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  • 1.
    Abdelrazek, Fathya
    et al.
    Faculty of Nursing, Suez Canal University, Port-Said, Egypt.
    Skytt, Bernice
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Aly, Magda
    Faculty of Nursing, Suez Canal University, Port-Said, Egypt.
    El-Sabour, Mona Abd
    Faculty of Nursing, Suez Canal University, Port-Said, Egypt.
    Ibrahim, Naglaa
    Faculty of Nursing, Suez Canal University, Port-Said, Egypt.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Leadership and management skills of first-line managers of elderly care and their work environment2010In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 736-745Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To study the leadership and management skills of first-line managers (FLMs) of elderly care and their work environment in Egypt and Sweden. Background FLMs in Egypt and Sweden are directly responsible for staff and quality of care. However, FLMs in Sweden, in elderly care, have smaller units/organizations to manage than do their colleagues in Egypt. Furthermore, family care of the elderly has been the norm in Egypt, but in recent years institutional care has increased, whereas in Sweden, residential living homes have existed for a longer period. Methods A convenience sample of FLMs, 49 from Egypt and 49 from Sweden, answered a questionnaire measuring leadership and management skills, structural and psychological empowerment, job satisfaction and psychosomatic health. Results In both countries, FLMs' perceptions of their leadership and management skills and psychological empowerment were quite high, whereas scores for job satisfaction and psychosomatic health were lower. FLMs had higher values in several factors/study variables in Egypt compared with in Sweden. Conclusion and implications The work environment, both in Egypt and Sweden, needs to be improved to increase FLMs' job satisfaction and decrease stress. The cultural differences and levels of management have an effect on the differences between the two countries.

  • 2.
    Amnå, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ekström, Mats
    Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Codebook: The Political Socialization Program (2015-01-26)2015Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Amnå, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Political socialization and human agency: The development of civic engagement from adolescence to adulthood2009In: Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-0747, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 27-40Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 4. Apleberger, Lennart
    et al.
    Cederwall, Krister
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Emborg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Massiva betongkonstruktioner i varmt klimat: fältmätningar och teoretisk analys av väggsektioner : D. 1 Rapportdel1985Report (Other academic)
  • 5. Apleberger, Lennart
    et al.
    Cederwall, Krister
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Emborg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Massiva betongkonstruktioner i varmt klimat: fältmätningar och teoretisk analys av väggsektioner : D. 2 Tabelldel1985Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bagge, Niklas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Nilimaa, Jonny
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Enochsson, Ola
    Sabourova, Natalia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Grip, Niklas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Emborg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Elfgren, Lennart
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Lundmark, Tore
    Ramböll Sverige AB, Luleå.
    Tu, Yongming
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Protecting a five span prestressed bridge against ground deformations2015In: IABSE Conference Geneva 2015: Structural Engineering: Providing Solutions to Global Challenges, Geneva: International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering, 2015, p. 255-262Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A 55 year-old, 121.5 m long, five span prestressed bridge was situated in the deformation zone close to a mine in Kiruna in northern Sweden. There was a risk for uneven ground deformations so the bridge was analyzed and monitored. Results and measures taken to ascertain the robustness of the bridge are presented.The analysis resulted in an estimate that the bridge could sustain 24 mm in uneven horizontal and 83 mm in uneven vertical displacement of the two supports of a span. To be able to sustain larger deformations, the columns of the bridge were provided with joints, where shims could be inserted to counteract the settlements. To accomplish this, each one of the 18 columns of the bridge was unloaded by help of provisional steel supports. The column was then cut and a new foot was mounted to it. This made it possible to lift each individual column with two jacks, when needed, and to adjust its height by inserting or taking away shim plates.The deformations of the bridge and the surrounding ground were monitored. The eigenmodes of the bridge were studied with accelerometers and by analysis with finite elements (FE) models. Comparison indicated good agreement between the model and the actual bridge, with calculated eigenfrequencies of 2.17, 4.15 and 4.67 Hz, for the first transversal, vertical and torsional modes, respectively. Measurements during winter resulted in higher values due to increased stiffness caused by frozen materials.

  • 7.
    Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Moberg, Ulla
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Pressen sviker sin roll2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8. Bernander, Stig
    et al.
    Emborg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Assessment of the risk of internal cracking in hardening concrete1990In: Proceedings: Nordic Concrete Research Meeting : Trondheim 1990 / [ed] Jens Jacob Jensen, Oslo: Norsk Betongforening , 1990, p. 302-303Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9. Bernander, Stig
    et al.
    Emborg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Early age thermal crack control: industrial benefits of new technology1997In: Selected research studies from Scandinavia: dedicated to professor Göran Fagerlund on his 60th anniversary November 11, 1997, Lund: Lund Institute of Technology, Division of Building Materials , 1997, p. 14-21Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10. Bernander, Stig
    et al.
    Emborg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Risk of cracking in massive concrete structures: new developments and experiences1995In: Thermal cracking in concrete at early ages: proceedings of the international symposium held by RILEM at the Technical Univ. of Munich ..., Oct. 10-12, 1994 / [ed] Rupert Springenschmid, London: Spon press, 1995, p. 385-392Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11. Bernander, Stig
    et al.
    Emborg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Temperaturförhållanden och sprickbegränsning i grova betongkonstruktioner1992In: Betonghandbok. Arbetsutförande: projektering och byggande, Solna: Svensk byggtjänst , 1992, 2, p. 639-666Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Björkman, Annica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Nursing Department, Medicine and Health College, Lishui University, Lishui, China .
    Olsson, Annakarin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Wahlberg, Anna Carin
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Identified obstacles and prerequisites in telenurses’ work environment: a modified Delphi study2017In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Telenursing is an expanding part of healthcare, staffed with registered nurses whose work environment is typical of a call centre. Work-related stress has been shown to be a major problem in nurses’ work environments and of importance to the outcome of care, patient safety, nurse job satisfaction and burnout. Today, however, we have a limited understanding of and knowledge about the work environment for telenurses. The aim of the present study is to explore and reach consensus on perceived important obstacles and prerequisites in telenurses’ work environment.

    Methods: A modified Delphi design, using qualitative as well as quantitative data sequentially through three phases, was taken. Data were initially collected via semi-structured interviews (Phase I) and later using a web survey (Phase II-III) between March 2015 and March 2016.

    Results: The findings present a consensus view of telenurses’ experiences of important obstacles and prerequisites in their work environment. Central to the findings are the aspects of telenurses having a demanding work, cognitive fatigue and having no opportunity for recovery during the work shift was ranked as important obstacles. Highly ranked prerequisites for managing were being able to focus on one caller at a time, working in a calm and pleasant environment and having technical support 24/7.

    Conclusions: Managers need to enable telenurses to experience control in their work, provided with possibilities to control their work and to recover during work; shortening work time could improve their work environment. Limited possibilities to perform work might contribute to feelings of stress and inability to perform work. 

  • 13.
    Blanck, Susanne
    et al.
    Baldersnäs Din Hälsocentral, Bollnäs, Sweden.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    District nurses' prescribing practice and its link to structural conditions2015In: Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, ISSN 2327-6886, E-ISSN 2327-6924, Vol. 27, no 10, p. 568-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe district nurses' (DNs') prescribing practice and examine associations between DNs' self-reported prescribing frequency, opinions about prescribing, and structural conditions/empowerment.

    Data sources: A cross-sectional and correlational design was employed. Data were collected during 2012 using questionnaires and a prescribing register. A random sample of 150 DNs from 32 primary care centers in Sweden was invited.

    Conclusions: DNs' ability to prescribe is used to a relatively small extent and access to "opportunities" and "informal power" seems to be the most important structural empowerment conditions for increased prescribing frequency and positive opinions about prescribing. The results support Kanter's theory of structural empowerment.

    Implications for practice: This article regarding restricted prescribing shows how important structural conditions/empowerment is to DNs' prescribing and employers have to enhance nurses' access to especially the structures "opportunities" and "informal power" to increase nurse prescribing. More targeted support and training are needed in different prescribing areas to make use of DNs' prescription qualification to a greater extent.

  • 14.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Faculty of Health, Sciences and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden .
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Surgery and Oncology Division, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Muntlin Athlin, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia; .
    Prevention of heel pressure ulcers among older patients - from ambulance care to hospital discharge: a multi-centre randomized controlled trial2016In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 30, p. 170-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate the effect of an early intervention, a heel suspension device boot, on the incidence of heel pressure ulcers among older patients (aged 70 +). Background: Pressure ulcers are a global healthcare issue; furthermore, the heel is an exposed location. Research indicates that preventive nursing interventions starting during the ambulance care and used across the acute care delivery chain are seldom used. Methods: A multi-centre randomized control study design was used. Five ambulance stations, two emergency departments and 16 wards at two Swedish hospitals participated. Altogether, 183 patients were transferred by ambulance to the emergency department and were thereafter admitted to one of the participating wards. Results: Significantly fewer patients in the intervention group (n=15 of 103; 14.6%) than the control group (n=24 of 80; 30%) developed heel pressure ulcers during their hospital stay (p=0.017). Conclusions: Pressure ulcer prevention should start early in the acute care delivery chain to increase patient safety.

  • 15.
    Candell, Agneta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Dental hygienists' work environment: motivating, facilitating, but also trying2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Candell, Agneta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Uppsala universitet.
    Dental hygienists’ work environment: motivating, facilitating, but also trying2010In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 204-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to describe dental hygienists' experiences of their physical and psychosocial work environment. The study was descriptive in design and used a qualitative approach. Eleven dental hygienists participated in the study and data were collected during spring 2008 using semi-structured interviews. The material was analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results showed that the dental hygienists experienced their work environment as motivating and facilitating, but at the same time as trying. The three categories revealed a theme: Being controlled in a modern environment characterized by good relationships. Motivating factors were the good relationship with co-workers, managers and patients, seeing the results of your work, having your own responsibility and making your own decisions. The new, pleasant and modern clinics, good cooperation between co-workers and varying duties were described as facilitating factors. The trying factors, as described by the dental hygienists, were above all being controlled by time limits or by some elements of the work, such as teamwork. The dental hygienists also felt stress because appointments were too-short. To conclude, the participants described their work environment as trying in several ways, despite the modern clinics and good relationships.

  • 17. Carlswärd, Jonas
    et al.
    Emborg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Avoiding undesirable end results of bonded steel fibre concrete overlays: observations from tests and theoretical calculations2014In: Nordic Concrete Research, ISSN 0800-6377, Vol. 49, p. 93-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to a high degree of damages and undesirable final results of bonded overlays, research has been conducted to develop recommendations on design and execution. Laboratory and half scale tests as well as theoretical analyses have been carried out including e. g. base and end restraint tests on overlays with various reinforcement, concrete qualities, substrate preparing and curing. Also, analytical and numerical calculations have been performed. Results reveal that the bond between overlay and substrate is the most critical parameter for a successful final result. Other key parameters are shrinkage and curing, while fibre and bar reinforcement generally proved to be less significant. Theoretical models work well on this case and will be further developed

  • 18.
    Carlswärd, Jonas
    et al.
    Betongindustri AB.
    Emborg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Prediction of stress development and cracking in steel fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete overlays due to restrained shrinkage2010In: Fiber-Reinforced Self-Consolidating Concrete: Research and Applications, American Concrete Institute, 2010, p. 31-49Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shrinkage cracking of self-compacting concrete (SCC) overlays with and without steel fibres has been assessed through laboratory testing and theoretical analysis. Test results verified that steel fibre reinforcement has a crack width limiting effect. However, the contribution in case of fibre contents up to 0.75 vol% was not found to be sufficient to distribute cracks in situations where bond to the substrate was nonexistent. Thus, even higher steel fibre contents (or other types of fibres) are required in order to control cracks. A distributed pattern of fine cracks was however obtained even for unreinforced SCC within bonded areas of the overlays. This implies that steel fibres, or other crack reinforcement, are not required if high bond strength is obtained. An analytical model, proposed to assess the risk of cracking and to predict crack widths in overlays, was found to give reasonable correlation with experimental results

  • 19. Carlswärd, Jonas
    et al.
    Emborg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Restrained shrinkage cracking of thin overlays made of steel fibre reinforced self-compacting concrete2005In: Proceedings: Nordic Concrete Research meeting : Sandefjord, Norway 2005 / [ed] Terje Kanstad; Einar Aassved Hansen, Oslo: Norsk Betongforening , 2005, p. 362-364Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20. Carlswärd, Jonas
    et al.
    Emborg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Shrinkage cracking of steel fibre reinforced SCC overlays2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21. Carlswärd, Jonas
    et al.
    Emborg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Shrinkage cracking of thin concrete overlays2014In: Nordic Concrete Research, ISSN 0800-6377, Vol. 50, p. 355-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to a high degree of damages and undesirable end results of bonded overlays, research is conducted to develop recommendations on design and execution. Laboratory and full scale tests as well as theoretical analyses have been carried out including e. g. base and end restraint tests on overlays with various reinforcement, concrete qualities, substrate preparing and curing. Moreover, analytical and numerical calculations have been performed. Results reveal that the e. g. bond between overlay and substrate is a critical parameter for a successful end result. Another key parameter is sufficient curing, while reinforcement generally proved to be less significant. Theoretical models works well on this structural situation and will be further developed.

  • 22. Carlswärd, Jonas
    et al.
    Emborg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Olofsson, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Shrinkage cracking of steel fiber reinforced self compacting concrete overlays: test methods and theoretical modelling2007In: Proceedings of the 5th International Rilem Symposium on Self-Compcting Concrete: SCC2007 / [ed] G. De Schutter ; G. De Schutter . Boel, Bagneux, France: Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research, Ghent University , 2007, p. 793-798Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Chen, Jian Hua
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Medicine and Health College, Lishui University, Lishui, Zhejiang Province, China.
    Björkman, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zou, Ji Hua
    Department of Nursing, Medicine and Health College, Lishui University, Lishui, Zhejiang Province, China.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Self–regulated learning ability, metacognitive ability, and general selfefficacy in a sample of nursing students: A cross-sectional and correlational study2019In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 37, p. 15-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The healthcare sector is fast-growing and knowledge-intensive, and to meet the demands associated with it, nursing students must have high levels of self-regulated learning (SRL), metacognition, and general self-efficacy (GSE). In this cross-sectional, correlational study, data were collected from 216 nursing students through a questionnaire. The aims were: 1) to describe the levels of SRL ability, metacognitive ability and GSE among second- and third-year nursing students; 2) to explore the relationships between the SRL ability, metacognitive ability and GSE of second- and third-year nursing students; 3) and to compare SRL ability, metacognitive ability and GSE between second- and third-year nursing students. Nursing students had moderate levels of SRL ability and metacognitive ability, but lower levels of GSE. Positive relationships between SRL ability, metacognitive ability, and GSE were observed. Third-year nursing students had a higher level of SRL ability but lower levels of GSE, compared to second-year students. In terms of metacognitive ability, no significant differences were observed between the student batches. Interventions are required for the improvement of nursing students’ SRL ability, metacognitive ability, and GSE.

  • 24.
    Daerga, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Bernander, Stig
    Emborg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Egenspänningar i undervattensgjutna bottenplattor: inverkan av temperaturförlopp under hydratationen1986Report (Other academic)
  • 25. Dahlgren, Peter
    et al.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Nohrstedt, Stig Arne
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Internet: enhancing democracy via the mediated public sphere?2006In: Democratic eGovernance: approaches and research directions / [ed] Jan Olsson, Joachim Åström, Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell, 2006, p. 75-101Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Dahlkvist, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Residents’ use and perceptions of residential care facility gardens: a behavior mapping and conversation study2019In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To describe the gardens and their use by individuals living at residential care facilities (RCFs) with high ratings on restorative values.

    Background

    Being outdoors has been described as important to older people's well‐being. Use of outdoor gardens may increase residents’ well‐being through experiences of restorative qualities such as being away and fascination. Thus far, there has been little research on restorative experiences of gardens in the care of older people.

    Design

    A descriptive design using behaviour mapping observations integrated with qualitative field notes and recorded conversations.

    Methods

    A criterion sampling of two gardens (out of a total of 87) was made based on residents’ ratings of restorative values; the two with the highest values were chosen. Eleven residents at the two RCFs took part. Data were collected through behaviour mapping observations, field notes and conversations on five occasions in the respective facilities during residents’ visits to the garden.

    Results

    The observations revealed that the main uses of the gardens were to socialise and relax. The conversations also showed that the garden stimulated residents’ senses and evoked memories from the past. These restorative values were interpreted as a sense of being away and fascination. Not having opportunities for outdoor visits was reported to result in disappointment and reduced well‐being.

    Conclusions

    The findings showed that two basic gardens with different characteristics and views could stimulate residents’ senses and evoke memories from the past; this supports the call for residents to be able to spend time in gardens to promote their well‐being.

    Implications for practice

    First‐line managers, nurses and healthcare staff in the care of older people should consider that regular opportunities to spend time outdoors may promote older people's well‐being through feelings of being away and fascination.

  • 27.
    Dahlkvist, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Health and Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hartig, Terry
    Department of Psychology, Uppsala university, Uppsala, Sweden; Institute for Housing and Urban Research,Uppsala university, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högberg, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud and Vestfold university, Norway.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Garden greenery and the health of older people in residential care facilities: A multi-level cross-sectional study2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 9, p. 2065-2076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS:

    To test the relationship between greenery in gardens at residential facilities for older people and the self-perceived health of residents, mediated by experiences of being away and fascination when in the garden and the frequency of visitation there. To examine how these indirect effects vary with the number of physical barriers to visiting the garden.

    BACKGROUND:

    Many older people in residential facilities suffer from complex health problems. Access to a green outdoor environment may enable psychological distance, engage effortless attention, encourage more frequent visitation and promote resident health.

    DESIGN:

    A multi-level, cross-sectional, correlational design.

    METHODS:

    Questionnaires were administered June-August, 2011 to convenience samples of residents at 72 facilities for older people with complex healthcare needs. One to 10 eligible residents were sampled during self-motivated garden visits at each facility (n = 290). They reported on their garden experiences and health. Facility staff reported on objective garden characteristics and barriers to access. A serial mediation model was tested with multiple linear regression analysis.

    RESULTS:

    The total indirect effect of greenery on self-perceived health was positive and significant. Garden greenery appears to affect health by enhancing a sense of being away, affording possibilities to experience the outdoor environment as interesting and encouraging visitation. Among residents in homes with multiple barriers, only fascination mediated the relationship between greenery and self-perceived health.

    CONCLUSION:

    Ample greenery in outdoor space at residential facilities for older people appears to promote experiences of being away and fascination, more frequent visitation and better health.

  • 28.
    Dahlkvist, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Health and Medicine, Örebro University.
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    Örebro Universitet, Institutionen för Hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Is there a caring perspective in garden/patio design in elderly care?: a description and a comparison of residents' and staff members' perceptions of these outdoor spaces2014In: Journal of Housing for the Elderly, ISSN 0276-3893, E-ISSN 1540-353X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 85-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aimed to describe characteristics of and design elements in gardens/patios at 87 residential living homes for older people and to describe and compare residents’ and staff members’ perceptions of these spaces. The result showed that many gardens/patios had several recommended design elements and at the same time obvious deficiencies. The residents (n=415) valued various aspects of the garden/patio more highly than the staff did (n=667). One conclusion is that managers responsible for residential living homes for older people should pay attention to and takes measures to ameliorate shortcomings and deficient elements in design and accessibility so that the garden/patio can be used as an important health promotion resource in the care of older people. Residents and staff can be seen as very important actors in such development work.

     

  • 29.
    Danermark, Berth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Jakobsen, Liselotte
    Karlsson, Jan Christer
    Explaining society: critical realism in the social sciences2002 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Einarson, Daniel
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Melén Fäldt, Maria
    Kristianstad University, Learning Resource Centre.
    Introduktion till Temanumret: läraktiviteter för att uppnå värderingsförmåga och förhållningssätt2017In: Högskolepedagogisk debatt, E-ISSN 2000-9216, no 1, p. 2-15Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Ekerfors, Katarina
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Jonasson, Jan-Erik
    Emborg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Behaviour of young high-strength concrete1993In: Utilization of High Strength Concrete : Proceedings: Symposium in Lillehammer, Norway / [ed] Ivar Holand, Oslo: Norsk Betongforening , 1993, p. 691-697Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Announced refusal to answer: a study of norms and accountability in broadcast political interviews2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Announced refusal to answer: a study of norms and accountability in broadcast political interviews2009In: Discourse Studies, ISSN 1461-4456, E-ISSN 1461-7080, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 681-702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the announced refusal to answer asa form of dispreferred and challenging response in broadcastpolitical interviews. The aim is to study how the rightnessand wrongness of conduct is dealt with in situations of announcedrefusal. More specifically, the paper focuses on: (1) announcedrefusal as a particular type of conduct; (2) the orientationto norms and accountability in situations of announced refusal;(3) how the legitimacy of politics and journalism is negotiatedin broadcast interviews. The data consist of 23 cases from Swedishelection campaigns, and the analysis is based on ConversationAnalysis, focusing on how the participants treat themselvesand others as normatively accountable. The study indicates thatthe politicians understand themselves as accountable and avoidhostile actions in the interviews. Their refusals are designedmainly to be understood as appropriate distancing actions withoutexplicitly complaining about the interviewers’ conduct.

  • 34.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Conversation analysis in journalism studies2007In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 964-973Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article considers the role of conversational analysis in the study of journalism. The author argues that conversation is inherent to the very being of journalism, whether it be conversational exchange in broadcast journalism or the conversation engaged in by print journalists in their news gathering activities. The article offers a brief history of the field of conversational analysis. Of particular interest in conversational analysis for journalistic study is the role of institutional interaction. The author discusses the role of communication and conversation in news legitimacy.

  • 35.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Etnografiska observationer2010In: Metoder i kommunikationsvetenskap / [ed] Mats Ekström, Larsåke Larsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2010, 2, p. 25-52Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Exploaterade röster: opinionsmätningar som mediedramaturgi2007In: Paketerad politik: elva essäer om journalistik och medier / [ed] Mats Ekström, Åsa Kroon, Stockholm: Carlssons , 2007, p. 45-61Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Folkets instrument eller journalisternas?: Opinionsmätningar som mediedramaturgi2006In: Media i fokus, ISSN 1403-8145, no 2, p. 66-88Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Individuals, representatives and deputies: talk on behalf of positions in broadcast political interviews2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Interviewing, quoting, and the development of modern news journalism: a study of the Swedish press 1915 – 19952006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Interviewing, quoting and the development of modern news journalism: a study of the Swedish press 1915-19952006In: News from the interview society / [ed] Mats Ekström, Åsa Kroon, Mats Nylund, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2006, p. 21-48Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Iscensatta samtal: om relationer mellan politik och journalistik2008In: Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-0747, Vol. 110, no 4, p. 407-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Staged talk: On relations between politics and journalism. This article focuses on political talkin the media. Taking the point of departure in discourse and conversation analysis the aim is to study relations and methods on a micro level in two forms of staged talk; the interaction in live interviews and the practices of quoting in edited news reports. The study of live interviews is based on programs broadcasted during the Swedish election campaigns 2002 and 2006. The study shows how relations of power are negotiated in interaction. Methods used by the politicians to deal with delicate situations created by the questions asked are analysed. The analysis of edited news reports shows how techniques of quoting have been part of a process moving the stage of the political debate more and more into the media. Quoting is a flexible resource frequently used by journalists in the dramatization of news stories and the recontextualization of others voices. 

  • 42.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Journalisternas val2010In: Norsk Medietidsskrift, ISSN 0804-8452, E-ISSN 0805-9535, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 101-103Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Mediernas språk2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Michael Schudson "Why Democracies Need an Unlovable Press"2010In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 184-186Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Occupying the floor in political press conferences: a study on interaction and territorial power2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Politiken i mediesamhället: om nyhetsintervjuer och fotojournalistik2006 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Politikkens medialisering2008In: Norsk Medietidsskrift, ISSN 0804-8452, E-ISSN 0805-9535, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 254-257Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Politiskt ansvarsutkrävande i mediesamhället2006In: Demokratins villkor: volym 1 / [ed] Mats Ekström et al., Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2006, 1, p. 195-220Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Power and affiliation in presidential press conferences: A study on interruptions, jokes and laughter2009In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 386-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Presidential press conference is an enduring form for public interrogations. Interaction in this context regulates and symbolizes relations of power, autonomy and affiliation between the President and the journalists. A general argument is that we have to study sequences of interaction in order to understand the roles and relations established in press conferences. The article investigates interruptions, and jokes and laughter. The study is based on Conversation Analysis and the data encompasses 19 press conferences held by George W Bush from 2005-2007. The analysis shows how the President uses interruptions in order to control the allocation of turns, disagree and reject criticism, demonstrate certainty and conviction, and makes joke with the journalists. Sequences of jokes and laughter strengthen the interactive power of the President, create affiliations, and questioning the expected neutrality of journalism.

  • 50.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Power and affiliation in presidential press conferences: a study on interruptions, jokes and laughter2008Conference paper (Refereed)
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