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  • 1.
    Buehler, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Eriksson, Patrick
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Earth and Space Sciences.
    Lemke, Oliver
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Absorption lookup tables in the radiative transfer model ARTS2011In: Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer, ISSN 0022-4073, E-ISSN 1879-1352, Vol. 112, no 10, 1559-1567 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the lookup table approach that is used to store pre-calculated absorption data in the radiative transfer model ARTS. The table stores absorption cross sections as a function of frequency, pressure, temperature, and the water vapor volume mixing ratio, where the last dimension is only included for those gas species that require it. The table is used together with an extraction strategy, which uses polynomial interpolation, with recommended interpolation orders between five and seven. We also derived recommended default settings for grid spacings and interpolation orders, and verified that the approach gives very accurate results with these default settings. The tested instrument setups were for AMSU-B, HIRS, and Odin, three well-known satellite remote sensing instruments covering a wide range of frequencies and viewing geometries. Errors introduced by the lookup table were found to be always below a few millikelvin, in terms of the simulated brightness temperature.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, P.
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Davis, C.P.
    Meteorological Service of New Zealand.
    Emde, C.
    Meteorological Institute, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munchen.
    Lemke, Oliver
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    ARTS, the atmospheric radiative transfer simulator, version 22011In: Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer, ISSN 0022-4073, E-ISSN 1879-1352, Vol. 112, no 10, 1551-1558 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The second version of the atmospheric radiative transfer simulator, ARTS, is introduced. This is a general software package for long wavelength radiative transfer simulations, with a focus on passive microwave observations. The core part provides a workspace environment, in line with script languages. New for this version is an agenda mechanism that gives a high degree of modularity. The framework is intended to be as general as possible: the polarisation state can be fully described, the model atmosphere can be one- (1D), two- (2D) or three-dimensional (3D), a full description of geoid and surface is possible, observation geometries from the ground, from satellite, and from aeroplane or balloon are handled, and surface reflection can be treated in simple or complex manners. Remote sensing applications are supported by a comprehensive and efficient treatment of sensor characteristics. Jacobians can be calculated for the most important atmospheric variables in non-scattering conditions. Finally, the most prominent feature is the rigorous treatment of scattering that has been implemented in two modules: a discrete ordinate iterative approach mainly used for 1D atmospheres, and a Monte Carlo approach which is the preferred algorithm for 3D atmospheres. ARTS is freely available, and maintained as an open-source project.

  • 3.
    Gasteiger, J.
    et al.
    Meteorologisches Institut, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität.
    Emde, C.
    Meteorologisches Institut, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität.
    Mayer, B.
    Meteorologisches Institut, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität.
    Buras, R.
    Meteorologisches Institut, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Lemke, Oliver
    Representative wavelengths absorption parameterization applied to satellite channels and spectral bands2014In: Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer, ISSN 0022-4073, E-ISSN 1879-1352, Vol. 148, 99-115 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate modeling of wavelength-integrated radiative quantities, e.g. integrated over a spectral band or an instrument channel response function, requires computations for a large number of wavelengths if the radiation is affected by gas absorption which typically comprises a complex line structure. In order to increase computational speed of modeling radiation in the Earth׳s atmosphere, we parameterized wavelength-integrals as weighted means over representative wavelengths. We parameterized spectral bands of different widths (1 cm−1, 5 cm−1, and 15 cm−1) in the solar and thermal spectral range, as well as a number of instrument channels on the ADEOS, ALOS, EarthCARE, Envisat, ERS, Landsat, MSG, PARASOL, Proba, Sentinel, Seosat, and SPOT satellites. A root mean square relative deviation lower than 1% from a “training data set” was selected as the accuracy threshold for the parameterization of each band and channel. The training data set included high spectral resolution calculations of radiances at the top of atmosphere for a set of highly variable atmospheric states including clouds and aerosols. The gas absorption was calculated from the HITRAN 2004 spectroscopic data set and state-of-the-art continuum models using the ARTS radiative transfer model. Three representative wavelengths were required on average to fulfill the accuracy threshold. We implemented the parameterized spectral bands and satellite channels in the uvspec radiative transfer model which is part of the libRadtran software package. The parameterization data files, including the representative wavelengths and weights as well as lookup tables of absorption cross sections of various gases, are provided at the libRadtran webpage.In the paper we describe the parameterization approach and its application. We validate the approach by comparing modeling results of parameterized bands and channels with results from high spectral resolution calculations for atmospheric states that were not part of the training data set. Irradiances are not only compared at the top of atmosphere but also at the surface for which this parameterization approach was not optimized. It is found that the parameterized bands and channels provide a good compromise between computation time requirements and uncertainty for typical radiative transfer problems. In particular for satellite radiometer simulations the computation time requirement and the parameterization uncertainty is low. Band-integrated irradiances at any level as well as heating and cooling rates below 20 km can also be modeled with low uncertainty.

  • 4.
    Mendrok, Jana
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Eriksson, Patrick
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    PERRIN, Agnes
    LISA, CNRS.
    HARTOGH, Paul
    Max-Planck-Institut für Solar System Research.
    REZAC, Ladislav
    Max-Planck-Institut für Solar System Research.
    Lemke, Oliver
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    ARTS+ - A toolbox for microwave atmospheric radiative transfer in solar system planets2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Microwave and (sub)millimetre-wave frequencies have long been of interest for remote sensing of the Earth and space objects. They suffer less from interference by small particles (dust, clouds), hence penetrate deeper into atmospheres revealing their deeper structures hidden to shorter wavelengths, and possess characteristic line absorption features of many gaseous species, which are of interest for the understanding of atmospheric chemistry and dynamics.Models simulating radiative transfer and wave propagation (RT/WP) have been developed by many institutions. Most of them are designed for a particular, narrow region of the electromagnetic spectrum, certain instrument types or missions, and specific atmospheric conditions. In particular, they are usually set up for a specific planetary body. This high level of specialisation allows for accurate modelling results. However, it also limits the flexibility of those models and comparability between them.For various applications there is a demand on easy and quick calculations of propagation characteristics, like feasibility estimates of missions proposed to space agencies and performance estimates of radiocommunication links between satellites or orbiter and lander.Within an ESA study we have developed a toolbox for microwave RT/WP in planetary atmospheres. The toolbox consists of the RT/WP model and a data package. The RT/WP model is a largely revised and extended version of ARTS, a sophisticated, flexible RT model for Earth atmosphere (3D spherical geometry, diverse absorption models, scattering, polarization, Jacobians). Focus has been on creating a consistent, physics-based model. Several features have been added (radio link and cloud radar modes, zeeman splitting, doppler shifts). A new spectroscopic approach has been implemented considering effects of a range of broadening/pressure-shifting/refracting species, a corresponding spectroscopic line catalogue designed and prepared. At the current state, the data package contains atmospheric and surface data for Earth and the planets Venus, Mars, and Jupiter, but is easily extendable.We will illustrate the capabilities of the toolbox introducing several example cases and presenting results from the toolbox validation.

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