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  • 1.
    Beven, Laure
    et al.
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Charenton, Claire
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Dautant, Alain
    Univ Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France ; IBMC, CNRS, Bordeaux, France.
    Bouyssou, Guillaume
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Labroussaa, Fabien
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Sköllermo, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Blanchard, Alain
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Specific Evolution of F-1-Like ATPases in Mycoplasmas2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 6, p. e38793-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    F1F0 ATPases have been identified in most bacteria, including mycoplasmas which have very small genomes associated with a host-dependent lifestyle. In addition to the typical operon of eight genes encoding genuine F1F0 ATPase (Type 1), we identified related clusters of seven genes in many mycoplasma species. Four of the encoded proteins have predicted structures similar to the alpha, beta, gamma and e subunits of F-1 ATPases and could form an F-1-like ATPase. The other three proteins display no similarity to any other known proteins. Two of these proteins are probably located in the membrane, as they have three and twelve predicted transmembrane helices. Phylogenomic studies identified two types of F-1-like ATPase clusters, Type 2 and Type 3, characterized by a rapid evolution of sequences with the conservation of structural features. Clusters encoding Type 2 and Type 3 ATPases were assumed to originate from the Hominis group of mycoplasmas. We suggest that Type 3 ATPase clusters may spread to other phylogenetic groups by horizontal gene transfer between mycoplasmas in the same host, based on phylogeny and genomic context. Functional analyses in the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides showed that the Type 3 cluster genes were organized into an operon. Proteomic analyses demonstrated that the seven encoded proteins were produced during growth in axenic media. Mutagenesis and complementation studies demonstrated an association of the Type 3 cluster with a major ATPase activity of membrane fractions. Thus, despite their tendency toward genome reduction, mycoplasmas have evolved and exchanged specific F-1-like ATPases with no known equivalent in other bacteria. We propose a model, in which the F-1-like structure is associated with a hypothetical X-0 sector located in the membrane of mycoplasma cells.

  • 2. Pang, Jun-Feng
    et al.
    Klütsch, Cornelya
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Zou, Xiao-Ju
    Zhang, Ai-bing
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Luo, Li-Yang
    Angleby, Helen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Ardalan, Arman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Ekström, Camilla
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Sköllermo, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Matsumura, Shuichi
    Leitner, Thomas
    Zhang, Ya-Ping
    Savolainen, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    mtDNA Data Indicate a Single Origin for Dogs South of Yangtze River, Less Than 16,300 Years Ago, from Numerous Wolves2009In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 26, no 12, p. 2849-2864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is no generally accepted picture of where, when, and how the domestic dog originated. Previous studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have failed to establish the time and precise place of origin because of lack of phylogenetic resolution in the so far studied control region (CR), and inadequate sampling. We therefore analyzed entire mitochondrial genomes for 169 dogs to obtain maximal phylogenetic resolution and the CR for 1,543 dogs across the Old World for a comprehensive picture of geographical diversity. Hereby, a detailed picture of the origins of the dog can for the first time be suggested. We obtained evidence that the dog has a single origin in time and space and an estimation of the time of origin, number of founders, and approximate region, which also gives potential clues about the human culture involved. The analyses showed that dogs universally share a common homogenous gene pool containing 10 major haplogroups. However, the full range of genetic diversity, all 10 haplogroups, was found only in southeastern Asia south of Yangtze River, and diversity decreased following a gradient across Eurasia, through seven haplogroups in Central China and five in North China and Southwest (SW)Asia, down to only four haplogroups in Europe. The mean sequence distance to ancestral haplotypes indicates an origin 5,400-16,300 years ago (ya) from at least 51 female wolf founders. These results indicate that the domestic dog originated in southern China less than 16,300 ya, from several hundred wolves. The place and time coincide approximately with the origin of rice agriculture, suggesting that the dogs may have originated among sedentary hunter-gatherers or early farmers, and the numerous founders indicate that wolf taming was an important culture trait.

  • 3.
    Strömberg, Sara
    et al.
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Gry Björklund, Marcus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Asplund, Caroline
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sköllermo, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Wester, Kenneth
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Andersson, Ann-Catrin
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Kononen, Juha
    Beecher Instruments, Sun Prairie, WI, United States.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Asplund, Anna
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    A high-throughput strategy for protein profiling in cell microarrays using automated image analysis2007In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 7, no 13, p. 2142-2150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in antibody production render a growing supply of affinity reagents for immunohistochemistry (IHC), and tissue microarray (TMA) technologies facilitate simultaneous analysis of protein expression in a multitude of tissues. However, collecting validated IHC data remains a bottleneck problem, as the standard method is manual microscopical analysis. Here we present a high-throughput strategy combining IHC on a recently developed cell microarray with a novel, automated image-analysis application (TMAx). The software was evaluated on 200 digital images of IHC-stained cell spots, by comparing TMAx annotation with manual annotation performed by seven human experts. A high concordance between automated and manual annotation of staining intensity and fraction of IHC-positive cells was found. in a limited study, we also investigated the possibility to assess the correlation between mRNA and protein levels, by using TMAx output results for relative protein quantification and quantitative real-time PCR for the quantification of corresponding transcript levels. In conclusion, automated analysis of immunohistochemically stained in vitro-cultured cells in a microarray format can be used for high-throughput protein profiling, and extraction of RNA from the same cell lines provides a basis for comparing transcription and protein expression on a global scale.

  • 4.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Agaton, Charlotta
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Amini, Bahram
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Andersen, Elisabet
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Andersson, Ann-Catrin
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Angelidou, Pia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Asplund, Caroline
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Berglund, Lisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Bergström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Cerjan, Dijana
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Ekström, Marica
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Elobeid, Adila
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Eriksson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Falk, Ronny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Fall, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Forsberg, Mattias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gry Björklund, Marcus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gumbel, Kristoffer
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Halimi, Asif
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hallin, Inga
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Hamsten, Carl
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Hansson, Marianne
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hercules, Görel
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Larsson, Karin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lindskog, Mats
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lodewyckx, Wald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lund, Jan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Magnusson, Kristina
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Malm, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Ödling, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Olsson, Ingmarie
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Öster, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Ottosson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Paavilainen, Linda
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Rimini, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Runeson, Marcus
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sköllermo, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Steen, Johanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Stenvall, Maria
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sterky, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Strömberg, Sara
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Tourle, Samuel
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wahlund, Eva
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Waldén, Annelie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wan, Jinghong
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology (closed 20130101).
    Wernérus, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Westberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wester, Kenneth
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Wrethagen, Ulla
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Xu, Lan Lan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    A human protein atlas for normal and cancer tissues based on antibody proteomics2005In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 1920-1932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody-based proteomics provides a powerful approach for the functional study of the human proteome involving the systematic generation of protein-specific affinity reagents. We used this strategy to construct a comprehensive, antibody-based protein atlas for expression and localization profiles in 48 normal human tissues and 20 different cancers. Here we report a new publicly available database containing, in the first version, similar to 400,000 high resolution images corresponding to more than 700 antibodies toward human proteins. Each image has been annotated by a certified pathologist to provide a knowledge base for functional studies and to allow queries about protein profiles in normal and disease tissues. Our results suggest it should be possible to extend this analysis to the majority of all human proteins thus providing a valuable tool for medical and biological research.

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