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  • 1.
    Ye, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The Aspirants: How faith is built in emerging occupations2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Anticipating future demands in skills and workforce development has been a longstanding practice and challenge for governments and policy-makers. While such developments are examined closely at the national and regional levels, an even more pressing issue is to advance our understanding of how people who take on jobs in new and emerging fields embark on and persist in their occupational pathways. A striking feature of these occupations is their weakly defined and unstable nature. How do individuals traverse career trajectories with these characteristics? What drives and enables them to take the road less travelled? To address such questions, this research project set off from a distinctive occupational school in Sweden that prepares individuals for emerging occupational roles in digital work. Using an interpretative, longitudinal, and multi-method approach, this study focuses on a group of aspirants who were being trained to become specialists in extracting, analysing, and using digital data for the growth and profit of organisations. These individuals can be viewed as experiencing a double “not-yet” situation, since not only are they at the stage of aspiring to certain work roles, but the occupations to which they aspire are also in a nascent, not yet fully defined stage. This study accompanies them through significant events over the years: from when they are in training, to when they search for jobs, and, finally, when they are in work.

    The monograph contains three empirical sections that are sequenced by the aspirants’ school-to-work pathways. The first section examines the processes of socialisation into the occupational school; the second analyses their efforts to meet the labour market; and the final one investigates the ways in which they persist in their occupational trajectories. Following these stages reveals how a strong school culture, coupled with a strong labour market, facilitates the building of “faith” into weak-form occupational pathways. Through the ceremony of being selected into the educational organisation and performing everyday rituals that engender confidence in their individual and collective futures, the analysis reveals types of “scripts” that are fashioned into the school’s methodology as well as the expectations of future hirers. It becomes apparent that aspirants generally accept these scripts as necessary and adhere to them to navigate the constantly changing demands of the labour market. However, when these interpretive schemes fail to help them cope with their unclear occupational futures, uncertainties of worth, and the unstable normative logics they encounter at work sites, the aspirants are compelled to deliberate and adapt conceptions of what is possible and permissible through individual and collective projections. In all, the empirical findings form the basis for a sociological model that offers a perspective on how to treat temporality, anticipation, and the “not-yets”, particularly in the context of education to work transitions.

  • 2.
    Ye, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Transnational Higher Education Strategies into and out of Singapore: Commodification and Consecration2016In: TRaNS: Trans-Regional and -National Studies of Southeast Asia, ISSN 2051-3658, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 85-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses transnational higher education strategies both to and from Singapore. It does so by focusing on outbound educational mobility from Singapore to the UK and inbound educational mobility from Vietnam to Singapore. Since the turn of the century, Singapore has pursued the agenda of developing itself as a regional hub for higher education, aspiring to be a Global Schoolhouse. Yet, while the number of international students grows in local universities, Singapore's academically brightest do not necessarily take advantage of higher educational opportunities within the shores of the city-state, with many traveling to universities overseas through a form of sponsored mobility. Using two case studies, I trace two logics of commodification and consecration as observed through the processes whereby individuals and institutions devise transnational higher education strategies into and out of Singapore. The first case study draws on interviews conducted with Singaporean undergraduates at Oxbridge while the second case focuses on Vietnamese students at two Singaporean universities. Together, the analysis from these cases uncovers the value for these Southeast Asian students in studying abroad and distinguishes between different types of routes that exist: one where students choose their own educational plans and another where students are chosen for a prestigious educational and occupational pathway. With increasing participation in mass higher education taking place across the region, the article outlines, through the site of Singapore, strategies of transnationalism employed by both individuals and institutions as a means of social differentiation.

  • 3.
    Ye, Rebecca
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Erik, Nylander
    The transnational track: state sponsorship and Singapore's Oxbridge elite2015In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, ISSN 0142-5692, E-ISSN 1465-3346, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 11-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the process of transnational institutional matching between elite institutions in Singapore and Great Britain, and the role of state-sponsored scholarships in enabling this process as political and administrative elites are selected and groomed. Using data gathered from in-depth interviews conducted with Singaporean undergraduates studying at Oxbridge and a dataset of the institutional origins of 580 Singaporean government scholars, the analysis illustrates how students are being matched from two Singaporean junior colleges to Oxbridge and back to the higher strata of the Singaporean Public Service. We show that the educational trajectories of these government scholars need to be addressed in relation to the informational capital acquired in specific elite schools as well as the governing roles these individuals are meant to obtain within the state upon graduation.

  • 4.
    Ye, Rebecca
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Erik, Nylander
    The transnational track: State sponsorship and Singapore’s Oxbridge elite2017In: New Sociologies of Elite Schooling / [ed] Jane Kenway, Aaron Koh, Routledge, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ye, Rebecca
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Nylander, Erik
    The Transnational Track: State Sponsorship and Singapore's Oxbridge Elite2018In: Elites in Education: Volume 2: National traditions and cosmopolitism in elite education / [ed] Agnes van Zaten, Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
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