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  • 1.
    Ali, Zaheer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mukwaya, Anthonny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Biesemeier, Antje
    Univ Tubingen, Germany.
    Ntzouni, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ramskold, Daniel
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Giatrellis, Sarantis
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Mammadzada, Parviz
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Cao, Renhai
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Missouri, MO 65211 USA.
    Marass, Michele
    Max Planck Inst Lung and Heart Res, Germany.
    Gerri, Claudia
    Max Planck Inst Lung and Heart Res, Germany.
    Hildesjö, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Taylor, Michael
    Univ Wisconsin, WI 53706 USA.
    Deng, Qiaolin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping. Bayer AB, Sweden.
    del Peso, Luis
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas Alberto Sols, CSIC-UAM Madrid, Spain.
    Kvanta, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Rickard
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Schraermeyer, Ulrich
    Univ Tubingen, Germany.
    Andre, Helder
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Steffensen, John F.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kele, Julianna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Univ Autonoma Madrid, Spain; UAM, Spain.
    Intussusceptive Vascular Remodeling Precedes Pathological Neovascularization2019In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 1402-1418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective—

    Pathological neovascularization is crucial for progression and morbidity of serious diseases such as cancer, diabetic retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration. While mechanisms of ongoing pathological neovascularization have been extensively studied, the initiating pathological vascular remodeling (PVR) events, which precede neovascularization remains poorly understood. Here, we identify novel molecular and cellular mechanisms of preneovascular PVR, by using the adult choriocapillaris as a model.

    Approach and Results—

    Using hypoxia or forced overexpression of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) in the subretinal space to induce PVR in zebrafish and rats respectively, and by analyzing choriocapillaris membranes adjacent to choroidal neovascular lesions from age-related macular degeneration patients, we show that the choriocapillaris undergo robust induction of vascular intussusception and permeability at preneovascular stages of PVR. This PVR response included endothelial cell proliferation, formation of endothelial luminal processes, extensive vesiculation and thickening of the endothelium, degradation of collagen fibers, and splitting of existing extravascular columns. RNA-sequencing established a role for endothelial tight junction disruption, cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicle- and cilium biogenesis in this process. Mechanistically, using genetic gain- and loss-of-function zebrafish models and analysis of primary human choriocapillaris endothelial cells, we determined that HIF (hypoxia-induced factor)-1α-VEGF-A-VEGFR2 signaling was important for hypoxia-induced PVR.

    Conclusions—

    Our findings reveal that PVR involving intussusception and splitting of extravascular columns, endothelial proliferation, vesiculation, fenestration, and thickening is induced before neovascularization, suggesting that identifying and targeting these processes may prevent development of advanced neovascular disease in the future.

    Visual Overview—

    An online visual overview is available for this article.

  • 2.
    Macwan, Ankit
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Ntzouni, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Gibbins, Jonathan M.
    Univ Reading, England.
    Faxälv, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Gradient-dependent inhibition of stimulatory signaling from platelet G protein-coupled receptors2019In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 104, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As platelet activation is an irreversible and potentially harmful event, platelet stimulatory signaling must be tightly regulated to ensure the filtering-out of inconsequential fluctuations of agonist concentrations in the vascular milieu. Herein, we show that platelet activation via G protein-coupled receptors is gradient-dependent, i.e., determined not only by agonist concentrations per se but also by how rapidly concentrations change over time. We demonstrate that gradient-dependent inhibition is a common feature of all major platelet stimulatory G protein-coupled receptors, while platelet activation via the non-G protein-coupled receptor glycoprotein VI is strictly concentration-dependent. By systematically characterizing the effects of variations in temporal agonist concentration gradients on different aspects of platelet activation, we demonstrate that gradient-dependent inhibition of protease-activated receptors exhibits different kinetics, with platelet activation occurring at lower agonist gradients for protease-activated receptor 4 than for protease-activated receptor 1, but shares a characteristic bimodal effect distribution, as gradient-dependent inhibition increases over a narrow range of gradients, below which aggregation and granule secretion is effectively shut off. In contrast, the effects of gradient-dependent inhibition on platelet activation via adenosine diphosphate and thromboxane receptors increase incrementally over a large range of gradients. Furthermore, depending on the affected activation pathway, gradient-dependent inhibition results in different degrees of refractoriness to subsequent autologous agonist stimulation. Mechanistically, our study identifies an important role for the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent pathway in gradient-dependent inhibition. Together, our findings suggest that gradient-dependent inhibition may represent a new general mechanism for hemostatic regulation in platelets.

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