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  • 1.
    Lundberg, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    AitBlal, C.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Alm, Tove L.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Björk, L.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bäckström, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Danielsson, Frida
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fall, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hjelmare, Martin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mahdessian, Diana
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schutten, Rutger
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Skogs, Marie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stadler, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sullivan, Devin P.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Thul, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wiking, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Winsnes, Casper F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Åkesson, Lovisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    The Cell Atlas: Creation of an image-based atlas of the subcellular distribution of the human proteome.2016In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, ISSN 1059-1524, E-ISSN 1939-4586, Vol. 27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Mahdessian, Diana
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Sullivan, D. P.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Danielsson, Frida
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Arif, Muhammad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhang, Cheng
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Åkesson, Lovisa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gnann, Christian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Shutten, Rutger
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Thul, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Carja, Oana
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA..
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. Centre for Host–Microbiome Interactions, Faculty of Dentistry, Oral & Craniofacial Sciences, King's College London, London, SE1 9RT, United Kingdom.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Lindskog, Cecilia
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA..
    Spatiotemporal dissection of the cell cycle regulated human proteomeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we present a spatiotemporal dissection of proteome single cell heterogeneity in human cells, performed with subcellular resolution over the course of a cell cycle. We identify 17% of the human proteome to display cell-to-cell variability, of which we could attribute 25% as correlated to cell cycle progression, and present the first evidence of cell cycle association for 258 proteins. A key finding is that the variance, of many of the cell cycle associated proteins, is only partially explained by the cell cycle, which hints at cross-talk between the cell cycle and other signaling pathways. We also demonstrate that several of the identified cell cycle regulated proteins may be clinically significant in proliferative disorders. This spatially resolved proteome map of the cell cycle, integrated into the Human Protein Atlas, serves as a valuable resource to accelerate the molecular knowledge of the cell cycle and opens up novel avenues for the understanding of cell proliferation.

  • 3.
    Mahdessian, Diana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Wiking, Mikaela
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bäckström, Anna
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Danielsson, Frida
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fall, Jenny
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stadler, Charlotte
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Thul, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Åkesson, Lovisa
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA ; Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
    An image-based map of the human mitochondrial proteome and its heterogeneityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitochondria is involved in a numerous variety of cellular functions beyond its role in energy metabolism. Defining the human mitochondrial proteome is crucial to understand the mitochondria’s diverse functions and role in disease. Here, we present an image-based map of the human mitochondrial proteome containing 1,098 proteins. The single cell resolution revealed extensive heterogeneity for as much as 20% (n=226) of the mitochondrial proteome.  These variations are independent of cell cycle position and likely represent metabolic fluctuations in the cell. Our analysis shows that 48% (n=524) of the proteins localize to additional cellular compartments, further contributing to the diverse cellular functions of mitochondria. This map of the mitochondrial proteome, part of the Cell Atlas of the Human Protein Atlas database (www.proteinatlas.org), provides a valuable knowledge resource for studies of mitochondria function, dysfunction and disease.

  • 4.
    Ouyang, Wei
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Winsnes, Casper F.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Hjelmare, Martin
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Åkesson, Lovisa
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Xu, Hao
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Sullivan, D. P.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Lundberg, Emma
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, San Francisco, CA 94158 USA..
    Analysis of the Human Protein Atlas Image Classification competition2019In: Nature Methods, ISSN 1548-7091, E-ISSN 1548-7105, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 1254-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pinpointing subcellular protein localizations from microscopy images is easy to the trained eye, but challenging to automate. Based on the Human Protein Atlas image collection, we held a competition to identify deep learning solutions to solve this task. Challenges included training on highly imbalanced classes and predicting multiple labels per image. Over 3 months, 2,172 teams participated. Despite convergence on popular networks and training techniques, there was considerable variety among the solutions. Participants applied strategies for modifying neural networks and loss functions, augmenting data and using pretrained networks. The winning models far outperformed our previous effort at multi-label classification of protein localization patterns by similar to 20%. These models can be used as classifiers to annotate new images, feature extractors to measure pattern similarity or pretrained networks for a wide range of biological applications.

  • 5.
    Sullivan, Devin P.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Winsnes, Casper F.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Åkesson, Lovisa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hjelmare, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wiking, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schutten, Rutger
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Campbell, Linzi
    CCP Hf, Reyjkavik, Iceland..
    Leifsson, Hjalti
    CCP Hf, Reyjkavik, Iceland..
    Rhodes, Scott
    CCP Hf, Reyjkavik, Iceland..
    Nordgren, Andie
    CCP Hf, Reyjkavik, Iceland..
    Smith, Kevin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computational Science and Technology (CST). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Revaz, Bernard
    MMOS Sarl, Monthey, Switzerland..
    Finnbogason, Bergur
    CCP Hf, Reyjkavik, Iceland..
    Szantner, Attila
    MMOS Sarl, Monthey, Switzerland..
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Deep learning is combined with massive-scale citizen science to improve large-scale image classification2018In: Nature Biotechnology, ISSN 1087-0156, E-ISSN 1546-1696, Vol. 36, no 9, p. 820-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pattern recognition and classification of images are key challenges throughout the life sciences. We combined two approaches for large-scale classification of fluorescence microscopy images. First, using the publicly available data set from the Cell Atlas of the Human Protein Atlas (HPA), we integrated an image-classification task into a mainstream video game (EVE Online) as a mini-game, named Project Discovery. Participation by 322,006 gamers over 1 year provided nearly 33 million classifications of subcellular localization patterns, including patterns that were not previously annotated by the HPA. Second, we used deep learning to build an automated Localization Cellular Annotation Tool (Loc-CAT). This tool classifies proteins into 29 subcellular localization patterns and can deal efficiently with multi-localization proteins, performing robustly across different cell types. Combining the annotations of gamers and deep learning, we applied transfer learning to create a boosted learner that can characterize subcellular protein distribution with F1 score of 0.72. We found that engaging players of commercial computer games provided data that augmented deep learning and enabled scalable and readily improved image classification.

  • 6.
    Thul, Peter J.
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Åkesson, Lovisa
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mahdessian, Diana
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bäckström, Anna
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Danielsson, Frida
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gnann, Christian
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hjelmare, Martin
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schutten, Ragnar
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stadler, Charlotte
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sullivan, Devin
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Winsnes, Casper
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    An image-based subcellular map of the human proteome.2017In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, ISSN 1059-1524, E-ISSN 1939-4586, Vol. 28Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Thul, Peter J.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Åkesson, Lovisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wiking, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mahdessian, Diana
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Geladaki, A.
    Ait Blal, Hammou
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Alm, Tove L.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Asplund, A.
    Björk, Lars
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Breckels, L. M.
    Bäckström, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Danielsson, Frida
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fall, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gatto, L.
    Gnann, Christian
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology.
    Hjelmare, Martin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Johansson, Fredric
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lee, Sunjae
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lindskog, C.
    Mulder, J.
    Mulvey, C. M.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Schutten, Rutger
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sjöstedt, E.
    Skogs, Marie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stadler, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sullivan, Devin P.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Winsnes, Casper F.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhang, Cheng
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zwahlen, Martin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pontén, F.
    von Feilitzen, Kalle
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lilley, K. S.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    A subcellular map of the human proteome2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 356, no 6340, article id 820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resolving the spatial distribution of the human proteome at a subcellular level can greatly increase our understanding of human biology and disease. Here we present a comprehensive image-based map of subcellular protein distribution, the Cell Atlas, built by integrating transcriptomics and antibody-based immunofluorescence microscopy with validation by mass spectrometry. Mapping the in situ localization of 12,003 human proteins at a single-cell level to 30 subcellular structures enabled the definition of the proteomes of 13 major organelles. Exploration of the proteomes revealed single-cell variations in abundance or spatial distribution and localization of about half of the proteins to multiple compartments. This subcellular map can be used to refine existing protein-protein interaction networks and provides an important resource to deconvolute the highly complex architecture of the human cell.

  • 8.
    Thul, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Åkesson, Lovisa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mahdessian, Diana
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bäckström, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Danielsson, Frida
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gnann, Christian
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hjelmare, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schutten, Rutger
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stadler, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sullivan, Devin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Winsnes, Casper
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Galea, Gabriella
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pepperkok, R.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Exploring the Proteome of Multilocalizing Proteins2017In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, ISSN 1059-1524, E-ISSN 1939-4586, Vol. 28Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Thul, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Åkesson, Lovisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Wiking, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Mahdessian, Diana
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Lundberg, Emma Käller
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    A subcellular map of the human proteomeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Åkesson, Lovisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mahdessian, Diana
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Gnann, Christian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Thul, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Spatial organization of the nucleolar proteome during mitosisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the interphase cell, the membrane-less nucleoli are the sites of ribosome biogenesis. As part of the Human Protein Atlas we created an image catalogue comprising 1,314 nucleolar proteins using antibody-based proteomics. We show experimental evidence for 1,027 proteins localizing to the whole nucleoli and 287 to the fibrillar center or dense fibrillar component. We also propose a new sub-compartment located in the nucleoplasmic border denoted as nucleoli rim, comprising at least 131 proteins. As a step toward better understanding of nucleolar protein function during cell division, we additionally generated confocal images of 68 nucleolar proteins being recruited to the chromosomal periphery in mitosis. Thanks to the single cell resolution we were able to define three expression phenotypes among the mitotic chromosome proteins; early, intermediate and late recruitment suggesting phase specific functions. We also for the first time provide a proteome-wide confirmation that the nucleoli in general, but mitotic chromosome proteins in particular have a higher predicted intrinsic disorder level compared to cytoplasmic proteins, indicating that the perichromosomal layer indeed is a liquid-like layer.

1 - 10 of 10
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