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  • 1.
    Abudayyeh, H.A.
    et al.
    Department of Physics, Al-Quds University, Jerusalem.
    Barghouthi, I.A.
    Department of Physics, Al-Quds University, Jerusalem.
    Slapak, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik.
    Centrifugal acceleration at high altitudes above the polar cap: A Monte Carlo simulation2015In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 120, no 8, p. 6409-6426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Monte Carlo simulation was used to study the outflow of O+ and H+ ions along three flight trajectories above the polar cap up to altitudes of about 15 RE. Barghouthi (2008) developed a model on the basis of altitude and velocity-dependent wave-particle interactions and a radial geomagnetic field which includes the effects of ambipolar electric field and gravitational and mirror forces. In the present work we improve this model to include the effect of the centrifugal force, with the use of relevant boundary conditions. In addition, the magnetic field and flight trajectories, namely, the central polar cap (CPC), nightside polar cap (NPC), and cusp, were calculated using the Tsyganenko T96 model. To simulate wave-particle interactions, the perpendicular velocity diffusion coefficients for O+ ions in each region were determined such that the simulation results fit the observations. For H+ ions, a constant perpendicular velocity diffusion coefficient was assumed for all altitudes in all regions as recommended by Nilsson et al. (2013). The effect of centrifugal acceleration was simulated by considering three values for the ionospheric electric field: 0 (no centrifugal acceleration), 50, and 100 mV/m. It was found that the centrifugal acceleration increases the parallel bulk velocity and decreases the parallel and perpendicular temperatures of both ion species at altitudes above about 4 RE. Centrifugal acceleration also increases the temperature anisotropy at high altitudes. At a given altitude, centrifugal acceleration decreases the density of H+ ions while it increases the density of O+ ions. This implies that with higher centrifugal acceleration more O+ ions overcome the potential barrier. It was also found that aside from two exceptions centrifugal acceleration has the same effect on the velocities of both ions. This implies that the centrifugal acceleration is universal for all particles. The parallel bulk velocities at a given value of ionospheric electric field were highest in the cusp followed by the CPC followed by the NPC. In this study a region of no wave-particle interaction was assumed in the CPC and NPC between 3.7 and 7.5 RE. In this region the perpendicular temperature was found to decrease with altitude due to perpendicular adiabatic cooling.

  • 2.
    Barghouthi, Imad A.
    et al.
    Space Research Lab, Department of Physics, Al-Quds University, Jerusalem, Department of Physics, Al-Quds University, Jerusalem.
    Abudayyeh, H.A.
    Department of Physics, Al-Quds University, Jerusalem.
    Slapak, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik.
    O+ and H+ above the polar cap: Observations and semikinetic simulations2016In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 121, no 1, p. 459-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 1-dimensional direct simulation Monte Carlo model is used to study the outflow of O+ and H+ ions from 1.2 RE to 15.2 RE along two flight trajectories originating from the polar cap, namely the central polar cap (CPC) and the cusp. To study the effect of varying geophysical conditions and to deduce the proper set of parameters. several parameters were varied and the results were compared to corresponding data from Cluster spacecraft. First, several sets of diffusion coefficients were considered based on using diffusion coefficients calculated by Barghouthi et al. [1998], Nilsson et al. [2013], and Abudayyeh et al. [2015b] for different altitude intervals. It was found that in the central polar cap using the diffusion coefficients reported by Barghouthi et al. [1998] for altitudes lower than 3.7 RE, zero diffusion coefficients between 3.7 and 7.5 RE and diffusion coefficients from Nilsson et al. [2013] for altitudes higher than 7.5 RE provide the best fit for O+ ions. For O+ ions in the cusp the best fit was obtained for using Barghouthi et al. [1998] diffusion coefficients for altitudes lower than 3.7 RE and Nilsson et al. [2013] diffusion coefficients for altitudes higher than that. The best fit for H+ ions in both regions was obtained by using the diffusion coefficients calculated by Abudayyeh et al. [2015b]. Also, it was found that along an ion's trajectory the most recent heating dominates. Second, the strength of centrifugal acceleration was varied by using three values for the ionospheric electric field namely: 0, 50, and 100 mV/m. It was found that the value of 50 mV/m provided the best fit for both ion species in both regions. Finally the lower altitude boundary conditions and the electron temperature were varied. Increasing the electron temperature and the lower altitude O+ parallel velocity were found to increase the access of O+ ions to higher altitudes and therefore increase the density at a given altitude. The variation of all other boundary conditions only affected the densities of the ions and not the other moments due to the overwhelming effect of wave particle interaction. Furthermore varying the parameters of one ion species has no effect on the other ion species. We also compared the energy gain per ion due to wave particle interaction, centrifugal acceleration, and ambipolar electric field and found that wave particle interaction is the most important mechanism, while ambipolar electric field is relatively unimportant especially at higher altitudes.

  • 3. Fogelström, Sara
    et al.
    Levin, Lina
    Slapak, Rikard
    Local analysis of nonlinear oscillations of thin accretion disks2008In: Publication of the Astronomical Society of Japan, ISSN 2053-051X, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 605-612Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Horak, Jiri
    et al.
    Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences, Prague.
    Abramowicz, Marek A.
    Physics Department, Göteborg University.
    Levin, Lina
    Slapak, Rikard
    Straub, Odele
    Institute of Physics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian University in Opava.
    Alpha-Viscosity Effects in Slender Tori2012In: Nippon Tenmon Gakkai obun kenkyu hokoku, ISSN 0004-6264, Vol. 64, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Nilsson, Hans
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Barghouthi, Imad A.
    Department of Physics, Al-Quds University, Jerusalem.
    Slapak, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering.
    Eriksson, A.I
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala.
    André, M.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala.
    Hot and cold ion outflow: Observations and implications for numerical models2013In: Journal of Geophysical Research, ISSN 0148-0227, E-ISSN 2156-2202, Vol. 118, no 1, p. 105-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cluster observations of oxygen ion outflow and low-frequency waves at high altitude above the polar cap and cold ion outflow in the lobes are used to determine ion heating rates and low-altitude boundary conditions suitable for use in numerical models of ion outflow. Using our results, it is possible to simultaneously reproduce observations of high-energy O+ ions in the high-altitude cusp and mantle and cold H+ ions in the magnetotail lobes. To put the Cluster data in a broader context, we first compare the average observed oxygen temperatures and parallel velocities in the high-altitude polar cap with the idealized cases of auroral (cusp) and polar wind (polar cap) ion outflow obtained from a model based on other data sets. A cyclotron resonance model using average observed electric field spectral densities as input fairly well reproduces the observed velocities and perpendicular temperatures of both hot O+ and cold H+, if we allow the fraction of the observed waves, which is efficient in heating the ions to increase with altitude and decrease toward the nightside. Suitable values for this fraction are discussed based on the results of the cyclotron resonance model. Low-altitude boundary conditions, ion heating rates, and centrifugal acceleration are presented in a format suitable as input for models aiming to reproduce the observations

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Hans
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Hamrin, Maria
    Department of Physics, Umeå University.
    Pitkänen, Timo
    Department of Physics, Umeå University.
    Karlsson, Tomas
    Space and Plasma Physics, School of Electrical Engineering Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm.
    Slapak, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Andersson, Laila O.
    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado.
    Gunell, Herbert
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik , Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Brussels.
    Schillings, Audrey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Vaivads, Andris
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala.
    Oxygen ion response to proton bursty bulk flows2016In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 121, no 8, p. 7535-7546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have used Cluster spacecraft data from the years 2001 to 2005 to study how oxygen ions respond to bursty bulk flows (BBFs) as identified from proton data. We here define bursty bulk flows as periods of proton perpendicular velocities more than 100 km/s and a peak perpendicular velocity in the structure of more than 200 km/s, observed in a region with plasma beta above 1 in the near-Earth central tail region. We find that during proton BBFs only a minor increase in the O+ velocity is seen. The different behavior of the two ion species is further shown by statistics of H+ and O+ flow also outside BBFs: For perpendicular earthward velocities of H+ above about 100 km/s, the O+ perpendicular velocity is consistently lower, most commonly being a few tens of kilometers per second earthward. In summary, O+ ions in the plasma sheet experience less acceleration than H+ ions and are not fully frozen in to the magnetic field. Therefore, H+ and O+ motion is decoupled, and O+ ions have a slower earthward motion. This is particularly clear during BBFs. This may add further to the increased relative abundance of O+ ions in the plasma sheet during magnetic storms. The data indicate that O+ is typically less accelerated in association with plasma sheet X lines as compared to H+.

  • 7.
    Nilsson, Hans
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Slapak, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering.
    Barghouthi, I.A.
    Department of Physics, Al-Quds University, Jerusalem.
    Eriksson, A.I.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik.
    André, M.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik.
    Hot and cold ion outflow: Spatial distribution of ion heating2012In: Journal of Geophysical Research, ISSN 0148-0227, E-ISSN 2156-2202, Vol. 117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ions apparently emanating from the same source, the ionospheric polar cap, can either end up as energized to keV energies in the high-altitude cusp/mantle, or appear as cold ions in the magnetotail lobes. We use Cluster observations of ions and wave electric fields to study the spatial variation of ion heating in the cusp/mantle and polar cap. The average flow direction in a simplified cylindrical coordinate system is used to show approximate average ion flight trajectories, and discuss the temperatures, fluxes and wave activity along some typical trajectories. It is found that it is suitable to distinguish between cusp, central and nightside polar cap ion outflow trajectories, though O+ heating is mainly a function of altitude. Furthermore we use typical cold ion parallel velocities and the observed average perpendicular drift to obtain average cold ion flight trajectories. The data show that the cusp is the main source of oxygen ion outflow, whereas a polar cap source would be consistent with our average outflow paths for cold ions observed in the lobes. A majority of the cusp O+ flux is sufficiently accelerated to escape into interplanetary space. A scenario with significant oxygen ion heating in regions with strong magnetosheath origin ion fluxes, cold proton plasma dominating at altitudes below about 8 RE in the polar cap, and most of the cusp oxygen outflow overcoming gravity and flowing out in the cusp and mantle is consistent with our observations.

  • 8.
    Schillings, Audrey
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Slapak, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Yamauchi, Masatoshi
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Westerberg, Lars-Göran
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Atmospheric loss during major geomagnetic storms: Cluster observations2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Slapak, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    O⁺ heating in the high altitude cusp and mantle due to wave-particle interaction2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is composed of three articles, which have the common denominator that they are studies of heating of oxygen ions in the high altitude cusp and mantle in the terrestrial magnetosphere. All data analysis are based on observational data from the Cluster satellites. Oxygen ions originate in the ionosphere, from where they flow up along open cusp field lines. This upflowing ionospheric plasma is generally gravitationally bound and will return as ionospheric downflow. However, if the plasma is sufficiently energized it may overcome gravity and reach the magnetosphere. Further energization is able to put the plasma on trajectories leading downstream along the magnetotail, which may cause the plasma to escape into the magnetosheath. This thesis considers energization of oxygen ions through wave-particle interactions. We show that the average electric spectral densities in the altitude range of 8-15 Earth radii are able to explain the average perpendicular temperatures, using a simple gyroresonance model and 50% of the observed spectral density at the O+ gyrofrequency. We also show that the phase velocities derived from the observed low frequency electric and magnetic fields are consistent with Alfvén waves. Strong heating is sporadic and spatially limited. For three case studies of strong heating, we show that the regions of enhanced wave activity are at least one order of magnitude larger than the gyroradius of the ions, which is a condition for the gyroresonance model to be valid. An analysis indicates that enhanced perpendicular temperatures can be observed over several Earth radii after heating has ceased, suggesting that high perpendicular-to-parallel temperature ratio is not necessarily a sign of local heating. This also explains why we sometimes observe enhanced temperatures and low spectral densities. Three events of very high temperatures and simultaneously observed high spectral densities were studied, and we showed that the temperatures could be explained with the simple gyrofrequency model. We have also provided average diffusion coefficients at different altitudes, which can be used for ion heating and outflow modeling.

  • 10.
    Slapak, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    O+ heating, outflow and escape in the high altitude cusp and mantle2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Earth and its atmosphere are embedded in the magnetosphere, a region in space dominated by the geomagnetic field, shielding our planet as it acts to deflect the energetic solar wind. Even though the atmosphere is protected from direct interaction with the solar wind it is indirectly affected by significant magnetosphere-solar wind interaction processes, causing constituents of the upper atmosphere to flow up into the magnetosphere. The fate of the atmospheric originating ions is interesting from a planetary evolution point of view. If the upflowing ions in the magnetosphere are to escape into the solar wind they need to not only overcome gravity, but also the magnetic forces, and therefore need to be energized and accelerated significantly. The subject of this thesis is analysis of oxygen ions (O+) and wave field observations in the high altitude cusp/mantle and in the high latitude dayside magnetosheath of Earth, investigating magnetospheric processes behind ion heating, outflow and escape. Most data analysis is based on observational data from the Cluster satellites, orbiting the Earth and altitudes corresponding to different key regions of the magnetosphere and the immediate solar wind environment. The mechanism behind O+ heating mainly discussed in this thesis is energization through interactions between the ions and low-frequency waves. The average electric spectral densities in the altitude range of 8-15 Earth radii are able to explain the average perpendicular temperatures, using a gyroresonance model and 50% of the observed spectral density at the O+ gyrofrequency. Strong heating is sporadic and spatially limited. The regions of enhanced wave activity are at least one order of magnitude larger than the local gyroradius of the ions, which is a necessary condition for the gyroresonance model to be valid. An analysis indicates that enhanced perpendicular temperatures can be observed over several Earth radii after heating has ceased, suggesting that high perpendicular-to-parallel temperature ratio is not necessarily a sign of local heating. This also explains why we sometimes observe enhanced temperatures and low spectral densities. We also show that the phase velocities derived from the observed low frequency electric and magnetic fields are consistent with Alfvén waves. Outflowing ions flow along magnetic field lines leading downstream in the magnetotail, where the ions may convect into the plasma sheet and be brought back toward Earth. However, the effective heating in the cusp and mantle provides a majority of the O+ enough acceleration to escape into the solar wind and be lost, rather than entering the plasma sheet. The heating can actually be effective enough to allow outflowing cusp O+ to escape immediately from the high altitude cusp and mantle along recently opened magnetic field lines, facilitating a direct coupling between the magnetospheric plasma and interplanetary space. Observations in the shocked and turbulent solar wind (the magnetosheath) reveals hot O+ flowing downstream and approximately tangentially to the magnetopause and often close to it. An estimated total flux of O+ in the high-latitude magnetosheath of 0.7 ·1025 s-1 is significant in relation to the observed cusp outflows at lower altitudes, pointing to that escape of hot O+ from the cusp and mantle into the dayside magnetosheath being an important loss route.

  • 11.
    Slapak, Rikard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Gunell, H.
    Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Avenue Circulaire, Brussels.
    Hamrin, Maria
    Department of Physics, Umeå University.
    Observations of multiharmonic ion-cyclotron waves due to inverse ion-cyclotron damping in the northern magnetospheric cusp2017In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 22-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a case study of inverse ion-cyclotron damping taking place in the northern terrestrial magnetospheric cusp, exciting waves at the ion-cyclotron frequency and its harmonics. The ion-cyclotron waves are primarily seen as peaks in the magnetic-field spectral densities. The corresponding peaks in the electric-field spectral densities are not as profound, suggesting a background electric field noise or other processes of wave generation causing the electric spectral densities to smoothen out more compared to the magnetic counterpart. The required condition for inverse ion-cyclotron damping is a velocity shear in the magnetic field-aligned ion-bulk flow, and this condition is often naturally met for magnetosheath influx in the northern magnetospheric cusp, just as in the presented case. We note that some ion-cyclotron wave activity is present in a few similar shear events in the southern cusp, which indicates that other mechanisms generating ion-cyclotron waves may also be present during such conditions.

  • 12.
    Slapak, Rikard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Hamrin, Maria
    Department of Physics, Umeä University.
    Pitkänen, Timo
    Department of Physics, Umeä University.
    Yamauchi, Masatoshi
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Karlsson, Tomas
    Space and Plasma Physics, School of Electrical Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Schillings, Audrey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Quantification of the total ion transport in the near-Earth plasma sheet2017In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 869-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies strongly suggest that a majority of the observed O+ cusp outflows will eventually escape into the solar wind, rather than be transported to the plasma sheet. Therefore, an investigation of plasma sheet flows will add to these studies and give a more complete picture of magnetospheric ion dynamics. Specifically, it will provide a greater understanding of atmospheric loss. We have used Cluster spacecraft 4 to quantify the H+ and O+ total transports in the near-Earth plasma sheet, using data covering 2001-2005. The results show that both H+ and O+ have earthward net fluxes of the orders of 1026 and 1024 s -1, respectively. The O+ plasma sheet return flux is 1 order of magnitude smaller than the O+ outflows observed in the cusps, strengthening the view that most ionospheric O+ outflows do escape. The H+ return flux is approximately the same as the ionospheric outflow, suggesting a stable budget of H+ in the magnetosphere. However, low-energy H+, not detectable by the ion spectrometer, is not considered in our study, leaving the complete magnetospheric H+ circulation an open question. Studying tailward flows separately reveals a total tailward O+ flux of about 0. 5 × 1025 s -1, which can be considered as a lower limit of the nightside auroral region O+ outflow. Lower velocity flows ( < 100kms -1) contribute most to the total transports, whereas the high-velocity flows contribute very little, suggesting that bursty bulk flows are not dominant in plasma sheet mass transport.

  • 13.
    Slapak, Rikard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Schillings, Audrey
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Yamauchi, Masatoshi
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Westerberg, Lars-Göran
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Dandouras, Iannis
    CNSR, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse.
    Atmospheric outflow from the terrestrial magnetosphere: implications forescape on evolutionary time scales2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14. Slapak, Rikard
    et al.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Waara, Martin
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik.
    André, Mats
    Institutet för rymdfysik, Uppsala.
    Stenberg, Gabriella
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik.
    Barghouthi, Imad A.
    Space Research Lab, Department of Physics, Al-Quds University, Jerusalem.
    O+ heating associated with strong wave activity in the high altitude cusp and mantle2011In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576, Vol. 29, p. 931-944Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Slapak, Rikard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Westerberg, Lars-Göran
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    A statistical study on O+ flux in the dayside magnetosheath2013In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576, Vol. 31, p. 1005-1010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on terrestrial oxygen ion (O+) escape into the interplanetary space have considered a number of different escape paths. Recent observations however suggest a yet insufficiently investigated additional escape route for hot O+: along open magnetic field lines in the high altitude cusp and mantle. Here we present a statistical study on O+ flux in the high-latitude dayside magnetosheath. The O+ is generally seen relatively close to the magnetopause, consistent with observations of O+ flowing primarily tangentially to the magnetopause. We estimate the total escape flux in this region to be ~ 7 × 1024 s−1, implying this escape route to significantly contribute to the overall total O+ loss into interplanetary space.

  • 16.
    Slapak, Rikard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Westerberg, Lars-Göran
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik.
    Observations of oxygen ions in the dayside magnetosheath associated with southward IMF2012In: Journal of Geophysical Research, ISSN 0148-0227, E-ISSN 2156-2202, Vol. 117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a case study of high energy oxygen ions (O+) observed in the dayside terrestrial magnetosheath, in the southern hemisphere. It is shown that the presence of O+ is strongly correlated to the IMF direction: O+ is observed only for Bz<0. Three satellites observe O$^+ immediately at both sides of the magnetopause and about 2 RE outside the magnetopause. These conditions indicate escape along open magnetic field lines. We show that if outflowing O+ is heated and accelerated sufficiently in the cusp, it takes 15-20 minutes for it to reach the magnetopause, allowing the ions to escape along newly opened field lines on the dayside. Earlier studies show evidence of strong heating and high velocities in the cusp and mantle at high altitudes, strengthening our interpretation. The observed magnetosheath O+ fluxes are of the same order as measured in the ionospheric upflow, which indicates that this loss mechanism is significant when it takes place.

  • 17.
    Slapak, Rikard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Westerberg, Lars-Göran
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Larsson, Richard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    O+ transport in the dayside magnetosheath and its dependence on the IMF direction2015In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576, Vol. 33, p. 301-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have shown that the escape of oxygen ions (O+) into the magnetosheath along open magnetic field lines from the terrestrial cusp and mantle is significant. We present a study of how O+ transport in the dayside magnetosheath depends on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction. There are clear asymmetries in the O+ flows for southward and northward IMF. The asymmetries can be understood in terms of the different magnetic topologies that arise due to differences in the location of the reconnection site, which depends on the IMF direction. During southward IMF, most of the observed magnetosheath O+ is transported downstream. In contrast, for northward IMF we observe O+ flowing both downstream and equatorward towards the opposite hemisphere. We observe evidence of dual-lobe reconnection occasionally taking place during strong northward IMF conditions, a mechanism that may trap O+ and bring it back into the magnetosphere. Its effect on the overall escape is however small: we estimate the upper limit of trapped O+ to be 5%, a small number considering that ion flux calculations are rough estimates. The total O+ escape flux is higher by about a factor of 2 during times of southward IMF, in agreement with earlier studies of O+ cusp outflow.

  • 18.
    Slapak, Rikard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Schillings, Audrey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Yamauchi, Masatoshi
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Westerberg, Lars-Göran
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Atmospheric loss from the dayside open polar region and its dependence on geomagnetic activity: Implications for atmospheric escape on evolutionary time scales2017In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 721-731Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Slapak, Rikard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Schillings, Audrey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Yamauchi, Masatoshi
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Westerberg, Lars-Göran
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Corrigendum to Atmospheric loss from the dayside open polar region and its dependence on geomagnetic activity: Implications for atmospheric escape on evolutionary time scales, published in Ann. Geophys., 35, 721–731,20172018In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Waara, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Slapak, Rikard
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik.
    André, Mats
    Institutet för rymdfysik, Uppsala.
    Stenberg, Gabriella
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik.
    Oxygen ion energization by waves in the high altitude cusp and mantle2012In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576, Vol. 30, p. 1309-1314Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Waara, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik.
    Slapak, Rikard
    Nilsson, Hans
    Stenberg, Gabriella
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik.
    André, Mats
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala.
    Barghouthi, Imad A.
    Al Quds University, Jerusalem.
    Statistical evidence for O+ energization and outflow caused by wave-particle interaction in the high altitude cusp and mantle2011In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576, Vol. 29, p. 945-954Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Yamauchi, Masatoshi
    et al.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Slapak, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Cusp Current System: An Energy Source View2018In: Electric Currents in Geospace and Beyond / [ed] Andreas Keiling Octav Marghitu Michael Wheatland, Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, 2018, p. 339-358Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electric currents in the cusp region are reviewed from viewpoints of history and energy conversion. During late 1980s and early 1990s, there were debates on the cause of the cusp region current system (cusp Region 0 field‐aligned current [FAC] and cusp Region 1 FAC, and relevant ionospheric current). The major debates were whether the cusp part Region 1 FAC is an extension of the non‐cusp‐part dayside Region 1 FAC or whether they are generated in different regions independently. The independency of the cusp current system, which was demonstrated by many observations, suggests additional extraction of energy from the magnetosheath‐like flow (e.g., deceleration) inside the polar magnetosphere. An extra deceleration is theoretically possible by adding a substantial local obstacle such as the outflowing ionospheric ions through the mass‐loading effect, which conserves momentum but not kinetic energy. Thus, two different dynamo (J · E < 0) mechanisms most likely exist between the dayside Region 1 and 2 FACs and cusp Region 1 and 0 FACs, forming “double openness,” which was introduced by Vasyliunas [1995]. The other debates (e.g., roles of mesoscale FACs, mapping to high latitude, and current carriers problems) are also reviewed in the light of new observational knowledge after Cluster.

  • 23.
    Yamauchi, Masatoshi
    et al.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Slapak, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Energy conversion through mass loading of escaping ionospheric ions for different Kp values2018In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By conserving momentum during the mixing of fast solar wind flow and slow planetary ion flow in an inelastic way, mass loading converts kinetic energy to other forms-e.g. first to electrical energy through charge separation and then to thermal energy (randomness) through gyromotion of the newly born cold ions for the comet and Mars cases. Here, we consider the Earth's exterior cusp and plasma mantle, where the ionospheric origin escaping ions with finite temperatures are loaded into the decelerated solar wind flow. Due to direct connectivity to the ionosphere through the geomagnetic field, a large part of this electrical energy is consumed to maintain field-aligned currents (FACs) toward the ionosphere, in a similar manner as the solar wind-driven ionospheric convection in the open geomagnetic field region. We show that the energy extraction rate by the mass loading of escaping ions (δK) is sufficient to explain the cusp FACs, and that 1K depends only on the solar wind velocity accessing the mass-loading region (usw) and the total mass flux of the escaping ions into this region (mloadFload), as δK ∼-mloadFloadu2 sw=4. The expected distribution of the separated charges by this process also predicts the observed flowing directions of the cusp FACs for different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations if we include the deflection of the solar wind flow directions in the exterior cusp. Using empirical relations of μ 0α KpC1:2 and Fload/exp.0:45Kp/for Kp D 1-7, where u0 is the solar wind velocity upstream of the bow shock, δK becomes a simple function of Kp as log10.δK/log10 0:2 &dw=elta;KpC 2 log10.KpC1:2)+Cconstant. The major contribution of this nearly linear increase is the Fload term, i.e. positive feedback between the increase of ion escaping rate Fload through the increased energy consumption in the ionosphere for high Kp, and subsequent extraction of more kinetic energy 1K from the solar wind to the current system by the increased Fload. Since Fload significantly increases for increased flux of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation, high EUV flux may significantly enhance this positive feedback. Therefore, the ion escape rate and the energy extraction by mass loading during ancient Earth, when the Sun is believed to have emitted much higher EUV flux than at present, could have been even higher than the currently available highest values based on Kp D 9. This raises a possibility that the ion escape has substantially contributed to the evolution of the Earth's atmosphere.

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