examined in experimental studies, a sensitivity analysis was performed on the turbocompound DEP engine in terms of break specific fuel consumption to different parameters concerning the gas exchange such as blowdown valve timing, scavenging valve timing, blowdown valve size, scavenging valve size, discharge coefficients of blowdown and scavenging ports, turbine efficiency, turbine size and power transmission efficiency.

    Finally, to overcome the restriction in the effective flow areas of the exhaust valves, DEP was implemented externally on the exhaust manifold instead of engine exhaust valves, which is called externally DEP (ExDEP). This innovative engine architecture, which benefits from supercharging, turbocharging and turbocompounding, has a great fuel-saving potential in almost all load points up to 4%.

  • 2.
    Aghaali, Habib
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    On-Engine Turbocharger Performance Considering Heat Transfer2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Heat transfer plays an important role in affecting an on-engine turbocharger performance. However, it is normally not taken into account for turbocharged engine simulations.

    Generally, an engine simulation based on one-dimensional gas dynamics uses turbocharger performance maps which are measured without quantifying and qualifying the heat transfer, regardless of the fact that they are measured on the hot-flow or cold-flow gas-stand. Since heat transfer situations vary for on-engine turbochargers, the maps have to be shifted and corrected in the 1-D engine simulation, which mass and efficiency multipliers usually do for both the turbine and the compressor. The multipliers change the maps and are often different for every load point. Particularly, the efficiency multiplier is different for every heat transfer situation on the turbocharger. The heat transfer leads to a deviation from turbocharger performance maps, and increased complexity of the turbocharged engine simulation. Turbochargers operate under different heat transfer situations while they are installed on the engines.

    The main objectives of this thesis are:

    • heat transfer modeling of a turbocharger to quantify and qualify heat transfer mechanisms,
    • improving turbocharged engine simulation by including heat transfer in the turbocharger,
    • assessing the use of two different turbocharger performance maps concerning the heat transfer situation (cold-measured and hot-measured turbocharger performance maps) in the simulation of a measured turbocharged engine,
    • prediction of turbocharger walls’ temperatures and their effects on the turbocharger performance on different heat transfer situations.

    Experimental investigation has been performed on a water-oil-cooled turbocharger, which was installed on a 2-liter GDI engine for different load points of the engine and different heat transfer situations on the turbocharger by using insulators, an extra cooling fan, radiation shields and water-cooling settings. In addition, several thermocouples have been used on accessible surfaces of the turbocharger to calculate external heat transfers.

    Based on the heat transfer analysis of the turbocharger, the internal heat transfer from the bearing housing to the compressor significantly affects the compressor. However, the internal heat transfer from the turbine to the bearing housing and the external heat transfer of the turbine housing mainly influence the turbine. The external heat transfers of the compressor housing and the bearing housing, and the frictional power do not play an important role in the heat transfer analysis of the turbocharger.

    The effect of the extra cooling fan on the energy balance of the turbocharger is significant. However, the effect of the water is more significant on the external heat transfer of the bearing housing and the internal heat transfer from the bearing housing to the compressor. It seems the radiation shield between the turbine and the compressor has no significant effect on the energy balance of the turbocharger.

    The present study shows that the heat transfer in the turbocharger is very crucial to take into account in the engine simulations. This improves simulation predictability in terms of getting the compressor efficiency multiplier equal to one and turbine efficiency multiplier closer to one, and achieving turbine outlet temperature close to the measurement. Moreover, the compressor outlet temperature becomes equal to the measurement without correcting the map.

    The heat transfer situation during the measurement of the turbocharger performance influences the amount of simulated heat flow to the compressor. The heat transfer situation may be defined by the turbine inlet temperature, oil heat flux and water heat flux. However, the heat transfer situation on the turbine makes a difference on the required turbine efficiency multiplier, rather than the amount of turbine heat flow. It seems the turbine heat flow is a stronger function of available energy into the turbine. Of great interest is the fact that different heat situations on the turbocharger do not considerably influence the pressure ratio of the compressor. The turbine and compressor efficiencies are the most important parameters that are affected by that.

    The component temperatures of the turbocharger influence the working fluid temperatures. Additionally, the turbocharger wall temperatures are predictable from the experiment. This prediction enables increased precision in engine simulations for future works in transient operations.

  • 3.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångstrom, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Demonstration of Air-Fuel Ratio Role in One-Stage Turbocompound Diesel Engines2013In: SAE Technical Papers, 2013, Vol. 11Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large portion of fuel energy is wasted through the exhaust of internal combustion engines. Turbocompound can, however, recover part of this wasted heat. The energy recovery depends on the turbine efficiency and mass flow as well as the exhaust gas state and properties such as pressure, temperature and specific heat capacity.

    The main parameter influencing the turbocompound energy recovery is the exhaust gas pressure which leads to higher pumping loss of the engine and consequently lower engine crankshaft power. Each air-fuel equivalence ratio (λ) gives different engine power, exhaust gas temperature and pressure. Decreasing λ toward 1 in a Diesel engine results in higher exhaust gas temperatures of the engine.  λ can be varied by changing the intake air pressure or the amount of injected fuel which changes the available energy into the turbine. Thus, there is a compromise between gross engine power, created pumping power, recovered turbocompound power and consumed compressor power.

    In this study, the effects of different λ values and exhaust back-pressure have been investigated on the efficiency of a heavy-duty Diesel engine equipped with a single-stage electric turbocompounding. A one-dimensional gas dynamics model of a turbocharged engine was utilized that was validated against measurements at different load points. Two configurations of turbocompound engine were made. In one configuration an electric turbocharger was used and the amount of fuel was varied with constant intake air pressure. In another configuration the turbocharger turbine and compressor were disconnected to be able to control the turbine speed and the compressor speed independently; then the compressor pressure ratio was varied with constant engine fuelling and the exhaust back-pressure was optimized for each compressor pressure ratio.

    At each constant turbine efficiency there is a linear relation between the optimum exhaust back-pressure and ideally expanded cylinder pressure until bottom dead center with closed exhaust valves. There is an optimum λ for the turbocharged engine with regard to the fuel consumption. In the turbocompound engine, this will be moved to a richer λ that gives the best total specific fuel consumption; however, the results of this study indicates that turbocompound engine efficiency is relatively insensitive to the air-fuel ratio.

  • 4.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    A review of turbocompounding as a waste heat recovery system for internal combustion engines2015In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 49, p. 813-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internal combustion engines waste a large amount of fuel energy through their exhausts. Various technologies have been developed for waste heat recovery such as turbocompounds, Rankine bottoming cycles, and thermoelectric generators that reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. Turbocompounding is still not widely applied to vehicular use despite the improved fuel economy, lower cost, volume, and complexity higher exhaust gas recirculation driving capability and improved transient response. This paper comprehensively reviews the latest developments and research on turbocompounding to discover important variables and provide insights into the implementation of a high-efficiency turbocompound engine. Attention should be paid to the optimization of turbocompound engines and their configurations because the major drawback of this technology is additional exhaust back-pressure, which leads to higher pumping loss in the engines. Applying different technologies and concepts on turbocompound engines makes the exhaust energy recovery more efficient and provides more freedom in the design and optimization of the engines. Turbine efficiency plays an important role in the recovery of the wasted heat so turbine design is a crucial issue in turbocompounding. In addition, variability in geometry and rotational speed of power turbines allows for more efficient turbocompound engines in different operating conditions. The conclusion drawn from this review is that turbocompounding is a promising technology for reducing fuel consumption in the coming decades in both light- and heavy-duty engines.

  • 5.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Effects of Effective Flow Areas of Exhaust Valves on a Turbocompound Diesel Engine Combined With Divided Exhaust Period2014In: Proceedings from the FISITA 2014 World Automotive Congress, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research and /or Engineering Questions/Objective: Exhaust gas energy recovery in internal combustion engines is one of the key challenges in the future developments. The objective of this study is to reveal the fuel-saving potential of a turbocompound Diesel engine combined with divided exhaust period (DEP). The exhaust flow is provided for two different manifolds via separate valves, blowdown and scavenging, at different timings. The main challenge in this combination is choked flow through the exhaust valves due to the restricted effective flow areas. Therefore, the effects of enlarged effective flow areas of the exhaust valves are studied.

    Methodology: A commercial 1D gas dynamics code, GT-POWER, was used to simulate a turbocharged Diesel engine which was validated against measurements. Then the turbocharged engine model was modified to a turbocompound engine with DEP. Using statistical analysis in the simulation (design of experiment), the performance of this engine was studied at different sizes, lift curves and timings of the exhaust valves and turbine swallowing capacity.

    Results: In the paper the effects of the effective flow areas of the exhaust valves are presented on the break specific fuel consumption, pumping mean effective pressure and the turbine energy recovery by increasing the valve size and modifying valve lift curve to fast opening and closing. This has been done in a low engine speed and full load. The main finding is that the flow characteristics of the exhaust valves in the turbocompound DEP engine are very important for gaining the full efficiency benefit of the DEP concept.  The turbocompound DEP engine with modified valve lift shape of the exhaust valves could improve the overall brake specific fuel consumption by 3.44% in which 0.64% of the improvement is due to the valve lift curve. Modified valve lift curves contribute mainly in decreasing the period of choked flow through the exhaust valves.

    Limitations of this study: The simulations were not validated against measurements; however, the mechanical and geometrical limitations were tried to keep realistic when manipulating the valve flow area events.

    What does the paper offer that is new in the field in comparison to other works of the author: In addition to the novelty of the engine architecture that combines turbocompound with DEP, the statistical analysis and comparison presented in this paper is new especially with demonstrating the importance of crank angle coupled flow characteristics of the valves.

    Conclusion: To achieve full fuel-saving potential of turbocompound DEP engines, the flow characteristics of the exhaust valves must be considered. The effective flow areas of the exhaust valves play important roles in the choked flow through the valves, the pumping work and the brake specific fuel consumption of the engine.

  • 6.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Externally divided exhaust period on a turbocompound engine for fuel-saving2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve exhaust heat utilization of a turbocharged engine, divided exhaust period (DEP) and turbocompound are integrated. The DEP concept decreases pumping loss created by the turbocompound. In the DEP concept the exhaust flow is divided between two different exhaust manifolds, blowdown and scavenging. One of the two exhaust valves on each engine cylinder is opened to the blowdown manifold at the first phase of exhaust stroke and the other valve is opened to the scavenging manifold at the later phase of exhaust stroke. This leads to lower exhaust back pressure and pumping loss. The combination of turbocompound engine with DEP has been examined previously and the result showed that this combination reduces the fuel consumption in low engine speeds and deteriorates it in high engine speeds. The main restriction of this combination was the low effective flow areas of the exhaust valves at high engine speeds.

    To overcome this restriction and increase the effective flow areas of the exhaust valves, DEP is employed externally on the exhaust manifold instead of engine exhaust valves. In externally DEP (ExDEP), both exhaust valves will be opened and closed similar to the corresponding turbocharged engine and the exhaust flow is divided by flow splits on the exhaust manifold. Two valves on the outlet ports of each flow split are added. One of them is a non-return valve (check valve) and the other one is synchronized with the cam shaft.

    In this study, the fuel-saving potential of ExDEP is analysed on the turbocompound engine at different engine speeds and loads and compared with the corresponding turbocharged engine, turbocompound engine and turbocompound DEP engine equipped. The results show that ExDEP has a great fuel-saving potential in almost all load points.

    ExDEP concept, itself, is a novel concept that there is no available literature about it. Moreover, combination of this new gas exchange system with turbocompound engines is an innovative extension of combined turbocompound DEP engines.

  • 7.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Improving Turbocharged Engine Simulation by Including Heat Transfer in the Turbocharger2012In: 2012 SAE International, SAE international , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engine simulation based on one-dimensional gas dynamics is well suited for integration of all aspects arising in engine and power-train developments. Commonly used turbocharger performance maps in engine simulation are measured in non-pulsating flow and without taking into account the heat transfer. Since on-engine turbochargers are exposed to pulsating flow and varying heat transfer situations, the maps in the engine simulation, i.e. GT-POWER, have to be shifted and corrected which are usually done by mass and efficiency multipliers for both turbine and compressor. The multipliers change the maps and are often different for every load point. Particularly, the efficiency multiplier is different for every heat transfer situation on the turbocharger. The aim of this paper is to include the heat transfer of the turbocharger in the engine simulation and consequently to reduce the use of efficiency multiplier for both the turbine and compressor. A set of experiment has been designed and performed on a water-oil-cooled turbocharger, which was installed on a 2 liter GDI engine with variable valve timing, for different load points of the engine and different conditions of heat transfer in the turbocharger. The experiments were the base to simulate heat transfer on the turbocharger, by adding a heat sink before the turbine and a heat source after the compressor. The efficiency multiplier of the turbine cannot compensate for all heat transfer in the turbine, so it is needed to put out heat from the turbine in addition to the using of efficiency multiplier. Results of this study show that including heat transfer of turbocharger in engine simulation enables to decrease the use of turbine efficiency multiplier and eliminate the use of compressor efficiency multiplier to correctly calculate the measured gas temperatures after turbine and compressor.

  • 8.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Performance Sensitivity to Exhaust Valves and Turbine Parameters on a Turbocompound Engine with Divided Exhaust Period2014In: SAE International Journal of Engines, ISSN 1946-3936, E-ISSN 1946-3944, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 1722-1733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbocompound can utilize part of the exhaust energy on internal combustion engines; however, it increases exhaust back pressure, and pumping loss.  To avoid such drawbacks, divided exhaust period (DEP) technology is combined with the turbocompound engine. In the DEP concept the exhaust flow is divided between two different exhaust manifolds, blowdown and scavenging, with different valve timings. This leads to lower exhaust back pressure and improves engine performance.

    Combining turbocompound engine with DEP has been theoretically investigated previously and shown that this reduces the fuel consumption and there is a compromise between the turbine energy recovery and the pumping work in the engine optimization. However, the sensitivity of the engine performance has not been investigated for all relevant parameters. The main aim of this study is to analyze the sensitivity of this engine architecture in terms of break specific fuel consumption to different parameters concerning the gas exchange such as blowdown valve timing, scavenging valve timing, blowdown valve size, scavenging valve size, discharge coefficients of blowdown and scavenging ports, turbine efficiency, turbine size and power transmission efficiency. This study presents the sensitivity analysis of the turbocompound DEP engine to these parameters and defines a set of important parameters that should be examined in experimental studies.

  • 9.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Temperature Estimation of Turbocharger Working Fluids and Walls under Different Engine Loads and Heat Transfer Conditions2013In: SAE Technical Papers, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbocharger performance maps, which are used in engine simulations, are usually measured on a gas-stand where the temperatures distributions on the turbocharger walls are entirely different from that under real engine operation. This should be taken into account in the simulation of a turbocharged engine. Dissimilar wall temperatures of turbochargers give different air temperature after the compressor and different exhaust gas temperature after the turbine at a same load point. The efficiencies are consequently affected. This can lead to deviations between the simulated and measured outlet temperatures of the turbocharger turbine and compressor. This deviation is larger during a transient load step because the temperatures of turbocharger walls change slowly due to the thermal inertia. Therefore, it is important to predict the temperatures of turbocharger walls and the outlet temperatures of the turbocharger working fluids in a turbocharged engine simulation.

    In the work described in this paper, a water-oil-cooled turbocharger was extensively instrumented with several thermocouples on reachable walls. The turbocharger was installed on a 2-liter gasoline engine that was run under different loads and different heat transfer conditions on the turbocharger by using insulators, an extra cooling fan, radiation shields and water-cooling settings. The turbine inlet temperature varied between 550 and 850 °C at different engine loads.

    The results of this study show that the temperatures of turbocharger walls are predictable from the experiment. They are dependent on the load point and the heat transfer condition of the turbocharger. The heat transfer condition of an on-engine turbocharger could be defined by the turbine inlet temperature, ambient temperature, oil heat flux, water heat flux and the velocity of the air around the turbocharger. Thus, defining the heat transfer condition and rotational speed of the turbocharger provides temperatures predictions of the turbocharger walls and the working fluids. This prediction enables increased precision in engine simulation for future work in transient operation.

  • 10.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    The Exhaust Energy Utilization of a Turbocompound Engine Combined with Divided Exhaust Period2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To decrease the influence of the increased exhaust pressure of a turbocompound engine, a new architecture is developed by combining the turbocompound engine with divided exhaust period (DEP). The aim of this study is to utilize the earlier stage (blowdown) of the exhaust stroke in the turbine(s) and let the later stage (scavenging) of the exhaust stroke bypass the turbine(s). To decouple the blowdown phase from the scavenging phase, the exhaust flow is divided between two different exhaust manifolds with different valve timing. A variable valve train system is assumed to enable optimization at different load points. The fuel-saving potential of this architecture have been theoretically investigated by examining different parameters such as turbine flow capacity, blowdown valve timing and scavenging valve timing. Many combinations of these parameters are considered in the optimization of the engine for different engine loads and speeds.

    This architecture produces less negative pumping work for the same engine load point due to lower exhaust back pressure; however, the exhaust mass flow into the turbine(s) is decreased. Therefore, there is a compromise between the turbine energy recovery and the pumping work. According to this study, this combination shows fuel-saving potential in low engine speeds and limitations at high engine speeds. This is mainly due to the choked flow in the exhaust valves because this approach is using only one of the two exhaust valves at a time. To reveal the full potential of this approach, increasing the effective flow area of the valves should be studied.

  • 11.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Turbocharged SI-Engine Simulation with Cold and Hot-Measured Turbocharger Performance Maps2012In: Proceedings of ASME Turbo Expo 2012, Vol 5, ASME Press, 2012, p. 671-679Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heat transfer within the turbocharger is an issue in engine simulation based on zero and one-dimensional gas dynamics. Turbocharged engine simulation is often done without taking into account the heat transfer in the turbocharger. In the simulation, using multipliers is the common way of adjusting turbocharger speed and parameters downstream of the compressor and upstream of the turbine. However, they do not represent the physical reality. The multipliers change the maps and need often to be different for different load points. The aim of this paper is to simulate a turbocharged engine and also consider heat transfer in the turbocharger. To be able to consider heat transfer in the turbine and compressor, heat is transferred from the turbine volute and into the compressor scroll. Additionally, the engine simulation was done by using two different turbocharger performance maps of a turbocharger measured under cold and hot conditions. The turbine inlet temperatures were 100 and 600°C, respectively. The turbocharged engine experiment was performed on a water-oil-cooled turbocharger (closed waste-gate), which was installed on a 2-liter gasoline direct-injected engine with variable valve timing, for different load points of the engine. In the work described in this paper, the difference between cold and hot-measured turbocharger performance maps is discussed and the quantified heat transfers from the turbine and to/from the compressor are interpreted and related to the maps.

  • 12.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Serrano, Jose R
    Universitat Politècnica de València.
    Evaluation of different heat transfer conditions on an automotive turbocharger2014In: International Journal of Engine Research, ISSN 1468-0874, E-ISSN 2041-3149, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 137-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a combination of theoretical and experimental investigations for determining the main heat fluxes within a turbocharger. These investigations consider several engine speeds and loads as well as different methods of conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfer on the turbocharger. A one-dimensional heat transfer model of the turbocharger has been developed in combination with simulation of a turbocharged engine that includes the heat transfer of the turbocharger. Both the heat transfer model and the simulation were validated against experimental measurements. Various methods were compared for calculating heat transfer from the external surfaces of the turbocharger, and one new method was suggested.

    The effects of different heat transfer conditions were studied on the heat fluxes of the turbocharger using experimental techniques. The different heat transfer conditions on the turbocharger created dissimilar temperature gradients across the turbocharger. The results show that changing the convection heat transfer condition around the turbocharger affects the heat fluxes more noticeably than changing the radiation and conduction heat transfer conditions. Moreover, the internal heat transfers from the turbine to the bearing housing and from the bearing housing to the compressor are significant, but there is an order of magnitude difference between these heat transfer rates.

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