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  • 1. Christophe, Barbara
    et al.
    Gautschi, PeterThorp, RobertStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The Cold War in the Classroom: International Perspecives on Textbooks and Memory Practices2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book explores how the socially disputed period of the Cold War is remembered in today’s history classroom. Applying a diverse set of methodological strategies, the authors map the dividing lines in and between memory cultures across the globe, paying special attention to the impact the crisis-driven age of our present has on images of the past. Authors analysing educational media point to ambivalence, vagueness and contradictions in textbook narratives understood to be echoes of societal and academic controversies. Others focus on teachers and the history classroom, showing how unresolved political issues create tensions in history education. They render visible how teachers struggle to handle these challenges by pretending that what they do is ‘just history’. The contributions to this book unveil how teachers, backgrounding the political inherent in all memory practices, often nourish the illusion that the history in which they are engaged is all about addressing the past with a reflexive and disciplined approach.

  • 2.
    Thorp, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Deconstructing Karlsson, Part 1: Historical Consciousness2017In: Historical Encounters: A journal of historical consciousness, historical cultures and history education, E-ISSN 2203-7543, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an analysis of how leading Swedish historian and history didactical researcher Klas-Goran Karlsson presents the concept of historical consciousness in some of his most recent publications and seeks to analytically deconstruct his view of the concept. The study finds that Karlsson presents definitions of the concept that may not be compatible to each other. Using this result, the paper then tries to present and argue a view of the concept that harmonises with the one presented by Karlsson.

  • 3.
    Thorp, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. The University of Newcastle, Australia.
    Pedagogical Entanglements and the Cold War: A Comparative Study on Opening History Lessons on the Cold War in Sweden and Switzerland2019In: The Cold War in the Classroom: International Perspectives on Textbooks and Memory Practices / [ed] Barbara Christophe, Peter Gautschi, Robert Thorp, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 423-447Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thorp uses the case studies of two classrooms, one Swiss, one Swedish, exploring different pedagogical approaches to the Cold War and addressing the challenges posed to teachers of history in general. There is, he argues, a tension inherent in history that arises because history is both fixed yet also contingent upon who relates it. In this chapter, Thorp examines the degree to which the two teachers in his case study operate within this contingency. Thorp’s model of the narratological uses of history allows him to formulate a pedagogical approach which prioritises critical enquiry and the awareness of historical consciousness. Teaching the Cold War particularly reinforces this conclusion, because the topic can be addressed from radically different perspectives.

  • 4.
    Thorp, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Perspektiv på historiebruk - undervisa om hur historia används2018In: SO-didaktik, ISSN 2002-4525, no 5, p. 56-60Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Historiebruk intar en central plats i historieundervisningen. Klas-Göran Karlsson beskriver i en typologi hur historia används för olika syften av olika aktörer. Robert Thorp är kritisk till detta sätt att beskriva historie-bruk, och föreslår istället ett fokus på vad han vill kalla narratologiskt historiebruk. Fördelen, menar Thorp, är att kopplingen mellan historie-bruk och historiemedvetande blir tydligare.

  • 5.
    Thorp, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Persson, Anders
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Historieundervisningens existentialiserande potential2017In: Nordidactica: Journal of Humanities and Social Science Education, ISSN 2000-9879, no 2, p. 59-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a study of how history education can be understood as a practice directed towards existentialisation. Through classroom observation, teacher interviews and focus group interviews with students in grade 9 in Swedish lower secondary school, a complex teaching practice is uncovered where history teachers have to deal with matters pertaining to disseminating a meaningful narrative of the past, a critical approach to these narratives and an awareness of historicity and its implications for how we approach and understand the past. These results are then discussed from the perspectives of how history education can promote existentialisation among students, and what challenges and opportunities this may present to history teachers. 

  • 6.
    Thorp, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Törnqvist, Eleonore
    Young children's historical consciousness: A Swedish case study2017In: Yearbook (of the International Society for History Didactics), ISSN 1608-8751, Vol. 38, p. 215-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a study of how groups of 7-year-old pupils in Swedish primary school with little or no experience of history education expressed historical consciousness. The results of the study show that a perception of linear time where the past is seen as distinct and separated from the present is a key characteristic among the children that showed indication of historical consciousness. These results suggest a view of historical consciousness as something individuals may develop, rather than something that is innately human and anthropologically universal, and that a focus on the fostering of a perception of linear time and the epistemological challenges this poses, may be key in enabling and developing children’s historical consciousness.

  • 7. Vinterek, Monika
    et al.
    Donnelly, Debra
    Thorp, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Tell us about your nation's past: Swedish and Australian preservice history teachers’ conceptualisation of their national history2017In: Yearbook (of the International Society for History Didactics), ISSN 1608-8751, Vol. 38, p. 51-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Comparing our Pasts (COP) project aimed to determine what Swedish and Australian pre-service history teachers know, understand and believe to be important about their nations’ past. In this study pre-service history teachers were asked to write a short history of their nation in their own words without using outside sources of information. This article reports on a preliminary analysis of resulting texts, comparing and contrasting their conceptualisations of Sweden and Australia and what aspects of history were manifest in the analysed data. Given that the participant group is situated in two different national contexts, this study aims to analyse how the pre-service teachers’ narratives of the nation can be understood as influenced by the national historical cultures of Sweden and Australia. The results show that the respondents’ narratives expressed both similarities and differences that highlight the pertinence of a historical cultural approach to history education and pre-service history teacher training that may be linked to the differing national historical contexts. These results are then used to argue the importance of an awareness of historicity in order to highlight and stress how our views of and approaches to national history is contextually contingent. This poses a challenge to history teacher training both in Sweden and Australia. 

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