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  • 1.
    Forssberg, Anna Maria
    et al.
    Armémuseum.
    Hallenberg, MatsStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.Husz, OrsiUppsala universitet.Nordin, JonasKungliga biblioteket.
    Organizing History: Studies in Honour of Jan Glete2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizing History is a tribute to the late Jan Glete, focusing on the dynamic interaction of organizations, norm systems and institutional changes. The chapters span a period from the first cultures to the present day, and include European, Middle Eastern, Japanese, and South American history. But the book also highlights the need to organize historical knowledge through the critical use of theory.

  • 2.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    A State of Aggression? Swedish Peasant Elites and the Art of Bargaining During the Nordic Seven Years’ War (1563–70)2016In: Aggressive and Violent Peasant Elites in the Nordic Countries, C. 1500-1700 / [ed] Ulla Koskinen, Springer, 2016, p. 145-170Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter addresses the violent mentality of peasant elites in the Swedish Realm during the mid-sixteenth century. The purpose is to discuss how the belligerent politics of the Swedish kings was inflicted on peasant communities, and why this expansionist strategy came to foster a mentality of masculine honour and aggressive behaviour among the leading strata of peasant society. I will present a case study of the army campaigns against Norway in 1564–65 (which were ultimately futile) to demonstrate how the war policy came to rely on an extended bargaining process between royal officials and peasant elites, which in turn encouraged violent ideals of masculine honour as a means to achieve recognition.

  • 3.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Det förmoderna i det moderna: Om brott, kontinuitet och långa linjer i historien2015In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 81, no 2, p. 26-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The premodernity of modern times. Rupture, continuity and the longue durée

    This essay discusses how the concept of ’premodernity’ may be used to encourage the study of long-time perspectives in history, a feature which has become much in demand in recent scholarly debate. I argue that premodernity should be understood not as a chronological description, but as an analytical tool by which to contrast, criticize and discuss modern as well as premodern societies. The notion of a rupture between the premodern and the modern, and the ability to identify important traits in different societies, Mats Hallenberg 37 Scandia 81:2 may provide historians with the means to confront what is neither old nor new, but essentially human. I argue that there are two important benefits of applying the concept of premodernity in historical research. First, it may incite more cooperation between scholars of classic, medieval and early modern periods. Second, it may help us formulate a critique of modernity from a historical perspective by exposing the reproduction of premodern structures, ideas and concepts in contemporary times. By critically addressing the presumptions of ‘modernist’ social theory, scholars of older periods may contribute to make history less “presentist” in the future.

  • 4.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    En ny bild av det senmedeltida länsväsendet: Dag Retsö, Länsförvaltningen i Sverige 1434–15202010In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, no 3, p. 507-513Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    For the Wealth of the Realm: the transformation of the public sphere in Swedish politics, c. 1434-16502012In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 557-577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the transformation of the representative public in late-medieval and early modern Sweden. While recognizing the importance of Habermas’s theory of the public sphere, the focus is on the progressive character of the royal administration and on how the interaction within the administrative setting eventually came to serve as a basis for political opinion. The interplay between local bargaining over taxes and political action at the national level is of critical importance. The state formation process served to empower new groups like peasants and burghers, who eventually learned how to wield rational arguments in order to defend their interests. This is demonstrated by here by focusing on the interaction between local officeholders and the tax-paying peasantry.

  • 6.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Församlingsprästen i det svenska riket under 1500-talet: traditionell auktoritet under omförhandling2012In: Auktoritet i förvandling: Omförhandling av fromhet, lojalitet och makt i reformationens Sverige / [ed] Eva-Marie Letzter, Uppsala: Historiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet , 2012, p. 113-134Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Gör plats för konflikt. Kungsgårdarna i 1500-talets expanderande politiska rum2014In: Politiska rum: Kontroll, konflikt och rörelse i det förmoderna Sverige 1300-1850 / [ed] Mats Hallenberg & Magnus Linnarsson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2014, p. 177-195Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Kungen, fogdarna och riket: Lokalförvaltning och statsbyggande under tidig Vasatid2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The growth of the 16th century Swedish state is studied through the local organization created by Gustavus Vasa. The state is viewed as an organization, a collective agent, which may function as a formidable instrument of power for those who can control it. The inspiration comes from Max Weber as well as theories on how modern firms come to exist and expand their activities.

    The main issue is to explain why Gustavus Vasa and his successors created a wide-embracing local organization run by the state. In most parts of Europe, the princes tried to strengthen their positions by acting through noble officials on the provincial level. In Sweden royal bailiffs took over the responsibility for the tax collection in the entire realm. These bailiffs were the only intermediates between the king and his subjects. This flat, non-hierarchical structure meant that the Swedish nobility in effect was left outside the royal administration.

    In the first years of the reign of Gustavus Vasa mobilization of political support was given top priority, as the new regime needed to establish its legitimacy. The civil administration also performed important military functions. In the years around 1540, the local organization co-operated with the district courts in compiling records on the tax-base of the realm. As the political situation stabilized, and the central government gained access to information on local resources, the state expanded its activities into new areas. Under the entrepreneurial leadership of Gustavus Vasa the bailiffs took over operations that had previously been performed within civil society. As a result, the local administration had to grow. After 1560 this expansion stopped, and the state administration instead became more differentiated. But the local bargaining between bailiffs and peasantry was still of great importance. It added an important dimension of flexibility to the system.

    This study also addresses the relationship between the royal bailiffs and the peasantry. The bailiffs often used harsh methods, but peasants' complaints could prove worth while, and there was room for acting out conflicts within the system. From the reign of Gustavus Vasa, a line of communication was opened between king and peasants, which helped increase the legitimacy of state government while at the same time securing access to first-hand information about local circumstances. The Swedish state thus was able to mobilize resources and political support for its activities on a lower level in society than most of its competitors could. The significance of this state building in local society is strongly emphasized in this dissertation.

  • 9.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Kungen, kronan eller staten?: makt och legitimitet i Gustav Vasas propaganda2003In: Maktens skiftande skepnader: studier i makt, legitimitet och inflytande i det tidigmoderna Sverige, Umeå: Institutionen för historiska studier, Umeå universitet , 2003, p. 19-41Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Marthe Hommestad, Politiske bønder: Bondestrategene og kampen for demokratiet 1814–1837 Oslo: Scandinavian Academic Press 2014. 345 s.2015In: Historisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0018-263X, E-ISSN 1504-2944, Vol. 94, no 3, p. 506-510Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Militärstaten och kapitalet.: Privatisering och maktlegitimering i Gustav II Adolfs Sverige2009In: Sammanflätat: Civilt och militärt i det tidgmoderna Sverige / [ed] Maria Sjöberg, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2009, p. 47-59Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Ordens kraft. Politiska eder i Sverige 1520-1718, Sari Nauman2017In: Karolinska förbundets årbok, ISSN 0348-9833, p. 159-161Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Peasants and tax-farmers in seventeenth-century Sweden: local conflict and institutional change2009In: Empowering interactions: political cultures and the emergence of the state in Europe, 1300-1900 / [ed] Wim Blockmans, Andre Holenstein, Jon Mathieu, Aldershot: Ashgate, 2009, p. 253-266Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Piskan och moroten: om fogdarnas handel och vandel under tidig Vasatid2001In: Mellan makten och menigheten: ämbetsmän i det tidgmoderna Sverige / [ed] Börje Harnesk, Marja Taussi Sjöberg, Stockholm: Insitutet för rättshistorisk forskning , 2001, p. 43-67Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Psykopaattien aikakausi? Valtion muodostuminen ja maskuliinisuus Ruotsissa ja Suomessa noin 1450–16502014In: Näkymätön sukupuoli: Mieheyden pitkä historia / [ed] Pirjo Markkola, Ann-Catrin Östman & Marko Lamberg, Tampere: Vastapaino , 2014, 1, p. 78-91Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Sigfrid (Siffred) Jönsson2003In: Svenskt biografiskt lexikon: Bd 32, Sehlstedt-Sparre / [ed] Åsa Karlsson, Stockholm: Svenskt biografiskt lexikon , 2003, p. 158-160Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    State formation, history and the present2013In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 160-164Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Statsmakt till salu: Arrendesystemet och privatiseringen av skatteuppbörden i det svenska riket 1618-16352008Book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    The Golden Age of the Aggressive Male?: Violence, Masculinity and the State in Sixteenth-Century Sweden2013In: Gender and History, ISSN 0953-5233, E-ISSN 1468-0424, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 132-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the connection between violence, manhood and state formation in sixteenth-century Sweden. It argues that this period, which experienced the Lutheran Reformation and the establishment of a permanent state organization, also saw a shift in masculine ideals. R. W. Connell’s concept of hegemonic masculinity will serve as a starting point for discussing the conflict between the traditional norms of the ruling aristocracy and the instrumental violence employed by the servants of the king. Judging by the testimony of the time, the process of state formation seems to have triggered a mentality of ruthless self-assertion among the Swedish elites. During the initial phase, when a monopoly of violence had to be asserted by any means, this fiercely uncontrollable masculinity became a vital asset for the leaders of the state. However, as the Swedish quest for empire gained momentum, the aggressive forms of manhood were pushed towards the peripheries of the realm while a rational, calculating masculinity reasserted its dominance at the centre.

  • 20.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    The local adaptation of centralizing politics: hybrid statebuiling in sixteenth-century Sweden2013In: New Agendas in Statebuilding: Hybridity, contigency and history / [ed] Robert Egnell, Peter Haldén, London: Routledge, 2013, p. 122-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    The State as Enterprise: Applying theories of organizational growth to the process of state formation2011In: Organizing History: Studies in Honour of Jan Glete / [ed] Anna Maria Forssberg, Mats Hallenberg, Orsi Husz, Jonas Nordin, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2011, p. 45-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discuss the pros and cons of using economic theory to study political organization, as well as the implications of drawing analogies between states in history and modern business firms. Using the Swedish state and Edith Penrose's Theory of the firm as points of departure, this essay analyzes the transition from dynastic state to welfare state.

  • 22.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Undersåten som förstod: Reformationen som diskurs och tankesystem: Recension av Kajsa Brilkman, Undersåten som förstod. Den svenska reformatoriska samtalsordningen och den tidigmoderna integrationsprocessen2015In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 135, no 2, p. 301-308Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Forssberg, Anna Maria
    Armémuseum.
    Introduction: Organizing History2011In: Organizing History: Studies in Honour of Jan Glete / [ed] Anna Maria Forssberg, Mats Hallenberg, Orsi Husz, Jonas Nordin, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2011, p. 11-20Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Holm, Johan
    Man ur huse: Hur krig, upplopp och förhandlingar påverkade svensk statsbildning under tidigmodern tid2016Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book offers a fresh interpretation of the Swedish state’s evolution between 1530 and 1680. We have taken both a top-down and a bottom-up approach to the sociopolitical history of the country by applying our own analytical model (first described in the Scandinavian Journal of History in 2008). Our focus is the interplay of organizational growth and each monarch’s strategies to legitimize their rule, and the varying degrees of interaction between the peasantry and the central authorities.

  • 25.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Linnarsson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Hetsig vinstdebatt skymmer viktiga vägval2016In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Samhället behöver diskutera vad det allmänna ska sköta och vad som är den enskildes ansvar. Men denna avgörande debatt försvinner i ett ideologiskt krig kring vinster i dagens välfärd. Det skriver historikerna Mats Hallenberg och Magnus Linnarsson.

  • 26.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Linnarsson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Politiska rum: En introduktion2014In: Politiska rum: Kontroll, konflikt och rörelse i det förmoderna Sverige 1300–1850 / [ed] Mats Hallenberg, Magnus Linnarsson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2014, p. 7-17Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Politik har i alla tider utspelats på olika typer av platser, från de politiska sammanträdesrummen till galgbacken utanför byn. Vilken betydelse hade rummet eller platsen för politikens utformning under förmodern tid, och vad ansågs vara en politisk handling? Utifrån ett rumsligt perspektiv och med en vidare syn på politik går det att förklara konflikter som annars inte skulle betraktas som politiska.

    I Politiska rum undersöker en grupp historiker platser och områden där konflikter utspelades mellan överhet och undersåtar under den förmoderna perioden. Texterna handlar om politik, hur politiken formade platserna och hur rum och plats i sin tur påverkade politiken. I bokens olika bidrag är rummet inte enbart den scen där politiken utspelades. Författarna diskuterar också hur rumsliga villkor har påverkat politiken, samt hur människors rörelser och handlingar bidragit till att särskilda platser och rum blivit politiska. 

  • 27.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Linnarsson, MagnusStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Politiska rum: kontroll, konflikt och rörelse i det förmoderna Sverige 1300–18502014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Politik har i alla tider utspelats på olika typer av platser, från de politiska sammanträdesrummen till galgbacken utanför byn. Vilken betydelse hade rummet eller platsen för politikens utformning under förmodern tid, och vad ansågs vara en politisk handling? Utifrån ett rumsligt perspektiv och med en vidare syn på politik går det att förklara konflikter som annars inte skulle betraktas som politiska.

    I Politiska rum undersöker en grupp historiker platser och områden där konflikter utspelades mellan överhet och undersåtar under den förmoderna perioden. Texterna handlar om politik, hur politiken formade platserna och hur rum och plats i sin tur påverkade politiken. I bokens olika bidrag är rummet inte enbart den scen där politiken utspelades. Författarna diskuterar också hur rumsliga villkor har påverkat politiken, samt hur människors rörelser och handlingar bidragit till att särskilda platser och rum blivit politiska. 

  • 28.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Linnarsson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Privat och publikt i det förmoderna samhället: Konflikter om allmännyttan i frihetstidens Sverige2014In: Förmoderna offentligheter: Arenor och uttryck för politisk debatt 1550–1830 / [ed] Leif Runefelt, Oskar Sjöström, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2014, p. 57-74Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates and discusses privatization and out-sourcing of various state enterprises, regarded as a political problem. The aim is to show that the contradiction between public and private organization, is not a modern phenomena, rather a question that has permeated political discourse even in pre-modern times. Theoretically, the study draws on Janet Newman and John Clarkes work on how “publicness” – defined as a consciousness about the meaning of the public – has constructed discursive chains. These chains merge conceptions of the political community, the organization of the enterprise, and values ​​of the common good. The example used in the study is the debate about the organization of the Swedish customs service in the early 1700s.

    The analysis shows that the Swedish diet in 1723 was divided about the organization of the customs services. Some members of the diet thought that the customs should stay under state governance; some thought that a private entrepreneur should be engaged via a lease contract. The conflict between the two parts led to fierce debates at the diet, each side hurling arguments for their opinion. Those in favor for state service, considered the private entrepreneurs to be selfish and greedy; those arguing for a lease contract, considered the state servants to be sloppy and inefficient.

    The debate about the customs service in 1723 have proven that the discursive chains, derived from Newman and Clarke, were in place also in the politics of eighteenth century Sweden. The most prominent aspect in the customs debate is the linkage of the publicness to a specific form of organization – in this example public or private. These findings have briefly been compared to previous research on Sweden in the 1600s, and the debate in 1723 thus provides examples of discursive changes, but also of continuity of the arguments given.

  • 29.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Linnarsson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    The quest for publicness: political conflict about the organisation of tramways and telecommunication in Sweden, c. 1900–19202017In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 70-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores political conflicts about the organisation of public services in Sweden c. 1900–1920. The authors argue that political decisions play a vital role in shaping the political economy of public services. The case studies analysed are the political debates about the communalisation of the tramway system in Stockholm, and the nationalisation of Sweden’s last private telephone company. In both cases, the transfer of the service to public organisation was a lengthy process, ending in the late 1910s. This is explained using the concept of publicness. Drawing on three discursive chains, the argument is that the political development was affected by the politicians conception of the political community, the form of organisation and by perceptions of values such as equal access and modernity. In the case of the tramways, public organisation was seen as the best option to defend the public against corruption and self-interest. In the case of the telephones, free market competition was seen as a guarantee for an efficient and cost- effective service. The reason for this difference, is argued, was that the debate on the tramways articulated a clearer notion of publicness, where equal access and public opinion carried larger weight. 

  • 30.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Linnarsson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Vad vill ni egentligen med välfärden, politiker?2017In: Expressen, ISSN 1103-923X, no 4 septemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Politiker från höger till vänster missförstår frågan om vinster i välfärden. Släpp låsningarna och börja leverera samhällsservice till rimlig kostnad för samtliga medborgare, skriver historikerna Mats Hallenberg och Magnus Linnarsson, som studerat debatten ur ett 400-årigt perspektiv. 

  • 31.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Linnarsson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Vem tar bäst hand om det allmänna?: Politiska konflikter om privata och offentliga utförare 1720–18602016In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 136, no 1, p. 32-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores four political debates in the Swedish diet and among the ruling elite in Stockholm on the organization of public services. The results demonstrate how in different ways notions of the common good permeated the discourse on all occasions.

    When the Swedish government tried to initiate public street lightning in Stockholm in 1749, there was a broad consensus among government and city officials that this should be done by the creation of a municipal organization financed by tax income. The burghers of Stockholm, however, opposed the proposal and argued that they were themselves better suited to care for the streetlights. The common good should be provided by individual action of responsible, male householders. Eventually the burghers got the upper hand and public street lightning continued to be organized by private initiative until the mid-nineteenth century.

    When in the 1720s the Swedish diet discussed the lease of custom duties by a merchant consortium (Sw. generaltullarrendesocieteten), the problem of corruption emerged as the bone of contention. Proponents claimed that this form of private enterprise was an effective means to suppress widespread corruption among state officials. Their opponents argued to the contrary that private leaseholders would skim off the profits for themselves, thereby depriving the state of its income.

    In the mid-eighteenth century the city authorities in Stockholm debated whether the emptying of latrines should remain an individual concern or if it should be recognized as a public matter. The city officials at first decided that this task was indeed a matter of public concern that should be handled by private entrepreneurs. Within a few years they had changed their minds, however, proposing instead that a new communal organization should be created for the removal of city waste. By now, the ruling elite of Stockholm had begun to identify the common good with municipal direction.

    The development of railway infrastructure was a hotly debated subject in the Swedish diet of the 1850s. Some representatives argued that private entrepreneurs would provide more cost-effective solutions than publicly managed railways, while others claimed that the state must administer a national system of railways. In the debate, private self-interest was juxtaposed with equal access to the common good. The proponents of state intervention claimed that national concerns must have priority over financial gain, and this argument would eventually influence the final decision.

    By the middle of the nineteenth century there was a growing consensus among the ruling elites in Sweden that the common good could best be provided for by state or municipal initiative. In the debates, arguments about organizational efficiency and equal access to public services eventually won out over notions of individual responsibility and private enterprise as a better alternative to corrupt government. In the late twentieth century the debate had shifted radically, however. The reasons for this shift will be the subject of our future research.

  • 32.
    Linnarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Towns go public: Urban services and the broadening ofurban communities in Scandinavia 1850–19202018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From the mid-nineteenth century and onwards, debates on urban public services became an integral part of municipal politics in Nordic towns.  The industrial revolution came late in Nordic countries and the problem of how to integrate immigrants and factory workers into existing networks became paramount at the end of the century. This paper will discuss how municipal bodies tackled the problem of making the city accessible to new groups in the urban landscape.  

    New forms of infrastructure had been introduced by private initiative: water, gas, electricity, tramways etc. In city councils and popular press, proponents of equal access argued that such services should be controlled and provided by municipal bodies. Their adversaries claimed that business operations were better run by private companies, and that municipal takeovers would only mean a larger burden for the tax-payers. The debates on how to improve and extend the reach of public services articulated new notions of community. The daily lives of women, children and the urban poor became a contested issue, and a new field for political solutions. Eventually, a future-oriented discourse became dominant where the solutions for today were expected to solve the problems of tomorrow as well.

  • 33.
    Linnarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Urban space, private business and the common good: The Politics of the street in early 20th century Stockholm2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses political conflict over the organisation of public services in Sweden at the turn of the century, c. 1900. It’s part of a research project where we analyse similar discussions from the mid-seventeenth to the late twentieth century (Hallenberg & Linnarsson, 2016). Our starting point is that the organisation of public services is a political as well as an economical problem.

    In the paper we will demonstrate how the commercial restructuring of urban space challenged conservative notions of the common good as well as modern views of social reform and publicness. The modernization of public transport and telecommunications offered new possibilities for urban planning and extending the public sphere. The paper argues that political decisions played a vital role in shaping the management of public services. Discussions over who has the right to organise the common good has remained a leading trope in European history to this day, which makes it all the more important to see how political discourse on this subject have developed and changed over time.

  • 34.
    Linnarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Hallenberg, MatsStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Vad ska vi med det förmoderna? tio texter om ett gäckande begrepp2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In January 2011 the Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences (RJ) announced the launch of a particular fund for research on the pre-1800s. Behind the initiative lay amongst other things a desire to increase the number of Swedish researchers studying the “premodern” era. The foundation used the term “premodern” solely to provide chronological demarcation. However, the term premodern also gives rise to questions like: what is meant by premodern; what was the premodern era, and when was this premodernity played out? These questions were addressed in a session at the national historical conference “Svenska historikermötet” in 2015. During the session many of the issues and problems related to premodernity were discussed. Each participant described his or her view of premodernity as a chronological period, and as a theoretical concept, and then concluded with a discussion on how the concept was relevant in their own research. The participants were invited to write an article based on the session and the results are published in this Supplement of Scandia. Hopefully, the various approaches and perspectives presented here reveal the multifaceted nature of the concept of premodernity. Further to the very simple chronological demarcation of the “premodern”, as given by the Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences, this collection of articles shows its wide and varied definitions. Limiting premodern to the chronological inter-pretation of the concept, risks lumping all pre-1800s history together into “something that happened in the old days”. As several of the contributions to this Supplement shows, premodernity can instead be used as a relevant analytical concept, discussed and applied by researchers. 

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