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  • 1.
    Kurland, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Wheat, Christopher W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Celorio Mancera, Maria de la Paz
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Kutschera, Verena E.
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Hill, Jason
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Andersson, Anastasia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Rubin, Carl-Johan
    Andersson, Leif
    Ryman, Nils
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Laikre, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Exploring a Pool-seq-only approach for gaining population genomic insights in nonmodel species2019In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 9, p. 11448-11463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing genomic insights is challenging in nonmodel species for which resources are often scarce and prohibitively costly. Here, we explore the potential of a recently established approach using Pool-seq data to generate a de novo genome assembly for mining exons, upon which Pool-seq data are used to estimate population divergence and diversity. We do this for two pairs of sympatric populations of brown trout (Salmo trutta): one naturally sympatric set of populations and another pair of populations introduced to a common environment. We validate our approach by comparing the results to those from markers previously used to describe the populations (allozymes and individual-based single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) and from mapping the Pool-seq data to a reference genome of the closely related Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). We find that genomic differentiation (F-ST) between the two introduced populations exceeds that of the naturally sympatric populations (F-ST = 0.13 and 0.03 between the introduced and the naturally sympatric populations, respectively), in concordance with estimates from the previously used SNPs. The same level of population divergence is found for the two genome assemblies, but estimates of average nucleotide diversity differ (pi over bar approximate to 0.002 and pi over bar approximate to 0.001 when mapping to S. trutta and S. salar, respectively), although the relationships between population values are largely consistent. This discrepancy might be attributed to biases when mapping to a haploid condensed assembly made of highly fragmented read data compared to using a high-quality reference assembly from a divergent species. We conclude that the Pool-seq-only approach can be suitable for detecting and quantifying genome-wide population differentiation, and for comparing genomic diversity in populations of nonmodel species where reference genomes are lacking.

  • 2. Obregón, C.
    et al.
    Lyndon, A. R.
    Barker, J.
    Christiansen, H.
    Godley, B. J.
    Kurland, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Piccolo, J. J.
    Potts, R.
    Short, R.
    Tebb, A.
    Mariani, S.
    Valuing and understanding fish populations in the Anthropocene: key questions to address2018In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 92, no 3, p. 828-845Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the values of fish populations and fisheries has primarily focused on bio-economic aspects; a more nuanced and multidimensional perspective is mostly neglected. Although a range of social aspects is increasingly being considered in fisheries research, there is still no clear understanding as to how to include these additional values within management policies nor is there a cogent appreciation of the major knowledge gaps that should be tackled by future research. This paper results from a workshop held during the 50th anniversary symposium of the Fisheries Society of the British Isles at the University of Exeter, UK, in July 2017. Here, we aim to highlight the current knowledge gaps on the values of fish populations and fisheries thus directing future research. To this end, we present eight questions that are deeply relevant to understanding the values of fish populations and fisheries. These can be applied to all habitats and fisheries, including freshwater, estuarine and marine.

  • 3. Paccard, Antoine
    et al.
    Wasserman, Ben A.
    Hanson, Dieta
    Astorg, Louis
    Durston, Dan
    Kurland, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Apgar, Travis M.
    El-Sabaawi, Rana W.
    Palkovacs, Eric P.
    Hendry, Andrew P.
    Barrett, Rowan D. H.
    Adaptation in temporally variable environments: stickleback armor in periodically breaching bar-built estuaries2018In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 735-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The evolutionary consequences of temporal variation in selection remain hotly debated. We explored these consequences by studying threespine stickleback in a set of bar-built estuaries along the central California coast. In most years, heavy rains induce water flow strong enough to break through isolating sand bars, connecting streams to the ocean. New sand bars typically re-form within a few weeks or months, thereby re-isolating populations within the estuaries. These breaching events cause severe and often extremely rapid changes in abiotic and biotic conditions, including shifts in predator abundance. We investigated whether this strong temporal environmental variation can maintain within-population variation while eroding adaptive divergence among populations that would be caused by spatial variation in selection. We used neutral genetic markers to explore population structure and then analysed how stickleback armor traits, the associated genes Eda and Pitx1 and elemental composition (%P) varies within and among populations. Despite strong gene flow, we detected evidence for divergence in stickleback defensive traits and Eda genotypes associated with predation regime. However, this among-population variation was lower than that observed among other stickleback populations exposed to divergent predator regimes. In addition, within-population variation was very high as compared to populations from environmentally stable locations. Elemental composition was strongly associated with armor traits, Eda genotype and the presence of predators, thus suggesting that spatiotemporal variation in armor traits generates corresponding variation in elemental phenotypes. We conclude that gene flow, and especially temporal environmental variation, can maintain high levels of within-population variation while reducing, but not eliminating, among-population variation driven by spatial environmental variation.

  • 4. Reusch, Thorsten B. H.
    et al.
    Dierking, Jan
    Andersson, Helen C.
    Bonsdorff, Erik
    Carstensen, Jacob
    Casini, Michele
    Czajkowski, Mikolaj
    Hasler, Berit
    Hinsby, Klaus
    Hyytiäinen, Kari
    Johannesson, Kerstin
    Jomaa, Seifeddine
    Jormalainen, Veijo
    Kuosa, Harri
    Kurland, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Laikre, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    MacKenzie, Brian R.
    Margonski, Piotr
    Melzner, Frank
    Oesterwind, Daniel
    Ojaveer, Henn
    Refsgaard, Jens Christian
    Sandström, Annica
    Schwarz, Gerald
    Tonderski, Karin
    Winder, Monika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Zandersen, Marianne
    The Baltic Sea as a time machine for the future coastal ocean2018In: Science Advances, ISSN 0036-8156, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 4, no 5, article id eaar8195Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coastal global oceans are expected to undergo drastic changes driven by climate change and increasing anthropogenic pressures in coming decades. Predicting specific future conditions and assessing the best management strategies to maintain ecosystem integrity and sustainable resource use are difficult, because of multiple interacting pressures, uncertain projections, and a lack of test cases for management. We argue that the Baltic Sea can serve as a time machine to study consequences and mitigation of future coastal perturbations, due to its unique combination of an early history of multistressor disturbance and ecosystem deterioration and early implementation of cross-border environmental management to address these problems. The Baltic Sea also stands out in providing a strong scientific foundation and accessibility to long-term data series that provide a unique opportunity to assess the efficacy of management actions to address the breakdown of ecosystem functions. Trend reversals such as the return of top predators, recovering fish stocks, and reduced input of nutrient and harmful substances could be achieved only by implementing an international, cooperative governance structure transcending its complex multistate policy setting, with integrated management of watershed and sea. The Baltic Sea also demonstrates how rapidly progressing global pressures, particularly warming of Baltic waters and the surrounding catchment area, can offset the efficacy of current management approaches. This situation calls for management that is (i) conservative to provide a buffer against regionally unmanageable global perturbations, (ii) adaptive to react to new management challenges, and, ultimately, (iii) multisectorial and integrative to address conflicts associated with economic trade-offs.

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